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Welcome to the Online Program and Planner!

The 4th Annual CPP Student RSCA Conference hosts oral, poster and performance presentations from a wide area of study. The conference is bigger this year, hosting close to 165 presentations. Enhance your conference experience by planning your schedule ahead of time.

Getting Started:

  1. To search for presenters by name, click on the Presenter Directory tab, click on the appropriate name dropdown and select the name. Presenters are organized by last name.
  2. To search by Oral Session, click on the Oral Session tab and select the appropriate session.
  3. To search by Poster Sessions, click on the Poster Sessions tab and select the appropriate field of study.
  4. To search by Performance Sessions, click on the Performance Sessions tab and select the appropriate presentation.

Click here to see the overall Conference Schedule. If you have any questions please email our-cpp@cpp.edu.


1. Select the Directory or Select a type of presentation.
2. Search student researcher by Last Name. Click the dropdown list below and scroll to the Student's name.

Session 1: Graduate Biological and Agricultural Sciences

1:15PM
It loves me, it loves me not: Counting species of the "rose petal sea slug," Polybranchia (Mollusca: Gastropoda) with a molecular systematics approach.
Lead Author: Sabrina Medrano (Biological Sciences, Graduate Student). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Angel Valdes
1:30PM
The slug within the bivalve: Reconciliation of shell-based taxonomy and molecular data in Juliidae (Heterobranchia: Sacoglossa)
Lead Author: Jennifer McCarthy (Biological Sciences, Graduate Student). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Ángel Valdés
1:45PM
Microbiological Quality of Packaged Ice from Various Sources in Southern California
Lead Author: Kun Lee (Biological Sciences, Graduate Student). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Wei-Jen Lin
2:00PM
Effect of Dietary Fiber on in vitro Bioavailability of Minerals in Fiber-enriched Pasta Products
Lead Author: Yuguang Zheng (Nutrition and Food Science, Graduate Student). Co-Authors: Thomas Dandin, Giselle Hernandez. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Yao Olive Li and Dr. Yan Liu
2:30PM
The interaction of nitrogen and topography on the physiology of Stipa pulchra
Lead Author: Robert Fitch (Biological Sciences, Graduate Student). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Erin Questad
2:45PM
Efficacy in Mice of a Liposomal Influenza M2e Vaccine Containing the TLR3 Adjuvant, dsRNA
Lead Author: Paulina Villanueva (Biological Sciences, Graduate Student). Co-Authors: Jonathan Tringali, Sam Ho. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jill Adler-Moore
3:00PM
Efficacy against vaginal Herpes virus infection by Lipidated or Non-Lipidated Tucaresol adjuvants in a Herpes gD tripeptide liposomal vaccine
Lead Author: Jennifer Rubio (Biological Sciences, Graduate Student). Co-Authors: Eleana Guardado. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jill Adler-Moore
3:15PM
Regulator of G protein signaling 2 (RGS2) in Human Adipogenesis and Osteogenesis
Lead Author: Alma Madrigal (Biological Sciences, Graduate Student). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Yuanxiang (Ansel) Zhao
3:45PM
Bee Diversity and Abundance in a Coastal Sage Scrub Community
Lead Author: Carmel Pearson (Biological Sciences, Graduate Student). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Joan Leong
4:00PM
The phylogenetic reconstruction of the genus Berthella using molecular and morphological traits
Lead Author: Hessam Ghanimi (Biological Sciences, Graduate Student). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Angel Valdes
4:15PM
Stand Demographics, and Plant Anatomy and Physiology of Juglans californica in Response to Extreme Drought
Lead Author: Killian Fleurial (Biological Sciences, Graduate Student). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Edward Bobich
4:30PM
Flora of the San Jose Hills
Lead Author: Asseneth Berbeo (Botany, Graduate Student). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Edward Bobich

Session 2: Business, Economics, and Public Administration; Behavioral and Social Sciences

2:00PM
Application of Relative Valuation Model to Firm Valuation
Lead Author: Steve Ngo (Finance, Real Estate, and Law, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Wei Yu
2:15PM
Using Mobile Apps to Foster Brand Loyalty in Millennials
Lead Author: Kelly Tolle (Marketing, Senior). Co-Authors: Sarah Angelia. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jae Min Jung
2:30PM
Promoting Impartiality Within Police Misconduct Investigations
Lead Author: Karen Ortegon (English, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Michael Cholbi
2:45PM
The Market Economy, Non Academic Organizations, and the University: Impacts on Professor's Knowledge Production in the U.S. Social and Environmental Sciences
Lead Author: Daniel Gomez (Sociology, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Ruben Martinez
3:15PM
The Evolution of News and Media Websites
Lead Author: Ashish Hingle (Computer Infomation Systems, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Sonya Zhang
3:30PM
Eye of The Beholder: The Effects of Advertising on The Perception of Beauty In South Korea
Lead Author: Stacey De La Riva (Liberal Studies, Junior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Don Page and Ms. Wendolyn Vermeer
3:45PM
Prize Money and Crashes in NASCAR
Lead Author: Shunto Kobayashi (Economics, Junior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Craig Kerr

Session 3: Undergraduate Biological and Agricultural Sciences; Health, Nutrition, and Clinical Sciences

1:15PM
Investigation of changes in monomeric anthocyanins during sulfite treatment
Lead Author: Yee Teng Moo (Food Science Technology, Senior). Co-Authors: Lauren Chuman, Carol Pow Sang. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Harmit Singh
1:30PM
Effect of Nicotine and Sugar on the Growth and Biofilm Formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Lead Author: Nalinee Chalongwongse (Biology,Microbiology Option, Senior). Co-Authors: Gabrielle De Leon. Faculty Mentor: Dr. John Chan
1:45PM
Development of fiber optic biosensors for rapid detection of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus
Lead Author: Christian Garrido (Biotechnology, Senior). Co-Authors: Angela Liu, Adrian Ortiz, Renault Ong. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Ertan Salik, Dr. Shelton Murinda, and Dr. Wei-Jen Lin
2:00PM
High-frequency low-magnitude body vibration exercise on bone mineral density and body composition in physically active adults
Lead Author: Elbert Chen (Kinesiology and Health Promotion, Senior). Co-Authors: Tatiana Metchkoff, Jaime Flores. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Michael T.C. Liang
2:15PM
Electrochemical Study of Pt Nanoparticles
Lead Author: Jordan Kitt (Chemistry, Senior). Co-Authors: Mytruc Dang. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Peng Sun
2:45PM
Analysis of Poly-hydroxylated Biodiesel Through GC-MS
Lead Author: Michael Luzuriaga (Chemistry, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Michael Page
3:00PM
Studying Hemagglutinin Protein Interactions in Botulinum Neurotoxin Complex
Lead Author: Phillip Lwin (Biotechnology, Senior). Co-Authors: Liana Ab Samad, Melissa Guzman Morris. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Wei-Jen Lin
3:15PM
Atrizine and malathion shorten the maturation process of Xenopus leaves oocytes and have an adverse effect on early embryo development
Lead Author: Lindsay Hetrick (Biochemistry, Senior). Co-Authors: Yu-Huey Lin, and Junjun Liu. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Junjun Liu
3:30PM
Solar-assisted Inland Brackish Water Desalination System
Lead Author: Sean Yazdi (Mechanical Engineering, Senior). Co-Authors: Andres Ceja, Abraham Morales, Vien Nguyen. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Reza Lakeh and Dr. Ali Sharbat
3:45PM
Calpollini- a rice flour-based gluten-free pasta enriched with protein and dietary fiber
Lead Author: Tiffany Yang (Food Science and Technology, Junior). Co-Authors: Rafael Martin Del Campo, Julia Conchas, Ali Hasan, Giselle Hernandez. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Yao Olive Li
4:15PM
Quantifying MyHC isoforms in WT and HD transgenic mice
Lead Author: Su Yeon Kim (Biological Sciences, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Robert Talmadge
4:30PM
Generation of Integration-Free Feline Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells
Lead Author: Jade Lolarga (Biotechnology, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jijun Hao
4:45PM
Pavioli - a novel RTE product based on under-utilized ingredients and suitable for HPP processing
Lead Author: Sabah Baig (Food Science Technology, Senior). Co-Authors: Musa Fareed, Nicole Tellez. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Yao Olive Li

Session 4: Behavioral and Social Sciences; Humanities and Letters

1:15PM
School-Work-Life Balance among College Students
Lead Author: Vanessa Baca (Psychology, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Alejandro Morales
1:30PM
Tip of the Tongue Phenomenon in Bilinguals: Is there an effect of bilingual language control?
Lead Author: Alexandra Rivas Ixtlahuac (Psychology, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Eleonora Rossi
1:45PM
Mode of transportation and commuting stress in Melbourne, Australia
Lead Author: Paul Rogo (Psychology, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Juliana Fuqua
2:00PM
Surface Texture Effects on Grounded Cognition and the Gendering of Faces
Lead Author: Jimena Jaramillo (Psychology, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Nicholas Von Glahn
2:30PM
Belonging Uncertainty Among Women in Engineering: Can Wonder Woman Save the Day?
Lead Author: Audrey Aday (Psychology, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Viviane Seyranian
2:45PM
What's There To Cheer About?: How Does Cheerleading Affect the Identity of Young Girls of Color
Lead Author: Sekani Robinson (Sociology, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Erica Morales, and Dr. Mary Danico
3:00PM
Knowledge of California Residents on Citrus Greening Disease
Lead Author: Ashley Van Vliet (Agricultural Sciences, Graduate Student). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Valerie Mellano and Dr. Anna Soper
3:15PM
Impact of Western Dietary Pattern on Development of Incident and Recurrent Clostridium difficile Associated Disease: A Systematic Review
Lead Author: Marwa Mhtar (Anthropology, Junior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jill Wenrick
3:45PM
Is Competence to Stand in Trial, Affected by an Underlying Structure of Psychiatric Symptoms or a Forensic Psychiatric Patient's demographics?
Lead Author: Jessica Galvan (Psychology, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Mark Williams
4:00PM
Can Non-Verbal Behavior Mitigate the Effects of Stereotype Threat?
Lead Author: Emilio Medina (Psychology, Senior). Co-Authors: Gracie Flicker, Jason Nerio, Jessica Galvan, Sarine Aratoon, and Diana Castro. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Viviane Seyranian
4:15PM
Charismatic Leadership and Perception during a Crisis
Lead Author: Jessenia Tovar (Psychology, Senior). Co-Authors: Nicole Duong. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Viviane Seyranian
4:30PM
An Integrative Outlook on Burn Survivors and Post-traumatic Growth
Lead Author: Berenice Monarrez (Sociology, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jack Fong

Session 5: Engineering and Computer Science

1:00PM
Modeling and Simulation of the Mars Glider
Lead Author: Emerson Baker (Aerospace Engineering, Junior). Co-Authors: Isaac Guzman, Edward Gomez. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Subodh Bhandari
1:15PM
Simulation Enviroment for Testing UAS Collision Avoidance System
Lead Author: Edward Gomez (Aerospace Engineering, Senior). Co-Authors: David Hunter, Daniel Garcia. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Subodh Bhandari
1:30PM
Development, Testing and Implementation of Vehicle to Grid Functionality
Lead Author: Thang Vo (Electrical Engineering, Senior). Co-Authors: Andrew Kim, Jassimran Sokhi. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Ha Le
1:45PM
Head Coupled Perspective for Mobile Devices
Lead Author: Oleg Tosltov (Computer Science, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Yu Sun
2:15PM
High Temperature Cyclic Oxidation of Aluminized Nickel Chromium Alloys
Lead Author: Joe Furukawa (Chemical Engineering, Junior). Co-Authors: Moses Deleon. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Vilupanur Ravi
2:30PM
IoTCom: Automating the Development of Communication Channels for Internet of Things Applications
Lead Author: Roshan Rathod (Computer Science, Graduate Student). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Yu Sun
2:45PM
A Web Service for Parking Exchange
Lead Author: Zachary Kysar (Computer Science, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Yu Sun
3:00PM
Distraction-Free Writing Device
Lead Author: Jonathan Johannsen (Computer Science, Graduate Student). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Yu Sun
3:30PM
Ceramic Matrix Composites Formed by Directed Metal Oxidation
Lead Author: Connor Knowles (Chemical Engineering, Graduate Student). Co-Authors: Erick Santiago, Stephanie Schlagel, Dr. Vilupanur Ravi. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Vilupanur Ravi
3:45PM
Aluminization of Cobalt and a Cobalt-based Superalloy
Lead Author: Susan Karakira (Chemical Engineering, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Vilupanur Ravi
4:00PM
Hot Corrosion of Nickel-Chromium Alloys in a Molten Eutectic Salt Environment
Lead Author: Bradley Stuart (Chemical Engineering, Junior). Co-Authors: Obed Villapando. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Vilupanur Ravi and Dr. Juan Carlos Nava
4:15PM
Developing a Coercion Resistant Authentication System Using Physiological and Neurological Responses to Music
Lead Author: Max Wolotsky (Computer Science, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Mohammad Husain
4:30PM
Enhancing the Limit of Detection of a Biconically Tapered Fiber Optic Sensor
Lead Author: Jordan DeHaven (Physics, Junior). Co-Authors: Joey Girardini. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Ertan Salik

Session 6: Behavioral and Social Sciences; Humanities and Letters; Education

1:00PM
The Lost Neighborhood of Bunker Hill, Los Angeles: Decline in the Inter-War Period (1918-1941).
Lead Author: Adrienne Jaime (History, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Eileen Wallis
1:15PM
Historic Districts: Product of Attractions
Lead Author: Jeffrey Nelson (Environmental Geography, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Terence Young
1:30PM
Boyle Heights: The Jewish Community and the Freeways that Drove them away
Lead Author: Kimberly Castaneda (Geography, Junior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Terrence Young
2:00PM
The past, present and future: A comparative look into how social media effects fundraising and strategies of presidential campaigns.
Lead Author: Alexis Ojinaga (Political Science, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Mario Guerrero
2:15PM
"The Egocentric Presidency: How Presidents Use Language to Communicate with the American Public"
Lead Author: Travis Barrett (Political Science, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Mario Guerrero
2:30PM
Promises, Promises: The policy proposals of George W. Bush and Barack Obama
Lead Author: Tommy Orona (Political Science, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Mario Guerrero
3:00PM
The Personal and the Political: An Analysis on the Relationship Between Feminist Identity, Gender, and Partisanship
Lead Author: Natalie Reyes (Political Science, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Mario Guerrero
3:15PM
How Use of an On-Line Simulation Help Students Understand Chemical Equilibrium
Lead Author: Phelicita Bell (Chemistry, Junior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jodye Selco
3:30PM
The Generation of 1959: Competing Visions of the Cuban Revolution
Lead Author: Marco Covarrubias (History, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Pablo R. Arreola

Session 7: Engineering and Computer Science; Physical and Mathematical Sciences

1:00PM
Aquaponics
Lead Author: Jordan Jarnagin (Mechanical Engineering, Senior). Co-Authors: Aaron Thormodsen, Brandon Lace. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Maryam Shafahi
1:15PM
Halide Activated Pack Aluminizing of Steels
Lead Author: Dylan Vogt (Chemical Engineering, Senior). Co-Authors: Vilma Gonzalez. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Vilupanur Ravi
1:30PM
Pack Aluminization of Austenitic Stainless Steels
Lead Author: Michell Aranda (Mechanical Engineering, Senior). Co-Authors: Daniel Navarro, Ani Nazari. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Vilupanur Ravi
1:45PM
Hot corrosion of steels in chloride salts for concentrated solar power generation environments
Lead Author: Obed Villalpando (Mechanical Engineering, Senior). Co-Authors: Blake Morris, Jason Wang, Jared Logier. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Vilupanur Ravi
2:15PM
Development of A Zero Carbon-Footprint Desalination System
Lead Author: Christopher Thomas (Civil & Environmental Engineering, Sophomore). Co-Authors: Stephanie Osorio, Christian Mui. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Ali Sharbat
2:30PM
Energy-Based Design Method For Seismic Isolators In Highway Bridges
Lead Author: Nathan Jo (Civil Engineering, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Giuseppe Lomiento
2:45PM
Enhanced Seismic Protection of Oil Rigs
Lead Author: Zabdiel Garcia (Civil Engineering, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Giuseppe Lomiento
3:00PM
Energy Mapping for Seismic Design of Structures
Lead Author: Elie Hasso (Civil Engineering, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Giuseppe Lomiento
3:30PM
Probabilistic HR Diagrams: A New Infrared and X-ray Chronometer for Very Young, Massive Stellar Clusters and Associations
Lead Author: Jessica Maldonado (Physics, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Matthew Povich
3:45PM
Repeatability Performance Evaluation of RTK and VRS Positioning Networks: A Case Study on the Cal Poly Pomona Campus
Lead Author: Rudy Mislang (Civil Engineering, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Omar E. Mora and Mr. Allan Ng
4:00PM
Analysis of National Bridge Inventory (NBI) Data for California Bridges
Lead Author: Emily Yu (Civil Engineering, Junior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Rosa Vasconez, PE, LEED AP
4:15PM
Discovering Massive Runaway Stars with Infrared Bow Shock Nebulae: First Results
Lead Author: Julian Andrews (Physics, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Matthew Povich

Session 8: Engineering and Computer Science; Physical and Mathematical Sciences

1:00PM
Electrospun Polyvinylidene Membranes for Direct Contact Membrane Distillation
Lead Author: James Roska (Chemical Engineeering, Senior). Co-Authors: Patrick Hogan, Harjot Gill, Gevork Kazaryan, Jeremy Mortrud. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Keith Forward
1:15PM
Triboelectrific Charging of Insulators
Lead Author: Andy Quan (Chemical Engineering, Senior). Co-Authors: Jennifer Lopez, Sam White, Cynthia Montanez. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Keith Forward
1:30PM
Free Surface Electrospinning of Microemulsions Containing Vitamin E
Lead Author: Jeremy Lewis (Chemical Engineering, Junior). Co-Authors: Anh Lam, Grace Machado, Michelle Miner, Cuong Nguyen. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Keith Forward
1:45PM
Particle and Bulk level Characterization of Pharmaceutical Powders
Lead Author: Derek Havel (Chemical Engineering, Junior). Co-Authors: Sabrina Schnakenberg, Donald Tran, Matthew Lopez, Elizabeth Arciga, Vincent Moya, Mitchell Moon, Josh Harris, Domingo De La Cruz, Amy Eisenbeisz. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Laila Jallo
2:15PM
Concentration Polarization in Industrial Reverse Osmosis Desalination
Lead Author: Thanh Bui (Chemical Engineering, Junior). Co-Authors: Steven Chao. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Mingheng Li
2:30PM
A Kinetic Study of (3-oxo-3-phenyl-1-propen-1-yl)-Ferrocene: A Chalcone Derivative
Lead Author: Pablo Unzueta (Chemistry, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Francis Flores
2:45PM
The Hidden Epidemic in Our Mind
Lead Author: Hsien-Te Kao (Mathematics, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jennifer Switkes
3:00PM
Diffusion Model of Aluminide Coatings
Lead Author: Sutine Sujittosakul (Chemical Engineering, Senior). Co-Authors: Elvin Sepanosian, Micheal Huluf. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Vilupanur Ravi
3:30PM
Effects of chromium diffusion in aluminized nickel chromium alloys
Lead Author: Karyna Banuelos (Chemical Engineering, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Vilupanur Ravi
3:45PM
Corrosion Behavior of Coated and Uncoated Nickel and Stainless Steel in PEM Fuel Cell Environments
Lead Author: Miguel Reyes (Chemical Engineering, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Vilupanur Ravi
4:00PM
Electrochemical Evaluation of Advanced Titanium Alloys in Simulated Physiological Environments
Lead Author: Kevin Robles (Chemical Engineering, Senior). Co-Authors: Jackie Medina, Luan Nguyen, Ruby Rodriguez, Shay McCarthy. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Vilupanur Ravi
4:15PM
Laboratory Simulation of Marine Corrosion of Metallic Alloys
Lead Author: Gamer Margoosian (Chemical Engineering, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Vilupanur Ravi

Session 9: Engineering and Computer Science

12:45PM
Detecting Physical Plant Defects using Aerial Imagery
Lead Author: Paul Navarro (Aerospace Engineering, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Subodh Bhandari
1:00PM
Prandtl-M Trajectory Analysis for High Altitude Balloon Drop Test
Lead Author: Nathaniel Falwell (Aerospace Engineering, Senior). Co-Authors: Daniel Boebinger, Christopher Kuba. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Subodh Bhandari
1:15PM
Autonomous Path Planning System for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles
Lead Author: Isaac Guzman (Aerospace Engineering, Junior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Subodh Bhandari
1:30PM
Human Exploration of Phobos and Deimos: Robotic Precursor Measurements
Lead Author: Shannen Acedillo (Aerospace Engineering, Junior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Alexander Rudolph
1:45PM
Failure Criteria of FDM-Printed Parts
Lead Author: Lilliana Ochoa (Mechanical Engineering, Junior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Mehrdad Haghi
2:15PM
Wind Tunnel Study of the Aerodynamic Effects of Dimples on the Fuselage of an Aircraft
Lead Author: Anthony Klaib (Aerospace Engineering, Junior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Todd Coburn
2:30PM
Developing Bi-directional Charging Functions for Electric Vehicles
Lead Author: Travon Dent (Electrical Engineering, Junior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Ha Le
2:45PM
Computer Vision Real-Time Hazard Detection in High-Power Rockets using Raspberry Pi
Lead Author: Dean Coco (Electrical Engineering, Junior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Zekeriya Aliyazicioglu
3:00PM
Hibiscus Stained Dye Sensitized Solar Cells
Lead Author: Kathleen Bishop (Chemical Engineering, Junior). Co-Authors: Paul Fizer, Dabin Kim, Phuong Huynh, Adriel De Jesus, Alejandro Navarro, Nader Majzoub. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jonathan Puthoff
3:30PM
Development of Ceramic Metal Oxide Membranes By Means of Reactive Electrospinning
Lead Author: Brianna Cook (Chemical Engineering, Junior). Co-Authors: Josh Yamaguchi, Matthew Galazzo, Luke Gibson. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Keith M. Forward
3:45PM
Denitrification Removal Efficiency of Different Media of Surface Water
Lead Author: Ana Vargas (Civil Engineering, Senior). Co-Authors: Matthew Gonzalez, Robert Bufanda. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Monica Palomo
4:00PM
Vision Based Navigation in GPS Denied Environment
Lead Author: Amy Phan (Computer Science, Senior). Co-Authors: Daniel Garcia. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Subodh Bhandari
4:15PM
Analysis of Nanofluid Heat Pipe's Thermal Performance
Lead Author: Randy Castro (Mechanical Engineering, Senior). Co-Authors: Robert Cameron, Trevor Snay, Nishanth Mahankali. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Maryam Shafahi and Dr. Kevin R. Anderson
4:30PM
Nanostructures: Conductive Nanofibers
Lead Author: Luis Morales (Mechanical Engineering, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Yong X. Gan

Session 10: Humanities and Letters; Behavioral and Social Sciences

12:45PM
Remember the Roots
Lead Author: Jessica Santos (English, Junior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Dewey Hall
1:00PM
Directions for English Learners Success
Lead Author: Alejandra Pulido (English, Graduate Student). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Karen Russikoff
1:15PM
Revising the Endangered Species Act of 1973
Lead Author: Blake Eaton (Philosophy, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Michael Cholbi
1:30PM
A Girlish Nature: Ecofeminism in Samuel Taylor Coleridge's "Christabel"
Lead Author: Kristin Kawecki (English Literature and Language, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Dewey Hall
2:00PM
The construction of a hero: Rodrígo Díaz de Vivar through his epic adventures in Las Mocedades de Rodrigo and El Cantar de Mio Cid
Lead Author: Montserrat Gonzalez (Spanish, Junior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Marta Albala
2:15PM
Testimonials after DACA in Southern California: Lack of Equality
Lead Author: Karla Ayala (Spanish, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Marta Albalá Pelegrín
2:30PM
"The Songs We Sing: a Dreamer's Lyric (1985-2015)"
Lead Author: Violeta Villagomez (Spanish, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Marta Albalá Pelegrín
2:45PM
"After-effects of Sendero Luminoso Violence in Santiago Roncagliolo's Abril rojo"
Lead Author: Mecir Ureta (Spanish, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Marta Albalá Peligrín and Dr. Kent Dickson
3:15PM
Comic relief, and the dangers of a bystander: a note on the domestication of the Lazarillo de Tormes
Lead Author: Alfredo Raygoza (English, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Marta Albalá Pelegrín
3:30PM
Acquiring Lexical Feedback
Lead Author: Zainab Parekh (English, Graduate Student). Co-Authors: Allison Bruins, Jorge Larios. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Noel Houck
3:45PM
Militarization of Latina/o Youth
Lead Author: Estephanie Munoz (English, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jose Aguilar Hernandez

Session 11: Graduate Biological and Agricultural Sciences; Health, Nutrition, and Clinical Sciences

12:45PM
The Dopamine Transporter (DAT) is not required for entraining circadian rhythms to scheduled feeding but is required for diet-induced obesity
Lead Author: Jennifer Enriquez (Biological Sciences, Graduate Student). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Andrew Steele
1:00PM
Asymmetric Genetic Introgression of an Invasive Sea Slug in a Native Mediterranean Species
Lead Author: Haleh Golestani (Biological Sciences, Graduate Student). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Angel Valdes
1:15PM
Southern Invasion: Population Genetics of Phidiana hiltoni
Lead Author: Clara Jo King (Biological Sciences, Graduate Student). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Ángel Valdés
1:30PM
Evaluation of Lipidated and Non-Lipidated CDN Adjuvants in a gD Peptide Liposomal Vaccine for HSV-2 Murine Intravaginal Infection
Lead Author: Eleana Guardado (Biological Sciences, Graduate Student). Co-Authors: Jennifer Rubio. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jill Adler-Moore
2:00PM
Comparative Efficacy of a Liposomal Aspergillus Protein Vaccine Containing Different Immunomodulatory Adjuvants Used to Prevent Murine Pulmonary Aspergillosis
Lead Author: Hernan Reza (Biological Sciences, Graduate Student). Co-Authors: William Morris. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jill Adler-Moore
2:15PM
Role of the Peripheral Cannabinoid Receptor in the response to systemic Candida albicans infection in mice
Lead Author: Adam Marentes (Biological Sciences, Graduate Student). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Nancy Buckley
2:30PM
Effect of 17β-Estradiol and dihydroxytestosterone on Candida albicans growth rate and on Candida albicans-induced cytokine secretion from macrophages.
Lead Author: Sarah Kent (Biological Sciences, Graduate Student). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Nancy Buckley
2:45PM
The Role of Phosphorus on the Health and Success of Pennisetum setaceum
Lead Author: Glen Morrison (Biological Sciences, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Erin Questad
3:15PM
Juglone Concentration in Soil Underneath the California Black Walnut (Juglans californica) Throughout the Growing Season
Lead Author: Asma Ayyad (Biotechnology, Junior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Erin Questad
3:30PM
The Effects of Varying Concentrations of Juglone on the Germination and Seedling Success of Frangula californica, Heteromeles arbutifolia, and Prunus ilicifolia
Lead Author: Borman Quinonez (Botany, Junior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Edward Bobich
3:45PM
Phylogenetic Analysis of Dolabrifera dolabrifera and Dolabrifera brazieri
Lead Author: Eric Breslau (Biological Sciences, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Ángel A. Valdés
4:00PM
Identification of DNA Transposable Elements in the Tasmanian Devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) Genome
Lead Author: German Lagunas-Robles (Biotechnology, Junior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Peter Arensburger
4:15PM
Identification of the Genes that Regulate Silk Production in Spiders: A Computational Biology Approach
Lead Author: Mark Ellie Alonzo (Biological Sciences, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Peter Arensburger

Agricultural Sciences

Bronco Student Center, Ursa Major
P.9
Investigation of the rate of degradation of grape anthocyanins in the presence of ascorbic acid using an accelerated shelf life test (ASLT) method
Lead Author: Lauren Chuman (Food Science and Technology, Senior). Co-Authors: Yee Teng Moo, Carol Pow Sang, Abdulrahman Al-azazi. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Harmit Singh
P.11
Development of efficient tissue culture and transformation protocols for Aquilegia
Lead Author: Timothy Batz (Plant Science, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Bharti Sharma
P.12
Use of PCR for Detection of Mastitis-Causing Pathogens Isolated from Bovine Quarter Milk Samples
Lead Author: Patricia Galvan (Animal Science/Pre-Vet, Senior). Co-Authors: Leanna Little Dog, Anthony Chew. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Shelton Murinda
P.15
Acceptance of Aerobic Apparel with Heating and Icing Capabilities
Lead Author: Kristen Murphy (Apparel Merchandising and Management, Senior). Co-Authors: Elena Rhodes. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Chitra Dabas and Dr. Cynthia Reagan

Biological Sciences

Bronco Student Center, Ursa Major
P.1
To binge or not to binge: Studying the effects of Dopamine Receptor 1 signaling on feeding in mice
Lead Author: Gabriela Garza-Vazquez (Biological Sciences, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Andrew Steele
P.2
Tissue culture and metabolite profiling of submergence tolerant rice M202 (Sub 1)
Lead Author: Jyoti Uppal (Biological Sciences, Graduate Student). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Bharti Sharma and Dr. Gregory Barding
P.3
Characterization of Outer Membrane Vesicles in Probiotic Esh
Lead Author: Cezar Osuna (Biological Sciences, Graduate Student). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Christos Stathopoulos
P.4
The effects of phlorotannin concentrations of brown seaweeds (Phaeophyceae) on the feeding rates of the black sea hare Aplysia vaccaria
Lead Author: Danielle McHaskell (Biological Sciences, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jayson Smith
P.5
Recent emergence of the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in northern California Cascades Frogs (Rana cascadae)
Lead Author: Marina De Leon (Biological Sciences, Graduate Student). Co-Authors: Dr. Jonah Piovia-Scott, Dr. Vance Vredenburg. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Wei-Jen Lin
P.6
Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Formation on Plasma Treated Prosthetic Alloys
Lead Author: Hansini Vitharanage (Microbiology, Senior). Co-Authors: Jennifer C. Lopez. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Steve Alas
P.10
Characterization of Native Microalgae for Bioremediation coupled to Feed Production
Lead Author: Natalie Eulogio (Biological Sciences, Senior). Co-Authors: Isis Janilkarn-Urena. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Marcia Murry-Ewers
P.14
High Resolution Microscopic Imaging of Functionally Specialized Cytochrome Oxidase-Rich Epithelial Cells in the Rat Salivary Gland, Kidney and Stomach
Lead Author: Vivianne Mitri (Management and Human Resources, Sophomore). Co-Authors: Hosne Afrin, Ursala Simonoski, Christopher Buglino, David Afework, Crystal Carter, Melissa Howe, Odette Hovsepian. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Glenn H. Kageyama

Biotechnology

Bronco Student Center, Ursa Major
P.7
Universal Detection of Cyanobacteria and Their Toxins Using PCR for Safe Algae-based Feed Production
Lead Author: Alyssa Sancio (Biotechnology, Senior). Co-Authors: Sharon Wu, Yash Patel. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Shelton Murinda
P.8
Establishing a diet-induced type II diabetes model in ICR male mice with nicotinamide/streptozotocin induction
Lead Author: Shirleen Simargi (Biotechnology, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jill Adler-Moore and Dr. Jon Olson
P.13
An All-Solid State pH Sensor Based on Pd Nanoparticle Sensing
Lead Author: Daniel Saavedra (Biochemistry / Biotechnology, Senior). Co-Authors: Daniel Saavedra, Clinton Tong, Monica Paz, Dulce Ayala. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Peng Sun

Business, Economics, and Public Administration

Bronco Student Center, Ursa Major
P.32
The Impact of Cultural Value and Cognitive Style on Web Usability
Lead Author: Jae Jung (Computer Infomation Systems, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jae Min Jung and Dr. Sonya Zhang

Chemistry

Bronco Student Center, Ursa Major
P.17
Analysis of nutrient absorption in obesity resistant mice by adiabatic bomb calorimetry
Lead Author: Melody Sycks (Chemistry, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Andrew Steele
P.18
Isotope Labeling in Astrobiology: Ethanol as a Carbon Source
Lead Author: Nicole Perkins (Chemistry, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Gregory A. Barding and Dr. Rakesh Mogul
P.19
Quantification of Trehalose and Other Sugars in Submergence Resistance Rice
Lead Author: Elizabeth Martinez (Chemistry, Graduate Student). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Gregory Barding
P.20
Voltammetry on a Nanometer-sized Electrode in Solution Containing Very Dilute Electroactive Species
Lead Author: Rachel Wampler (Chemistry, Junior). Co-Authors: Jordan Kitt, Nina Tran, Daniel P. Saavedra, Jungik Hong. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Peng Sun
P.21
Investigation of Flow Inside Paper-Based Analytical Devices
Lead Author: Ching Man Choy (Chemistry, Graduate Student). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Yan Liu

Engineering and Computer Science

Bronco Student Center, Ursa Major
P.22
Engineering Cosmetic Powders
Lead Author: Priscilla Babiak (Chemical Engineering, Senior). Co-Authors: Tatiana Galanto, Maryam Dadi, Robert Bates. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Laila Jallo
P.28
Bronco shuttle plus
Lead Author: Chon in Luk (Computer Science, Sophomore). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Yu Sun
P.29
3D Sensor for Structural Health Monitoring of Civil Infrastructure
Lead Author: Eric Walz (Electrical Engineering, Senior). Co-Authors: Tunji Owolabi. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Zhen Yu
P.30
Water Reuse
Lead Author: Kurt Paul (Civil Engineering, Senior). Co-Authors: Danny Vera, Hector Cardenas, Sean Yazdi. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Ali Sharbat
P.31
Regenerative Aerospace
Lead Author: Rita Eick (Aerospace Engineering, Senior). Co-Authors: Emerson Baker, Hali Arriaga, Jorge Rivera, Wesley Miller, David Hunter, Eric Johnson. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Steven K. Dobbs

Humanities and Letters

Bronco Student Center, Ursa Major
P.16
Propping up Folk Tales, Frozen in Time: Analysis of "The Snow Queen" and Frozen with Propp's 31 Narratemes
Lead Author: Kristin Kawecki (English Literature and Language, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Allison Baker

Physical and Mathematical Sciences

Bronco Student Center, Ursa Major
P.23
Exploration of Newton's Method
Lead Author: Samantha Secor (Mathematics, Junior). Co-Authors: Anthony Simon. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Hubertus von Bremen
P.24
Characterizing Primitive Nondeficient Numbers with a Given Number of Primes
Lead Author: Fany Salazar (Mathematics, Senior). Co-Authors: Huyen Le. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Mitsuo Kobayashi and Dr. Berit Givens
P.25
Current Sensor Casing for Accurate Current Measurements in High-Power Transmission Lines
Lead Author: Stephen Alatorre (Physics, Senior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Ertan Salik
P.26
Enhancing Sensitivity and Robustness of Tapered Fiber Optic Sensors
Lead Author: Julien Okey (Physics, Senior). Co-Authors: Brandi Wooten, Jose Flores. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Ertan Salik
P.27
Interaction Induced Size Evolution in Galaxies
Lead Author: Francisco Mercado (Physics & Astronomy, Junior). Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jorge Moreno
It loves me, it loves me not: Counting species of the "rose petal sea slug," Polybranchia (Mollusca: Gastropoda) with a molecular systematics approach.
Time:
1:15PM
Location:
15-1802

Sabrina Medrano. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Angel Valdes

Synopsis: Molecular study conducted on Polybranchia viridis to identify one or two valid species. Investigation of biogeography of P. virids also conducted.

Abstract: Polybranchia (Gastropoda, Heterobranchia, Sacoglossa) is a wide spread pantropical group of herbivorous sea slugs consisting of nine valid species. The biology and the taxonomic relationships of these animals is poorly studied. Reasons for this include that these animals are easy to overlook because they are hide under rocks or coral rubble during the day suggesting nocturnal behavior. Secondly, the original descriptions describe these species with very similar morphological characteristics making identification very difficult in the field. The objective of this study is to 1) explain the distjunct range of Polybranchia viridis and 2) identify Polybranchia viridis as a valid species or two valid species. The objectives will be tested with the use of three nuclear genes (H3, 18S, 28S) and two mitochondrial genes (CO1 and 16S). A Bayesian analysis will be conducted on nuclear and mitochondrial genes to identify clades and misidentified species. Additionally, the validity of the Eastern Pacific and Caribbean Polybranchia viridis species will be evaluated using scanning electron microscopy to examine the morphology of the radulae and penis (simultaneous hermaphrodites). I expect the distribution pattern of Polybranchia to be explained by vicariant events that date back to the Tethys sea (~200mya). The disjunct range of P. viridis is expected to be a result of the Panama Isthmus that arose 3mya. Consequently, if P.viridis was separated 3mya, then based on genetic and morphology data I hypothesize that there is two valid species.

The slug within the bivalve: Reconciliation of shell-based taxonomy and molecular data in Juliidae (Heterobranchia: Sacoglossa)
Time:
1:30PM
Location:
15-1802

Jennifer McCarthy. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Ángel Valdés

Synopsis: Molecular phylogeny and geometric morphometric analyses are integrated to revise the family Juliidae, a clade of Heterobranchia: Sacoglossa.

Abstract: Juliidae is a member of Sacoglossa, a clade of Heterobranchia gastropods. Juliidae have a complex taxonomic history based largely on the morphology of their bivalved shells, but to some extent on internal anatomy of their radula and reproductive organs. Based on these data Juliidae is considered to have two extant genera, Berthelinia and Julia, both having a pan-tropical distributions. This project will use comparative methods to integrate shell morphology and molecular phylogenies to investigate the evolution of the shell in Juliidae. An integrative framework will be developed to classify extant and fossil taxa. A species-level molecular phylogeny of Juliidae will be built using five genes, two mitochondrial (CO1, 16S) and three nuclear (H3, 18S, and 28S). Geometric morphometric analyses will be used as a diagnostic for genus and/or species level diversity. The molecular phylogeny and the geometric morphometric data will be integrated.

Microbiological Quality of Packaged Ice from Various Sources in Southern California
Time:
1:45PM
Location:
15-1802

Kun Lee. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Wei-Jen Lin

Synopsis: To investigate the microbiological quality of packaged ice in southern California, a total of 156 packaged ice samples were randomly collected from various sources.

Abstract: Microbial contamination in food and water may post a threat to public health. Ice is defined as a food by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). According to the International Packaged Ice Association (IPIA), approximately 2 billion bags of ice are sold from retail, wholesale, and vending producers each year in the U.S. Out of 700 commercial ice-making companies, 200 of the aforementioned are not presented by the IPIA and do not comply to specific packaged ice processing standards. Non-IPIA complied samples were collected from gas stations, liquor stores, or convenient stores in Los Angeles, Orange, San Diego/Imperial, and San Bernardino/Riverside counties. The microbiological quality of non-IPIA complied ice samples were compared with the IPIA-complied packaged ice samples using microbiological, molecular, and sequencing analyses. Among 132 non-IPIA complied packaged ice samples analyzed, 13 samples contained unsatisfactory level of heterotrophs, (≥ 500 Most Probable Number [MPN]/ml), 12 samples contained unsatisfactory level of coliforms (≥1 MPN/100 ml), 41 samples had staphylococci, and 67 samples had yeast/mold. None of the 24 IPIA-complied samples had unacceptable microbial levels. None of the samples analyzed showed the presence of the pathogens, Salmonella. Next generation sequencing (NGS) results revealed that there are more diverse microbial populations in non-IPIA than IPIA samples, including opportunistic pathogens. Our results revealed the microbiological quality of non-IPIA and IPIA complied ice samples in southern California. These findings may lead to a better enforcement of processing standard on packaged ice.

Effect of Dietary Fiber on in vitro Bioavailability of Minerals in Fiber-enriched Pasta Products
Time:
2:00PM
Location:
15-1802

Yuguang Zheng, Thomas Dandin, Giselle Hernandez. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Yao Olive Li and Dr. Yan Liu

Synopsis: Food fortification is an effective means to deliver vitamins and minerals to the human body. Similarly, functional foods have been identified as effective delivery systems for various nutraceuticals including dietary fiber. However, there is a concern that increased intake of dietary fiber may cause a potentially negative effect on mineral absorption. Hence, it is necessary to investigate the potential interactions between dietary fiber and minerals when both are added in same food matrices such as pasta. Better understanding of this mechanism would warrant proper utilization and application of dietary fiber in new product development.

Abstract: Microencapsulation could be a solution to prevent the interaction between fiber and iron, which enables the development of novel functional foods that provide enhanced nutritional value from high dietary fiber content without sacrificing mineral bioavailability. Hence, the objective of this research is to investigate the potential interactions between dietary fiber and minerals when both are added in same food matrices such as pasta. The selected dietary fiber sources and two forms of ferrous fumarate were added to cereal grain flours based on a formulation design. Using a pasta extruder, the shaped pasta was collected and dried to be with shelf-stable moisture content. The total dietary fiber measurements were taken using an automated Ankom Dietary Fiber Analyzer. A Thermo GFS Atomic Absorption Spectrometer was used to quantify the total iron content and iron dissolution profile via a simulated iron in vitro bioavailability test. The results of total iron analysis suggested cooking might cause iron loss for samples fortified with powder ferrous fumarate, but not for samples made with microencapsulated iron premix. Similarly, iron in vitro bioavailability tests suggested the addition of various fiber sources did impede the iron release in pH 1 HCl solution for all uncooked pasta samples made with iron powder; however, there is no difference for iron release in cooked samples between samples made with iron powder versus encapsulated iron premix, suggesting cooking may offset the potential blocking effect from fibers on iron.

The interaction of nitrogen and topography on the physiology of Stipa pulchra
Time:
2:30PM
Location:
15-1802

Robert Fitch. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Erin Questad

Synopsis: My project analyzed the differences in soil moisture and soil nitrogen created by a topographical gradient to determine the areas most suitable for Stipa pulchra.

Abstract: Increased nitrogen deposition has been shown to favor invasive plant species and hinder native plant species. Anecdotal evidence suggests that invasion of annual grasses occurs more abundantly in valleys and lowlands and less abundantly on the steeper slopes where native species, such as Stipa pulchra, appear to be more prevalent. A possible explanation for this pattern is the fact that nitrogen strongly covaries with water; therefore, during rainfall events, water carries nitrogen off the slopes in runoff where it collects in the valleys and lowlands. The objectives of this study were to 1) analyze the differences in soil moisture and soil nitrogen created by a topographical gradient and 2) to determine the areas within the topographical gradient that are the most suitable for the native perennial bunch grass, Stipa pulchra. To test these hypotheses, plots were established along different topographical positions while replicating three nitrogen treatments, within the Voorhis Ecological Reserve. Soil nitrogen and soil moisture were highest in the lowest topographical positions and were lowest in the steepest positions, suggesting that topography effects the soil nitrogen content at small spatial scales due to covariance with water and soil movement. The leaf water potential of Stipa in the lowest topographic position was sometimes lower and sometimes higher than other positions, suggesting that there may be shifting limitations on plant water status in low-lying areas. Nitrogen did not have an effect on plant growth or measures of plant performance. Further research will be conducted analyzing soil temperature and solar radiation.

Efficacy in Mice of a Liposomal Influenza M2e Vaccine Containing the TLR3 Adjuvant, dsRNA
Time:
2:45PM
Location:
15-1802

Paulina Villanueva, Jonathan Tringali, Sam Ho. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jill Adler-Moore

Synopsis: Vaccine formulations containing the influenza protein M2e in combination with the TLR3 adjuvant, dsRNA, provided significant protection against H1N1 and H3N2 Influenza challenge.

Abstract: Background: We investigated the efficacy of a liposomal M2e peptide vaccine (L-M2e) with dsRNA (TLR3 adjuvant) versus L-M2e with monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL, TLR4 adjuvant) following H1N1 or H3N2 influenza challenge. Methods: SW mice (n=22/group) were vaccinated d0 subcutaneously and intranasally (IN) d28 and d56 as follows: L-M2e (50ugM2e)/MPL(15ug); L-M2e(50ugM2e)/dsRNA(100ug); L-dsRNA(100ug); L-MPL(15ug); phosphate buffered saline (PBS). d60, mice (n=7/gp) were sacrificed for blood collection and serum used in ELISA IgG isotype assays. Remaining mice (n=15/group) were challenged IN d70 with 10XLD50 H1N1 or H3N2. d75, lungs were collected (n=5 /gp) and analyzed for viral burden. Remaining 10 mice/group were monitored 2X/day for disease signs, weight loss and morbidity to d98. Results: % survival following H1N1 challenge was as follows: L-M2e/dsRNA (60%), L-M2e/MPL (40%), L-dsRNA (40%), L-MPL and PBS (10%). % survival following H3N2 was as follows: L-M2e/dsRNA (90%), L-M2e/MPL (60%), L-dsRNA 70%), L-MPL and PBS (10%). Disease signs and weight loss for practically all groups paralleled survival data. Mice vaccinated with L-M2e/dsRNA or L-M2e/MPL had lower lung viral burden versus PBS controls following H1N1 or H3N2 challenge (p<0.03). The anti-M2e IgG1(Th2 response) and IgG2a (Th1 response) concentrations were higher for the L-M2e/dsRNA and L-M2e/MPL groups versus L-dsRNA, L-MPL or PBS groups. Anti-whole virus H1N1 or H3N2 IgG antibody concentrations were elevated for L-M2e/dsRNA and L-M2e/MPL groups versus all control groups. Conclusion: L-M2e/dsRNA generated the most protection against both H1N1 and H3N2 challenge stimulating both a Th1 and Th2 immune response.

Efficacy against vaginal Herpes virus infection by Lipidated or Non-Lipidated Tucaresol adjuvants in a Herpes gD tripeptide liposomal vaccine
Time:
3:00PM
Location:
15-1802

Jennifer Rubio, Eleana Guardado. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jill Adler-Moore

Synopsis: Liposomes with Herpes virus gD tripeptide and lipidated Tucaresol or MPL adjuvants each generated significant protection against a murine intravaginal HSV-2 challenge.

Abstract: Introduction: Herpes Simplex Virus 2 (HSV-2) causes recurrent genital lesions. This study examined the efficacy against murine vaginal Herpes infection using an HSV-2 gD tripeptide (gD3pep) liposomal vaccine (LV) with Lipidated or Non-Lipidated Tucaresol (LipT or NLipT) adjuvants. Methods: LV or phosphate buffer (PBS) were administered 3X subcutaneously(SQ) to BALB/c mice on d0, d28, d56. LV contained gD3pep (15μg/dose) and LipT (3μg or 5.6μg/dose), NLipT (5.6μg/dose), MPL (monophosphoryl Lipid A,15μg/dose) or LipT (3ug/dose) plus MPL (7.5ug/dose); controls were LipT or NLipT (5.6μg/dose) without gD3pep, or PBS. Medroxyprogestrone was given SQ d63 and d69 to enhance virus infectivity and mice challenged intravaginally with HSV-2, d70. Disease signs and morbidity were monitored 2X/day for 28 days. Vaginal swabs collected d72 were analyzed for vaginal viral burden. Results: Survival with gD3pep and LipT (3ug/dose) plus MPL (7.5ug/dose) (100%), MPL (15ug/dose) (100%) or LipT(5.6μg/dose) (90%) was significantly better than vaccination with NLipT (5.6μg/dose) with no protein (11%) or PBS (0%) (¬¬p <.0047). Disease signs and viral burden paralleled survival data. There was also a significant difference in viral burden between the gD3pep liposomes having different LipT doses or the combination of LipT plus MPL versus PBS (p<0.0129). Conclusions: gD3pep liposomes containing LipT at 5.6μg/dose, LipT (3ug/dose) plus MPL (7.5ug/dose) or MPL (15ug/dose) each generated significant protection against a murine intravaginal HSV-2 challenge. The marked efficacy seen using the combination of LipT plus MPL at lower doses, indicate that these adjuvants are not antagonistic and may further enhance the immune response when used in combination.

Regulator of G protein signaling 2 (RGS2) in Human Adipogenesis and Osteogenesis
Time:
3:15PM
Location:
15-1802

Alma Madrigal. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Yuanxiang (Ansel) Zhao

Synopsis: Study focuses on the role of RGS2 in human mesenchymal lineage determination into adipocytes and osteoblast. RGS2 is shown to be a positive regulator of adipogenesis and osteogenesis.

Abstract: Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are multipotent adult stem cells derived from adult tissues that are capable of giving rise to mesodermal tissues and can be expanded and differentiated in vitro upon external stimuli. Although major regulators of hMSC differentiation have been identified, the molecular mechanisms underlying the differentiation into adipocytes (fat cells) or osteocytes (bone cells) are not fully understood. Through a microarray study comparing gene expression profiles between hMSCs undergoing adipogenesis and hMSCs controls, a number of genes whose expression was regulated were uncovered. We focus on understanding the role of one uncovered gene, RGS2, during the differentiation of hMSCs into adipocytes and osteocytes. We characterized RGS2 expression pattern throughout both adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs by RT-PCR. Overall, RGS2 was up regulated during both adipogenic and osteogenic induction but oscillates in response to media change at 48hr intervals. Expression knock-down of RGS2 by siRNA resulted in significant decrease in adipogenic efficiency, measured by relative quantification of OilRedO stained oil droplets in adipocytes as well as total number of adipocytes (p<0.05). Total cell numbers in siRGS2 treated samples consistently trended lower but were not statistically significantly different from control samples (p>0.05), indicating that RGS2 might play a role in regulating cell proliferation. RGS2 expression knock-down significantly decrease osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs, measured by relative quantification of calcium phosphate deposits stained by Alizarin Red (p<0.05). Our results suggest that RGS2 is a positive regulator of both adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs.

Bee Diversity and Abundance in a Coastal Sage Scrub Community
Time:
3:45PM
Location:
15-1802

Carmel Pearson. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Joan Leong

Synopsis: Seasonal differences in bee abundance of Coastal Sage Scrub in the Voorhis Ecological Reserve.

Abstract: Coastal sage scrub, a native plant community of conservation concern, occurs within California inland regions like the Voorhis Ecological Reserve on the Cal Poly Pomona campus. To observe and compare the seasonal abundances and diversity of bees of the coastal sage scrub regions of the Voorhis Ecological Reserve from 2014 to 2015, insect samples were collected using yellow and blue pan traps. An average of 3 bees per bowl were trapped during the fall, 7.06 per bowl during the spring, and 15.25 per bowl during the summer. Approximately three times as many bees were trapped in blue bowls than yellow bowls in both fall and spring, and roughly six times as many were trapped in the summer. Of the bees caught, the common genera were Diadasia, Melissodes, Ceratina, Anthophora, Halictus, Lasioglossum, Agapostemon, and Hylaeus from the families Apidae, Halictidae and Colletidae. The majority of the bees caught in the fall were in the Halictidae, with Lasioglossum being the most abundant genus. The genus that was most abundant in the samples obtained during the spring was Diadasia (F.Apidae), which was nearly ninety percent of the entire spring sample. During summer, the most abundant genus trapped was Lasioglossum (F.Halictidae), making up nearly fifty percent of the entire sample, while approximately thirty-five percent of the sample was of the genus Ceratina (F.Apidae). Only five honeybees were trapped in all seasons combined. The diversity and abundance of bee genera drastically changed between the seasons, suggesting that seasonality is a factor in the bee fauna of coastal sage scrub communities.

The phylogenetic reconstruction of the genus Berthella using molecular and morphological traits
Time:
4:00PM
Location:
15-1802

Hessam Ghanimi. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Angel Valdes

Synopsis: A phylogenetic tree of the group Berthella will be made using three genes and geometric morphometric of the shells.

Abstract: Berthella is a genus of sea slugs, marine gastropods that belong to the family Pleurobranchidae. The species in this family either possess a vestigial reduced internal shell or lose their shell completely as adults. Because the shell of Pleurobranchidae is internal and vestigial it has been hypothesized not to play a significant evolutionary role, but the differences in shell morphology among species suggest otherwise. Based on morphological phylogenies Berthella is sister to Pleurobranchus, another genus in the family Pleurobranchidae, molecular phylogeny of which has been recently reconstructed. Berthella is present in the fossil record, however, based on fossil shell morphology; it is unclear whether these shells represent Berthella or Pleurobranchus. The goal of this study is to use molecular data from a total of three genes including two mitochondrial genes (CO1 and 16S) and a nuclear gene (H3) to reconstruct the phylogeny of Berthella. Geometric morphometrics will be used to compare the morphology of fossil shells in the literature to extant shells of Berthella and Pleurobranchus. Finally the morphological data will be integrated in the molecular phylogeny using comparative methods. The objectives of the study are to determine whether Berthella is monophyletic and sister to Pleurobranchus, to investigate the rate of evolutionary change over time in shell morphology in Berthella, and finally whether the fossil shells can be assigned confidently to Berthella. Preliminary molecular analysis results suggest Berthella to be non-monophyletic. There also seems to be evidence of cryptic diversity in some of the species.

Stand Demographics, and Plant Anatomy and Physiology of Juglans californica in Response to Extreme Drought
Time:
4:15PM
Location:
15-1802

Killian Fleurial. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Edward Bobich

Synopsis: The study examines this unusual occurrence of resprouting from belowground biomass in California black walnut (Juglans californica) after an exceptional drought.

Abstract: Juglans californica (California black walnut) is a low-growing hardwood tree endemic to southern California that resprouts shoots from belowground biomass when recovering from a fire. After a fourth consecutive below average rainfall season in southern California, leading to the most extreme drought in recorded history, J. californica, in a stand located on the campus of California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, were observed to be resprouting from their base in the absence of fire beginning in spring 2014. The study examines this unusual occurrence of resprouting from belowground biomass in California black walnut. It is hypothesized that the resprouting is in response to the drought and that the plants that resprout will show equal or greater signs of water-related stress than adult trees that have retained most of their canopy. It is also hypothesized that resprouting and mortality is related to plant size (age), with smaller (younger) plants experiencing greater mortality and resprouting more frequently than larger plants. The hypotheses will be tested by examining stand demography, as well as the wood anatomy, water relations, and gas exchange of J. californica.

Flora of the San Jose Hills
Time:
4:30PM
Location:
15-1802

Asseneth Berbeo. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Edward Bobich

Synopsis: A vegetation map and manual for the Flora of the San Jose Hills will be created, vouchers housed in the Cal Poly Pomona Herbarium (CSPU).

Abstract: The San Jose Hills are part of an important wildlife corridor between the Peninsular Ranges and the Transverse Ranges of Southern California. Though the natural areas have been greatly reduced, there remain continuous stands of increasingly rare native coastal sage scrub, riparian, and woodland communities; threatened Southern California black walnut (Juglans californica) woodland habitat and breeding grounds for the California Gnatcatcher (Polioptila californica) have resulted in much of the Hills being recognized as a Significant Biological Area. The purpose of this study is to create and catalogue herbarium vouchers, to be housed in the Cal Poly Pomona Herbarium (CSPU), and creation of a vegetation map and manual for the Flora of the San Jose Hills. Voucher samples are being collected in all areas of the San Jose Hills and identified using dichotomous keys; the location and habitat of each specimen is also recorded. Vouchers are mounted and preserved so they can be used as representative specimens. In addition to new collections, 285 records of collections in the San Jose Hills have been found through research of the historical collections in the Consortium of California Herbaria. The records are concentrated mainly in the Voorhis Ecological Reserve (Cal Poly Pomona) and Puddingstone Reservoir and Dam in Bonelli Regional Park, areas which make up only 5% of the total area of the San Jose Hills. Collection of specimens will continue throughout all seasons; the catalog of plants will eventually be available to scientists and the general public through the Consortium of California Herbaria.

Application of Relative Valuation Model to Firm Valuation
Time:
2:00PM
Location:
15-1808

Steve Ngo. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Wei Yu

Synopsis: To determine valuation through the application of relative valuation technique.

Abstract: Relative valuation technique is used to value a company by comparing peer companies to a target company. It is a common practice for financial analyst and investors. This will be done through the application of relative valuation among companies. The research will assess the practice of the technique, including its strengths and weaknesses, the analysis of publicly available information, the selected appropriate multiples for valuation, and then the finding of company valuation.

Using Mobile Apps to Foster Brand Loyalty in Millennials
Time:
2:15PM
Location:
15-1808

Kelly Tolle, Sarah Angelia. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jae Min Jung

Synopsis: To find out if the frequency use of a mobile application can increase brand loyalty, if incentives attract and retain customers, and if the mobile application's user interface affects user satisfaction and brandy loyalty.

Abstract: As an increasing number of consumers use mobile devices to transact with businesses, understanding consumer behavior with mobile devices has become the most pressing topic for research in marketing. One prevalent phenomena in mobile marketing today is that firms make mobile applications to engage with their customers to deliver convenience and reward customers. While this practice is prevalent, scant attention is paid to the effectiveness of such practice on the attraction of new customers and the retention of existing customers. Thus, this research is purported to identify factors that will enhance customer attraction and brand loyalty. We draw on previous research conducted on non-mobile contexts to understand brand loyalty. It was found that valuable incentives increase brand loyalty and sales (e.g., Yi and Jeon 2003), and that many customers leave websites because they are difficult to navigate (e.g., Schaffer 2000). Thus, we hypothesize that (H1) the mobile application usage will positively influence brand loyalty, (H2) provision of incentives will help attract new customers and retain current customers, and (H3) the mobile application usability will enhance user satisfaction and brand loyalty. To test these hypotheses, we collected data from a convenience sample of Millennial undergraduate students using Qualtrics (n=237). With a combination of Chi-square test, t-test, and regression analysis, we found statistically significant support for the hypotheses. This research contributes to the marketing theory and practice as it is the first in testing the impact of mobile application usability on the user satisfaction and brand loyalty. Summary of Results: Results show that as predicted in H1, mobile application usage positively influenced brand loyalty (Beta = .35, p < .001). A close examination revealed that brand loyalty was significantly higher when the applications was used at least "once a month" compared to when it was used less frequently (p's < .05). Consistent with H2, Chi-square analysis indicated that participants were likely to download the application for the incentives and that provision of application with incentives would increase customer retention (p's < .05). As predicted in H3, mobile application usability significantly influenced user satisfaction (Beta = .43, p < .001) and brand loyalty (Beta = .21, p = .05).

Promoting Impartiality Within Police Misconduct Investigations
Time:
2:30PM
Location:
15-1808

Karen Ortegon. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Michael Cholbi

Synopsis: Existing policies to investigate police misconduct fail to ensure impartiality. Reforms should promote transparency, discourage quid pro quo, and shorten time between charges and questioning.

Abstract: Police officers are accorded unique powers. They alone are legally authorized to infringe upon the rights of other citizens by detaining, questioning, searching, arresting, investigating, surveilling, and physically restraining or harming them. However, as police officers are human, they are fallible, and therefore susceptible to the misuse of these powers. Moreover, that same fallibility can undermine their capacity to investigate complaints regarding the abuse of their powers. Although national policies regarding the collection of data on police misconduct make precise estimates of its prevalence difficult, analysis of U.S. police misconduct polices (particularly Maryland's Law Enforcement Officers' Bill of Rights) indicates that such policies are ethically suspect inasmuch as they lack measures to ensure police impartiality during misconduct investigations. Ideally, those investigating complaints of police misconduct must impartially gather evidence, assess that evidence, and render a determination of misconduct. However, existing policies largely fail in these regards and in fact actively invite corruption. Misconduct policies should be reformed to ensure public transparency through civilian participation, to eliminate opportunities for professional quid pro quo, and to decrease the time span between charging and questioning officers. By stanching opportunities for corruption in misconduct investigations, such reforms would increase the impartiality of such investigations and thereby serve to protect officers from frivolous misconduct accusations. Moreover, the establishment of stricter procedures for identifying and punishing police misconduct is imperative for deterring such misconduct and abuse of power, for holding officers accountable for their misconduct, and for encouraging the public's cooperation with, and confidence in, police.

The Market Economy, Non Academic Organizations, and the University: Impacts on Professor's Knowledge Production in the U.S. Social and Environmental Sciences
Time:
2:45PM
Location:
15-1808

Daniel Gomez. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Ruben Martinez

Synopsis: This research proposes to study three cohorts of U.S. environmental and social scientists/professors from four different disciplines.

Abstract: Using Pierre Bourdieu's concept of the scientific field as an arena of the struggle for scientific capital, this study proposes to analyze three cohorts of U.S. university professors who endured peer review procedures in their departments to obtain tenure in four social and environmental science fields (sociology, economics, "environmental science", and geochemistry). The cohorts will be selected from four top-ranked research universities respective to each discipline, and four teaching universities each corresponding to a top-ranked university's state (e.g., Michigan). Through analysis of subjects' Curriculum Vitae (CV) data comparing each cohorts', schools' and disciplines' modes and amount of intellectual production before and after the granting (or denial) of tenure, I will assess the nature of change in the criteria of tenure as a dynamic of knowledge production. If a shift occurs between cohorts CVs in the dominant modes and amount of production (primarily categorized as non-academic and academic) prior to their successful obtainment of tenure, then we can confirm shifts in the power relations between the two poles across time. I propose to conduct quantitative and qualitative surveys measuring and assessing the amount and modes of possible knowledge production and ties with non-academic institutions not stated on subjects' CVs before tenure. I propose to conduct semistructured in-depth interviews investigating the logics and opinions behind such tenure criteria, production choice, and selective display. Together, these procedures would uncover the relational power structures within each cohorts' respective time frame of tenure, discipline, and school-type within the U.S.

The Evolution of News and Media Websites
Time:
3:15PM
Location:
15-1808

Ashish Hingle. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Sonya Zhang

Synopsis: In this exploratory study, we examined 9 highly rated news and media websites in 4 categories and collected data on the evolution of design trends.

Abstract: News and Media websites have evolved over time, with increasing complexity in design, content, marketing and monetization channels. In this exploratory study we examined 9 popular and highly rated news and media websites in 4 categories: online extension of television news (CNN, BBC, Fox News), online newspapers (LA Times, NY Times), online magazines (Forbes, Wired), and tech blogs (TechCrunch and The Verge). We collected, analyzed and compared multimedia, social sharing, and monetization data of these websites over the past 5 years, since 2010. "Multimedia" data refers to the adoption of video content to complement images, the ratio of these videos and images, and the inclusion of video content as a highlighted story. "Social Sharing" data refers to the inclusion of social share buttons, comments and access to user-profiles, which work to create new and retain current users. "Monetization" data refers to the number of advertisement spaces and the number of promoted stories / native content. We observed interesting trends among all selected websites along the years, such as the increase of multimedia, social sharing and monetization, as well as their usage on a particular web page being influenced by the type of page (the home page, a category page such as "Business" or "Technology", and article page). Our study provides valuable insight related to current research and trends in news and media website design.

Eye of The Beholder: The Effects of Advertising on The Perception of Beauty In South Korea
Time:
3:30PM
Location:
15-1808

Stacey De La Riva. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Don Page and Ms. Wendolyn Vermeer

Synopsis: This presentation will show the influence of cosmetic surgery advertising on the perception of beauty in women of Seoul, South Korea.

Abstract: The purpose of this presentation is to show how advertising affects women's perception of beauty in Seoul, South Korea. In the Gangnam District, also known as the Beverly Hills of Seoul, The Beauty Belt, or even The Improvement Quarter, residents are bombarded with both traditional advertising and media technology (such as blogs, social media, digital billboards, and other technologies made possible by an advanced broadband infrastructure). As a result, South Korean women are undergoing cosmetic surgery at an alarming rate and changing the culture of merely wanting surgery to needing it. Wide-ranging effects of this trend include an increase of beauty tourism; impacts on one's ability to succeed personally and professionally; and even a boost to the economy of Seoul, which has become the world's plastic surgery capital. By exploring literature in this area, I will make the connection between cosmetic surgery and media technology/advertising and demonstrate how it influences views of beauty. I will utilize images and videos to effectively illustrate this growing trend of normalizing elective surgery for purposes of beauty.

Prize Money and Crashes in NASCAR
Time:
3:45PM
Location:
15-1808

Shunto Kobayashi. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Craig Kerr

Synopsis: To find the relationship between the size of prize money and the prevalence of crashes in NASCAR.

Abstract: This research involves identifying the relationship between prize money and the rate of crashes in the National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR). The goal is to test whether a compensating wage differential exists in the form of prize money. A compensating wage differential is the additional amount of income paid for workers accepting undesirable characteristics of a particular job. Drivers in NASCAR face the risk of being involved in accidents, so they should be paid accordingly. However, the literature argues that the causality may go in the opposite direction. That is, the amount of prize money may induce drivers to take on more risk, causing more crashes. Previous studies use tournament theory to both theoretically and empirically show that this is indeed the case. This suggests that there is a potential endogeneity between prize money and crashes. The research presented here modifies the model used in O'Roark et al. (2012) by controlling for tracks, drivers' traits, and body modifications in order to reassess the effect of prize money on the prevalence of crashes. Then, while controlling for endogeneity of risky behavior and prize money, I empirically test for the existence of the compensating wage differential in NASCAR.

Investigation of changes in monomeric anthocyanins during sulfite treatment
Time:
1:15PM
Location:
15-1814

Yee Teng Moo, Lauren Chuman, Carol Pow Sang. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Harmit Singh

Synopsis: RP-HPLC analysis of ACNs-sulfite solution showed different trends which indicated the presence of different reaction when different ACNs were used

Abstract: Sulfites are widely used in food processing due to their antioxidant and preservation properties. Examples of the common uses of sulfites are during wine production and browning prevention of fruits and vegetable. Different anthocyanins ACNs react differently when encountered with sulfites. ACNs samples from red cabbage, grape juice concentrate, grape skin, and elderberry were prepared at pH 3.0 and with additions of 50 uL, 100 uL, and 150uL of 20% sulfite solution with a resulting concentration of 0.02%. The samples were heated in a water bath at 80 °C and 105 °C and were analyzed by HPLC and spectrophotometric method before and after sulfite addition and heating. The absorbance decrease showed an approximately 99% decrease in ACNs from Red Cabbage and Elderberry Whereas grape juice and grape skin ACNs showed a 83 % decrease. The HPLC data showed different trends as compared to spectral data for various monomeric ACNs reaction with sulfites. These results indicate that grape juice and grape skin ACNs reacted differently with sulfite solutions. The results also suggested the possibility of grape juice and grape skin ACNs being more stable or less reactive to sulfites as compared to elderberry and cabbage colors. Understanding the variability in the reaction of sulfites and ACNs from various sources will help in the selection of appropriate sources and application conditions for using natural colors in food products.

Effect of Nicotine and Sugar on the Growth and Biofilm Formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Time:
1:30PM
Location:
15-1814

Nalinee Chalongwongse, Gabrielle De Leon. Faculty Mentor: Dr. John Chan

Synopsis: This study was done to see if smokers and those who consume candy have a greater risk of obtaining biofilm infections.

Abstract: Nicotine is the addictive chemical found in tobacco and is consumed by millions of people daily. It has been proven that smokers experience more bacterial infections than non- smokers. In addition, sugars are also known to be a health risk and can lead to obesity and tooth decay. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is a gram-negative opportunistic bacterium that is found in the human body, including the oral cavity. The ability of PA to form biofilms allows it to survive in adverse conditions and to be more tolerant to antibiotics than stationary-phase planktonic bacteria. The objective of this study is to examine how nicotine and various sugars affect the growth and biofilm formation of PA. To determine the effect of nicotine on the growth, different concentrations of nicotine ranging from 1x10-1 M to 1x10-11 M were added to a flat bottom 96-well microtiter plate containing a 1:10 dilution of the 24 hour culture of PA in M63 liquid media. After 48 hours of incubation, the growth of the PA was read using a spectrophotometer. The above data was analyzed using a sample t-test to observe for significant differences (p<0.05). To study the effect of nicotine and sugars on biofilm formation, the crystal violet biofilm assay was used. After 48 hours of incubation of the fresh culture PA, the non-adhered PA cells were washed and decanted and the adhered PA cells were stained with crystal violet. The amount of stain in the bacteria was released with acetic acid and was then measured and analyzed using a sample t-test for significance. The current findings represent quadruplicate runs and indicate that nicotine at the concentrations used has no significant effect on the growth of PA, but significantly decreases the biofilm formation, with higher concentrations of nicotine suppressing biofilms formed (p<0.05). To expand these results, a capsule stain was done on the PA grown on LB agar plates both in the absence and in the presence of nicotine at a concentration of 1x10-3 M. The current results show that there is a decrease in capsule size of the PA grown in the presence of nicotine. Results also show that of the sugars tested, sucrose, maltose and galactose all significantly suppressed biofilm formation of PA, while glucose has no significant effect. When combined with nicotine at a concentration of 1x10-3 M, the results show that the suppressing effect of nicotine with sugar is not additive.

Development of fiber optic biosensors for rapid detection of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus
Time:
1:45PM
Location:
15-1814

Christian Garrido, Angela Liu, Adrian Ortiz, Renault Ong. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Ertan Salik , Dr. Shelton Murinda, and Dr. Wei-Jen Lin

Synopsis: Our fiber optic biosensors have the potential to drastically reduce the diagnostic time of MRSA infection from 48-72 hours to less than 3 hours.

Abstract: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is known for skin infections and is potentially life threatening if not treated immediately. Its presence in livestock and farm workers suggest agriculture industries may have an impact in spreading the infection. Its methicillin-resistance, encoded by mecA, protects it from beta-lactam antibiotics. Current diagnostic techniques are very slow (48-72 hours) and performed only by trained personnel. We are developing a rapid detection method for MRSA based on tapered fiber optic biosensors, which we have recently demonstrated for detection of binding between immunoglobulin-G (IgG) and anti-IgG. This method does not require any fluorescent labels and data acquired in real time allows rapid detection in less than 3 hours. MRSA is detected by a hybridization reaction between immobilized mecA probes (oligonucleotides) on the tapered fiber sensor surface and target complimentary mecA (prepared by heat-treatment and lysostaphin cell lysis of S. aureus). The protocol and the reagents used to bind mecA probes to the sensor surface were the same as the one used in our previous IgG-anti-IgG binding studies. Typical buffers used in hybridization reactions include sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and standard saline citrate (SSC). In our preliminary experiments, we found that both mecA+ and mecA- generated large sensor signals. We hypothesized these signals were contributed by the reagents of the buffer and not the hybridization reaction. Through multiple control experiments, we discovered by removing the SDS from the buffer we were able to show difference in the sensor response to mecA+ and mecA-.

High-frequency low-magnitude body vibration exercise on bone mineral density and body composition in physically active adults
Time:
2:00PM
Location:
15-1814

Elbert Chen, Tatiana Metchkoff, Jaime Flores. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Michael T.C. Liang

Synopsis: Four-week of high-frequency and low magnitude whole-body vibration training induces changes in bone mineral density and body fat.

Abstract: INTRODUCTION. There is a scarcity of study on the use of high frequency and low magnitude body vibration (HFLMBV) training on bone mineral density (BMD) and body composition in humans. We tested the hypothesis that 4 weeks of HFLMBV training can improve BMD, and body composition in adults. METHOD. Physically active women and men (n=32), age 20 - 31 years, volunteered as study subjects. Subjects were randomly allocated to 3 groups. Group 1 (G1) performed HFLMBV training, 2 sessions a day, 10-min each (n=11), group 2 (G2) performed HFLMBV training 1 session a day, 20-min each (n=15), and group 3 was a non-treatment control (CON, n=6). G1 performed 4 bouts of vibration exercise, twice a day with 1-2 hours resting between sessions; and G2 performed 8 bouts of vibration exercise, once a day. Both G1 and G2 trained 3 days/week for 4 weeks. The high frequency, low magnitude vibration platform (DKN Technology, Alhambra, CA) with a vibration frequency = 40 Hz, and magnitude = 4 g was used for this study. The training subjects stood on a vibration platform with knees bent at 40o angle, and feet contacting the platform. Results show significant changes at week 4 in BMD of the trochanter (P=0.04), and in percent fat (P=0.02) and body lean mass (P=0.09). In conclusion, our results indicate that a four-week HFLMBV training induced changes in bone mineral density at the trochanteric region and lower % body fat, and a trend in lowering lean mass in physically active adults.

Electrochemical Study of Pt Nanoparticles
Time:
2:15PM
Location:
15-1814

Jordan Kitt, Mytruc Dang. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Peng Sun

Synopsis: Electrochemical Study of TOA+ Facilitated Transfer of PtCl62- Across the Aqueous/1,2-Dichloroethane Interface Author: Jordan A Kitt, Cal Poly Pomona Mentor: Dr. Peng Sun, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Cal Poly Pomona

Abstract: The study of Pt nanoparticles is leading to the discovery of innovative techniques in diagnosing and treating diseases, assisting in drug delivery and catalyzing chemical reactions that promote fuel efficiency, solar energy conversion and removal of pollutants in wastewater. So far, the most commonly used method to synthesis Pt nanoparticles is the Brust-Schiffrin method in which PtCl62- is extracted into the organic phase under the assistance of very hydrophobic Tetryloctylammonium ion. PtCl62- is then reduced to Pt nanoparticles in the organic phase. One fundamental question about the synthesis is what mechanism is used for the transfer of PtCl62- ion from aqueous phase into the organic phase. In our research, a potential is added onto an interface between a PtCl62- ion aqueous solution and a Tetryloctylammonium ion organic solution. Under the influence of the electric field, the transfer of PtCl62- ion from aqueous phase into the organic phase can be controlled, and thus the transfer mechanism can be studied. We found the transfer of PtCl62- ion from aqueous phase into the organic phase is a Tetryloctylammonium ion facilitated transfer process. We have also studied how many Tetryloctylammonium ions can facilitate the transfer of one PtCl62- ion.

Analysis of Poly-hydroxylated Biodiesel Through GC-MS
Time:
2:45PM
Location:
15-1814

Michael Luzuriaga. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Michael Page

Synopsis: Seperation and purification of a polyol mixture to further characterize petroleum-free polyurethanes.

Abstract: Petroleum is a nonrenewable resource that is source for fuel, plastics, and various other consumer products. In the U.S. about 8% of petroleum is used yearly to make plastics, which is about 0.56 billion of barrels of petroleum. Replacing petroleum with a renewable source can help extend the lifetime of petroleum reserves and lead to a more sustainable future. Our research group has synthesized polyurethanes from seed oils with varying equivalents of green polyols and fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs). These formulations have resulted in materials with varying degrees of rigidity and hardness. A point of emphasis is determining the exact composition of a synthesized FAME polyols that contains 2 or 4 hydroxyl groups. By determining the exact abundance of reactive alcohol functional groups, more detailed characterization of the eventual polyurethanes can be generated. Normal phase column chromatography was used to separate the FAME polyols. The two compounds displayed a broad IR resonance of 3423.67 cm-1 due to the alcohol functionality. The isolated diol displayed two resonances in the 13C NMR at 74.443 and 74.503 ppm. Theese signals resulted from deshielded carbons that are alpha to the alcohols in the fatty acid chain. The more highly substituted tetraol displayed multiple resonances in the 13C NMR ranging from 73.143 - 82.602 ppm. Analysis via GC-MS was accomplished by derivatizing the diol and tetraol to silyl ethers that have lower volatilities and retention times of 22.2 minutes and 23.0 minutes respectively. Further analysis of the mass spectra fragmentation, HSQC, and TOCSY will be presented. It is our hope that these defined polyols will shed more light on their exact role in fine-tuning the design and the rigidity of these consumer polyurethanes based on renewable materials.

Studying Hemagglutinin Protein Interactions in Botulinum Neurotoxin Complex
Time:
3:00PM
Location:
15-1814

Phillip Lwin, Liana Ab Samad, Melissa Guzman Morris. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Wei-Jen Lin

Synopsis: Investigate the role of Hemagglutinin proteins in C. botulinum serotype A1 strain neurotoxin complex, via protein in-vitro analysis to identify ways for preventative and therapeutic treatment of botulism.

Abstract: Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), produced by Clostridium botulinum, is considered one of the most lethal poisons known to humankind. In C. botulinum serotype A1 strains, the neurotoxin is non-covalently bonded with several associated non-toxic proteins (ANTPs) such as nontoxic-nonhemagglutinin (NTNH) and hemagglutinin (HA) proteins; forming a complex up to 900 kD. The ANTPs in the complex protect the toxin from the acidic and proteolytic environment of the digestive tract as well as facilitate the absorption of BoNT across the intestinal epithelium. The gene organization that harbors the BoNT and ANTPs has been well characterized. However, it is not clear how the neurotoxin complex is formed at the protein level. We used size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) to study protein interactions within the toxin complex. The SEC of the crude protein extract revealed that the protein complex assembles into two different-sized complexes: 900kD LL and 500kD L. Further SEC analysis showed that the L complex rearranging itself gradually into the stable LL complex. Yeast Two-Hybrid System measured the individual proteins interactions. Among several interacting pairs, the strongest interaction occurred between HA17 and HA52. Mutation studies of HA52 indicated that the C-terminus was responsible for the binding with HA17. Protein in-vitro studies were also performed to provide further confirmation of the interaction between these two proteins. Our data support the hypothesis of HA52 as a bridge between BoNT/NTNH and other HA proteins. Understanding how the neurotoxin complex is assembled will provide information leading to identify ways for preventative and therapeutic treatment of botulism.

Atrizine and malathion shorten the maturation process of Xenopus leaves oocytes and have an adverse effect on early embryo development
Time:
3:15PM
Location:
15-1814

Lindsay Hetrick, Lindsay Hetrick, Yu-Huey Lin, and Dr. Junjun Liu. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Junjun Liu

Synopsis: Pesticides including atrazine and malathion are shown to affect Xenopus laevis oocytes during their maturation process as well as cellular division during embryogenesis.

Abstract: The use of pesticides has a negative impact on the environment. Amphibians have long been regarded as indica- tor species to pollutants due to their permeable skin and sensitivity to the environment. Studies have shown that population declines of some amphibians are directly linked with exposure to agricultural contaminants. In the past, much of the studies have focused on the toxic effect of contaminants on larvae (tadpoles), juvenile and adult frogs. However, due to the nature of their life cycle, amphibian eggs and early embryos are especially sus- ceptible to the contaminants, and any alteration during the early reproductive stagesmay have a profound effect on the health and population of amphibians. In this study, we analyzed the effect of atrazine andmalathion, two commonly used pesticides, on Xenopus laevis oocyte maturation and early embryogenesis.We found that both atrazine andmalathion shortened the frog oocyte maturation process and resulted in reduced Emi2 levels at cy- tostatic factor-mediatedmetaphase arrest, and a high level of Emi2 is critically important for oocyte maturation. Furthermore, frog embryos fertilized under the influence of atrazine and/ormalathion displayed a higher rate of abnormal division that eventually led to embryo death during early embryogenesis.

Solar-assisted Inland Brackish Water Desalination System
Time:
3:30PM
Location:
15-1814

Sean Yazdi, Andres Ceja, Abraham Morales, Vien Nguyen. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Reza Lakeh and Dr. Ali Sharbat

Synopsis: Feasibility of using renewable energy for water reclamation projects.

Abstract: Reverse osmosis technology that utilizes both photovoltaic panels to power the system and concentrated solar panels to directly heat the brackish solution prior to desalination is a useful way to harness solar energy to produce drinkable water. The hydraulic system brings brackish water to 250 psi and directs the flow through a reverse osmosis membrane that separates the salt content from a permeated solution. The concentrated solar panel system heats the brackish water before it enters the reverse osmosis membrane, allowing for an increased separation rate of salt particles from purified water. This desalination system can remove about 99% of particulates per pass while using 0.63 kWh to purify each cubic meter of water. Based on Southern California Edison's rate of $0.46 per kWh, this unit saves $0.29 per cubic meter of desalinated water while, on average, producing 1 liter of permeate every 10 minutes. The Environmental Protection Agency defines potable water as having less than 500 mg/L of total dissolved solids within the solution. Assuming the salinity of brackish water is between 500 to 10,000 mg/L, this unit can produce fresh drinking water from a wide range of saline solutions of varying salt content. Sodium chloride has been the target solute to remove due to its majority presence in water resources around southern California, specifically in local inland aquifers. In conclusion, this desalination system can remove sodium chloride from brackish water and effectively produce potable water while solely using renewable energy to power each process.

Calpollini- a rice flour-based gluten-free pasta enriched with protein and dietary fiber
Time:
3:45PM
Location:
15-1814

Tiffany Yang, Rafael Martin Del Campo, Julia Conchas, Ali Hasan, Giselle Hernandez. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Yao Olive Li

Synopsis: There is an increasing demand on gluten-free pastas in recent years from a group of consumers who are intolerant of gluten or suffer from celiac disease. The goal of this project is to create a cereal and legume based gluten-free pasta with high fiber and protein content compared to commercial competitors.

Abstract: Pasta is a staple food in most countries. Regular pasta is made with durum semolina flour, in which the gluten network plays a role in pasta's biological and technological functionalities. The objective of this project is to create a high fiber, high protein, and gluten-free pasta to compete with the other competitors on market. Challenges were faced when finding a substitute for "gluten" and making it novel with enhanced nutritional value. Calpollini is developed based on rice flour that is enriched with fava bean flour as the protein source, and dehydrated fruit and vegetable waste pomaces as fiber sources. The utilization of these waste materials in the ingredient formulation leads to a unique feature of Calpollini that is able to promote sustainable agro-food production. Calpollini is a spiral shaped pasta that is made by extrusion using a Rotini die shape plate. There are two color variations based on the fiber source used. Green fibers consist of dehydrated powders from pomaces of green apple, spinach, kale, and cucumber while orange fibers consist of dehydrated powders from pomaces of carrot, red apple, orange, tomato, and green apple. Upon cooking, Calpollini tastes similar to regular pasta, with a springy and chewy mouthfeel, proper consistency for desirable texture, and a hint of fruity or vegetable flavor depending on the fiber source used. Measurements of dietary fiber and protein contents confirmed that Calpollini provides 20% of the recommended daily intake (RDI) for both protein and fiber; therefore, it meets the USDA's high protein and high fiber standards.

Quantifying MyHC isoforms in WT and HD transgenic mice
Time:
4:15PM
Location:
15-1814

Su Yeon Kim. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Robert Talmadge

Synopsis: Utilizing immunohistochemical staining techniques to determine the MyHC isoform expressions in WT and HD transgenic mice.

Abstract: Huntington's Disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disease that causes the degeneration of nerve cells in the brains of the affected individual. This results in motor, cognitive, and psychiatric disorders, impairing the individual's ability to move. Curiously, HD patients also develop muscle atrophy, weakness, and impaired muscular function, though there is no clear understanding of why this occurs. This disease currently has no cure. The purpose of this study will be to better understand the impairments in muscular function associated with Huntington's Disease. Specifically, this study addresses the expression of specific protein (myosin heavy chain, MyHC) isoforms that are known to play an important role in muscle function in muscles from transgenic mice (R6/2 mice) that are genetically altered to display HD symptoms and wild-type (WT) controls. Our preliminary results demonstrate that the TA muscle from the R6/2 mice had a smaller proportion of fibers with MyHC-IIa in the TA muscle (18%) compared to the WT mice (31%). The R6/2 mice also had an increased combined proportion of fibers with the MyHC-IIb (51%) and MyHC-IIx (24%) compared to the WT fibers with MyHC-IIb (46%) and MyHC IIx (17%). These preliminary data suggest that changes in muscle fiber characteristics (myosin heavy chain composition) occur with HD and may contribute to muscle dysfunction in HD patients.

Generation of Integration-Free Feline Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells
Time:
4:30PM
Location:
15-1814

Jade Lolarga. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jijun Hao

Synopsis: Generation of integration-free feline induced pluripotent stem cells through the use of episomal plasmids and lentiviruses.

Abstract: Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a very common type of heart disease found in adult cats and humans. HCM can result in a muscle wall thickness increase in the left ventricle of the heart, leading to a decrease of the left lumen size. Cardiac myosin binding-C (MYBPC3/A31P) is a causative autosomal dominant inherited mutation that is often found in cats. The mechanism underlying HCM development remains poorly understood due to the complexity and large scale randomized clinical trails. However, recent development of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) offers a revolutionary tool to study the HCM development mechanism in vitro. IPSCs are functionally equivalent to embryonic stem cells (ESCs), and are able to differentiate into various tissue cells including cardiomyocytes. Since the disease-specific iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs) have the same genetic traits of the patients, they could repopulate the specific disease phenotype in vitro, providing a unique platform to study HCM disease development and test therapeutic drugs in vitro. We isolated feline somatic cells from ear tissue of wild type Maine coon cats. We have been using episomal plasmids and lentiviruses that carry the four transcription factors, Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc, to generate feline iPSCs, and various transfection methods as well as reprograming media that have been examined for feline iPSC generation. Once the disease-specific iPSCs are generated and differentiated into cardiomyocytes, they would provide a unique platform to understand the HCM development mechanism and test therapeutic drugs for this disease.

Pavioli - a novel RTE product based on under-utilized ingredients and suitable for HPP processing
Time:
4:45PM
Location:
15-1814

Sabah Baig, Musa Fareed, Nicole Tellez. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Yao Olive Li

Synopsis: To address food insecurity and malnutrition issues, this project is to employ under-utilized food ingredients, brown rice and annatto, for developing a novel RTE product.

Abstract: It is well known the food insecurity and malnutrition are still the major challenges that affect the world. One approach to this problem is to utilize uncommonly-used natural ingredients for various food applications. The objective of this project is to develop a novel ready-to-eat entrée based on brown rice, which is an under-utilized ingredient yet with a relatively high production rate in under-developed nations. Lightly drizzled in a spicy yet tangy creamy sauce, the Flaming Crisp is an orange-colored ravioli product consisting of brown rice flour, annatto, and infused with a sweet potato filling. Annatto is known to add natural coloring elements to food, subtle flavors to many dishes and is chemically stable in oxidative, thermal, and well-lit conditions. The unique process involves the boiling annatto first, and the water containing of the orange color was used to prepare the dough for making ravioli wraps. The dough itself consisting of a brown rice flour was also mixed with different seasonings with a subtle orange appeal entailed from the annatto boiling water. In addition to consumer appeal, the annatto will help aid the brown rice flour during frying by providing a sturdy-friable structure that will aid the ravioli shell with an extra palpable crisp. Sweet potato was chosen to prepare for the filling based on a market trend and its ability to balance the overall taste. The project has some preliminary results: Preliminary results from visual observation of raw and cooked samples confirmed the color stability, suggesting the orange color from annatto was stable during cooking process. A quick taste test confirmed the cooked samples had desirable taste and texture. The vegetable filling is an item still being deliberated upon as a final filling for the raviolis. Future sensory tests along with nutritional information analyses of the product will determine how to distinguish between products likeness and similarity to a frozen entree ravioli sold in grocery stores.

School-Work-Life Balance among College Students
Time:
1:15PM
Location:
15-1822

Vanessa Baca. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Alejandro Morales

Synopsis: A study on one's balance of their school, work and personal life affect on their overall well-being.

Abstract: In 2013 the US census reported that 71% of undergraduate students work. Not only are students working, many are completing internships, conducting research, and participating in school activities to become a competing candidate for graduate school and employment. Attending school full time, completing research, and maintaining a job may lead to a decline in GPA. In turn affecting the chances of being admitted into a graduate program. Thus, it is important to understand how college students navigate or balance the multiple roles they play. This study focuses on the school-work-life balance of undergraduate students at large commuter school in the West Coast of the US. We are in the process of recruiting approximately 200 participants, 18 years old or older, all from different majors, socioeconomic backgrounds, and different employment histories. Three different five point likert scales will be used to determine the participants overall academic satisfaction, work-family balance, a modified version of work-family balance scale to measure school- family balance. Two seven point likert scales will also be used to find the participants life satisfaction, and satisfaction with work. Through a series of multiple regression, we are expected to see that those with better school-work life balance will have a higher GPA and greater life satisfaction. We also hope to find that students who are self-controlled and involved on campus will have greater school-work life balance. The results of this study will provide information on how to help improve the educational system for undergraduates, especially as they prepare to pursue a graduate education or join the labor force.

Tip of the Tongue Phenomenon in Bilinguals: Is there an effect of bilingual language control?
Time:
1:30PM
Location:
15-1822

Alexandra Rivas Ixtlahuac. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Eleonora Rossi

Synopsis: The Tip of the Tongue Phenomenon is a type of speech error in which the individual has the feeling that he or she knows the word but fails to retrieve a desired word. This is a phenomenon that we experience all the time when talking to peers or doing a presentation and suddenly we are unable to remember a word that we think we know, but we are unable to remember.

Abstract: The Tip of the Tongue Phenomenon -TOT- is considered to be a type of speech error in which speakers feel they do know the word but fail to retrieve it. Previous research has demonstrated that bilinguals show a higher number of TOTs than monolinguals (Gollan, 2006). One explanation that has been proposed suggests that the higher number of TOTs in bilinguals reflects the relative lower use of each of the two languages (i.e., Weaker Links Hypothesis, Gollan 2006). At the same time the Inhibitory Control Hypothesis -IC- (Green, 1998) posits that bilinguals might need to control their languages by temporarily inhibiting the strongest language to allow fluent speech production in the weaker language, when required to switch between languages. The goal of this study is explore the TOT phenomenon in the context of a blocked naming switching paradigm in bilinguals. This will provide an opportunity to understand how theories of TOTs can be informed by more general theories of cognitive control in bilingual speech production (IC). To this goal, we will test a number of bilinguals (Spanish-English and English-Spanish) who will vary in proficiency levels (i.e., high or low proficiency). Participants will be exposed to low-frequency words to elicit TOTs during a blocked language switching paradigm. More specifically, participants will name items in three separated experimental blocks in which languages will alternate (i.e., L1-L2-L1 or L2-L1-L2). We hypothesize that after speaking in the L2 block, participants will have higher rates of TOTs in their L1. Furthermore, we expect that proficiency will modulate this effect. Data collection is currently underway. This research will provide a deeper understanding of TOTs in bilinguals and will allow a new interpretation for this phenomenon. In addition, it will lead to an examination of the findings for this relatively unexplored field.

Mode of transportation and commuting stress in Melbourne, Australia
Time:
1:45PM
Location:
15-1822

Paul Rogo. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Juliana Fuqua

Synopsis: Manipulating mode of transportation to better understand stress experienced while commuting.

Abstract: Commuting stress is likely to be experienced by millions of people daily, whether en route to work or school. The identification of factors that lead to commuting stress could prove to be a stepping stone in working to eliminate or lessen stress and improve transportation options. Prior research has delved into whether the mode of transportation can have an effect on stress. Some studies have found mode of transportation is related to stress, possibly because different modes provide different amounts of predictability and control to the commuter. This study aimed to understand whether different levels of stress reported by commuters is related to their mode of transportation. Australian university students (n=82), from a city where public transportation is often used, were recruited to fill out an online questionnaire on stress levels and various commuting variables such as distance traveled, type of transportation, and perceived level of commute predictability. Participants were found to use the following types of transportation: personal vehicle (20%), public transportation such as trams, trains, buses (75%), and the most active commuting modes of walking (2%) and bicycling (3%). T test results indicated that mean commuting stress level was similar for public transportation users (X=2.12, n=17) and personal vehicle users (X=2.31, n=65). Walking and biking was reported by an insufficient number of participants to provide significant results. The findings that public transportation users and personal vehicle users reported similar stress levels was surprising. Possible explanations for these results will be described (e.g., small sample of Australian students, commute control and predictability may be important than mode). Compared to some public transportation users, a personal vehicle user may perceive greater control over the vehicle, but may be subject to unexpected and uncontrollable conditions such traffic, which might be more stressful for the driver of personal vehicle. Although transportation mode was not significant in this study, other studies have found significance which can prove useful for urban planning in metropolitan or suburban areas. Perhaps compared to other modes, the alternate, actives forms of commuting of bicycling and walking can lower commuting stress levels, improve health, reduce transportation costs. Overall, more research is needed by health specialists and urban planners in metropolitan or suburban areas, to add to the inconclusive literature so that we can better understand the predictors and outcomes of commuting stress.

Surface Texture Effects on Grounded Cognition and the Gendering of Faces
Time:
2:00PM
Location:
15-1822

Jimena Jaramillo. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Nicholas Von Glahn

Synopsis: The purpose of the present experiment was to investigate whether the tactile perception of surface texture would affect participant's categorization of gender-neutral faces.

Abstract: Grounded cognition dictates that, just as the mind can dictate bodily actions, so can sensorimotor systems impact cognition. The purpose of the present experiment was to investigate whether the tactile perception of surface texture would affect participant's categorization of gender-neutral faces. We hypothesized that participants would categorize more gender-neutral faces as being masculine when they touched rough surfaces and feminine when they touched smooth surfaces. Additionally, we hypothesized that participants would rate the faces in terms of their attractiveness in ways that matched with what is typically considered masculine or feminine (rough being masculine and smooth being feminine). Results showed that experiencing different surface textures did not significant affect the gender and attractiveness ratings of the gender-neutral faces. However, the order in which participants filled out the questionnaires did significantly affect their gender ratings. Participants that submitted gender ratings first rated the faces as being more feminine than participants who submitted attractiveness ratings first. The present experiment failed to replicate the basic phenomena of grounded cognition.

Belonging Uncertainty Among Women in Engineering: Can Wonder Woman Save the Day?
Time:
2:30PM
Location:
15-1822

Audrey Aday. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Viviane Seyranian

Synopsis: This study aims to explore the uncertainty of social belonging and ability among undergraduate females in engineering.

Abstract: Belonging uncertainty is a state occurring in academic settings when members of socially stigmatized groups are more uncertain of the quality of their social bonds and subsequently more sensitive to issues of social belonging (Walton & Cohen, 2007). Individuals experiencing belonging uncertainty may also experience ability uncertainty, or a sense of uncertainty regarding one's ability and competence in a given domain (Lewis & Hodges, 2015). One population that may be particularly discouraged by feelings of belonging uncertainty and ability uncertainty is women in engineering, given their underrepresentation in the field (Kokkelenberg & Sinha, 2010). This study aims to determine whether undergraduate females in engineering report higher levels of belonging uncertainty and ability uncertainty than undergraduate females in other majors. In turn, do higher levels of belonging uncertainty and ability uncertainty predict lower feelings of power? Finally, this study will explore the effects of a nonverbal behavioral intervention (high-power versus low-power posing) on sense of belonging uncertainty and ability uncertainty.

What's There To Cheer About?: How Does Cheerleading Affect the Identity of Young Girls of Color
Time:
2:45PM
Location:
15-1822

Sekani Robinson. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Erica Morales, and Dr. Mary Danico

Synopsis: How cheerleaders view their racial identity through social interactions.

Abstract: While research on gender, race and sports/physical activities is prevalent, there are limited studies on how cheerleading plays a part in how Black/ African American people negotiate cultural boundaries within predominantly white spaces. This research will focus and compare two adolescent cheerleading teams, one being a predominantly Black/African American cheer team and the other being a predominantly white/multi-racial cheerleading team. This research will view how their interactions with their peers impact how they express their self-esteem and racial-identity. The methodology for this study is field observations and participant observation. I frame my analysis using the social learning theory and symbolic interaction paradigms that observe how cheerleaders socially interact with each other and promote girl collectivism. Throughout my observations I have found that race and class play a significant role on how the cheerleaders interpret their self-esteem and racial identity. Through interactions and observations with the cheerleaders, I have found that cheerleading is helping the girls on predominantly Black/African American cheerleading teams build their racial-identity by the choreography from the cheers and the interactions with other cheerleaders of the same race/ethnic background.

Knowledge of California Residents on Citrus Greening Disease
Time:
3:00PM
Location:
15-1822

Ashley Van Vliet. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Valerie Mellano and Dr. Anna Soper

Synopsis: Survey of knowledge to evaluate if and how California residents are learning about the Asian Citrus Psyllid insect and Haunglongbing disease, to save California citrus.

Abstract: The Asian citrus Psyllid (ACP), Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), is an important pest in the citrus industry due to the bacterial disease that it vectors called Huanglongbing (HLB), also known as citrus greening disease. This study was aimed at evaluating the public's general knowledge of the psyllid and HLB in Southern California. Questions asked include: (1) knowledge of ACP (have participants heard of this insect), (2) knowledge of Citrus Greening disease/HLB (have participants heard of this disease), and (3) how knowledge was acquired about the issue, varieties of citrus trees owned, owning a citrus tree (and variety), gender, race, and education level of participants. Results estimate less than 10% of the surveyed populations have existing knowledge of HLB, while 15.3% have existing knowledge of ACP. The majority of respondents with knowledge of HLB learned from family or friends, and the majority of respondents who had knowledge of ACP learned from the internet. This data will be utilized to evaluate the effectiveness of certain outreach methods in Southern California in an effort to control the movement of the ACP, and prevent further spread of HLB.

Impact of Western Dietary Pattern on Development of Incident and Recurrent Clostridium difficile Associated Disease: A Systematic Review
Time:
3:15PM
Location:
15-1822

Marwa Mhtar. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jill Wenrick

Synopsis: Anthropological methods are applied to explain how the culture of developed nations causes and spreads Clostridium difficile infection (CDI).

Abstract: Clostridium difficile is one of the many etiological agents of antibiotic associated diarrhea and is implicated in 15-25 percent of the cases. The organism is involved in the exacerbation of inflammatory bowel disease and extra colonic manifestations. Due to increase in the incidence of C. difficile infection (CDI), emergence of hyper virulent strains, and increased frequency of recurrence in highly developed countries it has become important to assess behavior that could be exasperating the epidemic in order to provide preventative measures. While the disease is explained to be caused by overuse of antibiotics it does not explain why the disease is only emerging in highly developed countries. The hypothesis is that the western dietary pattern in conjunction with aggressive antibiotics over a long period of time is the primary cause for this nosocomial infection. If the results of the review support the hypothesis, preventative measures will be proposed to physicians who prescribe antibiotics.

Is Competence to Stand in Trial, Affected by an Underlying Structure of Psychiatric Symptoms or a Forensic Psychiatric Patient's demographics?
Time:
3:45PM
Location:
15-1822

Jessica Galvan. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Mark Williams

Synopsis: The preliminary findings of this study suggest that scoring poorly on the Understanding subtest of the MacCAT-CA is not due to present psychiatric symptoms.

Abstract: The MacArthur Competence Assessment Tool-Criminal Adjudication (MacCAT-CA) is a standardized assessment instrument used to assist with competency to stand trial evaluations. The MacCAT-CA consists of three scales that each measure distinct domains related to trial competency assessment: Understanding, Reasoning, and Appreciation. Many individuals who take the MacCAT-CA come from marginalized and lower socioeconomic backgrounds. Additionally, many individuals who take the MacCAT-CA likely have low levels of educational attainment. The current study was conducted to determine whether performance on the MacCAT-CA is related to demographic factors such as age, ethnicity, gender, and educational level. This archival research project examined patient files from a forensic psychiatric state hospital that serves an ethnically and diagnostically diverse patient population. The patient's files included basic demographic information as well as their assessment scores on the MacCAT-CA. Analysis of this data will be focused on examining whether there are group differences in MacCAT-CA scores across categorical demographic variables such as ethnicity and gender. Additionally, we will examine the correlations between MacCAT-CA scores and continuous demographic variables including education and age. The current number of MacCAT-CA protocols extracted from patient's files and inputted into SPSS is, n=112. It is hypothesized that self-reported educational level will be significantly associated with performance on MacCAT-CA subtests, but that all other demographic variables will be statistically unrelated to MacCAT-CA scores. Our preliminary analysis revealed a statistically significant positive correlation (r = 0.4) between the MacCAT-CA Understanding subtest and self-reported level of education.

Can Non-Verbal Behavior Mitigate the Effects of Stereotype Threat?
Time:
4:00PM
Location:
15-1822

Emilio Medina, Gracie Flicker, Jason Nerio, Jessica Galvan, Sarine Aratoon, and Diana Castro. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Viviane Seyranian

Synopsis: The current research will examine whether a simple intervention involving changing one's body posture - power posing - can mitigate the deleterious effects of stereotype threat.

Abstract: Stereotype threat involves experiencing judgment based on common stereotypes associated with one's group (Spencer, Steele, & Quinn, 1999). Research shows that it is associated with increased anxiety, which can lower test performance particularly for minority members (Beilock, Rydell, McConnell, 2007). High power posing is an expansive open posture, which involves spreading limbs and occupying large areas of space. Research has shown that this pose may help people to experience feelings of high power (Huang, Galinsky, Gruenfeld, Guillory, 2011), and may increase testosterone and decreases stress levels (Carney, Cuddy, Yap, & Carney, 2015). Since stereotype threat is associated with anxiety, we are hypothesizing that high power-posing can reduce the anxiety associated with stereotype threat, thereby, potentially bolstering math performance. While research has sought various ways to reduce the negative effects of stereotype threat, no prior studies (to our knowledge) have examined the effects of changing one's nonverbal behavior as a way to mitigate stereotype threat. Therefore, our research has the potential to contribute to the literature on both power posing and stereotype threat reduction. Additionally, if our hypothesis are confirmed, power-posing may serve as a simple intervention to help mitigate the deleterious effects of stereotype threat - thereby, empowering women with a simple way to overcome the negative effects of stigmatization.

Charismatic Leadership and Perception during a Crisis
Time:
4:15PM
Location:
15-1822

Jessenia Tovar, Nicole Duong. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Viviane Seyranian

Synopsis: This study examines how the use of ingroup and outgroup language during a crisis or no crisis situation impacts the perception level of a leader's traits.

Abstract: This study examines how the use of ingroup and outgroup language during a crisis or no crisis situation impacts the perception level of a leader's traits via a written speech and online survey. The study is a 2x2 between-subjects factorial design. Participants will be recruited through Amazon's Mechanical Turk, which means they are at least 18 years old. Other sample size demographics are not yet known. Participants will be randomly assigned to read one of four speeches, which vary in language type and crisis or NO crisis. Participants will answer a survey featuring Likert-type scale questions based on perceptions of the leader and also respond to demographic questions. Results will be tested using a 2-way ANOVA.

An Integrative Outlook on Burn Survivors and Post-traumatic Growth
Time:
4:30PM
Location:
15-1822

Berenice Monarrez. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jack Fong

Synopsis: This research focuses on the outlook of life and the coping mechanisms of burn survivors after a severe burn injury.

Abstract: In 2015, the National Fire Protection Association issued a report that revealed how every 2 hours and 41minutes a civilian fire death occurs. Civilian fire injuries occur every 33 minutes nationwide and 1,298,000 fires in the U.S were reported in 2014. Every year the community of burn survivors is increasing and those survivors after physically healing must learn to cope with a new reality. This research explores the community of burn survivors. Most of the current written literature focuses on PTSD after a burn injury or as educating material for burn injury specialist. Neglected by the social sciences, the community of burn survivors can help us understand why many develop an enthusiastic approach to life in spite of their experiences. The data, currently in the process of being collected, will help answer how burn survivors transcend the title of a victim and embrace the label of survivor, allowing them to experience posttraumatic growth. By employing a qualitative research method based on content analyses of in-depth focus group interviews, phone interviews, along with analyses of online forums that attend to burn survivors and their narratives, this study aims to answer a key question: What coping mechanisms allow burn survivors to overcome adversity, especially if they've encountered body disfigurement, amputations and ample scar tissues as a result of their experiences.

Modeling and Simulation of the Mars Glider
Time:
1:00PM
Location:
15-1828

Emerson Baker, Isaac Guzman, Edward Gomez. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Subodh Bhandari

Synopsis: Autopilot development of a fixed wing glider whose main goal is to survey the Martian atmosphere.

Abstract: During the design process of aircraft it is important to have a 3-dimensional CAD model for various disciplines of design. An accurate CAD model can be used to derive aerodynamic coefficients, structural deflection and failure data, and stability and control derivatives. Aerodynamic coefficients are used to determine the maximum structural load applied to the aircraft during the flight and to verify predicted performance. Structural simulation and experimentation are used to verify the structural integrity of the aircraft at maximum load. In the early stages of design it is also important to derive cost-effective estimates of stability and control derivatives. Stability and control derivatives provide an input - output relationship between the various controls of the aircraft and can be tuned using a proportional-integral-derivative control system to provide quick stable control outputs. The purpose of this research paper is to apply structural, aerodynamic, and stability and control principles to the Prandtl-M aircraft, or the Preliminary Research Aerodynamic Design to Land on Mars.

Simulation Enviroment for Testing UAS Collision Avoidance System
Time:
1:15PM
Location:
15-1828

Edward Gomez, David Hunter, Daniel Garcia. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Subodh Bhandari

Synopsis: A method to create a complete software-in-the-Loop simulation for the testing of autonomous collision avoidance programs involving two unmanned aerial vehicles.

Abstract: Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) have risen in popularity in recent years in both military and civilian applications. With their low operating cost and ability to operate autonomously for long periods of time, UAVs are utilized for various application including but not limited to search and rescue, surveillance operations, natural disasters, and more. However, the lack of collision and obstacle avoidance capabilities have limited the widespread use of these vehicles. Cal Poly Pomona is currently working on many projects that involve development of collision and obstacle avoidance system for UAVs. This presentation talks about a method to create a complete software-in-the-Loop simulation for the testing of autonomous collision avoidance programs involving two or more UAVs. Using a simulation environment allows for new UAV systems to be tested without the risks involved with using an actual aircraft in flight. Also, implementing a simulation environment allows for rapid prototyping of new UAV designs, which significantly reduces the cost and time during the testing and verification phases. This simulation system uses openly available software including Athena Vortex Lattice and FlightGear, Virtual models of existing UAVs are created and integrated into the simulation environment. A built-in feature of the ardupilot software is used in conjunction with collision avoidance program to create a closed-loop where inputs such as position, heading and velocity are passed through a collision avoidance algorithm into the autopilot software. Outputs are likewise sent from the autopilot software into the flight simulator in the form of GPS waypoints. Simulation results will be shown.

Development, Testing and Implementation of Vehicle to Grid Functionality
Time:
1:30PM
Location:
15-1828

Thang Vo, Adrew Kim, Jassimran Sokhi. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Ha Le

Synopsis: Developing intelligent functions for Electric Vehicles based on Smart Inverters, which are known as Vehicle-to-Grid (V2G) functionality.

Abstract: Number of Electric Vehicles (EV) has increased rapidly during the recent years, causing severe impacts on operation of power distribution systems. The vehicles draw lots of power from supply feeders for charging, leading to increased power losses in the power lines and depressed feeder voltages. The PEV charging also interferes with normal operation of other motor-based equipment such as residential appliances. Solutions to the problem are urgently required. This study proposes using smart inverters to enable EV bidirectional charging and interaction with the grid for mitigating the EV negative impacts on the power system. It focuses on developing intelligent functions for the EV, which are known as Vehicle-to-Grid (V2G) functionality. This solution can also create additional benefits for the EV owners. With bi-directional charging and two-way communication capability, smart inverters can manage the EV charging to make it more efficient. Moreover, the EV can participate in a range of grid supporting services such as supplying power to alleviate grid stress conditions where the owners earn extra income. A key system to be developed for the smart inverters is a non-intrusive control system (NCS). Selection of the intelligent functions to be implemented in the NCS is based on latest recommendations of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and California Smart Inverter Working Group (SIWG). The obtained results include several smart functions which have been developed and tested using MATLAB Stateflow where the function requirements have been achieved.

Head Coupled Perspective for Mobile Devices
Time:
1:45PM
Location:
15-1828

Oleg Tosltov. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Yu Sun

Synopsis: We demonstrate a technique that allows any Android smartphone to show glasses-free monocular 3D content without the use of proprietary hardware.

Abstract: The idea of showing 3D content on 2D screens has been around for a long time. It is usually implemented by changing the position and perspective from which the content is rendered by tracking the location of the user's head. This creates the illusion that the user is looking at a 3D object. This technique has been implemented on Android by Amazon in their Amazon Fire phone. However, Amazon's method requires specialized hardware and four cameras to be present on the phone, thereby making it only compatible with the Fire phone. We have proposed and implemented a method of achieving the same effect that doesn't require any specialized hardware and only one camera, thereby making it compatible with all modern Android devices.

High Temperature Cyclic Oxidation of Aluminized Nickel Chromium Alloys
Time:
4:15PM
Location:
15-1828

Joe Furukawa, Moses Deleon. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Vilupanur Ravi

Synopsis: The objective of this project was to investigate the behavior of aluminized specimens subjected to cyclic oxidation in ambient air.

Abstract: Many systems, such as engines and refinery tanks, undergo repeated heating and cooling. During the cooling process the metallic surfaces of these systems may crack due to the difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) with the layers of metal below the surface. The difference in CTE creates stress and strain between the two layers. When the stress on the top layer exceeds its fracture limit the layer cracks. The cracks allow for oxygen ingress leading to further oxidation, causing the further depletion of metallic constituents from the underlying alloy. By aluminizing the alloy, the alloy can retain its mechanical properties as well as increase its corrosion resistance. The objective of this project was to investigate the behavior of aluminized specimens subjected to cyclic oxidation. For this project, the halide activated pack cementation (HAPC) process was utilized to produce aluminized Ni-Cr alloy specimens. The specimens were subjected to 100 cycles of heating and cooling, where each cycle consisted of 1 hour of exposure at a chosen elevated temperature and 15 minutes of cooling in ambient air. After testing, the specimens underwent a series of characterization tests. X-ray diffraction was used to identify the phases in the outer layer. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM/EDS) was used to obtain the microstructure and chemical analysis of the inner layers. Optical microscopy was utilized to determine the thickness of oxide layer and coating. Vickers microhardness was measured to compare the hardness of the oxide, pre-test and post-test coating.

IoTCom: Automating the Development of Communication Channels for Internet of Things Applications
Time:
2:30PM
Location:
15-1828

Roshan Rathod. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Yu Sun

Synopsis: IoTCom is a model-driven software, created primarily for Internet of Things(IoT) developers, which generates code for any IoT system based on user provided input.

Abstract: With the introduction of Internet Of Things (IoT), a technologically advanced place to live with all the devices connected in a network is no longer an imagination. The development of an IoT application generally involves developing a set of software components (e.g., the embedded controller running in the IoT device, the web server running in the cloud, the mobile client running in the smart phone), as well as building the reliable communication channels to connect these components. To add to it, different IoT applications and platforms require different implementation (e.g., protocols, libraries, programming language) for the communication channels, which makes it really challenging for the developers to master all the options and build the correct implementation. We are working on a model-based framework - IoTCom to automate the development of communication channels used in the context of IoT, in order to accelerate the development and ensure a consistent application quality. In this way, the developers can access a plug-n-play kind of framework and customize their applications as per requirements.

A Web Service for Parking Exchange
Time:
2:45PM
Location:
15-1828

Zachary Kysar. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Yu Sun

Synopsis: A web service which facilitates the trade of a parking space and the transportation around a parking lot.

Abstract: Parking in lots with high volume, such as universities and airports, can be difficult during times of high traffic. To supplement this difficulty, many drivers will roam around the lot offering transportation to people walking back to their parked car. Using a web based platform, we are able to create a service which allows those people entering the parking lot to connect with those people leaving it, allowing them facilitate the exchange more fluidly.

Distraction-Free Writing Device
Time:
3:00PM
Location:
15-1828

Jonathan Johannsen. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Yu Sun

Synopsis: My project is to create a distraction-free writing device to aid users in the writing of academic papers or other projects.

Abstract: The goal of this project is to develop a distraction free writing device to assist users in completing papers more efficiently. While several distraction free word processors already exist, they have limited functionality and since they run on the user's PC, they do not eliminate many of the common distractions writers face. The end product will be a writing device that runs a custom designed word processor aimed at keeping the writer on task. To encourage the focus on the writing process, the software will have a required full screen display and limited text formatting options. Furthermore, the user will be able to take advantage of aids that enforce good writing behavior. The first tool discourages editing to previously written sections, until after the entire first draft is completed. Another feature encourages the writer to write a little bit each day rather than procrastinating and writing large sections near the deadline. The user will enter the required paper length and due date at the start of each new paper. The software will monitor their daily progress and send the user messages if they are not on pace with their goals or deadlines. Other features that promote good writing habits will be incorporated as the project progresses. The finished word processor will be integrated into a custom distribution of the Linux operating system and installed onto a low cost machine. The machine will only be allowed to run this one program, so the user will be free from the distractions of web browsing, online chatting, social media, and games. The user will be able to link their device to their Dropbox or Google Drive accounts to upload their papers and complete the final stage of editing on their computer, including adding graphics and text-formatting.

Ceramic Matrix Composites Formed by Directed Metal Oxidation
Time:
3:30PM
Location:
15-1828

Connor Knowles, Erick Santiago, Stephanie Schlagel, Dr. Vilupanur Ravi. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Vilupanur Ravi

Synopsis: This project investigated the effects of magnesium concentration on the reaction mechanism of aluminum/aluminum oxide ceramic matrix composites.

Abstract: Composite materials are designed to combine the desirable properties of dissimilar materials such that the combination outperforms the individual constituents, e.g., ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) combine desirable properties of ceramics and metals. This project explores the use of aluminum-based ceramic matrix composites. The DIMOX™ Directed Metal Oxidation method was employed for the processing of the CMCs. The procedure is based on a melt oxidation process where molten Al-Mg-Si alloys react with oxygen in the atmosphere to produce the ceramic matrix composite material. This process is desirable because it allows the growth of the composite to be controlled with the possibility of near-net shape fabrication, thereby cutting down on manufacturing costs. The process also allows the composites to be grown into reinforcement materials, furthering its versatility. In this project, effect of the magnesium content of the parent alloy, reaction temperature and time on the process also allows the composites to be grown into reinforcement materials, further diversifying the feasibility of the process. Our team looked closer into the chemical growth mechanism of the process and the process also allows the composites to be grown into reinforcement materials, further diversifying the feasibility of the process. In this project the effects of the magnesium content of the alloy, process temperature and time on the growth mechanisms was studied. Insights into growth mechanisms will allow for the process to be tailored for specific applications for high temperature applications including turbine blades to high wear resistance applications such as brake disks and slide bearings.

Aluminization of Cobalt and a Cobalt-based Superalloy
Time:
3:45PM
Location:
15-1828

Susan Karakira. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Vilupanur Ravi

Synopsis: Cobalt and a cobalt-based superalloy were successfully aluminized. The effect of using different pack activators and temperatures were also investigated.

Abstract: The application of protective coatings to metallic alloys is an effective way to improve their durability without having to use a different alloy. The pack cementation method is an efficient way to achieve a coating and requires that the metal sample be buried in a mix of powders: the master alloy, filler, and activator. In this study, Haynes NS-163 (Co-28Cr-21Fe-9Ni-1.25Ti-1Nb) alloy coupons were coated at different process temperatures and using different activators. The coated alloys were cleaned, ground, polished, and imaged with an optical microscope in order to measure the coating thicknesses resulting from each set of process conditions. The superalloy was successfully coated and was found, through SEM analysis, to contain several phases, including cobalt aluminides. The coatings formed on the cobalt-based superalloy appeared to be less brittle than those produced on pure cobalt coupons. Detailed microstructural analysis is being conducted using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to develop deeper insights into the interaction of the individual constituent elements of the super alloy with the aluminum from the pack.

Hot Corrosion of Nickel-Chromium Alloys in a Molten Eutectic Salt Environment
Time:
4:00PM
Location:
15-1828

Bradley Stuart, Obed Villapando. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Vilupanur Ravi and Dr. Juan Carlos Nava

Synopsis: Electrochemical testing techniques were used to determine the hot corrosion resistance of different model binary nickel chromium alloys for marine turbine applications.

Abstract: Aircraft engines, turbines, and industrial machinery operating at high temperatures near marine environments are prone to accelerated degradation of their components due to corrosion under a thin film of fused salt ("hot corrosion"). Typical salts formed under these conditions are sodium sulfate from fuels and sodium chloride from the marine environment leading to low temperature hot corrosion (Type II). In general, the addition of chromium to alloys is known to increase their corrosion resistance, especially in mitigating attacks from molten sulfates. However, systematic studies on the corrosion resistance of binary nickel-chromium alloys to molten salts as a function of their chromium content are sparse. In this study, the corrosion kinetics of Type II hot corrosion at 700°C were determined for UNS N02200, Ni-Cr alloys with 2.5, 5, 7.5 and 10 wt% Cr as well as the UNS N06600 alloy in a Na2SO4 - 30.8 wt% NaCl eutectic salt using DC electrochemical techniques in a stagnant air closed system and a flowing 1vol% SO2 - air blend (g). Metallography was used to validate the reliability of high temperature electrochemistry as an accelerated test for hot corrosion. Although the electrochemical test could not discriminate the influence of chromium in the long term performance of Ni-Cr model alloys, metallography confirmed that increasing Cr-contents in the alloy resulted in the formation of a continuous protective chromia layer at Cr-contents greater than and equal to 7.5 wt%.

Developing a Coercion Resistant Authentication System Using Physiological and Neurological Responses to Music
Time:
2:15PM
Location:
15-1828

Max Wolotsky. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Mohammad Husain

Synopsis: Current authentication systems cannot withstand situations where a user is forced to release their passwords under hostile circumstances. We offer an alternative to these systems.

Abstract: Current authentication systems cannot withstand situations where a user is forced to release their passwords under hostile circumstances. In response to this issue, we offer an alternative to these systems, coercion resistant authentication systems, which will not allow for authentication under significant stress (such as coercion) and are not susceptible to standard attack vectors. In this paper, we discuss a specific implementation of coercion resistant authentication using an individual's subconscious physiological and neurological responses to Chill (intensely pleasurable) music as an authenticating and experimental results supporting the method's accuracy. During a registration period, the user selects a piece of music that is personally chosen to be physiologically and neurologically stimulating, and is played the music multiple times in order to test their responses to it. If a Chill is identified, then a 1-minute sample of the music is chosen to be the user's authentication token, and the user's responses to that 1-minute sample are recorded to be used as a reference for future authentication attempts. When the user attempts to log in to the system, their selected music is then played and the subject's physiological and neurological responses are compared to the responses that were collected during registration.

Enhancing the Limit of Detection of a Biconically Tapered Fiber Optic Sensor
Time:
4:30PM
Location:
15-1828

Jordan DeHaven, Joey Girardini. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Ertan Salik

Synopsis: We propose that including a fiber-optic sensor as a component in a laser loop will enhance the sensor's limit of detection.

Abstract: Biconically tapered fiber-optic sensors (BTFS) have great potential to be powerful and cost efficient tools for detecting analytes, such as antigens, proteins, and DNA. Fabricated to assume a biconical shape, fiber tapers act as interferometers in which mode coupling in the thin waist region of the taper produces an interference spectrum. Each BTFS has an inherent limit of detection (LOD), upon which wavelength shifts due to changes in refractive index (RI) are indistinguishable from noise in the system. We hypothesize that using a single, much narrower laser peak to measure peak wavelength shift over time will result in a better LOD than using a wide peak associated with broadband light. This is because it is far easier to determine the center of a thin peak and, therefore, changes in wavelength can be more accurately determined. Including the taper as part of a laser loop, we find that lasing happens at one of the peak wavelengths present in this spectrum and the rest of the peaks are suppressed, resulting in a spectrum that is dominated by a single peak. First, we confirmed by experimentation that our lasing mechanism is stable to 0.2 pm, minimally. This means that we should be able to use our laser loop, with a BTFS included, to detect shifts in wavelength due to RI change to at least this much. Our next steps are to test our system's ability to do just that by collecting data when our taper is submerged in various solutions of ethanol.

The Lost Neighborhood of Bunker Hill, Los Angeles: Decline in the Inter-War Period (1918-1941).
Time:
1:00PM
Location:
WK Arabian Lib

Adrienne Jaime. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Eileen Wallis

Synopsis: The decline of Bunker Hill, Los Angeles during the Inter-War Period (1918-1941).

Abstract: The neighborhood once known as Bunker Hill, Los Angeles at one time dominated the landscape of the city's downtown during the Gilded Age (1870s-1900) until the end of The Great War (1914-1918). An area that comprised First to Fifth Streets, streets between Grand, Court and Bunker Hill Avenue. In its grand Victorian mansions dwelled the social elite of the burgeoning metropolis. For many years it towered over the city like a grand citadel; however the families on the Hill began to leave by the time World War I ended. Many moved to more fashionable neighborhoods in the surrounding communities away from the city center. In their place came boarders taking up residence in the now unfashionable domiciles. Even more people swarmed to Bunker Hill during the Great Depression. The area was soon deemed a slum & in the following decades would be the target of developers and city planners. By the early 1970s the old mansions were knocked by the wrecker's ball or lifted of its foundations & taken elsewhere. In its place came the high rises we associate with the city today. Though there has been some research done on the history of Bunker Hill, it has mostly focused on its early history and its destruction. Very little emphasis is given to the period between the World Wars. The goal of this research project is to explore why the area went into decline, and whether or not the claims of city planners and politicians were true about the neighborhood.

Historic Districts: Product of Attractions
Time:
1:15PM
Location:
WK Arabian Lib

Jeffrey Nelson. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Terence Young

Synopsis: The economic success of a commercial historic district is dependent on the ability of attractions in proximity to it drawing patrons to the area.

Abstract: Historic preservation in the United States is not a construct of the 20th century. Sociologist Diane Barthel notes that the earliest and most effective historic preservation in America are ones with a patriotic motivation behind its preservation. The New York state legislative committee in 1849 argued for the preservation of the Hasbrouck House in Newburgh for its history of use as George Washington's headquarters, through public purchase. There has been a change in the societal reasoning behind historic preservation, no longer do we preserve on the basis of patriotism but rather for economic motives. The success of a Historic District is dependent on a stable attraction that draws people to the area independent of the historic districts small draw of people interested in the area because of its historic status. In Pomona, CA this has been done on several occasions following passage of the National Historic Preservation Act by congress in 1966. Pomona's Fox Theater and the historic 2nd street walking mall are two of these such historic sites that have garnered little focus from academics. Using a variety of sources such as Historic City Directories, Census Data, and historic accounts, this research seeks a clearer understanding of the relationship between a stable attraction - The Fox Theater - and the success or failure of the adjacent historic district - the Walking Mall - and how the continued success of The Fox Theater may spawn a new wave of development in Pomona's Historic Downtown.

Boyle Heights: The Jewish Community and the Freeways that Drove them away
Time:
1:30PM
Location:
WK Arabian Lib

Kimberly Castaneda. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Terrence Young

Synopsis: The freeway system that encroaches and subdivides Boyle Heights today is the cause of the disappearance of a once prominent Jewish community.

Abstract: Boyle Heights is recognized as one of Los Angeles' historic east-side barrios. For the past 50 years, Mexican immigrants have successfully influenced local churches, shops, murals, and public squares. But a closer look reveals that this neighborhood wasn't always what it appears to be. Subtle traces of abandoned Jewish heritage are spotted within its vicinity. The principle objective of my research is to first unravel the mystery of these Jewish cultural findings among a predominately Catholic and Latino community, who follow a completely different set of believes. With the use of historic maps, news articles, and interviews I will describe the history of a once prominent Jewish Boyle Heights. I will also criticize the freeway system and explain in detail its role in the disappearance of a once thriving Jewish community east of Los Angeles.

The past, present and future: A comparative look into how social media effects fundraising and strategies of presidential campaigns.
Time:
2:00PM
Location:
WK Arabian Lib

Alexis Ojinaga. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Mario Guerrero

Synopsis: This thesis will look at how social media effects campaigns.

Abstract: Presidential campaign finance and campaign strategies are two topics that launch a candidate into office or into the shadows. This thesis focuses on how the Obama campaign was able to simultaneously raise money and attract voters by using technology to appeal to a younger demographic. By researching George Bush's 2004 campaign, Mitt Romney's 2012 campaign, Obama's 2012 campaign, and Donald Trump's and Ted Cruz' current 2016 campaigns, it will show just how different candidates raise funds as well as shed light on the different strategies the campaign committee's implement in order to win elections. Using past campaign sites, social media interfaces, popular sources, and interviews with individuals who worked directly inside Obama's financial committee, I will address how Barack Obama's 2008 fundraising strategies 2008 changed the way future campaigns choose their own fundraising strategies.

"The Egocentric Presidency: How Presidents Use Language to Communicate with the American Public"
Time:
2:15PM
Location:
WK Arabian Lib

Travis Barrett. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Mario Guerrero

Synopsis: This thesis aims to examine the rhetoric of modern American presidents by analyzing all State of the Union addresses from JFK to Obama.

Abstract: Modern presidential scholars have found that over the last sixty years, presidential speeches have become longer in length and less formal in language. This thesis aims to expand upon the findings of modern presidential scholarship by analyzing all State of the Union addresses from President John F. Kennedy's address in 1961 to President Barack Obama's most recent address in 2016. More specifically, this thesis aims to use modern American presidents' spoken State of the Union addresses to identify the difference in the word choice and speech pattern of each modern American president. In doing so, my thesis hopes to contribute to the notable scholarship of the rhetorical presidency and anti-intellectual presidency. Furthermore, this paper examines these State of the Union addresses while taking into account external factors, such as the president's political party, the president's approval ratings at the time of the speech, and the makeup of Congress at the time of the speech, and their possible effect on presidential rhetoric.

Promises, Promises: The policy proposals of George W. Bush and Barack Obama
Time:
2:30PM
Location:
WK Arabian Lib

Tommy Orona. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Mario Guerrero

Synopsis: I am writing and presenting a senior thesis paper that is looking into the campaign promises made by presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama and trying to find if they switch policy stances.

Abstract: This thesis seeks to find out whether or not presidents whom are running for re-election drastically change their policy stances from their initial campaign. By using Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama as the focal points and as the cases which are to be compared and contrasted, this paper determines similarities and differences between the two presidents . The objective is to find if these two presidents did or did not sway from their initial policy stances. If they indeed did sway away from their initial policy stances, to what degree did they change, and why. This thesis will attempt to expand the field political science and advance its study by shedding light on the topic and by contributing to the questions people have regarding the most powerful person in the world, the president of the United States. Finally, this thesis will try to find the answer to the taboo question of will a president do or say almost anything to simply get re-elected and to reserve their seat in the Oval Office for four more years.

The Personal and the Political: An Analysis on the Relationship Between Feminist Identity, Gender, and Partisanship
Time:
3:00PM
Location:
WK Arabian Lib

Natalie Reyes. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Mario Guerrero

Synopsis: This thesis will look at the effect a feminist identity has on political party affiliation.

Abstract: In both modern and historical times, feminism is a heated and sometimes controversial term. Additionally, the role of women in politics signifies a new area of interest to political science research. This thesis seeks to examine the impact that a feminist identity has on political party affiliation. Utilizing surveys collected from the Los Angeles Democratic Party and the Orange County Republican Party, this research argues that feminists align with democrats because of their record of public support for gender equality.

How Use of an On-Line Simulation Help Students Understand Chemical Equilibrium
Time:
3:15PM
Location:
WK Arabian Lib

Phelicita Bell. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jodye Selco

Synopsis: Will The Use of An On-line Simulation Help Students Understand Chemical Equilibrium?

Abstract: Dynamic Equilibrium is one of the hardest topics to learn in General Chemistry. At Cal Poly Pomona, this topic is taught in the 2nd quarter of the year-long course sequence. An online simulation was developed to help students understand and visualize what happens at the molecular level during dynamic equilibrium. To determine the effectiveness of the simulation, student performance on a variety of assessments (activity sheet, quiz, midterm, and a final exam - all containing questions about dynamic equilibrium) were examined. Student responses to questions about equilibrium were coded and then compared to see if there was a correlation between simulation use and performance. In a class of 86, over 56% of the students that did the online simulation mastered dynamic equilibrium towards the end of the quarter. Of the 13 students that did not do the assignment, only 5 (38%) mastered the material.

The Generation of 1959: Competing Visions of the Cuban Revolution
Time:
3:30PM
Location:
WK Arabian Lib

Marco Covarrubias. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Pablo R. Arreola

Synopsis: This research will discuss the involvement and influence of prominent secondary figures of the Cuban Revolution, who have largely been left out of Cuban historiography.

Abstract: Much of the scholarship on the development of the Cuban Revolution has focused on its relationship to Cold War tensions or the two most prominent figures of the revolution, Fidel Castro and Che Guevara. These two figures did indeed have the most power and influence over the course of the revolution, but the Cuban Revolution was not solely influenced and shaped by these two influential figures. Both during and after Castro's take over, there were prominent and influential secondary figures that played a significant role in the guerrilla campaign waged by the 26th of July Movement, the subsequent takeover of the government, and the development of the revolutionary regime in Cuba. Figures such as Carlos Franqui, Haydee Santamaria, Camilo Cienfuegos, and Celia Sanchez among others held significant influence at different stages of the revolution. These secondary figures came from a wide range of socioeconomic backgrounds and had diverse influences and ideologies, yet were brought together for a common struggle. These secondary figures each had a different outcome as a result of their involvement in the revolution; some stayed close to the regime until death, others went into exile. This research looks to shed light on the similarities and differences of the Cuban revolutionaries and how that impacted them and the outcomes and trajectory of the Cuban Revolution itself. Although these secondary figures came together for a common cause, it was their differences that influenced their relationship to the Castro regime and their experience in revolutionary Cuba.

Aquaponics
Time:
1:00PM
Location:
15-2907

Jordan Jarnagin, Aaron Thormodsen, Brandon Lace. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Maryam Shafahi

Synopsis: Aquaponics is a sustainable food production practice that produces both plants and fish that is compact and resource efficient.

Abstract: Aquaponics is a sustainable food production process which utilizes a closed-loop symbiotic cycle to produce fish and crops without soil or synthetic fertilizers. Ammonia from the bodily excretions of the fish is converted to nitrates and nitrites by means of a bacterial filtration process and used to fertilize the crops. In turn, the plants remove harmful chemicals from the water, which is then returned to the fish tanks to complete the cycle. This process offers several unique advantages over traditional farming: the closed-loop design allows for remarkably efficient use of water and space while minimizing environmental impact and the use of fish waste eliminates the need for toxic fertilizers. For tilapia fish, the water temperature must be maintained at around 74° F to ensure the health of the fish; this is typically accomplished by the use of electric heaters. This study examines the potential water conservation advantages of aquaponics systems when compared to traditional agriculture techniques. The study works to prove from data the efficiency of aquaponics systems for conserving water in southern California.

Halide Activated Pack Aluminizing of Steels
Time:
1:15PM
Location:
15-2907

Dylan Vogt, Vilma Gonzalez. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Vilupanur Ravi

Synopsis: The effect of process parameters on aluminide diffusional coatings applied to carbon and low alloy steels was studied.

Abstract: Aluminide coatings applied to plain carbon and low alloy steels can enhance their resistance to high temperature corrosion. Halide Activated Pack Cementation (HAPC) is a cost efficient process that can be used to create diffusional aluminide coatings. In this surface modification process, a "pack" consisting ofa master alloy, activator salt and filler are mixed together and heated to high temperatures along with the alloy substrate. The formation of a corrosion resistant and hard barrier on the substrate surface can increase the durability of the metallic substrate. Low, medium and high carbon steels [UNS G10180 (AISI 1018), UNS G10450 (AISI 1045) and UNS G10950 (AISI 1095)] and a water-hardening tool steel [UNS T72301 (W1)] were aluminized using packs containing pure aluminum, ammonium chloride activator and alumina filler. The ratio of the sample surface area to pack powder amount (mass) was held constant for comparison purposes. The pack parameters that were varied included coating temperatures (700-900°C) and times (0, 1, 4 and 9 h). The surface phases resulting from the coating process were determined using X-ray diffraction (XRD). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) was used to determine the chemical compositions of the coated cross-sections. Coating thicknesses were measured using optical microscopy of the mounted and polished cross-sections of the coated samples. Microhardness measurements of coated cross-sections were conducted using a Vicker's diamond pyramid with 10g load and following the procedure outlined in ASTM standard E384.

Pack Aluminization of Austenitic Stainless Steels
Time:
1:30PM
Location:
15-2907

Michell Aranda, Daniel Navarro, Ani Nazari. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Vilupanur Ravi

Synopsis: Aluminide coatings on stainless steels have been produced by a diffusional process and the effect of austenitic stability was examined on coating development and morphology.

Abstract: Stainless steels are used in aerospace and petrochemical applications because of their excellent corrosion resistance. However, when higher operating temperatures are needed to increase overall performance, the service life of the material is usually shortened. High temperature corrosion in these conditions can be mitigated by implementing protective coatings, thereby promoting the longevity of the material. One such method, halide activated pack cementation (HAPC) is a cost-effective batch process driven by a chemical vapor deposition reaction to produce corrosion- and wear-resistant coatings Aluminum, silicon, and chromium can be deposited through this coating method. These coating elements will subsequently form protective oxide scales during exposure to service conditions. In this study, aluminide coatings were produced on stainless steels by utilizing the HAPC process at temperatures of 650, 750 and 850°C for process times of 4, 9, 16, and 25 hours. The effect of coating development and morphology on austenite stability is being investigated. The results of coating characterization including mass change, thickness measurements, surface phases, and microstructural evolution will be reported.

Hot corrosion of steels in chloride salts for concentrated solar power generation environments
Time:
1:45PM
Location:
15-2907

Obed Villalpando, Blake Morris, Jason Wang, Jared Logier. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Vilupanur Ravi

Synopsis: The corrosion of steels in molten chloride salts at high temperatures for concentrating solar power applications was studied using immersion and electrochemical techniques.

Abstract: Concentrating (or concentrated) solar power (CSP) is a method of tapping plentifully available solar energy that offers grid flexibility over photovoltaic generation. Molten salts have emerged as viable candidates for thermal energy storage in CSP. Chloride salts have many advantages such as their economic availability and their stability to temperatures around 1100°C which opens up the possibility for higher power generation efficiency. However, molten chlorides are known corrosives; therefore, proper materials selection for plant hardware is important. Nickel-based superalloys are good candidates as construction materials. However, while superalloys provide the needed corrosion resistance, they are cost prohibitive for constructing industrial scale solar power plants. Due to this restriction, many existing solar power plants use stainless steels because of the combination of low cost and appropriate mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. In this research project, two different stainless steels (UNS S30400 and UNS S31600) and a carbon steel, i.e., UNS G10180, were tested at 450, 550, & 700°C under a NaCl-KCl-MgCl₂ salt eutectic. DC electrochemical techniques were utilized to characterize the corrosion behavior of these steels. The morphology of attack was determined using optical and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). X-ray diffraction was used to characterize the corrosion products formed on the surface of the substrate. Based on these results, inferences were drawn on the corrosion resistance of these particular alloys.

Development of A Zero Carbon-Footprint Desalination System
Time:
2:15PM
Location:
15-2907

Christopher Thomas, Stephanie Osorio, Christian Mui. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Ali Sharbat

Synopsis: Flow rate tests were conducted on a PV-ED (Photovoltaic Electro-Dialysis) desalination system to quantify and relate flow rate and product batch production time.

Abstract: The dependability and shortage of clean drinking water has been a principal concern for many countries around the world. The current impact of California's severe drought and droughts around the world has left us seeking alternative ways to account for our water shortages. A great alternative to traditional water purification methods is solar powered brackish water desalination. In multiple areas where freshwater is deficient, brackish water is a readily available and a viable alternative. By using solar powered desalination systems, it is possible to harness brackish water and convert it to clean purified drinking water. Along with producing purified water, solar powered desalination provides a cost effective method of tapping into brackish water resources while minimizing the carbon impact on our environment. The viability of solar powered desalination systems is evaluated by observing the cost of product water, salt removal rate, system capacity, price of system, recovery rate, power source type, and the efficiency of the desalination process. This project uses photovoltaic powered electro-dialysis (PV-ED) due to its ability to control flow rate of the system, which is dependent on the amount of solar energy that is captured. Preliminary flow rate data suggests the correlation between increasing flow rate and decreasing product water time.

Energy-Based Design Method For Seismic Isolators In Highway Bridges
Time:
2:30PM
Location:
15-2907

Nathan Jo. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Giuseppe Lomiento

Synopsis: Energy-based design is a novel methodology for the design of seismic isolators in highway bridges. This method overcomes the limitations of traditional design methods.

Abstract: Traditional force-based and displacement-based methods for the design of seismic isolation systems uses simplifying assumptions to account for the nonlinear behavior of seismic isolators. This results in inaccurate predictions of the structures response during earthquakes. As an alternative to overcome the limitations of traditional methods, energy can be set as the main criterion in the design of seismic isolators. In this study, an energy-based design method is applied to a seismic isolation system to include the nonlinear behavior of seismic isolators; thus, simplified assumptions to predict the force-displacement demand on the structure are avoided. This method is applied to a four-span highway bridge with seismic isolators atop the three columns and at the abutments. A set of nonlinear structural analyses is performed through computer software to assess the abilities of the traditional versus energy-based design methods to accurately predict the response of the structure during earthquakes. Based on the analyzed cases, the proposed energy-based design method resulted with more accurate predictions in force and displacement demands than traditional methods did. The proposed method also effectively confines all plastic deformations into the seismic isolators while the columns and deck remain elastic and undamaged.

Enhanced Seismic Protection of Oil Rigs
Time:
2:45PM
Location:
15-2907

Zabdiel Garcia. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Giuseppe Lomiento

Synopsis: The base connection design of oil rigs is modified to provide seismic isolation aimed at preventing damages and loss of functionality after large near-fault earthquakes.

Abstract: Despite being designed for seismic loads, Alaskan oil rigs are susceptible to damages after large near-fault earthquakes. Buckling of lateral bracing and permanent column yielding could occur, which would result in unwanted use interruptions, and would pose considerable risk to the surrounding environment. In order to prevent damages, an enhanced level of seismic protection can be provided by modifying base connections into flat friction seismic isolators. The proposed design also includes viscoelastic lateral bracing, aimed at providing recentering capability to the structure and additional seismic energy dissipation. Full nonlinear time-history analyses were performed to validate this solution. Results confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed solution in reducing base shear and axial forces in columns and diagonal braces, thus avoiding damages in the oil rig structure.

Energy Mapping for Seismic Design of Structures
Time:
3:00PM
Location:
15-2907

Elie Hasso. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Giuseppe Lomiento

Synopsis: Energy mapping is proposed as a supplemental tool for energy based design of highway bridges in seismic regions.

Abstract: Energy-based design is a recent alternative to traditional force-based and displacement-based design. The use of energy analysis overcomes the unavoidable simplifying assumptions made in traditional methods, which result in inaccurate estimations of the nonlinear, cyclical seismic forces that structures are subjected to. By utilizing energy as the basis for design, structural elements may be sized to redistribute energy within the structure, thus preventing undesired damages from occurring during major seismic events. State-of-the-art energy methods rely on iterative procedures for the sizing of structural elements. In this study, energy mapping is proposed as a design tool that supplements the iterative procedures. This method is applied to two variations of a four-span highway bridge: one with seismic isolation atop columns and abutments, the other without. By utilizing computer software to perform nonlinear structural analysis on the two systems, it is possible to compare the differences between energy dissipation as a result of seismic isolators and the lack thereof. The comparison is displayed by means of an "energy map" of each structure. The use of isolation results in plastic behavior of the lead-rubber isolators while allowing the columns and deck to remain within the range of desirable elastic behavior. The unisolated variation, however, utilizes the energy capacity of the columns and deck to dissipate the energy created by ground motion; effectively yielding the critical structural members at localized points and crippling their initial energy capacity.

Probabilistic HR Diagrams: A New Infrared and X-ray Chronometer for Very Young, Massive Stellar Clusters and Associations
Time:
3:30PM
Location:
15-2907

Jessica Maldonado. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Matthew Povich

Synopsis: Using Spectral Energy Distributions to learn about the stellar characteristics and constrain the ages of young star forming regions.

Abstract: We present a novel method for constraining the duration of star formation in very young, massive star-forming regions. Constraints on stellar population ages are derived from probabilistic HR diagrams (pHRDs) generated by fitting stellar model spectra to the infrared (IR) spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of Herbig Ae/Be stars and their less-evolved, pre-main sequence progenitors. Stellar samples for the pHRDs are selected based on the detection of X-ray emission associated with the IR source, and the lack of detectible IR excess emission at wavelengths ≤4.5 µm. The SED model fits were used to create two-dimensional probability distributions of the stellar parameters, specifically bolometric luminosity versus temperature and mass versus evolutionary age. We present first results from the pHRD analysis of the relatively evolved Carina Nebula and the unevolved M17 SWex infrared dark cloud, which reveal the expected, strikingly different star formation durations between these two regions. In the future, we will apply this method to analyze available X-ray and IR data from the MYStIX project on other Galactic massive star forming regions within 3kpc of the Sun.

Repeatability Performance Evaluation of RTK and VRS Positioning Networks: A Case Study on the Cal Poly Pomona Campus
Time:
3:45PM
Location:
15-2907

Rudy Mislang. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Omar E. Mora and Mr. Allan Ng

Synopsis: A study to evaluate the performance in position repeatability between VRS and RTK systems on the Cal Poly Pomona campus.

Abstract: Real-Time Kinematic (RTK) positioning with Global Positioning System (GPS) is an important surveying and mapping technique used today. The repeatability/precision of RTK positioning is an important component of why it is consistently used. Recently, interest has grown and the use of Virtual Reference Station (VRS) networks have become common, if available. VRS networks use GPS data from Continuously Operating Reference Stations (CORS) that are continuously connected and generating real time corrections to improve the precision of three dimensional positioning. As a result, the networks create a VRS a few meters from the rover location together with corrections. The rover uses the corrections from the VRS as if they were coming from a real reference station. In this study, a test is proposed to evaluate the performance of the VRS system covering the Cal Poly Pomona campus that is used to acquire high accuracy positioning. In particular, we will focus on the repeatability of the vertical component, which is the least accurate, being 2 to 3 times worse than the horizontal element. To determine the repeatability of VRS and RTK positioning a comparison will be performed between the observed data for both techniques. The analysis will evaluate the difference between the two statistically to determine if the repeatability of the observed positions using the VRS and RTK systems are within the allowed surveying and mapping practice tolerance.

Analysis of National Bridge Inventory (NBI) Data for California Bridges
Time:
4:00PM
Location:
15-2907

Emily Yu. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Rosa Vasconez, PE, LEED AP

Synopsis: Trends and correlations will be drawn from data analysis and statistical comparisons of the National Bridge Inventory, primarily focused on bridges in Southern California counties.

Abstract: The National Bridge Inventory (NBI), managed by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), is an untapped source of data that accounts for all the bridges and tunnels that are more than 20 feet in length within the United States. It records significant data regarding bridge properties which include: roadway classification, geographic location, age, material, structure type and others. Although the data has been studied briefly in some research, in depth analysis for specific states has not been performed. The objective of this research is to understand the NBI data structure and its limitations; retrieve, organize, and analyze bridge data, and provide meaningful information on bridge properties and performance. This research will focus on bridges in California, with an emphasis in Southern California counties around and including Los Angeles such as Kern, Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Diego, and Ventura counties. Trends and correlations will be drawn from data analysis and statistical comparisons. It is expected that a correlation between bridge performance and its properties will be established. Relationships between bridge performance in California in terms of strength and serviceability will also be examined. The data for this analysis is provided by the NBI, which is available through the FHWA website, the National Bridges website, which is an online database search engine that is based on data from the NBI and information from the Department of Transportation for each state, and the Department of Transportation website.

Discovering Massive Runaway Stars with Infrared Bow Shock Nebulae: First Results
Time:
4:15PM
Location:
15-2907

Julian Andrews. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Matthew Povich

Synopsis: We have found new massive runaway stars in the Milky Way using a new method.

Abstract: We have searched the plane of the Milky Way for candidate 22 μm and 24 μm infrared bow shock nebulae using the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) All-Sky Data Release and Spitzer GLIMPSE mosaic images. Infrared bow shocks driven by massive, OB stars can provide new constraints on stellar mass-loss rates and reveal new runaway late O- and early B-type stars. Candidate infrared bow shocks identified in this search were chosen using the criteria of a mostly symmetric arc-like morphology with the arc being bright in only 22 or 24 μm along with an apparent driving star associated with the bow shock in line with its axis of symmetry. Preliminary visible spectroscopic observations of candidate bow shock driving stars obtained using the Longslit Spectrograph at the Wyoming Infrared Observatory (WIRO) reveal that these visual inspections yield a 95% success rate of finding late O- or early B-type stars.

Electrospun Polyvinylidene Membranes for Direct Contact Membrane Distillation
Time:
1:00PM
Location:
15-2913

James Roska, Patrick Hogan, Harjot Gill, Gevork Kazaryan Jeremy Mortrud. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Keith Forward

Synopsis: Use of free surface electrospun Polyvinylidene membranes for direct contact membrane distillation as an alternative to water purification.

Abstract: One percent of the Earth's total supply of fresh water is potable and accessible to humans, and in order to increase the amount of potable water it has to be purified from non-potable sources. The use of current technologies such as osmosis, filtration, and distillation support the production of purified water; however, direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) has the potential to become a competitive, alternative method. The current process for manufacturing DCMD membranes is inefficient, expensive, and poorly optimized; resulting in limited industrialization and waste. A proposed alternative is fabricating the membranes through the means of free surface electrospinning, allowing for the control of desirable properties such as pore size (1 - 3 μm) and membrane thickness (50 - 400 μm). In this study, we produced DCMD membranes from a polymeric solution containing 22 wt% Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVdF) in Dimethylacetamide (DMAc). The free surface electrospinning setup consisted of a solution bath with a partially submerged rotating wire spindle. A voltage of 40 kV was applied to the wire spindle. The induced electric field caused charge to accumulate on the surface of the entrained solution, leading to the formation of electrohydrodynamic jets. Electrospinning experiments were performed in an environment with relative humidity ranging from 65-80 RH%. In the presence of high humidity, water absorbs into the polymeric jet causing the PVDF to phase separate prematurely, creating a larger fiber diameter. The gelled fibers were collected on a grounded rotating drum and left at room conditions to solidify. The performance of the produced membranes was evaluated using an in-house built DCMD apparatus.

Triboelectrific Charging of Insulators
Time:
1:15PM
Location:
15-2913

Andy Quan, Jennifer Lopez, Sam White, Cynthia Montanez. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Keith Forward

Synopsis: Study of humidity and material selection on the electrostatic phenomenon called triboelectrification.

Abstract: Triboelectric charging is a natural phenomenon, evident in a wide range of occurrences including volcanic lightning and grain silo explosions, that can adversely affect manufacturing processes. Electrical charge is transferred when two material surfaces contact and separate from each other. Currently, the mechanisms and variables that affect triboelectrification are poorly understood. Three mechanisms: electron, ion, and mass transfer, are believed to be responsible for the charge transfer. Variables such as relative humidity and material selection contribute to the sign and magnitude of charging that transpires. To investigate these variables and the mechanisms responsible, particles (300-800 μm) were gravitationally driven through a spiraled insulator tube (ID 1.5 mm). The tube was held in a controlled chamber with adjustable humidity and pressure. The rate of charge accumulation was recorded as the particles traversed through the copper Faraday tube. The charged particles were collected in a Faraday cup, and the total accumulated charge on each particle was calculated. Two types of particles (soda lime glass, polystyrene) and tubing (Nylon, Teflon) were studied due to their inherently different hydrophilicities and partial charges. This procedure was performed at various humidities to isolate the role of relative humidity. The study aims to determine the effects that humidity and material selection have on triboelectrification as well as to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms responsible for triboelectric charging of insulators.

Free Surface Electrospinning of Microemulsions Containing Vitamin E
Time:
1:30PM
Location:
15-2913

Jeremy Lewis, Anh Lam, Grace Machado, Michelle Miner, Cuong Nguyen. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Keith Forward

Synopsis: Approximately 90% of APIs exhibit poor bioavailability because of poor solubility. We use free surface electrospinning to improve bioavailability and solubility.

Abstract: An estimated 90% of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) in research and development are poorly soluble or insoluble in water. These APIs exhibit poor bioavailability in solid dosage forms due to their poor solubility. In order to increase the release rate of APIs, free surface electrospinning of a microemulsion was used as means to produce submicron size domains of API dispersed in an amorphous excipient. Microemulsions containing vitamin E, a poorly soluble API, Kolliphor EL, a surfactant, and a mixture of Polyvinylpyrrolidone and Polyethylene Glycol, excipients, are electrospun to produce highly porous nanofibers with high surface area, which promotes rapid drug release. Turbidity measurements served as a test of the stability of microemulsions, and was used to standardize the procedure for preparing the microemulsion. The amount of API used in the microemulsions and its effect on product encapsulation was examined. The applied potential and working distance of the electrospinning process and how they each affect the product were also investigated The electrospun nanofibers were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and high performance liquid chromatography to determine the morphology of the fibers and the bioavailability of the final material. The fibers contained significant amounts of Vitamin E encapsulated within the excipients, and release rates were significantly improved over commercial products. This technique can be utilized to streamline the downstream production of pharmaceuticals, which would result in lower operating costs and improved uniformity over current batch manufacturing processes.

Particle and Bulk level Characterization of Pharmaceutical Powders
Time:
1:45PM
Location:
15-2913

Derek Havel, Sabrina Schnakenberg, Donald Tran, Matthew Lopez, Elizabeth Arciga, Vincent Moya, Mitchell Moon, Josh Harris, Domingo De La Cruz, Amy Eisenbeisz. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Laila Jallo

Synopsis: Microscopic and bulk tests were conducted to determine the effect of coating on pharmaceutical powders.

Abstract: In the pharmaceutical industry, the flowability of a powder is an important consideration when producing a capsule or a tablet. Powders that have low or non-uniform flowability can aggregate and cause complications when ingested. Coating the powders with nanoparticles can alter their characteristics to eliminate these complications. The powders examined in this study were ibuprofen and ascorbic acid in combination with either a hydrophobic or hydrophilic coating. The particles were coated using a rotator that mixes the particles with silica coating and a milling machine that coats the particles. Coated corn starch was also examined and provided a control group for comparison. The flowability was quantified by measuring both the bulk density and the tap density of the powder with a hydrophobic or hydrophilic coating. Electrostatic testing was used to measure the effect the coating has on charge accumulation by the powders when it is being transported. Typical manufacturing materials like stainless steel, glass, and Teflon were used to simulate real world situations.

Concentration Polarization in Industrial Reverse Osmosis Desalination
Time:
2:15PM
Location:
15-2913

Thanh Bui, Steven Chao. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Mingheng Li

Synopsis: The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of feed spacer on hydrodynamics and concentration polarization in an industrial reverse osmosis system.

Abstract: Concentration polarization is an inherent problem in reverse osmosis (RO) which accelerates membrane fouling and reduces water flux in industrial water desalination. An accurate model capable of quantifying concentration polarization in RO modules under plant operating conditions is essential for optimizing water recovery. In this work, hydrodynamics and mass transfer characteristics of an industrial RO feed channel are investigated using coupled three-dimensional computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations with a detailed spacer geometry. Existence of feed spacer remarkably changes hydrodynamics and mass transfer in a RO channel. Significantly accelerated wall-parallel velocity, which occurs in restricted flow region between the membrane surfaces and opposing spacer filaments, suppresses solute boundary layer development. Rolling cells that are formed due to flow separation upon spacer filaments help to promote transverse mixing. Salt deposition in spacer-filled channel occurs in areas immediately adjacent to spacer filaments, where flow is relatively stagnant. Profile of local mass transfer coefficient km is repeated from cell to cell in obstructed feed channel and the cell-average km remains fairly constant in cells adjacent to one another. It is also found that mass transfer coefficient decreases longitudinally. As a result, the effects of concentration polarization on transmembrane water flux are substantially diminished in obstructed channel as compared to unobstructed channel. Concentration polarization is alleviated by spacer filaments at the cost of drastically increased pressure drop along the feed channel due to greater flow resistance. This work shows the necessity of spacer inclusion in development of reliable CFD models for optimizing RO desalination systems.

A Kinetic Study of (3-oxo-3-phenyl-1-propen-1-yl)-Ferrocene: A Chalcone Derivative
Time:
2:30PM
Location:
15-2913

Pablo Unzueta. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Francis Flores

Synopsis: Kinetics of a ferrocenyl chalcone were observed using UV/Vis spectrscopy at a constant temperature under psuedo-first order conditions.

Abstract: The ferrocenyl chalcone (3-oxo-3-phenyl-1-propen-1-yl)-Ferrocene and its derivatives (3-Nitro, 4-Nitro, 3-Methyl, 4-Methyl, 3-Methoxy, 4-Methoxy, 3-Bromo, 4-Bromo), were synthesized using the Claisen-Schmidt reaction. The products were then characterized using NMR, IR, and UV/Vis spectroscopy. These ferrocenyl chalcones were then reacted with varying concentrations of potassium hydroxide to study the reaction kinetics under pseudo-first order conditions. The progress of the reaction was monitored with UV/Vis spectroscopy at a constant 25℃ for 9 hours. Curve fit analysis was performed to determine the k(obsd) at different concentrations and were then plotted to obtain the rate constant.

The Hidden Epidemic in Our Mind
Time:
2:45PM
Location:
15-2913

Hsien-Te Kao. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jennifer Switkes

Synopsis: Studying quantitatively the persistent formation of binary human perspective using mathematical epidemic modeling.

Abstract: We are constantly making decisions every single day, and the majority of our decisions are affected by our preferences, likes or dislikes. A decision is the internal process of determining our perspective toward an idea, and a response is the external behaviors associated with the decision. Human preference is the process that analyzes the strength between likes and dislikes and concludes a dominating preference. Human perspective mimics similar behaviors in dominating preference where human perspective is the result of human preference. When likes and dislikes are unbalanced, either likes or dislikes with stronger strength will generate a dominating preference. Our preferences are also affected by others' preferences when it is common that others give their opinions or we ask other people for their opinions on an idea. When the decision has influences from others, the strength of your likes and dislikes can increase or decrease by others' responses, and your decision will be affected by others' dominating preferences. Human perspective can be viewed as an infectious disease where people are affected by both positive and negative influences created by others' dominating preferences toward an idea. With the positive and negative influences from others, the person can develop two possible perspectives to an idea: positive and negative. Based on the connection between perspective and response, we can predict a person's perspective toward an idea in respect to their response. The persistence of human perspective can be modeled using mathematical modeling and epidemiological concepts on the spread and durability of binary responses.

Diffusion Model of Aluminide Coatings
Time:
3:00PM
Location:
15-2913

Sutine Sujittosakul, Elvin Sepanosian, Micheal Huluf. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Vilupanur Ravi

Synopsis: A computer model for the diffusion of aluminum into steel was successfully developed. Coating thickness and aluminum concentration profiles were predicted for different coating parameters.

Abstract: Materials that can withstand corrosive environments at increasingly high temperatures and harsh conditions are needed for allowing higher operating efficiencies. Halide Activated Pack Cementation (HAPC) is one such coating method which mitigates the effects of corrosion by forming a protective oxide layer. The HAPC method creates a hard, corrosion-resistant, diffusional coating on the substrate of a softer metallic material through chemical reactions that occur in a "pack" consisting of inert filler (typically aluminum oxide), a master alloy (aluminum in this study) and a halide activator. In this study, the solid state diffusion of aluminum into stainless steel substrates was modeled using a popular computing environment. UNS S30400 austenitic stainless steel was aluminized for various times at 650°C, 750°C and 850°C. Samples were cross-sectioned for analysis by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy coupled with scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS).The coating thickness for each layer was measured and concentration profiles were determined. The Boltzmann-Matano method was applied to each concentration profile to determine the diffusion coefficients of aluminum in the coating and substrate phases assuming a semi-infinite substrate. This model can be utilized to predict coating thickness, the aluminum concentration profile and phases in the coating at 850°C as a function of time.

Effects of chromium diffusion in aluminized nickel chromium alloys
Time:
3:30PM
Location:
15-2913

Karyna Banuelos. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Vilupanur Ravi

Synopsis: The effect of chromium in aluminized Ni-Cr alloys was investigated in order to understand the mechanisms that create the resulting corrosion-resistant coatings.

Abstract: Metallic alloys are often degraded when used in corrosive, high temperature environments such as in gas turbines or nuclear power plants. To mitigate these effects, the surface of the existing alloy can be modified through the halide-activated pack cementation method by applying a coating that contains the elements to form a protective oxide layer. In this study, pure nickel and nickel-chromium alloys were utilized as the substrates, with aluminum as the coating element. The goal of this study was to investigate the role of chromium in promoting or inhibiting aluminum diffusion. Results show that the chromium content of the alloy has a significant effect on the microstructure of the coating. Microstructural analysis using Scanning Electron Microscopy coupled with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) show chromium-rich particles near the coating-substrate interface. These particles are present throughout the coating in a zone that gets thicker as the chromium content of the alloy increases. In addition, as the percentage of chromium increases within these particles, that of nickel decreases sharply while the aluminum content remains fairly constant. This suggests that the addition of chromium inhibits the outward diffusion of nickel during aluminization. Coupons will further be studied using image analysis software to determine the fraction of chromium-rich areas in the coating.

Corrosion Behavior of Coated and Uncoated Nickel and Stainless Steel in PEM Fuel Cell Environments
Time:
3:45PM
Location:
15-2913

Miguel Reyes. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Vilupanur Ravi

Synopsis: The corrosion behavior of stainless steels and nickel were determined in fuel cell environments for power generation applications.

Abstract: Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells are being developed for both stationary and portable power applications. Although PEM fuel cells have been in development for a while, there are still many issues before they can be made affordable and durable. One of these issues is in the materials selection for the bipolar plates that are exposed to both anodic and cathodic regions. Typically these plates are made out of graphite composites because of their high corrosion resistance and low contact resistance but their mechanical behavior (brittleness) and gas permeability in addition to cost issues have made this materials choice a problematic one. Metallic materials have been tried for this application with notable problems including the formation of passive oxide films which, while advantageous for corrosion resistance, is detrimental because of high contact resistance. One potential solution being considered for this issue is to coat metallic substrates to obtain corrosion protection while maintaining contact resistance. In this project, the corrosion behavior of aluminized UNS S30400 and UNS N02200 (Ni 200) as well as the uncoated substrates were studied in a simulated PEM fuel cell environment using DC electrochemical techniques. The aluminization was carried out using a halide activated pack cementation (HAPC) coating process. PEM conditions were simulated using an aqueous solution of 3.5 wt % sodium sulfate 60°C. Contact resistance was measured before and after electrochemical testing using a four-point probe. A ranking of the corrosion rates of materials in this PEM environment accompanied by relevant discussions will be presented.

Electrochemical Evaluation of Advanced Titanium Alloys in Simulated Physiological Environments
Time:
4:00PM
Location:
15-2913

Kevin Robles, Jackie Medina, Luan Nguyen, Ruby Rodriguez, Shay McCarthy. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Vilupanur Ravi

Synopsis: The purpose of this project is to compare the corrosion behavior of advanced titanium alloys in simulated physiological environments through DC electrochemical testing techniques.

Abstract: Modern structural biomedical implants are made from titanium alloys due to their excellent corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. Currently Ti-6Al-4V (Ti64) is the most commonly used structural implant material. This study was motivated by the need for longer-lasting implant alloys because of increasing life expectancy of patients and the need to avoid revision surgery. Moreover, Ti64 releases metal ions into the body, which are associated with neurological disorders, inflammation, pain, and loosening of the implant. The purpose of this project is to quantitatively compare the corrosion behavior of candidate titanium alloys, i.e., Ti-6Al-7Nb (Ti67), Ti-35Zr-10Nb (Ti3510), commercially pure titanium with and without boron (CPTi and CPTi+B), and Ti64 with and without boron. By having elastic moduli closer to that of human bone, Ti67 and Ti3510 can better redistribute mechanical stresses to the surrounding bone and thus minimize stress shielding. Previous studies in this group have shown that small additions of boron to CPTi and Ti64 increase the hardness and reduce the rate of corrosion compared to the parent alloys. Cyclic potentiodynamic polarization scans based on the ASTM F2129 test protocol were conducted in simulated physiological environments consisting of deaerated, body-temperature electrolytic solutions.

Laboratory Simulation of Marine Corrosion of Metallic Alloys
Time:
4:15PM
Location:
15-2913

Gamer Margoosian. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Vilupanur Ravi

Synopsis: A salt fog chamber was successfully setup with capabilities for simulating marine atmospheres in accordance with industry standards. Metallic alloys were exposed to this environment.

Abstract: There is an ongoing need in the marine industry for metals that withstand the harsh, salt-rich environment of sea water and air. Boron-containing titanium alloys were recently developed to improve the mechanical properties of titanium alloys. However, the corrosion behavior of these new alloys in marine environments is not fully understood. In this project, the effect of boron on the corrosion performance of titanium alloys is being studied. The boron contents of these titanium alloys range from less than 0.001 to 1.09 wt% boron. The alloys are ground to an 800 grit finish using standard metallographic procedures. The salt fog chamber has been setup and will be utilized according to the ASTM B117 standard. The alloys will be tested at 35⁰C in an environment of salt fog containing 5 wt% NaCl for a duration of 1 week, 2 weeks, and 3 weeks. The alloys will be placed at an angle between 15 and 30 degrees from the vertical. Photographs and mass measurements of the alloys will be taken before and after testing to evaluate the corrosion damage (if any). The extent of corrosion of the alloys will be determined by visual inspection of the surfaces as well as comparisons of mass loss.

Detecting Physical Plant Defects using Aerial Imagery
Time:
12:45PM
Location:
Grand Reading Room

Paul Navarro. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Subodh Bhandari

Synopsis: Unmanned aerial vehicles and their use in the agricultural field for smart surveying of crops using image processing.

Abstract: Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) have many applications in this day and age, the applications for UAVs is to help make everyday life easier for society. This research about (UAV) applications is designed to benefit the agricultural field. UAVs with a camera attached and equipped with a code to process images can survey fields for the farmers detecting which crops need more care. With this idea research will be done as to which light spectrum gives the best feedback for detecting plant defects in the crop. The experiment will be carried out with a plant with a set defect, a camera that can see in all portions of the light spectrum, and an image processing code. The most efficient light spectrum is dependent on if the defect was detected and what percentage of the defects were found through image processing. Lastly, this research is intended to set the ground rule of which portion of the light spectrum is most efficient in detecting physical plant defects.

Prandtl-M Trajectory Analysis for High Altitude Balloon Drop Test
Time:
1:00PM
Location:
Grand Reading Room

Nathaniel Falwell, Daniel Boebinger, Christopher Kuba. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Subodh Bhandari

Synopsis: Research done on the validity of the Prandtl-M glider for use on Mars through the trajectory prediction of a high altitude balloon drop test.

Abstract: This presentation talks about the trajectory analysis performed for the unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) designed to operate in the Martian environment. The goal was to analyze the trajectory of the UAV named Preliminary Research Aerodynamic Design to Land on Mars (Prandtl-M) after it is launched from a high altitude balloon (HAB). Since the UAV's and their performances cannot be tested on the Mars itself, it becomes imperative to test these vehicles and their trajectory in the earth' atmosphere where the temperature and density are similar to that found in the Martian atmosphere. At an altitude of 110,000 feet, the earth's atmosphere is similar to that of Mars. The goal of the ongoing research at Cal Poly Pomona that is funded by NASA is to perform the trajectory analysis of the Prandtl-M after it is released from a HAB at an altitude of 110,000 feet to simulate what the trajectory of the vehicle will be when it is released from the spacecraft in the Martian atmosphere for missions that will include exploration of Mars as well as a scout mission for potential human exploration. In order for the aircraft to safely transfer from a nose-down free-fall after it is released from the balloon to a controlled horizontal flight, the optimum flight path was determined using the aircraft dynamics analyzed in MATLAB®. The optimal flight path ensures adequate speed and altitude for the test and ensures the Prandtl-M will not be damaged by the maneuver. The presentation will show the simulation results. Future work will include, in collaboration with NASA Armstrong, releasing the aircraft from a balloon and flying the aircraft to the launch site autonomously.

Autonomous Path Planning System for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles
Time:
1:15PM
Location:
Grand Reading Room

Isaac Guzman. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Subodh Bhandari

Synopsis: To research how accurate ADS-B sensors will detect position to create real time collision avoidance in unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs).

Abstract: An Autonomous Path Planning System for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) or drones is crucial for UAVs to be commercially integrated into the National Airspace System (NAS). The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) demands highly accurate Path Planning Systems in autonomy for UAVs to be safe to fly in the NAS. With the use of Automatic Dependent Surveillance - Broadcast (ADS-B) sensor “in” and “out”, the position and velocity of the UAVs can be transmitted in real time. The ADS-B sensor “out” will allow UAVs to communicate with surrounding aircraft and neighboring ground stations, allowing for relative position and velocity data to be processed. This is crucial for collision detection and avoidance between UAVs in flight. The expected result will be a complete mathematical model of the aircraft that will be used for developing an obstacle avoidance algorithm for the UAV. This research will increase the level of UAV autonomy by allowing a more reliable and economical path planning system for the UAV to operate in the NAS.

Human Exploration of Phobos and Deimos: Robotic Precursor Measurements
Time:
1:30PM
Location:
Grand Reading Room

Shannen Acedillo. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Alexander Rudolph

Synopsis: We identified specific robotic precursor measurements required to fill Strategic Knowledge Gaps for future human missions to the moons of Mars, Phobos and Deimos.

Abstract: NASA and other private companies are planning Mars exploration strategies that will enable the human Journey to Mars. This opens up an opportunity to integrate the exploration of Phobos and Deimos, the moons of Mars. Exploring these moons would be very beneficial, enabling teleoperation on the Martian surface or even demonstrating human exploration technologies. However, there remains a number of unknowns concerning Phobos and Deimos, otherwise known as Strategic knowledge gaps; these can be addressed through robotic precursor missions. This has been considered in previous studies, but the planning lacks the specific measurements needed to fill the gaps. An initial list was derived from, but not limited to, the Mars Exploration Program Analysis Group and NASA's Office of Planetary Protection. The various lists were then compiled, updated, and quantified where ever possible. These precursor measurements are then formatted similar to the NASA Science Traceability Matrix structure to ensure an easy transition into any unique mission plan. From this research, there is a total of more than 30 parameters that need to be found. For example, the surface properties are important to survey before further exploration. Some measurements to aid this knowledge gap would be to understand the chemical composition of the surface and levitating particles, and also to determine the particles' grain size distribution. Other parameters include the toxicity, compressibility, and macroporosity of the regolith, which an important factor when conducting extravehicular activities. Identifying this list of unknowns now, is an important gateway to the future of human Mars exploration.

Failure Criteria of FDM-Printed Parts
Time:
1:45PM
Location:
Grand Reading Room

Lilliana Ochoa. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Mehrdad Haghi

Synopsis: This research project analyzes how raster angle and part size affect the maximum strain, ultimate tensile strength, and Young's modulus of FDM-printed parts.

Abstract: Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) is an additive manufacturing process in which molten filament of ABS (or other polymers) is deposited in a crisscross manner resulting in FDM-printed parts with anisotropic properties. Failure modes of FDM printed parts have been researched by previous students under Dr. Haghi, mainly focusing on the influence of raster orientation on ultimate tensile strength, maximum strain before failure, and Young's modulus of small ABS parts. In addition, small ABS and large polycarbonate tensile specimens were studied to research the edge effects experienced in FDM-printed parts. What remains to be tested further is the comparison of small ABS parts with large ABS parts in order to help clarify the influence of cross-section size on edge effects. The purpose of this research project is to establish further understanding of failure modes of small FDM printed parts, specifically edge effects in small ABS parts, and why there are significant changes in ultimate tensile strength and Young's modulus trends between 40 degree and 50 degree raster angles. Tensile testing of FDM-printed tensile specimens will be done to get data for UTS, maximum strain, and Young's modulus, and finite element analysis will be done for CAD models to analyze the predicted failure. The goal of this research is to establish a size guideline for edge effects to be negligible. In addition, determining the raster angle at which the sharp drop in UTS and maximum strain occur can help determine which raster orientation angles would be best for FDM-printed parts.

Wind Tunnel Study of the Aerodynamic Effects of Dimples on the Fuselage of an Aircraft
Time:
2:15PM
Location:
Grand Reading Room

Anthony Klaib. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Todd Coburn

Synopsis: The purpose of this study is to analyze the aerodynamic effects of dimples on the fuselage of an aircraft in an effort to reduce drag.

Abstract: The purpose of this study is to analyze the aerodynamic effects of dimples on the fuselage of an aircraft. Due to the large surface area of the fuselage, it contributes considerably to the overall drag of the aircraft. Previous studies have shown that dimples can reduce the overall drag of a body significantly; however, there have been no applications of dimples to an aircraft fuselage. By modeling an aircraft fuselage using a 3-D CAD program, a CFD analysis can be conducted to select an ideal dimpling pattern that results in the largest drag reduction. Using a 3-D printer, two aircraft models will be made: one without dimples and a second one with dimples. These two models will be subjected to a wind tunnel test in order to determine the coefficients of drag, lift, and pitching moment. Comparing the data from the two models would reveal if the dimpling caused any drag reduction.

Developing Bi-directional Charging Functions for Electric Vehicles
Time:
2:30PM
Location:
Grand Reading Room

Travon Dent. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Ha Le

Synopsis: Design and construct a circuit and power flow system to transfer power from an electric vehicle to homes for consumption.

Abstract: Electric Vehicles (EV) are increasingly adopted by consumers in the U.S. and around the world. However, the EV draw lots of power from supply feeders for charging, leading to increased power losses in the power lines and depressed feeder voltages. The EV charging also interferes with normal operation of other motor-based equipment such as residential appliances. This study seeks a solution to mitigate the EV adverse impacts while improving its value for the owners. Specifically, the study investigates a technique to enable bi-directional charging (i.e. both charge and discharge) functions for the vehicles using AC-DC-AC converters. These functions can create additional benefits for the EV owners. They can make use of the EV battery power for running other appliances when desired, such as for camping trips. The bi-directional functions are also useful for the grid as the EV can inject their battery power to support the grid under emergency conditions.

Computer Vision Real-Time Hazard Detection in High-Power Rockets using Raspberry Pi
Time:
2:45PM
Location:
Grand Reading Room

Dean Coco. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Zekeriya Aliyazicioglu

Synopsis: The design of a low-cost portable real-time hazard detection system for the decent of high-power rockets using a raspberry pi, camera, and OpenCV software.

Abstract: In this project I am designing a real-time hazard detection system for use during the decent of high-power rockets with the use of computer vision and a ground station. Computer vision has become increasingly popular in recent years with image recognition techniques being applied to a variety of applications from automated toll systems [1] to seed germination detection [2]. A common issue to arise in the application of computer vision is the high cost of host computers, image processing software, and the system's portability capabilities. This project aims to offer an alternative low cost and portable system using a raspberry pi mini-computer, raspberry pi camera module, OpencV library and a pair of XBee transceivers. With already established image recognition techniques in OpenCV, I will test different scripts to be run in the Linux OS and analyze which image recognition techniques are most compatible with the given region's environment. This includes the objects, textures, and colors that appear in the region's landscape. The key functions of the proposed system is: 1) capture and ready an image for processing, 2) process the image for any potential hazards, and 3) relay any detected hazards to a ground station with their representing image. Through the success of the project, related applications can further the research by utilizing the system to accomplish the task of moving the high-power rocket away from the ground hazards.

Hibiscus Stained Dye Sensitized Solar Cells
Time:
3:00PM
Location:
Grand Reading Room

Kathleen Bishop, Paul Fizer, Dabin Kim, Phuong Huynh, Adriel De Jesus, Alejandro Navarro, Nader Majzoub. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jonathan Puthoff

Synopsis: This project investigates the properties of dye sensitized solar cells that have been designed using a hibiscus dye.

Abstract: The use of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) is a novel approach to solar panel design. DSSCs are photovoltaic cells that incorporate a semiconductor thin film photosensitized with a plant-based dye. These cells have several advantages over their silicon-based counterparts, including higher efficiency, lower cost, semi-transparency, and (potentially) flexibility. The objective of this project was to construct and test DSSCs of consisting of titania films sensitized by anthocyanins obtained from a hibiscus flowers. Multiple cells were combined in an electric circuit to charge a battery. Voltage and amperage across individual cells and cells in a circuit were recorded in outdoor and indoor environments during both summer and winter. The finished cells maintain a potential of 0.3-0.5 V under various conditions, although the maximum voltage obtained from an individual cell was approximately 2 V. When testing the cells in series, the maximum potential was about 1.4 V across 3 cells. Efforts are underway to increase cell productivity by minimizing the inherent loss of voltage during the 'recharging' of the dye and decreasing electrical resistance in the assembly, all while maintaining the capabilities of the liquid electrolyte. Further materials and device design efforts are necessary to mitigate these issues and optimize this procedure for creating functional dye-sensitized solar panels.

Development of Ceramic Metal Oxide Membranes By Means of Reactive Electrospinning
Time:
3:30PM
Location:
Grand Reading Room

Brianna Cook, Josh Yamaguchi, Matthew Galazzo, Luke Gibson. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Keith M. Forward

Synopsis: To combat climate change, ceramic metal oxide membranes are produced through reactive electrospinning in order to advance carbon capture storage technology.

Abstract: Experts agree that carbon dioxide is the leading cause of the increase in global warming. To combat global climate change, Carbon Capture and Storage technology has been developed and implemented to reduce the amount of carbon dioxide and other malignant gases in the atmosphere. In efforts to contribute to this avenue of sustainable progress, we aimed to produce ceramic metal oxide membranes via reactive electrospinning with the intention of applying these novel nanofibrous membranes to greenhouse gas capture. Magnesium oxide membranes are considered viable candidates for adsorption processes because they exhibit high surface area, low density, high porosity and resistance to high temperatures and corrosion. The electrospinning solution consisted of 4MDa polyethylene oxide, acetic acid, magnesium methoxide, methanol and dichloromethane. During electrospinning, a voltage of 5-20 kV was applied to the solution in a flow-controlled needle housed in a humidity-controlled chamber. Once critical charge density was reached at the tip of the needle the solution formed a Taylor cone which ejected a continuous jet of magnesium oxide nanofibers. Another solution being pursued is composed of 4 MDa polyacrylic acid which substitutes for the dichloromethane and polyethylene oxide. Experimental data was collected for varying flow rates, supplied voltage, solution composition, substrate concentration and chamber humidity. Infrared spectroscopy followed for analysis of product chemical composition. Fiber diameter and porosity will be measured through Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Ideally, the nanofibers will exhibit a ceramic quality denoted by a visible, consistent rigidity under SEM analysis.

Denitrification Removal Efficiency of Different Media of Surface Water
Time:
3:45PM
Location:
Grand Reading Room

Ana Vargas, Matthew Gonzalez, Robert Bufanda. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Monica Palomo

Synopsis: Denitrification of contaminated surface and groundwater sources via natural treatment systems.

Abstract: Ground water and surface water make up more than half of the nation's drinking water. Due to natural and human activities like fertilizer use, manure application, and single-house septic systems; nitrate pollution has raised concern in California. These nitrogen rich additives eventually reach and contaminate ground and surface water sources. Run off of nitrate and other nutrients into bodies of water result in eutrophication and hypoxia in aquatic environments harming ecosystems beyond repair. Water reclamation of nitrate contaminated basins uses advanced water treatment such as reverse osmosis and ion exchange, energy-intensive processes that produce a significant amount of waste. Due to its feasibility, sustainability, and effectiveness, a natural treatment system such as a biological reactor is an ideal method to naturally reclaim water quality. These bioreactor systems create an environment that facilitates physical, chemical, and biological processes to remove nitrate. The bench-scale system evaluated in this study consisted of passing nitrate contaminated water through beds of woodchips and recycled wood kept under anoxic conditions. The media aide the growth of denitrifying microbes and provide carbon for the conversion of nitrate into nitrogen gas. Effluent samples were collected and tested after a 24-hour period with a targeted retention time of 8.5 hours. Previous research on the matter has shown the effectiveness of woodchip bioreactors. However, this experiment seeks to compare the two media, woodchip and recycled wood, and report which medium has greater nitrate removal capacity. In addition, this study evaluates the effects of varying exogenous carbon concentrations within the influent.

Vision Based Navigation in GPS Denied Environment
Time:
4:00PM
Location:
Grand Reading Room

Amy Phan, Daniel Garcia. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Subodh Bhandari

Synopsis: Using Vision to navigate an UAV in GPS denied environment.

Abstract: The task of guiding autonomous vehicles traditionally depends heavily on GPS. This makes GPS denied navigation a significant problem for autonomous vehicles. Inertial navigation allows for dead reckoning but with a significant compounding error. With the addition of optical navigation, points of interest can be used to increase the accuracy considerably. Optical processing also allows for the addition of mapping to the previously mentioned localization. When combined, this process is called SLAM (Simultaneous, Localization and Mapping). This project focuses on examining the usefulness of Optical Navigation and SLAM algorithms with the Prandtl-m flying wing aircraft. Optical navigation as well as SLAM would allow the plane to navigate and map the surface of mars in the absence of accurate GPS data.

Analysis of Nanofluid Heat Pipe's Thermal Performance
Time:
4:15PM
Location:
Grand Reading Room

Randy Castro, Robert Cameron, Trevor Snay, Nishanth Mahankali. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Maryam Shafahi and Dr. Kevin R. Anderson

Synopsis: Research measured the thermal resistance, velocity, pressure and maximum heat of Nanofluid heat pipes, using Al2O3 (Alumina).

Abstract: Heat pipes and their applications in thermal management have been studied for decades. They are efficient, compact tools that help dissipate substantial amount of heat from various engineering systems. Heat pipes are able to dissipate a substantial amount of heat with a small temperature drop along their length, while providing a self-pumping ability. Nanofluid heat pipes utilize nanofluids as their working fluid. Nanofluids are a relatively new class of fluids which consist of nano-sized particles (1–100 nm) suspended within a base fluid. The nanoparticle utilized in the current research is Al2O3 (Alumina) dissolved in water. Velocity and pressure profiles along with maximum heat, and thermal resistance within the two phases of a cylindrical heat pipe are studied using nanofluid as the working fluid. Early numerical models suggest that small changes to nanofluid concentration and nanoparticle size increase heat pipe thermal conductivity. The results of the numerical model are being verified by experimentation. Validation of thermal resistance decrease for the heat pipes will lead to many new advances in heat pipe applications.

Nanostructures: Conductive Nanofibers
Time:
4:30PM
Location:
Grand Reading Room

Luis Morales. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Yong X. Gan

Synopsis: The manufacturing of composite nanofiber material through electrospinning, in order to achieve a material with a higher heat conductivity and generation.

Abstract: Last year, a student research group conducted a similar research, where a ceramic composite nanofiber was manufactured through electrospinning. The response of the fiber to external electromagnetic field was characterized to observe the heat generation in the fiber. In addition, they also measured the current passing through the fiber under the polarization of DC potential. It was found that the fiber had intensive heating behavior when it was exposed to the electromagnetic field. The temperature increases more than 5 degrees in Celsius scale only after 5 s exposure. The current - potential curve of the fiber reveals its dielectric behavior. It was concluded that the ceramic fiber has the potential to be used for hyperthermia treatment in biomedical engineering or for energy conversions. In my research, we are testing the same research using different ceramic compositions, as well as using soluble metals, in order to achieve a nanofiber with high heat conductivity and generation.

Remember the Roots
Time:
12:45PM
Location:
Sp Collections

Jessica Santos. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Dewey Hall

Synopsis: Often times poetry holds a nature aspect within them, especially during the Romanticism Era. Jessica Santos's "Remember the Roots" explains the significance of nature and industrialization in regards to humankind by analyzing William Blake's poem "The Chimney Sweeper" from Songs of Innocence. Santos does not only note the symbolism Blake uses, but she discusses the unabiding concern he holds that industrialization without care towards nature can harm humankind. Nature offers a necessary relief from industrialization for humankind.

Abstract: Mankind is constantly aiming to expand and advance. At first, mankind attained this ever reaching goal by ignoring the natural world and destroying it. Now, there is a much greater focus on balancing both industrialization and the environment. Yet, during the Romanticism Period of Literature, there were a few individuals who saw the importance of nature and the environmental world. An important voice against mankind's blinded, expansive and destructive tendencies was William Blake. He wrote two outstanding collections of poetry titled Songs of Innocence and Songs of Experience to highlight nature's importance to mankind and mankind's environment. Specifically speaking, "The Chimney Sweeper" in Songs of Innocence offers a great perspective into industrialization, mankind and the importance of nature towards mankind during Blake's lifetime. With the help of fellow critics, scholars and journalists, research has been conducted to show Blake's perspective on nature and its importance to mankind. Although Blake uses symbolism throughout his poem, one can decipher the many hidden meanings after a thorough analysis of his diction. Despite these difficulties, Blake's poem offers great insight into his time. According to the research and careful analysis, Blake believes nature is a necessary role into shaping mankind so that industrialization can advance effectively and appropriately. Overall, the lesson Blake leaves his readers with in his poem is that mankind needs to balance nature and industrialization or else the spirit and will of an individual will break and cease to exist.

Directions for English Learners Success
Time:
1:00PM
Location:
Sp Collections

Alejandra Pulido. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Karen Russikoff

Synopsis: Students and teachers have difficulty providing and following directions. This underdeveloped area of study can help increase understanding and academic performance.

Abstract: Directions are imperative to successful student understanding of tasks, assignments, and projects. But English learners often fail to read or follow the directions. This research project conducted in multiple higher education settings explains a variety of causes for this issue with classroom implications and reliable teacher responses.

Revising the Endangered Species Act of 1973
Time:
1:15PM
Location:
Sp Collections

Blake Eaton. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Michael Cholbi

Synopsis: The Endangered Species Act of 1973 has goals that cannot be realized, and a revision in policy, called "ecological triage," is a solution.

Abstract: In this oral presentation, I will argue that the Endangered Species Act of 1973 or ESA, which states that the United States federal government incurs the responsibility to protect "endangered species -- species that are likely to become extinct throughout all or a large portion of their range." (Nwf.org) is fundamentally flawed in its policies and ought to be revised. With almost 17,000 species currently on the International Union for Conservation of Nature's red list ("Endangered Species Overview"), along with the fact that a mere 1.3% of species have been "delisted" -- that is, removed from the endangered species list, the ESA's goals of saving every endangered species is simply unrealizable. Therefore, a revised and updated policy is necessary for attaining the goal that is, simply put, saving the species that we can. I assert that because of the simple fact that there exists more creatures on the endangered species lists than conservation efforts can realistically aid, having a policy that invokes an "ecological triage," i.e. making specialized and deliberate efforts towards saving species that have been determined to be worthy of saving, is vital for three necessary and sufficient conditions for a successful act of this sort: 1.) making progress towards saving species, 2.) ensuring that our time and resources aren't wasted, and 3.) aiding in the progression of our fundamental ecological goals, including but not limited to the promotion of stable ecosystems and overall biodiversity.

A Girlish Nature: Ecofeminism in Samuel Taylor Coleridge's "Christabel"
Time:
1:30PM
Location:
Sp Collections

Kristin Kawecki. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Dewey Hall

Synopsis: This essay examines Samuel Taylor Coleridge's poem "Christabel" with an ecofeminist lens, identifying the similarity between the plight of the natural world and that of the protagonist Christabel.

Abstract: Examining Samuel Taylor Coleridge's narrative poem "Christabel" under an ecofeminist lens, this essay identifies the interconnectedness between femininity and the natural world within the poem. The pure and delicate character Christabel is a female embodiment of the natural world, a life giving force that is eventually corrupted through the seduction by the character Geraldine who represents forces unnatural and not understood. Christabel unsuspectingly acts as a welcoming and life-preserving host to the otherworldly Geraldine who not only sexually pollutes the unsullied and altruistic Christabel, but invokes a lust for her by Christabel's own father, Sir Leoline. As only a motherless daughter could, Christabel's plight embodies the violence imparted upon an unsuspecting Earth; the chastity of Christabel is itself paradise lost. In Coleridge's "Christabel" the power and vulnerability of the natural world is intimately intertwined with femininity.

The construction of a hero: Rodrígo Díaz de Vivar through his epic adventures in Las Mocedades de Rodrigo and El Cantar de Mio Cid
Time:
2:00PM
Location:
Sp Collections

Montserrat Gonzalez. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Marta Albala

Synopsis: This abstract provides a description of my research which analyzes the differences and similarities between the late epic poem Las Mocedades de Rodrigo and the literary myth El Cantar de Mio Cid.

Abstract: The construction of a hero: Rodrígo Díaz de Vivar through his epic adventures in Las Mocedades de Rodrigo and El Cantar de Mio Cid Montserrat Gonzalez California State Polytechnic University, Pomona Las Mocedades de Rodrigo is a late epic poem, composed during the Middle Ages narrating the fictional adventures of Rodrigo Díaz de Vivar, El Cid, a long-standing hero in Spanish Nationalistic discourses. Its codex, found in the National Library in Paris, does not portray the mature hero that will forge the legend on El Cantar de Mio Cid but instead describes him at a young stage of his life, what enables the poet to display Rodrigo's ancestors and the conflicts his family faced when he was a young boy. Las Mocedades depicts Rodrigo as an arrogant and rude twelve-year old kid who did not had the respect of the king, the soldiers or the community, thus questioning the very foundations of the construction of the literary myth, as portrayed in El Poema de Mio Cid. While Mocedades de Rodrigo presents the early life of Rodrigo Diaz de Vivar, el Cantar de Mio Cid portrays El Cid as the brave mature leader that late nineteenth century nationalistic critics, such as Menendez Pelayo have praised. El Cid is depicted as a loyal vassal who battles his enemies on behalf of his king as well as for his own honor. Critics of Mocedades de Rodrigo such as V.A Hubert claim that such poem is an imitation of El Cantar de Mio Cid which affects the perception and reputation of this iconic idol, thus availing for a more contemporaneous reading of the poem attuned to nowadays sensibilities. Thus, it is important to compare and understand both poems in order for us to ponder the different renderings of the character, and the impact those might have as contemporary readings.

Testimonials after DACA in Southern California: Lack of Equality
Time:
2:15PM
Location:
Sp Collections

Karla Ayala. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Marta Albalá Pelegrín

Synopsis: This paper focuses on the personal lives and experiences of these young dreamers who receive DACA, and who continue to fight towards stability and equality not only for DACA recipients, but for the whole immigrant community in Southern California. I have gathered my results by exploring testimonials and personal essays written by immigrants themselves who depict their continuous fight towards social justice that goes beyond being granted documentation.

Abstract: Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals is a program passed on June 15, 2012 by United States president Barack Obama that currently grants eligible undocumented immigrants a work permit and a valid social security number as well as temporary relief of deportation. Undoubtedly, this program has helped diminish the economic and social challenges that some young undocumented individuals have encountered. However, without a comprehensive immigration reform, fear and uncertainty of what the future holds for some DACA recipients continues. This study focuses on an in depth analysis and insight of these dreamer's lives through testimonials published after DACA, with the aim of gaining a broader understanding of how this temporary immigration policy has affected the lives of the undocumented community in Southern California. For this study I have analyzed the narratives found in books such as ¡Presente! (2014) a collection of first hand stories edited by Cristina Tzintzún, Carlos Pérez de Alejo and Arnulfo Manríquez. These testimonials are a way in which one can capture and explore their inner perceptions, experiences and the extent to which this program has impacted their lives. This research shows how Dreamers continue fighting for a more stable and permanent solution and to terminate inequality in all aspects of life.

"The Songs We Sing: a Dreamer's Lyric (1985-2015)"
Time:
2:30PM
Location:
Sp Collections

Violeta Villagomez. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Marta Albalá Pelegrín

Synopsis: This essay analyzes the vindication of Dreamers through lyrics and music surveying the changes in expression occurring with the passing of the DACA program.

Abstract: The program known as "Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals" or "DACA" has changed the lives of over a million undocumented immigrants across the United States since it was issued in 2012. This program has allowed Dreamers to fight for issues that have been a shadow for many decades such as legalization, equality in education, labor, racial justice and fair treatment in all aspects of life. Although this program is contingent upon the political situation and therefore has a temporary status, it has given the Dreamers the strength they were lacking to fight for a permanent solution. This force and new horizons are been reflected in numerous poems, and music that face the challenges of immigrants to create a communal artistic fabric in which the conscious use of popular forms of expression could spread to wider audiences. This essay analyzes the vindication of Dreamers through lyrics and music in the wide timeframe of the past 20 years, surveying the changes in expression occurring with the passing of the DACA program. In my research I have analyzed sources such as Los Tigres del Norte, and their album Gracias -América sin fronteras (1988), their hit "La jaula de oro", The golden cage (1985), the poem "Borders" (2013) by Denice Frohman, and the song "Ice el Hielo" (2013) by the band called La Santa Cecilia. My analysis of these sources reveals how vindication travels across borders and literary genders, revealing the great impact that not only physical but also internal borders creates in the lives of immigrants, as well as other issues of big proportions such as fear, instability and inequality.

"After-effects of Sendero Luminoso Violence in Santiago Roncagliolo's Abril rojo"
Time:
2:45PM
Location:
Sp Collections

Mecir Ureta. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Marta Albalá Peligrín and Dr. Kent Dickson

Synopsis: "After-effects of Sendero Luminoso Violence in Santiago Roncagliolo's Abril rojo"

Abstract: During the 1980's and early 1990's Peru faced a period of extreme violence due constant terrorist attacks and the government response to them, a period in which thousands of lives were lost . Not only did a particular rebel organization cause fear and insecurity in the nation's population, but also the Peruvian armed forces were responsible for acts of violence. The novel Red April, written by Santiago Roncagliolo, takes place in the year 2000 in Ayacucho a so-called "Red Zone" during the elaborate religious pageantry of the easter week celebrations. It emphasizes the after-effects of the years of violence mainly caused by "Sendero Luminoso" or "The Shining Path". Felix Chacaltana, the main character, is a district attorney who comes to believe through his investigation of a particular death that a resurgence of the armed rebel group is underway. His honesty and constant pressure to follow the guidelines of his job, lead him to understand the corruption that existed in the "fuerzas del orden", but also confirm his deepest fear: the continued presence of extremists twenty years later. During the course of the novel,the author also recounts multiple examples of real events, one of them being Uchurraccay (1983), The hanging of dogs on lampposts and the decapitation of human victims prove how violent Sendero was.This paper reads the novel against such testimonies to demonstrate that a period of extreme violence still continues to affect Peruvian today.

Comic relief, and the dangers of a bystander: a note on the domestication of the Lazarillo de Tormes
Time:
3:15PM
Location:
Sp Collections

Alfredo Raygoza. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Marta Albalá Pelegrín

Synopsis: La vida de Lazarillo de Tormes y de sus fortunas y de sus adversidades is a picaresque novel depicting life as experienced by a young man as he is developed by his surroundings. My research argues Lazaro has become a product of the social and religious corruption. Having nine masters, all differing in position under the social hierarchy, provide Lazaro with the skills needed to survive. Nonetheless, the novel provides various humorous instances which demonstrate an innocent Lazaro, but as the anonymous author intended, displays the injustices of 16th century Spain. The affinity between the humor and the satire shows the development of a picaresque character as he unveils the occult truth of Spanish culture and Catholic injustices.

Abstract: El Lazarillo de Tormes is an anonymous autobiographical picaresque novel that depicts the adventures of Lazaro de Tormes as depicted to a clergymen. Through a long epistle Lazaro recounts to Vuestra Merced the adversities he has faced when serving a variety of masters during 16th century Spain. A key element of this work is the humor there portrayed, as Lazaro is often defined by his ease in constantly deceiving his masters to achieve a momentary happiness for the sake of food or wine. Lazaro mechanisms of survival an adaptation heavily rely on lying and cheating. The anonymity of the work, give the character full freedom to criticize as he pleased. Thus, the crude humor that scars Lazaro although providing the reader with comedic relief, is rather used as a means to unveil the dark and twisted truths of Spanish society, and Catholic malpractice. Most of Lazaro's masters represent different social echelons, including several ecclesiastical figures of different rank, and deceive Lazaro from truly being able to define what life is. Ultimately, once he is free from having a master, he marries a woman who is having an affair with a Catholic clergymen displaying his inability to change the injustices. Therefore, Lazaro representation of a humorous and immature character, could be read instead as an affected, blameless bystander defined by corruption and religious negligence that could enable us to study and advise us of the domesticating effects of laugh in literary works and in our present interactions.

Acquiring Lexical Feedback
Time:
3:30PM
Location:
Sp Collections

Zainab Parekh, Allison Bruins, Jorge Larios. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Noel Houck

Synopsis: Examining students' acquisition of new lexical items from the instructor's written feedback.

Abstract: This presentation reports on research that compares the effects that implementing academic discourse in teachers' written feedback can have on university-level student writing. This study is based on Dr. Kinsella's focus on expanding academic and professional vocabulary in students' writing in order to better prepare them to succeed in their careers. Three instructors of nonnative-English-speaker freshman composition courses will provide feedback on student writing with three degrees of commentary: (1) heavy commentary with positive and critical vocabulary as well as more complex sentence structure, (2) moderate commentary with slightly simpler vocabulary and structures in the feedback, and (3) light commentary with generalized feedback. The research suggests a correlation between the academic register used by the teachers in this feedback and the academic register found on the students' compositions. This study will demonstrate the importance of teacher modeling in composition classes for multilingual speakers in addition to their ability to indirectly acquire the selected academic words presented by instructor feedback into their own written work.

Militarization of Latina/o Youth
Time:
3:45PM
Location:
Sp Collections

Estephanie Munoz. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jose Aguilar Hernandez

Synopsis: This research study will investigate the militarization of Latina/o Youth in secondary public high schools.

Abstract: As the fastest growing racial/ethnic "minority" in the United States (U.S.), Latina/o youth are the most enticing group for the U.S. military to recruit and the most underrepresented in postsecondary education. The Department of Defense (DOD) has an annual agenda of enlisting more or less 200,000 people in the armed forces (U.S. Gov, 2003, p.1). In order to satisfy the DOD's annual recruitment quota, recruiters must penetrate the high school market and create a positive awareness with respect to military service among students, parents, and educators. In recent years, recruiters have formulated a range of techniques to entice the vulnerability of Latina/o students who face serious challenges within the educational pipeline. This study is a qualitative case study that will focus particularly on Latina/o students who are joining the military directly out of high school. A semi-structure interview will be conducted to obtain data from participants.

The Dopamine Transporter (DAT) is not required for entraining circadian rhythms to scheduled feeding but is required for diet-induced obesity
Time:
12:45PM
Location:
Sp Events

Jennifer Enriquez. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Andrew Steele

Synopsis: Dopamine Transporter Knock out mice (DATKO) express Food Anticipatory Activity (FAA) on Calorie Restriction Diet (CR) and are resistant to diet-induced obesity.

Abstract: The Dopamine Transporter (DAT) is a transmembrane protein responsible for recycling dopamine back into dopamine neurons. This transporter is vital for the termination of dopamine signaling and many common drugs of abuse, such as cocaine, inhibit the activity of DAT. Changes in DAT expression level and regulation are also implicated in a number of human diseases, including attention deficit disorder, schizophrenia, depression, anxiety disorders, and in susceptibility substance abuse. DAT knock-out (KO) mice lack this transporter allowing more dopamine to be present in the synaptic cleft per each dopamine signaling even when compared to wild type mice. Our laboratory recently implicated dopamine signaling as crucial to entraining circadian rhythms to scheduled feeding. We sought to test whether DAT knockout mice, with prolonged dopamine signals, would show altered circadian entrainment to feeding. When mice are placed on a calorie restricted (CR) diet (60% of their daily calorie intake) they shift their activity and many physiological rhythms to predict scheduled food availability. Much to our surprise, we observed that DAT knockout mice had normal, or even enhanced, food anticipatory activity, showing that they entrained their behavioral rhythms to scheduled feeding. We also tested another feeding phenotype-diet induced obesity-in the DAT knockout mice. When control mice were placed on a high fat diet they gain an enormous amount of weight whereas DAT knockout mice does not gain weight. Based on our preliminary data, DAT is not a key regulator of circadian rhythm but it is required for diet-induced obesity.

ASYMMETRIC GENETIC INTROGRESSION OF AN INVASIVE SEA SLUG IN A NATIVE MEDITERRANEAN SPECIES
Time:
1:00PM
Location:
Sp Events

Haleh Golestani. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Angel Valdes

Synopsis: Molecular data has been collected from Aplysia parvula, a circumtropical species of sea slug, to confirm asymmetric genetic introgression and hybridization in the Mediterranean.

Abstract: Aplysia parvula is a circumtropical species of sea slug that has only recently been found in the Mediterranean and was first recorded in Turkey in 1961. It is often confused with the closely related species Aplysia punctata, which is a species native to the northeastern Atlantic and the Mediterranean. A preliminary molecular phylogeny was made using a nuclear gene (H3) and two mitochondrial genes (16S and CO1). This preliminary evidence suggests that Aplysia parvula is a species complex with distinct Atlantic and Indo-Pacific species. There is evidence of Atlantic nuclear introgression of A. parvula in the Mediterranean. There was however no Pacific A. parvula genes detected in the Mediterranean. Nuclear alleles of A. parvula have introgressed into A. punctata but nuclear alleles of A. punctata have not introgressed into A. parvula. Future work will include confirming asymmetric genetic introgression and hybridization of A. parvula in the Mediterranean. This will be done by sequencing an additional nuclear gene, 18S.

Southern Invasion: Population Genetics of Phidiana hiltoni
Time:
1:15PM
Location:
Sp Events

Clara Jo King. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Ángel Valdés

Synopsis: The population genetics of Phidiana hiltoni, a species of sea slug, to determine the genetic origins of a newly emerging population in Northern California.

Abstract: Phidiana hiltoni, a species of nudibranch, is known for its pugnacious behavior, note its synonymized name, Phidiana pugnax, as it often attacks and eats other aeolids along with its more common diet of hydroids. Its historical range was from the Gulf of California to central California, but as of the early 1990's, the species has been found as north as the San Francisco Bay area. This has already proven a problem for the native species of sea slugs in the Bay area as Phidiana hiltoni is not only showing signs of competing with them for hydroids, but has also been observed fighting and eating native species. Specimens of Phidiana hiltoni will be collected from all along its habitat range, historical and new, their DNA sequenced and we will develop a genetic map of this species. This map will help us get an idea of where the new population is deriving from.

Evaluation of Lipidated and Non-Lipidated CDN Adjuvants in a gD Peptide Liposomal Vaccine for HSV-2 Murine Intravaginal Infection
Time:
1:30PM
Location:
Sp Events

Eleana Guardado, Jennifer Rubio. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jill Adler-Moore

Synopsis: A liposomal vaccine against HSV-2 was protective in mice when the vaccine contained the viral gD tripeptide and a Lipidated or non-Lipidated cyclic dinucleotide adjuvant.

Abstract: Background: An effective vaccine is needed for HSV-2 genital infections. A liposomal (Ls) viral gD tripeptide (gD3pep) vaccine was formulated with gD3pep plus a protein hydrophobic domain(HD) or gD3pep conjugated to Ls via maleimide (Cys). Lipidated (Lip) or Non-lipidated (NLip) cyclic dinucleotide (CDN) were used as adjuvants in the Ls. Methods: Ls vaccines were administered subcutaneously d0, d28, d56 to BALB/c mice (n=17/group) as follows: Ls-NLip CDN+/- gD3pep-HD or gD3pep-Cys, Ls-Lip CDN +/- gD3pep-HD or gD3pep-Cys, or phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Splenocytes and serum were collected on d59/d60 and assayed for Neutralizing antibodies (NAb), anti-gD3pep IgG Isotypes, and cytokine levels. Mice were given medroxyprogesterone d63/d69, challenged intravaginally with HSV-2 d70, vaginally swabbed d72 for viral burden and monitored for disease signs for 28 days post-challenge. Results: Vaccination with Ls-NLipCDN or Ls-LipCDN plus gD3pep-HD or gD3pep-Cys had prolonged survival following HSV-2 challenge versus PBS controls. Weight loss, disease signs, viral burden, and NAb titers paralleled survival data. Gamma interferon and IL-4 levels were elevated in mice given Ls-NLipCDN with gD3pep-HD or gD3pep-Cys versus PBS controls. IgG1 and IgG2a isotype levels were elevated in Ls-NLipCDN with gD3pep-HD or gD3pep-Cys vs PBS controls. Discussion: Ls-NLipCDN or Ls-LipCDN plus either form of gD3pep were protective against HSV-2 infection. Enhanced Th1 and Th2 immune responses were generated with elevated levels of serum IgG2a (Th1) and IgG1 (Th2) and enhanced production of Gamma interferon (Th1) and IL-4 (Th2) cytokines following vaccination with Ls-NLip CDN plus gD3pep-HD or gD3pep-Cys.

Comparative Efficacy of a Liposomal Aspergillus Protein Vaccine Containing Different Immunomodulatory Adjuvants Used to Prevent Murine Pulmonary Aspergillosis
Time:
2:00PM
Location:
Sp Events

Hernan Reza, William Morris. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jill Adler-Moore

Synopsis: MPL or Lipidated Tucaresol adjuvants in an Aspergillus protein liposomal vaccine generated significant protection against pulmonary aspergillosis using different immune mechanisms.

Abstract: Background: Antifungal drugs for pulmonary aspergillosis yield about 50% survival, underscoring the need for an Aspergillus vaccine. We compared the efficacy of a liposomal vaccine, containing Aspergillus proteins, Aspf3 or Aspf9 (LAsV), and different immune adjuvants. Methods: Aspf3 and Aspf9 were conjugated to separate LAsV preparations. Mice were vaccinated [n=16-17/group (gp)] d0 subcutaneously, d21 and d42 intranasally (IN) with LAsV administered at 5ug Aspf3/dose and 5ug Aspf9/dose with 15ug monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), 5ug lipidated Tucaresol (LpT), 25ug PAM3CAG, or 50ug dsRNA; controls were MPL liposomes (MPLlip) or buffer. d53, d55, d57 mice were immunosuppressed with triamcinolone acetonide and d56 challenged IN with 1.5x10ex7 A. fumigatus conidia. Lungs, BAL and blood were collected (n=6-7/gp) 3 days post-challenge for fungal burden; remaining mice (n=9-10/gp) were monitored for morbidity for 3 weeks. Serum IgG2a and IgG1 were determined by ELISA with Aspf3 or Aspf9 as capture antigens. Results: LAsV with MPL or LpT produced significantly more survival, 70% and 60%, respectively, than MPLlip (0% ) (p≤0.011). Although fungal burden was reduced in lungs and BAL of groups receiving LAsV with either adjuvant, this reduction did not reach significance. IgG levels showed that LAsV with MPL elicited a Th1 response (IgG2a: IgG1 >1.0) to Aspf3 or Aspf9 ;LAsV with LpT elicited a Th2 response (IgG2a: IgG < 1.0) to Aspf3 or Aspf9. Conclusion: MPL or LpT in LAsV generated the most protection against pulmonary aspergillosis by stimulating different immune mechanisms, since MPL produced a Th1 response and LpT stimulated a Th2 response.

Role of the Peripheral Cannabinoid Receptor in the response to systemic Candida albicans infection in mice
Time:
2:15PM
Location:
Sp Events

Adam Marentes. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Nancy Buckley

Synopsis: We infected CB2 KO and WT mice with Candida albicans, then assessed the fungal load and cytokine production in their tissues.

Abstract: The endocannabinoid system is a collection of endogenously produced cannabinoids (compounds closely related in structure to those made by the marijuana plant) and the tissues and cells with receptors for them. Immune cells such as macrophages/monocytes and lymphocytes express the peripheral cannabinoid receptor, CB2R. Activation of this receptor on these cells is known to alter immune function. . CB2R is known to play a role in the resistance to bacterial infections, but the role of CB2R on the resistance to yeast infection is unknown. Therefore, we used c57BL/6 lacking the CB2 receptor (CB2R KO) (n=8) and wild type mice (n=10) to determine whether CB2R played a role in the resistance to yeast infection. The mice were infected with the opportunistic yeast, Candida albicans, with an IV injection of 0.75x105 on day 1 and 5x105 on day 18. Kidneys, livers, spleens, and brains were collected 18 days post infection and analyzed for fungal load and the cytokines interleukin-12p40 and interferon-ɣ via ELISA. There was no significant difference in cytokine concentrations between CB2R knockout and WT mice nor in the fungal load of the liver, kidneys, and brain. However, there was a significant difference in fungal load in the spleens, with CB2R KO mice being able to clear the fungus better than the WT mice. These data suggest an immunomodulatory role for the CB2 receptor in the spleen in yeast infected mice.

Effect of 17β-Estradiol and dihydroxytestosterone on Candida albicans growth rate and on Candida albicans-induced cytokine secretion from macrophages.
Time:
2:30PM
Location:
Sp Events

Sarah Kent. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Nancy Buckley

Synopsis: Effect of 17β-Estradiol and dihydroxytestosterone on Candida albicans growth rate and on Candida albicans-induced cytokine secretion from macrophages.

Abstract: Gender differences play a major role in immune responses to many pathogens. However, little is known about the gender effects on yeast infections. Candida albicans (C. albicans) is a yeast found on the skin and mucosa of healthy individuals. C. ablicans can become an opportunistic pathogen in immunocompromised individuals. We have found that the susceptibility to systemic C. albicans infection varies within gender; female mice are significantly more resistant to systemic C. albicans infections than male mice. Furthermore, castrated males are as resistant to the infection as females, and 5α-dihydroxytestosterone (5α DHT, the stable form of testosterone) supplementation decreases the resistance to the yeast infection in female mice. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), primarily secreted by macrophages, was a cytokine most affected by sex hormone treatment. Thus, sex hormones play an important role in the immune response to C. albicans infection. It is possible that sex hormones (1) alter the growth rate of C. albicans and/or (2) that sex hormones alter macrophage's response to the yeast. To address (1), C. albicans was treated with different concentrations of 17β-estradiol (E2) or 5α DHT, the yeast was plated on SAB agar, incubated at 37oC and yeast colonies counted. To address (2), macrophages were treated with yeast in the presence or absence of different concentrations of E2 or 5αDHT and TNF-α assessed. Thus far, we find the concentrations of sex hormones used do not alter growth rates of C. albicans significantly. However, we expect sex hormones to decrease C. albicans-induced macrophage cytokine production.

Juglone Concentration in Soil Underneath the California Black Walnut (Juglans californica) Throughout the Growing Season
Time:
3:15PM
Location:
Sp Events

Asma Ayyad. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Erin Questad

Synopsis: This study quantifies the concentration of the allopathic chemical, juglone, in the soil beneath Juglans californica and studies the dispersal of juglone throughout the growing season.

Abstract: As the drought in California continues natural landscaping with native species is becoming a preferred choice among gardeners and landscape architects, the search for native drought resistant species is on the rise. One native tree species that has great potential is Southern California black walnut (Juglans californica); however, other Juglans species are known to release juglone into the soil and can interfere with the growth of neighboring plants. In order to better understand J. californica , a thorough study on the dispersal and effects of juglone in the soil could lead to vital information on how we can better utilize this tree. There has been an extensive amount of research done on J. californica's relative the eastern black walnut (Juglans nigra), but very little is known on our own native. In this study, we determine the soil conditions underneath J. californica trees, how these soil conditions could affect nearby plants, and how the juglone concentrations change during the growing seasons. Soil samples will be analyzed for juglone concentrations through high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). With a better understanding on the soil conditions beneath the J. californica, we can discover which species of plants are unaffected by the juglone produced by the tree and possibly begin to use this tree in landscaping and native plant restoration.

The Role of Phosphorus on the Health and Success of Pennisetum setaceum
Time:
2:45PM
Location:
Sp Events

Glen Morrison. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Erin Questad

Synopsis: An investigation to determine whether the invasive C4 bunch grass, Pennisetum setaceum, is associated with high soil phosphate.

Abstract: Pennisetum setacuem (Forssk.) Chiov., commonly known as Fountain Grass, is a perennial C4 bunch grass native to Africa. The species is widely naturalized or invasive outside of its native range. In this project I test the novel hypothesis that the health of Fountain Grass is tied to high availability of phosphate in the soil where it grows. This project consists of a nutrient addition greenhouse experiment, as well as an observational field study in southern California wildlands. Additionally I will determine through nutrient analysis whether phosphorus is differentially allocated to the roots, leaves, and seeds. Possible findings could better inform the efforts of those tasked with managing non-native populations of Fountain Grass in the field.

The Effects of Varying Concentrations of Juglone on the Germination and Seedling Success of Frangula californica, Heteromeles arbutifolia, and Prunus ilicifolia
Time:
3:30PM
Location:
Sp Events

Borman Quinonez. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Edward Bobich

Synopsis: Aim of research is to find companion plantings to plant with Juglans californica.

Abstract: In response to the drought many cities have started to stress to its residents the importance of conserving water (dpw.lacounty.gov); native plants from arid environments have been touted as a way to help individuals and municipalities can meet the water-use reductions imposed by the state. Most native plants will fare well when partnered with other native plants, especially those with which they are sympatric, but there are some plants that produce chemicals that are toxic to other plants. One such tree is Juglans californica (California Black Walnut), which, like other members of its genus, produces an allelopathic chemical known as juglone (5 hydroxy-1,4-napthoquinone; Cosmulescu et al. 2014). Juglans californica is a tree of a manageable size that would make a great addition to any native California landscape, but is often passed over due to the unknown effects that juglone may have on other species. The aim of our experiment is to identify companion plantings for J. californica by testing how the seed germination and seedlings of native plant species respond to exposure of different concentrations of juglone (Questad 2014). In particular, we will study the following native shrubs that can co-occur with J. californica in the walnut woodlands of Southern California: Frangula californica (Eschsch.) A. Gray (coffee berry), Heteromeles arbutifolia (Lindley) Roemer (toyon), and Prunus ilicifolia (Nutt.) Walp. (holly-leaf cherry).

Phylogenetic Analysis of Dolabrifera dolabrifera and Dolabrifera brazieri
Time:
3:45PM
Location:
Sp Events

Eric Breslau. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Ángel A. Valdés

Synopsis: Project covers phylogenetic relationship between two currently separate species and questions their validity as distinct species.

Abstract: The species of sea hare Dolabrifera dolabrifera is found in several different oceanic regions spanning the tropics. Locations include the shores of Panama, the tropical central and western Pacific, and the Caribbean Sea. Thus it is considered to be a pantropic species. Because these oceanic regions have not been connected for millions of years, it is likely that Dolabrifera dolabrifera constitutes a species complex. Another species, Dolabrifera brazieri, is found off the coast of New Zealand; however, the validity of D. brazieri is questionable. The focus of this study is to determine whether D. dolabrifera is a paraphyletic or monophyletic group and whether D. brazieri is a true distinct clade. Genetic sequences of the nuclear genes H3 and CO1 as well as the mitochondrial gene 16S will be compared across several specimens collected from several locations including the Caribbean Sea, the eastern Pacific, and the tropical central Pacific where D. dolabrifera is found, and New Zealand where D. brazieri is found. If this study is successful it is hypothesized that several new species will be classified based on genetic and morphological identification data.

Identification of DNA Transposable Elements in the Tasmanian Devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) Genome
Time:
4:00PM
Location:
Sp Events

German Lagunas-Robles. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Peter Arensburger

Synopsis: The Tasmanian devil genome was annotated for class II transposable elements using bioinformatics tools and custom made Perl scripts.

Abstract: Genomes consist of many different types of DNA segments. The most abundant and relatively understudied segments are transposable elements (TEs). These elements are known to have an impact on genetic expression, both positive and negative - this is associated with the TEs capability of transposing within the host genome. For example, these effects can be seen in the different pigmentations in individual corn kernels. TEs have also been associated with mammalian cancers. Devil facial tumor disease (DFTD), a transmissible cancer, is currently driving down the numbers of the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrissi). The possible relationship between TEs and DFTD is something that could explain the transmissibility of the cancer. In order to establish the existence of this relationship, bioinformatics tools and custom made Perl scripts were used to annotate the Tasmanian devil genome denovo for a group of TEs, the class II TEs. The analysis pipeline was run at three different parameters (5E-2, 5E-4, and 5E-6) to determine the possible TEs and to evaluate how likely the pipeline returned accurate results (i.e. identified real TE sequences) through parameter and sequence analysis.

Identification of the Genes that Regulate Silk Production in Spiders: A Computational Biology Approach
Time:
4:15PM
Location:
Sp Events

Mark Ellie Alonzo. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Peter Arensburger

Synopsis: The aim of this research is to analyze mRNA sequences from spider silk glands and identify the genes that are responsible for spider silk production.

Abstract: The molecular basis of spider silk production is of broad interest because of its possible mechanical applications. For instance, dragline silk, which is produced in the major ampullate gland of certain spiders, has been found to be tougher than nylon and Kevlar®. However, even though there is research on the mechanical and structural properties of spider silk, the gene expression and regulation responsible for spider silk production remains largely unexplored. In this project, I will try to identify the genes that regulate spider silk production by analyzing several RNAseq libraries from major ampullate glands of Holocnemus pluchei and Lactrodectus hesperus. A de novo transcriptome assembly will be constructed from these RNAseq libraries using the program Trinity because neither species have fully sequenced genomes available. This transcriptome will be used to reference back the mRNA transcripts using the program BOWTIE2 in order to analyze their different levels of gene expression. Statistical analysis of the gene expression will be performed using the Bioconductor package. This analysis will provide insight into the genes that are either upregulated or downregulated during silk production in spiders.

To binge or not to binge: Studying the effects of Dopamine Receptor 1 signaling on feeding in mice
Poster:
P.1
Location:
Ursa Major

Gabriela Garza-Vazquez. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Andrew Steele

Synopsis: By studying dopamine receptor 1 knockout mice, we hope to find the population of neurons responsible for the binge eating of high fat foods. After fasting and then feeding D1R mice, we found that the KO mice binge eat and have hypothalamic activation whereas the WT mice do not. The hypothalamus is involved in the reward system and numerous bodily activities, but new findings suggest that it may play a role in the timing of feeding. As obesity becomes a growing issue in our country, so will the need to understand the neural circuitry that can cause it.

Abstract: Obesity is associated with a number of health problems and is now an epidemic across most of our country. To understand this issue we ask the question: what can cause overeating? Dopamine receptors are distributed across several regions in the brain and are key mediators of the dopamine signal coding for motivation, pleasure, learning, and memory. Dopamine receptor 1 (D1R) neurons have been shown to mediate entrainment to feeding, suggesting that dopamine signaling may be actively involved in the timing of hunger signals. Interestingly, D1R knockout mice do not exhibit diet-induced obesity when placed on high fat diet. We performed a 24 hour experiment in which a group of D1R KO and WT mice placed on been on high fat diet (HFD) were fasted and fed, a group were fasted and not fed, and the final group was given HFD ad libitum. After being culled, the mice brains were extracted, sectioned, fixed and stained. We found that there was activation of the hypothalamus of the D1R KO mice, but not the D1R WT mice. Additionally, the D1R KO mice binged on HFD after fasting. The hypothalamus is not only responsible for metabolic processes but for the control of activities such as hunger, thirst, body temperature, sleep and circadian rhythms. This is important because there are many dopamine dependent behaviors, but they are not all from the same D1R population. By performing this experiment we can begin to process the characterization of which D1R neural populations affect binge eating of high fat foods.

Tissue culture and metabolite profiling of submergence tolerant rice M202 (Sub 1)
Poster:
P.2
Location:
Ursa Major

Jyoti Uppal. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Bharti Sharma and Dr. Gregory Barding

Synopsis: Metabolic differences in root and shoot cultures of rice plants: M202 (sub 1) and control M202 were analyzed to determine the effects of flood tolerance.

Abstract: Feeding over 2 billion people each year and making up 20% of the world's dietary energy supply, rice is a major food crop. Environmental stresses, such as flooding, limit agricultural productivity. During flooding, water fills air pockets, creating hypoxic and possibly even anoxic conditions. Submergence tolerant Oryza sativa rice plants M202 sub 1 and control M202 plants were used to determine the extent of the tolerance response and the metabolic differences between the two genotypes. Sterile tissue culture techniques were used to grow plants in vitro. Plants were submerged after the appearance of the primary leaf for 72 hours. Roots and shoots of the two genotypes were analyzed separately. GC/MS analysis was performed. Metabolic analysis was accomplished using isotope labeling, plastid isolation, and mitochondria isolation.

Characterization of Outer Membrane Vesicles in Probiotic Esh
Poster:
P.3
Location:
Ursa Major

Cezar Osuna. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Christos Stathopoulos

Synopsis: In this study, we investigate the roles of outer membrane vesicle in Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 and Uropathogenic Escherichia coli CFT073.

Abstract: Outer membrane vesicles are spherical structures that are constitutively produced by all Gram negative bacteria. They range from 10-300 nm in diameter and have been shown to be an alternative transport system for secreting proteins into the extracellular space. Outer membrane vesicles are monoluminal and are composed of proteins, DNA, phospholipids and lipopolysaccharides. Although their exact function remains unclear, it has been proposed that they play a role in pathogenicity as well as cell signaling between bacteria. The probiotic bacterium, E. coli Nissle 1917 (EcN), has been observed to produce outer membrane vesicles. EcN is currently being marketed under the brand Mutaflor® in order to alleviate gastrointestinal ailments such as ulcerative colitis and irritable bowel syndrome. Recently, the full genome of EcN has been sequenced and has been found to have high homology with Uropathogenic E. coli strain CFT073 (UPEC). UPEC is the leading cause of urinary tract infections in humans and has the potential to cause renal failure when left untreated. UPEC is slowly building antibiotic resistance which is why researchers are exploring the option of vaccine development. Both microbes have been observed to produce autotransporter proteins as well as outer membrane vesicles. This study aims to characterize outer membrane vesicles of EcN in comparison to the outer membrane vesicles of its closest genetic relative, uropathogenic E.coli strain CFT073 by studying their physical properties, their protein composition, and their roles in biofilm formation.

The effects of phlorotannin concentrations of brown seaweeds (Phaeophyceae) on the feeding rates of the black sea hare Aplysia vaccaria
Poster:
P.4
Location:
Ursa Major

Danielle McHaskell. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jayson Smith

Synopsis: Chemical defenses in brown seaweeds are being quantified to determine their role in diet selectivity of Black Sea Hares.

Abstract: In marine ecosystems, herbivory plays a vital role in ecosystem functioning and structuring of seaweed communities. In response to herbivory, some seaweeds produce chemical defenses to deter consumption, including production of phlorotannins by brown algae (Phaephyceae). Phlorotannins can reduce palatability by inhibiting nutrient assimilation but are known to vary greatly among brown seaweeds species. The black sea hare, Aplysia vaccaria, is a large, marine gastropod and an important herbivore in coastal ecosystems. It is a voracious grazer, reaching 14 kg within its 1-year life span, and consumes primarily kelps and other brown algae. While phlorotannin concentrations have been previously shown to reduce consumption in some herbivores, little has been conducted with large herbivores exhibiting high consumption rates, such as A. vaccaria. The phlorotannin concentration of a series of brown seaweeds will be determined using a standard Folin-Ciocalteau method. The consumption rate of A. vaccaria for each of these seaweeds will be examined in a controlled aquaria system and the relationship between feeding rates and phlorotannin concentrations determined. To date, phlorotannin concentrations have been ascertained for three brown algal species, Macrocystis pyrifera, Sargassum horneri, and Sargassum muticum, with concentrations varying among species (2.1%, 3.4%, and 5.4%, respectively). Results will elucidate the effectiveness of phlorotannins in protecting brown seaweeds from a voracious herbivore, in addition to quantifying the consumption rates of an important yet understudied herbivore.

Recent emergence of the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in northern California Cascades Frogs (Rana cascadae)
Poster:
P.5
Location:
Ursa Major

Marina De Leon, Dr. Jonah Piovia-Scott, Dr. Vance Vredenburg. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Wei-Jen Lin

Synopsis: We surveyed historical museum specimens of frogs for the parasitic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis. We then statistically estimated the pathogen's arrival date and the post-arrival prevalence.

Abstract: The pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) has been associated with global amphibian declines, but it is often difficult to discern the relative importance of Bd as a causal agent in declines that have already occurred. The recent development of retrospective analyses of museum specimens has allowed researchers to associate the timing of Bd arrival with the timing of past amphibian declines. Cascades frogs (Rana cascadae) have experienced dramatic declines in northern California, but it is not clear whether the onset of these declines corresponds to the arrival of Bd. We used quantitative real-time PCR assays of samples collected from museum specimens to determine historical Bd prevalence in the northern California range of R. cascadae. We detected Bd in 13 of 355 (3.7%) R. cascadae specimens collected between 1907 and 2003, with the first positive result from 1978. A Bayesian analysis suggested that Bd arrived in the region between 1973 and 1978, which corresponds well with the first observations of declines in the 1980s.

Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Formation on Plasma Treated Prosthetic Alloys
Poster:
P.6
Location:
Ursa Major

Hansini Vitharanage, Jennifer C.Lopez. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Steve Alas

Synopsis: Biofilm formation by two types of bacteria on traditional and newly synthesized prosthetic alloys before and after plasma pre-treatment were quantified.

Abstract: We are currently in an age when the use of prosthetic implants is on the rise. Prosthetics commonly fail due to bacterial colonization. Once bacteria colonize the prosthetics, the biofilm produced protects them from susceptibility to antibiotics. The most prevalent infections leading to implant colonization are from Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Our long-term goal is to determine whether new alloys are less susceptible to bacterial colonization. Consequently we are testing biofilm production by S.epidermidis and P.aeruginosa on six different biometals. Three of the metals being tested are traditional metals used for prosthetics; commercially pure titanium, a titanium-based alloy (Ti-6Al-4V), and stainless steel. The additional three metals are new titanium alloys having different percentages of boron; 1.0, 0.4 and 0.05. Biofilm formation on the surface of each metal is measured after bacterial exposure for 48 hours. Our laboratory has shown that the alloys resist P.aeruginosa colonization better than stainless steel, but not as well as Ti-6Al-4V with no boron. Similar results were seen using S.epidermidis, which colonized the new alloys and Ti-6Al-4V less than stainless steel. Thereafter, we have been studying whether pretreatment of the biometals with cold-plasma reduces colonization by bacteria even further. The traditional metals and new alloys were treated with oxygen plasma to alter their surface microstructure, and the biofilm formation was quantified. We have found that the plasma treated boron metals alloys do not provide a viable surface for bacteria to colonize while plasma treated traditional metals have lower biofilm formation when grown with P.aeruginosa.

Universal Detection of Cyanobacteria and Their Toxins Using PCR for Safe Algae-based Feed Production
Poster:
P.7
Location:
Ursa Major

Alyssa Sancio, Sharon Wu, Yash Patel. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Shelton Murinda

Synopsis: This study aims to develop protocols for early detection and elimination of toxin-producing cyanobacteria for production of safe livestock feeds based on microalgae.

Abstract: Toxic cyanobacteria, a photosynthetic phylum of prokaryotic algae, are a common contaminant in nitrogen rich water supplies. Our goal is to identify presence of toxin-producing cyanobacteria to enable for early toxin threat-detection. This screening is part of a larger sustainability project focused on converting (nutrient-rich) dairy cow manure effluent into a fast-growing, algae-based, safe animal feed crop. The algae are produced in paddle-wheeled model ponds that could become contaminated by toxic cyanobacteria. Multiple species of pure cyanobacteria cultures were grown and their DNA isolated and purified. The cya gene fragment, which codes for 16S rRNA is unique to cyanobacteria, was selected for universal detection of cyanobacteria using PCR. To detect toxin-producing cyanobacteria five gene clusters in the toxin synthesis pathways were targeted: mcy (microcystin), nda (nodularin), cyr (cylindrospermopsin), ana (anatoxin-a) and sxt (saxitoxin). PCR-amplified fragments were separated using gel electrophoresis and sequenced. cya amplification results enabled identification of quality control strains with high sensitivity and specificity allowing discrimination of cyanobacteria from non-cyanobacteria. Using PCR and nucleotide sequencing, we identified quality control strains that have potential to produce microcystin and anatoxin-a. Our future goals are to correlate presence of toxin genes with toxin production and develop qPCR protocols. Toxin production will be evaluated using ELISA kits. These protocols will be used for routine detection and identification of cyanobacteria species that could produce toxins in algae production ponds and allow for their control in algae-based livestock feeds.

Establishing a diet-induced type II diabetes model in ICR male mice with nicotinamide/streptozotocin induction
Poster:
P.8
Location:
Ursa Major

Shirleen Simargi. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jill Adler-Moore and Dr. Jon Olson

Synopsis: Mice were maintained on a high fat diet and induced with nicotinamide and streptozotocin to establish murine progressive type II diabetes.

Abstract: Introduction: The incidence of diabetes worldwide is 415 million and is expected to reach 642 million by 2040 with 90% being Type II. This disease compromises the circulatory and immune systems and understanding how this condition effects drug distribution and efficacy in the body is critical. To examine this, we first had to establish a murine model of progressive type II diabetes. Methods: ICR male mice (4wks old, n=7/group) were fed a regular diet (10% fat, Groups 1 and 2) or a high fat diet (60% fat, Groups 3 and 4) for 4wks, followed by 2 days of intraperitoneal dosing with 120mg/kg nicotinamide (NA) and 100mg/kg streptozocin (STZ) (Groups 2 and 4). All mice were maintained on their respective diets for an additional 7 weeks while being monitored for weight change (3x/week) and blood glucose levels (2x/week). Results: Mice fed the high fat diet (Groups 3 and 4) gained significantly more weight than the those on the low fat diet (Groups 1 and 2) (p≤0.04). By 7wks post-induction, NA/STZ treated mice (Groups 2 and 4) had significantly higher blood glucose levels (211.4mg/dL and 292.1mg/dL, respectively) than the comparator non-induced mice (Group 1=135.9 mg/dL and Group 3=146.4mg/dL) (p<0.03) indicating that only the NA/STZ Groups had reached a diabetes type II condition. Conclusion: Having established diabetes type II in ICR male mice by their maintenance on a high fat or low fat diet with NA/STZ induction, this model, which mimics the human disease, will be used for subsequent drug pharmacokinetic studies.

Investigation of the rate of degradation of grape anthocyanins in the presence of ascorbic acid using an accelerated shelf life test (ASLT) method
Poster:
P.9
Location:
Ursa Major

Lauren Chuman, Yee Teng Moo, Carol Pow Sang, Abdulrahman Al-azazi. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Harmit Singh

Synopsis: This study investigated the degradation of ACNs from grape juice with ascorbic acid using an (ASLT) method with different thermal treatments for various time intervals.

Abstract: Anthocyanins (ACNs) are dark colored natural pigments used in food products and are sensitive to pH, temperature and ascorbic acid (AA). AA is naturally present in fruit juices and can cause the degradation of ACNs and decrease in shelf life of the products. The aim of this study was to investigate the degradation of ACNs from commercial grape juice concentrate color in the presence of AA using an accelerated method at 85°C for various time intervals. The stability of grape ACNs was determined by the rate of degradation of monomeric ACNs on heating. The change in the polymeric color, the color density and polymeric color percentage (PCP) were determined using a potassium metabisulfite solution (20%) based on spectrophotometric method. Monomeric ACNs were determined using RP-HPLC methods. For each treatment, 2.8mL of color was added into the cuvette along with 0.2mL of potassium metabisulfite. Eight monomeric ACNs were identified using HPLC and total area was calculated to compare the degradation. Unexpected results were obtained indicating that AA either did not change the degradation rate or prevented the degradation of ACNS. The spectrophotometric analysis showed that even 8 hours, the control w/o AA showed a minimal difference in PCP as compared to with AA sample indicating no effect of AA on the degradation of ACNs. The heated control w/o AA showed a decreased in total HPLC area by 1064.34, whereas with AA sample showed an increase in total HPLC area by 1535 indicating protective affect of AA for grape juice ACNs.

Characterization of Native Microalgae for Bioremediation coupled to Feed Production
Poster:
P.10
Location:
Ursa Major

Natalie Eulogio, Isis Janilkarn-Urena. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Marcia Murry-Ewers

Synopsis: This study is directed to advance our knowledge of algal biology to optimize productivity for bioremediation and economically efficient operations.

Abstract: The large-scale livestock and dairy industries in California are adversely affected by the high cost of feed and the current regulatory pressure to recover nutrients derived from manure waste. In collaboration with Cal Poly SLO, we are isolating seasonally dominant algal strains from high rate race-track ponds fed with primary effluent of barn flush from a 300 head organic dairy farm. Axenic strains were isolated and studied under controlled laboratory conditions that simulate key factors in pond operation at that location. These parameters include light and temperature diurnal cycles, retention time, CO2 supplementation and stirring speed as a function of light intensity. The goal is to optimize production of strains that can compete in outdoor ponds and have a proximal biochemical composition to serve as a high protein, high lipid feed supplement. To identify algal isolates, the rRNA ITS1/4 regions have been amplified, sequenced and analyzed phylogenetically. Carbon and nitrogen preferences were analyzed in high throughput experiments to optimize growth, protein and lipid content by manipulating culture conditions. Fluorometric quantification of lipids and proteins were correlated with traditional biochemical techniques. PAM fluorometry was used to assess photosynthetic efficiency under environmental stress including light inhibition, a critical issue in outdoor pond operations. Animal feed production is a relatively low-value commodity, even when coupled to bioremediation as a co-product. Hence the optimization of growth is crucial.

Development of efficient tissue culture and transformation protocols for Aquilegia
Poster:
P.11
Location:
Ursa Major

Timothy Batz. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Bharti Sharma

Synopsis: This project aims to develop efficient tissue culture and transformation protocols required for genetic and genomic analysis in the emerging model plant system, Aquilegia.

Abstract: Aquilegia (Columbine) is an emerging model system in the fields of plant biology and evolution. Because of a radiation event, the young genus has undergone rapid speciation into about 70 flowering species in the past 3 million years. The resulting characteristics: wide ecological and habitable range, novel floral organ formation (staminodia), variable flower morphology and diverse pollination within the genus offer scientific insight into vital plant adaptations. Understanding these adaptations on a genetic level have potential in agricultural crop improvement. Many of the necessary plant-specific resources required for genetic and genomic research exist; a fully sequenced genome, EST database, and functional tools have been developed specifically for Aquilegia. However, to conduct forward genetics studies a standardized and customized tissue culture and transformation protocol is required. Tissue culture allows the in vitro aseptic culture of cells, tissues, organs, and whole plants under controlled nutritional and environmental conditions. The ability to produce and propagate genetically homogeneous, disease-free plant material provides stability and reproducibility in the research environment. Once established, plants grown from tissue culture can undergo genetic transformation-a method of introducing novel genes into a model plant genome. This core research tool is instrumental in understanding gene function through the controlled expression of desired genes in model plant systems. The proposed study is currently exploring the possibilities of optimal plant transformation in Aquilegia via a tissue culture approach.

Use of PCR for Detection of Mastitis-Causing Pathogens Isolated from Bovine Quarter Milk Samples
Poster:
P.12
Location:
Ursa Major

Patricia Galvan, Leanna Little Dog, Anthony Chew. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Shelton Murinda

Synopsis: In this study, a Polymerase Chain Reaction protocol utilizes pathogen-specific primers in order to detect the presence of mastitis causing pathogens in quarter milk samples.

Abstract: Bovine mastitis results in economic losses to dairy farmers, and presence of mastitis pathogens in unpasteurized milk and dairy products poses food safety concerns. Bovine mastitis is commonly attributed to Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Streptococcus species. The purpose of this study was to develop a Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) protocol that would detect presence of these pathogens in 184 quarter milk (QM) samples that were collected from the udders of mastitic dairy cows treated with an experimental pulsed electromagnetic field therapy (PEMFT) protocol. The presence or absence of mastitis causing organisms in the QM samples would determine the effectiveness of PEMFT in treating bovine mastitis. The PCR protocol utilizes S. aureus, E. coli, and Streptococcus pathogen-specific primers that amplify a specific segment of DNA in these bacterial strains. Once DNA amplification is achieved, gel electrophoresis allows for comparison of the DNA banding patterns of quality control strains with isolates from QM samples. A total of 60 of the QM samples were evaluated, and 58 (97%) tested positive for E. coli, 2 (3%) for Staphylococcus, and 5 (8%) for both E. coli and Staphylococcus. We are currently refining the multiplex PCR protocol to integrate primers for Streptococcus detection. If PEMFT is effective in decreasing the numbers of mastitis causing pathogens it could lead to a mastitis treatment that is non-invasive, that reduces or eliminates use of antibiotics, and reduces economic losses to dairy farmers.

An All-Solid State pH Sensor Based on Pd Nanoparticle Sensing
Poster:
P.13
Location:
Ursa Major

Daniel Saavedra, Clinton Tong, Monica Paz, Dulce Ayala. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Peng Sun

Synopsis: An all-solid state pH sensor with palladium is tested to determine if there is a viable replacement for contemporary pH sensors.

Abstract: Contemporary pH meters are bulky, fragile, and expensive. The purpose of the project is to determine if there is a way to create a portable and disposable pH sensor with a low cost. The pH sensor is a small titanium wire held within a glass capillary. Cyclic voltammetry was used to oxidize the Ti wire in 0.1 M H2SO4. After this step, a layer of TiO2 can be formed on the Ti wire's surface. An additional cyclic voltammetry in 0.1 mM K2PdCl4, was used to deposit Pd particles onto the wire. The pH sensor has many advantages: the sensor is all-solid state, durable, cheap, disposable, and portable. Results show that the pH sensor is linearly response to the pH change with a linearity range at 0.8091- 0.9986. The pH sensor is most stable a pH range from 5 to 11. The reproducibility of the sensor was also tested, and results were consistent between twelve electrodes produced through the above methods.

High Resolution Microscopic Imaging of Functionally Specialized Cytochrome Oxidase-Rich Epithelial Cells in the Rat Salivary Gland, Kidney and Stomach
Poster:
P.14
Location:
Ursa Major

Vivianne Mitri, Hosne Afrin, Ursala Simonoski, Christopher Buglino, David Afework, Crystal Carter, Melissa Howe, Odette Hovsepian. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Glenn H. Kageyama

Synopsis: Cytochrome oxidase histochemistry was used to localize elevated levels of oxidative metabolic activity in functionally specialized epithelial cells in rat kidney, salivary glands, and stomach.

Abstract: The brain requires a great amount of energy to function. Cytochrome oxidase (CO) histochemistry has been used to identify metabolically active areas in the CNS but cellular localization is made difficult by its complex structure. In epithelial tissues functionally distinct cell types are easily distinguished. Since elevated CO activity has been observed primarily in post-synaptic dendrites that require a significant amount of energy for active ion transport in the brain, we hypothesize that epithelial cell types that specialize in this type of transport would also have high levels of oxidative metabolic activity. To expand on a prior experiment where thicker 60 µm sections were examined and to observe the samples at a single cell level, high resolution microscopy was used to view 1.5 µm plastic-embedded rat tissue sections of kidney, salivary gland, and stomach that were histochemically reacted with CO. The tissues selected contained specific cell types with distinct specialized functions. In the kidney, elevated CO levels were observed in the proximal and distal convoluted tubules but not within the renal corpuscles where filtration takes place. In the salivary glands, elevated CO was confined to the striated ducts but not the intercalated or interlobar ducts, serous cells, or mucous cells. In the gastric epithelium, elevated CO was concentrated in the acid-secreting parietal cells but not in protein-synthesizing chief cells or mucous-secreting mucous neck cells. Thus, the cell types whose main function is the active transport of sodium (Na+) or hydrogen (H+) ions showed elevated levels of CO activity.

Acceptance of Aerobic Apparel with Heating and Icing Capabilities
Poster:
P.15
Location:
Ursa Major

Kristen Murphy, Elena Rhodes. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Chitra Dabas and Dr. Cynthia Reagan

Synopsis: Researchers explored performance leggings intended to alleviate knee pain using smart technology. Results showed preference for prototype leggings with non-removable tubing in a triangle pattern.

Abstract: This research explores the possible manufacture and sale of performance leggings intended to help alleviate knee pain in female athletes. With injuries on the rise and female athletes becoming more active, the development of non-addictive pain alleviation is paramount. We investigate possible systems of administering heat and cold by way of smart technology within the legging itself. The researchers developed a web based questionnaire to evaluate users' perceptions of the fit, function, and design of the performance leggings; and included an illustrated prototype of the performance legging to test whether female athletes would accept such a heating and cooling device. The survey indicated that regardless of whether or not participants had experienced knee pain in the past, all were interested in purchasing performance leggings with built-in smart technology. As female athletes are now four-to-six times more likely to injure their knees than are male athletes, the research discussed in this paper is particularly relevant. That said, the proposed design might also be incorporated into professional sporting uniforms for male athletes, such as football players who often experience knee pain during games. Indeed, a smart technology capable of alleviating knee pain through heating and icing will offer pain relief for both male and female athletes of all ages. In the near future, we would like to create a series of working prototypes to help determine and evaluate specific concerns female athletes might have with such a product moving forward.

Propping up Folk Tales, Frozen in Time: Analysis of "The Snow Queen" and Frozen with Propp's 31 Narratemes
Poster:
P.16
Location:
Ursa Major

Kristin Kawecki. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Allison Baker

Synopsis: An essay outlining a comparison of the film "Frozen" and the tale it was loosely based upon, "The Snow Queen" using Propp's approach of 31 narratemes; evincing the similarity of the two as well as the validity of Propp's approach and the eternal popularity of the folk genre.

Abstract: Frozen, the most popular fairy-tale type movie of recent release is usually declared as nothing like the Hans Christian Anderson tale upon which it was based, "The Snow Queen". Vladimir Propp's 31 Narratemes, outlined in his "Morphology of the Folktale", is a system designed to numerically sequence plot occurrences in Russian folktales. This system was applied to both tales in order to have a more solid manner of comparing the two. The results indicated that while the two differ in detail, the general plot occurrences largely remained the same. Furthermore, the ability to apply Propp's formula to both tales evidenced the dexterity and validity of Propp's approach: although Danish, and crafted, "The Snow Queen" fit perfectly within Propp's approach originally designed for orally passed Russian tales; additionally, the plot of Frozen-American, and crafted for the cinema-was generally able to fit within Propp's approach, stretching it on occasion in order to allow for plot complexity. This general applicability of Propp's 31 Narratemes evinces the standing of both of these crafted tales as belonging within the folk tale genre; the popularity of both indicating the resilient power and continuing resonance of this genre.

Analysis of nutrient absorption in obesity resistant mice by adiabatic bomb calorimetry
Poster:
P.17
Location:
Ursa Major

Melody Sycks. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Andrew Steele

Synopsis: Adiabatic bomb calorimetry methods were explored in an attempt to quantify differences in the caloric content of fecal matter in mice of interest.

Abstract: The incidence of obesity in America is skyrocketing. The direct and indirect healthcare costs are also increasing. Due to the ease of making genetic manipulations, mouse models are useful for studying the complex mechanisms of diseases such as obesity. We have observed that two very different insults to the dopamine system lead to a resistance to diet-induced obesity: mice with a gene deleted for either the dopamine transporter (DAT) or the type-1 dopamine receptor (D1R) demonstrate a nearly complete resistance to diet-induced obesity in comparison to wild type mice on similar diets. Our goal is to determine whether the resistance to obesity results from differences in nutrient absorption; our first target is fecal excrement studies by adiabatic bomb calorimetry to determine variations in fecal caloric content. Fecal samples were obtained and lyophilized, compounded with enriched wheat flour, pelleted, and analyzed by adiabatic bomb calorimetry. Data analysis led to inconclusive results in the determination of nutrient absorption in obesity resistant versus wild type mice. Future optimization of sampling methods for the analysis of mouse feces by adiabatic bomb calorimetry is necessary in order to accurately determine if there is any true caloric differences between fecal excrement of diet-induced obesity resistant versus wild type mice.

Isotope Labeling in Astrobiology: Ethanol as a Carbon Source
Poster:
P.18
Location:
Ursa Major

Nicole Perkins. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Gregory A. Barding and Dr. Rakesh Mogul

Synopsis: This project involved interdisciplinary research (with connections between biology and chemistry) as a bacteria's metabolism was studied through gas chromatography- mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis.

Abstract: Originally isolated from the Mars Odyssey prior to launch, Acinetobacter radioresistens 50v1, a gram negative bacteria, was found to exhibit extremophile capabilities as it can resist multiple decontamination techniques within spacecraft facilities. In particular, this strain of Acinetobacter is believed to not only survive ethanol cleaning but also utilize it as its sole carbon source. To verify and understand the unique characteristics of Acinetobacter radioresistens 50v1 to resist and exploit the ethanol-based decontamination process, several different growth conditions were compared and analyzed by GC-MS. First, the capability of the bacterium to utilize ethanol as a sole carbon source in a nutrient-poor environment was evaluated. After collecting the cells from an inoculated sample, GC-MS analysis was done in order to identify if ethanol was present and incorporated into the cell. To confirm and explore the switch to ethanol as an energy source, the experiment was repeated using U-[sup]13[/sup]C and deuterium labeled ethanol and compared to growth under nutrient rich conditions using glucose as the carbon source. Isotopic labeling was extensively observed and included metabolites such as proline, lysine, isoleucine, valine, and trehalose. Because of the lack of other compounds as carbon sources in the growth media, the labeling of metabolites and disaccharides strongly suggest that the organism is capable of using ethanol as its sole carbon source.

Quantification of Trehalose and Other Sugars in Submergence Resistance Rice
Poster:
P.19
Location:
Ursa Major

Elizabeth Martinez. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Gregory Barding

Synopsis: This is a metabolomics study that aims to quantify trehalose, and other abundant carbohydrates in submergence resistant rice by means of gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry.

Abstract: Trehalose, a disaccharide found in many organisms, is an important sugar often associated with increased tolerance to a variety of stressors. In plants, trehalose is present in exceedingly low quantities making it difficult to detect and quantify, especially due to its low relative abundance comparted to sucrose, fructose and glucose. Gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS) equipped with a quadrupole detector is a powerful technique for the sensitive detection of metabolites after derivatization with a suitable reagent, such as MSTFA. In this study, trehalose, fructose, sucrose, and glucose were evaluated in two different varieties of rice, one submergence tolerant and the other submergence intolerant. The LOD and LOQ for trehalose was found to be 4.4 nM 14.7 nM, respectively, with a 1 uL injection. Because of the excessive amount of sucrose in rice, a separate measurement was taken after a 1:100 dilution to ensure detection of the lower abundant saccharides. The analysis was first ran using a 60 - 600 m/z scan to identify each sugar using library matching as well as an in-house library generated with standards. Subsequently, selected ion monitoring (SIM) was after selecting ions specific to the sugars to further reduce the background associated with unwanted signals and increase sensitivity relative to full scan mode. In unstressed rice tissue, fructose had an abundance of approximately 0.01 μg/g tissue, glucose had an abundance of 0.09 μg/g tissue, Sucrose had an abundance of 19.40 mg/g tissue, and trehalose had an abundance of 0.01 μg/g tissue.

Voltammetry on a Nanometer-sized Electrode in Solution Containing Very Dilute Electroactive Species
Poster:
P.20
Location:
Ursa Major

Rachel Wampler, Jordan Kitt, Nina Tran, Daniel Saavedra, Jungik Hong. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Peng Sun

Synopsis: A homemade potentiostat with a peak-peak noise of 5fA can use a nm-sized voltammetric electrode to measure micromolar ferrocenmethanol.

Abstract: A nanometer-sized Pt electrode is becoming a routine tool in nano-electrochemical research. But the dissolution of Pt in aqueous solution is quite common, and the rate of Pt dissolution is related to the current density across the electrode. This means a nanometer-sized Pt electrode could be recessed if a large current goes across the electrode, but the information extracted from the electrode could be problematic. Conducting measurements on a nanometer-sixed electrode in solution containing very dilute electroactive species decreases the extent of the dissolution of the nanometer-sized Pt electrode. So far, a commercial potentiostat, which has a peak-peak noise of less than 10 fA, is uncommon. In this paper, a homemade potentiostat, which has a peak-peak noise of less than 5 fA, was made. By using the instrument, voltammograms, with a limiting current of less than 20 fA, can be obtained on a nanometer-sized electrode in solution containing micromolar ferrocenmethanol. Our results show that the standard rate constant of the oxidation of ferrocenemethanol measured in a micromolar ferrocenmethanol solution is a little bit bigger than that measured in milimolar ferrocenemethanol solution. This indicates that kinetic parameter may be affected by the amount of electroactive molecules being measured.

Investigation of Flow Inside Paper-Based Analytical Devices
Poster:
P.21
Location:
Ursa Major

Ching Man Choy. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Yan Liu

Synopsis: To investigate flows on inexpensive and environment friendly paper-based devices, and apply them to semi-quantitative analysis of ambient ammonia.

Abstract: Title: Investigation of Flow Inside Paper-Based Analytical Devices Name: Ching Man Choy, Yan Liu Address: Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State Polytechnic University Pomona, 3801 W Temple Ave, Pomona, CA 91768 Microfluidic devices have been applied toward analyses of a wide variety of biological, chemical, environmental, and food samples. Compared to conventional analytical methods, microfluidic device-based analysis requires very small amount of sample and reagent consumption and thus generates minimal waste while still maintains its high performance. Among all materials used for microfluidic devices, paper has gained more and more interest in that it is cheap, light in weight, and easy to handle. The main material inside a piece of paper is cellulose which sometimes is not evenly distributed throughout a piece of paper. The complexity of the paper substrate often generates unpredictable flow inside the paper-based device. This project was to investigate the flow inside paper-based devices using different patterns and reactions. Two different patterns of network, single channel and three-channel, were first wax printed on a piece of regular paper. The paper was then waterproof sealed at the backside. Following 45 seconds of heating at 130 oC, the wax penetrated and formed a channel inside the paper. For the single channel device, 15 microliters of water was applied on the reservoir, and the travelling time of water from reservoir through the channel was recorded. The flow rate of water was determined to be 0.03068 mm2/s. The three-channel was used for the investigation of mixing reactions between salt solution and water. A salt solution was introduced into the middle channel and water into two side channels; the flow rate of 1 mM copper sulfate and 1 mM potassium permanganate were calculated to be 0.08412 mm2/s and 0.07719 mm2/s respectively. Preliminary data showed that it had the potential to run on-chip Berthelot's reaction which may be applied toward semi-quantitative analysis of ambient ammonia sample. This project is supported by the RSCA program and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at California State Polytechnic University Pomona.

Engineering Cosmetic Powders
Poster:
P.22
Location:
Ursa Major

Priscilla Babiak, Tatiana Galanto, Maryam Dadi, Robert Bates. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Laila Jallo

Synopsis: The purpose of this research is to examine the effectiveness of dry coating cosmetic powders versus the conventional method of mixing as used in industry.

Abstract: Pressed cosmetic powders made from mineral powders are widely used due to their ability to camouflage acne, rosacea, and scars; amongst many other skin discolorations. Similarly, they are popular due to their incorporation of zinc oxide which offers sun protection. Mixing techniques used to make these powders affect how well they pack, which ultimately affects the features of camouflaging and sunscreen protection. In this work, three different techniques were compared; blending with a blender, hand mixing with a mortar and pestle, and dry coating using the magnetically assisted impaction coating device (MAIC). System parameters included variation of dry coating, coating percentage of silica, mixing time, and MAIC magnet to powder ratio to examine how well the nanoparticles were coated. Each powder was characterized using bulk density to determine how well the powders pack and EDX spectroscopy to determine the uniformity of the mixture. Preliminary results showed higher bulk density for the dry coated samples compared to the other two. EDX spectroscopy results will be obtained in the next coming week.

Exploration of Newton's Method
Poster:
P.23
Location:
Ursa Major

Samantha Secor, Anthony Simon. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Hubertus von Bremen

Synopsis: In this presentation, we will be discussing Newton's method and how it applies with multivariable functions, complex functions, and examples of convergence rates displayed on MATLAB.

Abstract: Convergence and convergence rate of the method are treaded rigorously for the single variable case in the course work. In the multi-variable function case, most undergraduate numerical analysis texts (and in the course work) only treat the case when the Jacobian of the system is nonsingular. In this undergraduate research project we will be exposed to Newton's method for finding zeros of functions of a complex variable and for functions of several variables with emphasis on systems with a singular Jacobian.

Characterizing Primitive Nondeficient Numbers with a Given Number of Primes
Poster:
P.24
Location:
Ursa Major

Fany Salazar, Huyen Le. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Mitsuo Kobayashi and Dr. Berit Givens

Synopsis: We present 3-prime factorization similar to 2-prime factorization for even primitive nondeficient numbers (PNDs), and a separate behavior for odd PNDs.

Abstract: In the first century, Philo of Alexandria wrote that the world was created in 6 days and the moon orbits the earth in 28 days because 6 and 28 are perfect numbers. These numbers also belong to the larger set of primitive nondeficient numbers (PNDs). A natural number is primitive non-deficient if the sum of the reciprocals of its factors is greater than or equal to 2 while any proper subsum is less than 2. In 1913, L. E. Dickson found a two-prime characterization for PNDs: n is a PND with 2 prime factors if and only if n=(2^k)p when p is a prime and 2^k<p<2^(k+1). We demonstrate a way to calculate infinitely many even 3-prime PNDs of the form 2pq and present a complete list of odd 3-prime PNDs.

Current Sensor Casing for Accurate Current Measurements in High-Power Transmission Lines
Poster:
P.25
Location:
Ursa Major

Stephen Alatorre. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Ertan Salik

Synopsis: Development of a nonlinear magnetic material casing and embed an optical current sensor to accurately measure current from magnetic field for commercial optimization.

Abstract: Optical current sensors have potential to be part of future smart power grid systems. Typically, an optical current sensor measures current by detection of magnetic field. Although such sensors were demonstrated in the recent decades, for them to be part of commercial systems, their accuracy needs to be improved. We are developing a magnetic casing for the current sensor to measure the magnetic field from the current without oversaturating because of nonlinear magnetic phenomena. A typical configuration is being simulated using COMSOL Multiphysics. The goals of our simulation are (1) to determine the ideal nonlinear magnetic materials for the casing, (2) determine the best geometric configuration, (3) to characterize the range of allowable currents before the sensor oversaturates for a given set of specifications. We will present our preliminary results for these simulations.

Enhancing Sensitivity and Robustness of Tapered Fiber Optic Sensors
Poster:
P.26
Location:
Ursa Major

Julien Okey, Brandi Wooten, Jose Flores. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Ertan Salik

Synopsis: We have run successful experiments to increase the sensitivity in our bio-sensors. We have also built a an apparatus to prevent our sensors from breaking.

Abstract: Biconically tapered optical fibers (BTOF) are refractive index sensors with potential applications in chemical and biological sensing. Possible areas of application include medical diagnosis, food safety, environmental monitoring, and defense against chemical and biological warfare agents. We have investigated ways to improve the sensitivity of BTOFs by optimizing their geometry, which can enhance their sensitivity by an order of magnitude. Tapering involves pulling glass optical fibers while heating them with a torch. We have adjusted the amount of heat applied, heat distribution, pull rate and pull distance to achive a more optimal geometry. We successfully fabricated sensors with taper waist diameters less than 5 micrometers and characterized their sensitivity. We have also recently started developing a method to improve robustness of the sensors. Because a glass thread with 5 micrometer thickness is highly fragile, we aim to embed them within microfluidic channels to ensure their mechanical strength. In addition, a microfluidic channel limits the volume of reagents to be used, and improve robustness of fluid delivery. We will present our preliminary results on sensor sensitivity and robustness.

Interaction Induced Size Evolution in Galaxies
Poster:
P.27
Location:
Ursa Major

Francisco Mercado. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jorge Moreno

Synopsis: Preliminary results from a project that uses numerical simulations to study the effects that galaxy interactions have on the size of galaxies.

Abstract: In this work we utilize two suites of 75 different simulations of major galaxy mergers based on the Gadget model (Springel & Hernquist+ 2003) and the novel "Feedback in Realistic Environments" FIRE model (Hopkins et al. 2014). These mergers are composed of spiral galaxies of mass ratio 2.5:1 and are set at various impact parameters, eccentricities, and relative spin-orbit orientations. We focus on the effect of interactions on the evolution of the size of the gaseous, stellar, and star-forming components of the galaxies.

Bronco shuttle plus
Poster:
P.28
Location:
Ursa Major

Chon in Luk. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Yu Sun

Synopsis: Navigation and informational application for shuttle on campus.

Abstract: The bronco shuttle plus app provides shuttle information on a native mobile environment versus web based site. It is optimized for mobile devices and utilizes gps to navigate users to stops.

3D Sensor for Structural Health Monitoring of Civil Infrastructure
Poster:
P.29
Location:
Ursa Major

Eric Walz, Tunji Owolabi. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Zhen Yu

Synopsis: The development of a three-dimensional linear digital accelerometer to monitor structural acceleration for the purpose of identifying damaged infrastructure.

Abstract: Accelerometers are the ideal sensor for monitoring the structural responses of stresses because of the sensor's ability to measure static and dynamic accelerations and to provide instant and accurate data, which allows early detection of beginnings of poor structural integrity. Civil structures are under constant stressed acceleration derived from vibration, motion, shocks, and seismic activity. The stress causes structural degradation, eventually leading to damaged and unstable structures. Using sensors to monitor the degradation of structures and infrastructure is a promising alternative to visual inspections for maintenance purposes. The purpose of our research is to develop a three-dimensional linear digital accelerometer system, used to monitor and log vibrations in structures. The objective is to collect, store, and transmit vibration data and analyze it for the identification of structural damages.

Water Reuse
Poster:
P.30
Location:
Ursa Major

Kurt Paul, Danny Vera, Hector Cardenas, Sean Yazdi. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Ali Sharbat

Synopsis: This study was conducted to educate the public on water reuse and its benefits in solving the water supply shortage.

Abstract: Reclamation and reuse of waste water plays a vital part in cutting the gap between our water supply and water demand. Several water reuse technologies are introduced within the literature. Each of these technologies have been proven to be effective in treating the water to acceptable water standards. Water reuse can be found everywhere from a local, national or global level. Described in the literature is also the growth trends and how water reuse has been gaining popularity over recent years. Another topic of discussion that is covered within the literature review is the amount of waste produced by water reuse as well as different ways to treat and take care of this waste. Lastly, another main topic of discussion is the public perception on indirect and direct potable reuse. The public has a negative view point on reusing water for drinking water purposes. This negative perception stems from the fact that they are drinking water which was once waste. This negative view is due to a lack of knowledge by the consumer. As the drinking water that comes from waste is just as clean as water that is pumped from the ground water table.

Regenerative Aerospace
Poster:
P.31
Location:
Ursa Major

Rita Eick, Emerson Baker, Hali Arriaga, Jorge Rivera, Wesley Miller, David Hunter, Eric Johnson. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Steven K. Dobbs

Synopsis: Regenerative Aerospace is in the research and development phase of designing and 3-D printing a composite wing implemented with power generation systems that will be used to study aeroelastic phenomena.

Abstract: Regenerative Aerospace is currently working towards proving the viability of a 3-D printed composite wing in addition to the application of energy harvesting during the aeroelastic phenomenon. As the aviation industry continues to push for more fuel efficient flight, different methods have been researched. One of them includes the method of high aspect ratio wings, however, these wings are susceptible to the aeroelastic phenomena at much lower speeds than that of lower aspect ratio wings. Regenerative Aerospace seeks to take advantage of the vibrations produced by aeroelasticity and use them to generate electricity. Currently, three devices have been studied: linear power generators, rotational power generators and piezo-electric materials. Preliminary tests have proven that the piezo-electric generators and rotational power generators generate electricity. These devices generate the electricity as a result of the vibrations the wing experiences during flight. The devices will be tested on a 3-D printed wing made of a rubber polymer material embedded with fibers made of poly lactic acid. This is to add stiffness in bending so the wing does not flutter uncontrollably. This 3-D printed wing allows for a strong light weight structure and is easy to manufacture. So far, the team has been able to successfully build an 8-inch prototype of the wing proving the reliability of 3-D printing as a means to manufacture wings. Wind tunnel testing is planned in the immediate future and the team hopes to prove that energy harvesting through flutter can be achieved.

The Impact of Cultural Value and Cognitive Style on Web Usability
Poster:
P.32
Location:
Ursa Major

Jae Jung. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jae Min Jung and Dr. Sonya Zhang

Synopsis: Is a "usable" website perceived differently by individuals? A framework is developed based on cultural and cognitive theory that effects on website usability.

Abstract: The global business environment has been hypercompetitive especially in online markets. It is becoming more critical to understand different online users' behaviors for website success. Web usability measures how a website is optimized based on its user's perspective toward their goals. To date, most of studies have focused on either a methodology to measure web usability or its users' behavior itself. There has been a paucity of research examining why different individuals perceive the website differently. However, it has been well known that cultural values play a significant role in influencing individual's values, beliefs, emotions, and behaviors. Thus, this research focuses on the role of thinking style stemming from culture on the users' perceptions and preferences for their website usage. To this end, this study conducted secondary data research by thoroughly searching online databases in information system, social psychology, and marketing (i.e., ABI/INFORM and ACM Digital Library). This effort yielded 45 relevant articles from prominent journals such as Information System Research, Management Science, and Social and Behavioral Science. Review of those articles lead me to suggest that the Microsoft Usability Guidelines (MUG) be used to evaluate websites and propose a number of propositions drawing on Hofstede's cultural values and Nisbett's cognitive style framework. This research contributes to the information systems and marketing literatures by identifying under-researched areas in an effort to stimulate research.

Modeling and Simulation of the Mars Glider
Time:
1:00PM
Location:
15-1828

Emerson Baker, Isaac Guzman, Edward Gomez. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Subodh Bhandari

Synopsis: Autopilot development of a fixed wing glider whose main goal is to survey the Martian atmosphere.

Abstract: During the design process of aircraft it is important to have a 3-dimensional CAD model for various disciplines of design. An accurate CAD model can be used to derive aerodynamic coefficients, structural deflection and failure data, and stability and control derivatives. Aerodynamic coefficients are used to determine the maximum structural load applied to the aircraft during the flight and to verify predicted performance. Structural simulation and experimentation are used to verify the structural integrity of the aircraft at maximum load. In the early stages of design it is also important to derive cost-effective estimates of stability and control derivatives. Stability and control derivatives provide an input - output relationship between the various controls of the aircraft and can be tuned using a proportional-integral-derivative control system to provide quick stable control outputs. The purpose of this research paper is to apply structural, aerodynamic, and stability and control principles to the Prandtl-M aircraft, or the Preliminary Research Aerodynamic Design to Land on Mars.


Regenerative Aerospace
Poster:
P.31
Location:
Ursa Major

Rita Eick, Emerson Baker, Hali Arriaga, Jorge Rivera, Wesley Miller, David Hunter, Eric Johnson. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Steven K. Dobbs

Synopsis: Regenerative Aerospace is in the research and development phase of designing and 3-D printing a composite wing implemented with power generation systems that will be used to study aeroelastic phenomena.

Abstract: Regenerative Aerospace is currently working towards proving the viability of a 3-D printed composite wing in addition to the application of energy harvesting during the aeroelastic phenomenon. As the aviation industry continues to push for more fuel efficient flight, different methods have been researched. One of them includes the method of high aspect ratio wings, however, these wings are susceptible to the aeroelastic phenomena at much lower speeds than that of lower aspect ratio wings. Regenerative Aerospace seeks to take advantage of the vibrations produced by aeroelasticity and use them to generate electricity. Currently, three devices have been studied: linear power generators, rotational power generators and piezo-electric materials. Preliminary tests have proven that the piezo-electric generators and rotational power generators generate electricity. These devices generate the electricity as a result of the vibrations the wing experiences during flight. The devices will be tested on a 3-D printed wing made of a rubber polymer material embedded with fibers made of poly lactic acid. This is to add stiffness in bending so the wing does not flutter uncontrollably. This 3-D printed wing allows for a strong light weight structure and is easy to manufacture. So far, the team has been able to successfully build an 8-inch prototype of the wing proving the reliability of 3-D printing as a means to manufacture wings. Wind tunnel testing is planned in the immediate future and the team hopes to prove that energy harvesting through flutter can be achieved.

Investigation of changes in monomeric anthocyanins during sulfite treatment
Time:
1:15PM
Location:
15-1814

Yee Teng Moo, Lauren Chuman, Carol Pow Sang. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Harmit Singh

Synopsis: RP-HPLC analysis of ACNs-sulfite solution showed different trends which indicated the presence of different reaction when different ACNs were used

Abstract: Sulfites are widely used in food processing due to their antioxidant and preservation properties. Examples of the common uses of sulfites are during wine production and browning prevention of fruits and vegetable. Different anthocyanins ACNs react differently when encountered with sulfites. ACNs samples from red cabbage, grape juice concentrate, grape skin, and elderberry were prepared at pH 3.0 and with additions of 50 uL, 100 uL, and 150uL of 20% sulfite solution with a resulting concentration of 0.02%. The samples were heated in a water bath at 80 °C and 105 °C and were analyzed by HPLC and spectrophotometric method before and after sulfite addition and heating. The absorbance decrease showed an approximately 99% decrease in ACNs from Red Cabbage and Elderberry Whereas grape juice and grape skin ACNs showed a 83 % decrease. The HPLC data showed different trends as compared to spectral data for various monomeric ACNs reaction with sulfites. These results indicate that grape juice and grape skin ACNs reacted differently with sulfite solutions. The results also suggested the possibility of grape juice and grape skin ACNs being more stable or less reactive to sulfites as compared to elderberry and cabbage colors. Understanding the variability in the reaction of sulfites and ACNs from various sources will help in the selection of appropriate sources and application conditions for using natural colors in food products.


Investigation of the rate of degradation of grape anthocyanins in the presence of ascorbic acid using an accelerated shelf life test (ASLT) method
Poster:
P.9
Location:
Ursa Major

Lauren Chuman, Yee Teng Moo, Carol Pow Sang, Abdulrahman Al-azazi. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Harmit Singh

Synopsis: This study investigated the degradation of ACNs from grape juice with ascorbic acid using an (ASLT) method with different thermal treatments for various time intervals.

Abstract: Anthocyanins (ACNs) are dark colored natural pigments used in food products and are sensitive to pH, temperature and ascorbic acid (AA). AA is naturally present in fruit juices and can cause the degradation of ACNs and decrease in shelf life of the products. The aim of this study was to investigate the degradation of ACNs from commercial grape juice concentrate color in the presence of AA using an accelerated method at 85°C for various time intervals. The stability of grape ACNs was determined by the rate of degradation of monomeric ACNs on heating. The change in the polymeric color, the color density and polymeric color percentage (PCP) were determined using a potassium metabisulfite solution (20%) based on spectrophotometric method. Monomeric ACNs were determined using RP-HPLC methods. For each treatment, 2.8mL of color was added into the cuvette along with 0.2mL of potassium metabisulfite. Eight monomeric ACNs were identified using HPLC and total area was calculated to compare the degradation. Unexpected results were obtained indicating that AA either did not change the degradation rate or prevented the degradation of ACNS. The spectrophotometric analysis showed that even 8 hours, the control w/o AA showed a minimal difference in PCP as compared to with AA sample indicating no effect of AA on the degradation of ACNs. The heated control w/o AA showed a decreased in total HPLC area by 1064.34, whereas with AA sample showed an increase in total HPLC area by 1535 indicating protective affect of AA for grape juice ACNs.

Is Competence to Stand in Trial, Affected by an Underlying Structure of Psychiatric Symptoms or a Forensic Psychiatric Patient's demographics?
Time:
3:45PM
Location:
15-1822

Jessica Galvan. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Mark Williams

Synopsis: The preliminary findings of this study suggest that scoring poorly on the Understanding subtest of the MacCAT-CA is not due to present psychiatric symptoms

Abstract: The MacArthur Competence Assessment Tool-Criminal Adjudication (MacCAT-CA) is a standardized assessment instrument used to assist with competency to stand trial evaluations. The MacCAT-CA consists of three scales that each measure distinct domains related to trial competency assessment: Understanding, Reasoning, and Appreciation. Many individuals who take the MacCAT-CA come from marginalized and lower socioeconomic backgrounds. Additionally, many individuals who take the MacCAT-CA likely have low levels of educational attainment. The current study was conducted to determine whether performance on the MacCAT-CA is related to demographic factors such as age, ethnicity, gender, and educational level. This archival research project examined patient files from a forensic psychiatric state hospital that serves an ethnically and diagnostically diverse patient population. The patient's files included basic demographic information as well as their assessment scores on the MacCAT-CA. Analysis of this data will be focused on examining whether there are group differences in MacCAT-CA scores across categorical demographic variables such as ethnicity and gender. Additionally, we will examine the correlations between MacCAT-CA scores and continuous demographic variables including education and age. The current number of MacCAT-CA protocols extracted from patient's files and inputted into SPSS is, n=112. It is hypothesized that self-reported educational level will be significantly associated with performance on MacCAT-CA subtests, but that all other demographic variables will be statistically unrelated to MacCAT-CA scores. Our preliminary analysis revealed a statistically significant positive correlation (r = 0.4) between the MacCAT-CA Understanding subtest and self-reported level of education.


Can Non-Verbal Behavior Mitigate the Effects of Stereotype Threat?
Time:
4:00PM
Location:
15-1822

Emilio Medina, Gracie Flicker, Jason Nerio, Jessica Galvan, Sarine Aratoon, and Diana Castro. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Viviane Seyranian

Synopsis: The current research will examine whether a simple intervention involving changing one's body posture - power posing - can mitigate the deleterious effects of stereotype threat.

Abstract: Stereotype threat involves experiencing judgment based on common stereotypes associated with one's group (Spencer, Steele, & Quinn, 1999). Research shows that it is associated with increased anxiety, which can lower test performance particularly for minority members (Beilock, Rydell, McConnell, 2007). High power posing is an expansive open posture, which involves spreading limbs and occupying large areas of space. Research has shown that this pose may help people to experience feelings of high power (Huang, Galinsky, Gruenfeld, Guillory, 2011), and may increase testosterone and decreases stress levels (Carney, Cuddy, Yap, & Carney, 2015). Since stereotype threat is associated with anxiety, we are hypothesizing that high power-posing can reduce the anxiety associated with stereotype threat, thereby, potentially bolstering math performance. While research has sought various ways to reduce the negative effects of stereotype threat, no prior studies (to our knowledge) have examined the effects of changing one's nonverbal behavior as a way to mitigate stereotype threat. Therefore, our research has the potential to contribute to the literature on both power posing and stereotype threat reduction. Additionally, if our hypothesis are confirmed, power-posing may serve as a simple intervention to help mitigate the deleterious effects of stereotype threat - thereby, empowering women with a simple way to overcome the negative effects of stigmatization.

To binge or not to binge: Studying the effects of Dopamine Receptor 1 signaling on feeding in mice
Poster:
P.1
Location:
Ursa Major

Gabriela Garza-Vazquez. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Andrew Steele

Synopsis: By studying dopamine receptor 1 knockout mice, we hope to find the population of neurons responsible for the binge eating of high fat foods. After fasting and then feeding D1R mice, we found that the KO mice binge eat and have hypothalamic activation whereas the WT mice do not. The hypothalamus is involved in the reward system and numerous bodily activities, but new findings suggest that it may play a role in the timing of feeding. As obesity becomes a growing issue in our country, so will the need to understand the neural circuitry that can cause it.

Abstract: Obesity is associated with a number of health problems and is now an epidemic across most of our country. To understand this issue we ask the question: what can cause overeating? Dopamine receptors are distributed across several regions in the brain and are key mediators of the dopamine signal coding for motivation, pleasure, learning, and memory. Dopamine receptor 1 (D1R) neurons have been shown to mediate entrainment to feeding, suggesting that dopamine signaling may be actively involved in the timing of hunger signals. Interestingly, D1R knockout mice do not exhibit diet-induced obesity when placed on high fat diet. We performed a 24 hour experiment in which a group of D1R KO and WT mice placed on been on high fat diet (HFD) were fasted and fed, a group were fasted and not fed, and the final group was given HFD ad libitum. After being culled, the mice brains were extracted, sectioned, fixed and stained. We found that there was activation of the hypothalamus of the D1R KO mice, but not the D1R WT mice. Additionally, the D1R KO mice binged on HFD after fasting. The hypothalamus is not only responsible for metabolic processes but for the control of activities such as hunger, thirst, body temperature, sleep and circadian rhythms. This is important because there are many dopamine dependent behaviors, but they are not all from the same D1R population. By performing this experiment we can begin to process the characterization of which D1R neural populations affect binge eating of high fat foods.


Research in Dance-making
Time:
Location:
Ursa Major

Jennifer Gerry, Brenda Reyes-Chavez, Gabriela Garza-Vazquez, Manuel Macias, Amber Hauss, Cylinda Joy Haynes. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Gayle Fekete

Synopsis: Mechanism Dance Theatre, all current and former students of Cal Poly Pomona, will highlight their interest in research and scientific method in the dance-making process.

Abstract: Mechanism Dance Theatre is movement-centered project based in Pomona, CA. The collective consists of interdisciplinary members who are all current or former students of Cal Poly. Their interest is in the body's ability, regardless of its state of movement trajectory, to illuminate social issues and personal narratives. Mechanism's core values depend on the inclusion of non-traditional-dance forms and identities, cross discipline exploration and collaboration, and passing on the value of mentorship. In each of their works, attention is paid to research. Due to the interdisciplinary nature of the members, the scope of this research covers a wide spectrum of topics including cultural and gender studies, mathematics, history and literature, physics and so on as well as the intersections between them. Their contribution to the RSCA conference highlights the value of interdisciplinary research in dance-making, their process as it follows the scientific method, and will provide concrete examples of these aspects in a culminating performance. One such example is a current project drawing upon a particular flow-theory (physics) called the Constructal law. The law states that in order for a living flow-system to persist, or to "survive", it must evolve in such a way that it provides better access for its currents (Bejan, 2007). In a pattern known as tree-flow, imperfection and branching behavior is the vehicle for such access; a steady negotiation between resistance and optimization. With issues of power and control, in unsupportive architectures, how might we create movement that portrays the navigation of change, and shift the balance of value toward the branches?

Simulation Enviroment for Testing UAS Collision Avoidance System
Time:
1:15PM
Location:
15-1828

Edward Gomez, David Hunter, Daniel Garcia. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Subodh Bhandari

Synopsis: A method to create a complete software-in-the-Loop simulation for the testing of autonomous collision avoidance programs involving two unmanned aerial vehicles.

Abstract: Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) have risen in popularity in recent years in both military and civilian applications. With their low operating cost and ability to operate autonomously for long periods of time, UAVs are utilized for various application including but not limited to search and rescue, surveillance operations, natural disasters, and more. However, the lack of collision and obstacle avoidance capabilities have limited the widespread use of these vehicles. Cal Poly Pomona is currently working on many projects that involve development of collision and obstacle avoidance system for UAVs. This presentation talks about a method to create a complete software-in-the-Loop simulation for the testing of autonomous collision avoidance programs involving two or more UAVs. Using a simulation environment allows for new UAV systems to be tested without the risks involved with using an actual aircraft in flight. Also, implementing a simulation environment allows for rapid prototyping of new UAV designs, which significantly reduces the cost and time during the testing and verification phases. This simulation system uses openly available software including Athena Vortex Lattice and FlightGear, Virtual models of existing UAVs are created and integrated into the simulation environment. A built-in feature of the ardupilot software is used in conjunction with collision avoidance program to create a closed-loop where inputs such as position, heading and velocity are passed through a collision avoidance algorithm into the autopilot software. Outputs are likewise sent from the autopilot software into the flight simulator in the form of GPS waypoints. Simulation results will be shown.


Vision Based Navigation in GPS Denied Environment
Time:
4:00PM
Location:
Grand Reading Room

Amy Phan, Daniel Garcia. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Subodh Bhandari

Synopsis: Using Vision to navigate an UAV in GPS denied environment

Abstract: The task of guiding autonomous vehicles traditionally depends heavily on GPS. This makes GPS denied navigation a significant problem for autonomous vehicles. Inertial navigation allows for dead reckoning but with a significant compounding error. With the addition of optical navigation, points of interest can be used to increase the accuracy considerably. Optical processing also allows for the addition of mapping to the previously mentioned localization. When combined, this process is called SLAM (Simultaneous, Localization and Mapping). This project focuses on examining the usefulness of Optical Navigation and SLAM algorithms with the Prandtl-m flying wing aircraft. Optical navigation as well as SLAM would allow the plane to navigate and map the surface of mars in the absence of accurate GPS data.

Modeling and Simulation of the Mars Glider
Time:
1:00PM
Location:
15-1828

Emerson Baker, Isaac Guzman, Edward Gomez. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Subodh Bhandari

Synopsis: Autopilot development of a fixed wing glider whose main goal is to survey the Martian atmosphere.

Abstract: During the design process of aircraft it is important to have a 3-dimensional CAD model for various disciplines of design. An accurate CAD model can be used to derive aerodynamic coefficients, structural deflection and failure data, and stability and control derivatives. Aerodynamic coefficients are used to determine the maximum structural load applied to the aircraft during the flight and to verify predicted performance. Structural simulation and experimentation are used to verify the structural integrity of the aircraft at maximum load. In the early stages of design it is also important to derive cost-effective estimates of stability and control derivatives. Stability and control derivatives provide an input - output relationship between the various controls of the aircraft and can be tuned using a proportional-integral-derivative control system to provide quick stable control outputs. The purpose of this research paper is to apply structural, aerodynamic, and stability and control principles to the Prandtl-M aircraft, or the Preliminary Research Aerodynamic Design to Land on Mars.


Simulation Enviroment for Testing UAS Collision Avoidance System
Time:
1:15PM
Location:
15-1828

Edward Gomez, David Hunter, Daniel Garcia. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Subodh Bhandari

Synopsis: A method to create a complete software-in-the-Loop simulation for the testing of autonomous collision avoidance programs involving two unmanned aerial vehicles.

Abstract: Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) have risen in popularity in recent years in both military and civilian applications. With their low operating cost and ability to operate autonomously for long periods of time, UAVs are utilized for various application including but not limited to search and rescue, surveillance operations, natural disasters, and more. However, the lack of collision and obstacle avoidance capabilities have limited the widespread use of these vehicles. Cal Poly Pomona is currently working on many projects that involve development of collision and obstacle avoidance system for UAVs. This presentation talks about a method to create a complete software-in-the-Loop simulation for the testing of autonomous collision avoidance programs involving two or more UAVs. Using a simulation environment allows for new UAV systems to be tested without the risks involved with using an actual aircraft in flight. Also, implementing a simulation environment allows for rapid prototyping of new UAV designs, which significantly reduces the cost and time during the testing and verification phases. This simulation system uses openly available software including Athena Vortex Lattice and FlightGear, Virtual models of existing UAVs are created and integrated into the simulation environment. A built-in feature of the ardupilot software is used in conjunction with collision avoidance program to create a closed-loop where inputs such as position, heading and velocity are passed through a collision avoidance algorithm into the autopilot software. Outputs are likewise sent from the autopilot software into the flight simulator in the form of GPS waypoints. Simulation results will be shown.

Efficacy against vaginal Herpes virus infection by Lipidated or Non-Lipidated Tucaresol adjuvants in a Herpes gD tripeptide liposomal vaccine
Time:
3:00PM
Location:
15-1802

Jennifer Rubio, Eleana Guardado. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jill Adler-Moore

Synopsis: Liposomes with Herpes virus gD tripeptide and lipidated Tucaresol or MPL adjuvants each generated significant protection against a murine intravaginal HSV-2 challenge.

Abstract: Introduction: Herpes Simplex Virus 2 (HSV-2) causes recurrent genital lesions. This study examined the efficacy against murine vaginal Herpes infection using an HSV-2 gD tripeptide (gD3pep) liposomal vaccine (LV) with Lipidated or Non-Lipidated Tucaresol (LipT or NLipT) adjuvants. Methods: LV or phosphate buffer (PBS) were administered 3X subcutaneously(SQ) to BALB/c mice on d0, d28, d56. LV contained gD3pep (15μg/dose) and LipT (3μg or 5.6μg/dose), NLipT (5.6μg/dose), MPL (monophosphoryl Lipid A,15μg/dose) or LipT (3ug/dose) plus MPL (7.5ug/dose); controls were LipT or NLipT (5.6μg/dose) without gD3pep, or PBS. Medroxyprogestrone was given SQ d63 and d69 to enhance virus infectivity and mice challenged intravaginally with HSV-2, d70. Disease signs and morbidity were monitored 2X/day for 28 days. Vaginal swabs collected d72 were analyzed for vaginal viral burden. Results: Survival with gD3pep and LipT (3ug/dose) plus MPL (7.5ug/dose) (100%), MPL (15ug/dose) (100%) or LipT(5.6μg/dose) (90%) was significantly better than vaccination with NLipT (5.6μg/dose) with no protein (11%) or PBS (0%) (¬¬p <.0047). Disease signs and viral burden paralleled survival data. There was also a significant difference in viral burden between the gD3pep liposomes having different LipT doses or the combination of LipT plus MPL versus PBS (p<0.0129). Conclusions: gD3pep liposomes containing LipT at 5.6μg/dose, LipT (3ug/dose) plus MPL (7.5ug/dose) or MPL (15ug/dose) each generated significant protection against a murine intravaginal HSV-2 challenge. The marked efficacy seen using the combination of LipT plus MPL at lower doses, indicate that these adjuvants are not antagonistic and may further enhance the immune response when used in combination.


Evaluation of Lipidated and Non-Lipidated CDN Adjuvants in a gD Peptide Liposomal Vaccine for HSV-2 Murine Intravaginal Infection
Time:
1:30PM
Location:
Sp Events

Eleana Guardado, Jennifer Rubio. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jill Adler-Moore

Synopsis: A liposomal vaccine against HSV-2 was protective in mice when the vaccine contained the viral gD tripeptide and a Lipidated or non-Lipidated cyclic dinucleotide adjuvant.

Abstract: Background: An effective vaccine is needed for HSV-2 genital infections. A liposomal (Ls) viral gD tripeptide (gD3pep) vaccine was formulated with gD3pep plus a protein hydrophobic domain(HD) or gD3pep conjugated to Ls via maleimide (Cys). Lipidated (Lip) or Non-lipidated (NLip) cyclic dinucleotide (CDN) were used as adjuvants in the Ls. Methods: Ls vaccines were administered subcutaneously d0, d28, d56 to BALB/c mice (n=17/group) as follows: Ls-NLip CDN+/- gD3pep-HD or gD3pep-Cys, Ls-Lip CDN +/- gD3pep-HD or gD3pep-Cys, or phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Splenocytes and serum were collected on d59/d60 and assayed for Neutralizing antibodies (NAb), anti-gD3pep IgG Isotypes, and cytokine levels. Mice were given medroxyprogesterone d63/d69, challenged intravaginally with HSV-2 d70, vaginally swabbed d72 for viral burden and monitored for disease signs for 28 days post-challenge. Results: Vaccination with Ls-NLipCDN or Ls-LipCDN plus gD3pep-HD or gD3pep-Cys had prolonged survival following HSV-2 challenge versus PBS controls. Weight loss, disease signs, viral burden, and NAb titers paralleled survival data. Gamma interferon and IL-4 levels were elevated in mice given Ls-NLipCDN with gD3pep-HD or gD3pep-Cys versus PBS controls. IgG1 and IgG2a isotype levels were elevated in Ls-NLipCDN with gD3pep-HD or gD3pep-Cys vs PBS controls. Discussion: Ls-NLipCDN or Ls-LipCDN plus either form of gD3pep were protective against HSV-2 infection. Enhanced Th1 and Th2 immune responses were generated with elevated levels of serum IgG2a (Th1) and IgG1 (Th2) and enhanced production of Gamma interferon (Th1) and IL-4 (Th2) cytokines following vaccination with Ls-NLip CDN plus gD3pep-HD or gD3pep-Cys.

Modeling and Simulation of the Mars Glider
Time:
1:00PM
Location:
15-1828

Emerson Baker, Isaac Guzman, Edward Gomez. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Subodh Bhandari

Synopsis: Autopilot development of a fixed wing glider whose main goal is to survey the Martian atmosphere.

Abstract: During the design process of aircraft it is important to have a 3-dimensional CAD model for various disciplines of design. An accurate CAD model can be used to derive aerodynamic coefficients, structural deflection and failure data, and stability and control derivatives. Aerodynamic coefficients are used to determine the maximum structural load applied to the aircraft during the flight and to verify predicted performance. Structural simulation and experimentation are used to verify the structural integrity of the aircraft at maximum load. In the early stages of design it is also important to derive cost-effective estimates of stability and control derivatives. Stability and control derivatives provide an input - output relationship between the various controls of the aircraft and can be tuned using a proportional-integral-derivative control system to provide quick stable control outputs. The purpose of this research paper is to apply structural, aerodynamic, and stability and control principles to the Prandtl-M aircraft, or the Preliminary Research Aerodynamic Design to Land on Mars.


Autonomous Path Planning System for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles
Time:
1:15PM
Location:
Grand Reading Room

Isaac Guzman. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Subodh Bhandari

Synopsis: To research how accurate ADS-B sensors will detect position to create real time collision avoidance in unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs).

Abstract: An Autonomous Path Planning System for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) or drones is crucial for UAVs to be commercially integrated into the National Airspace System (NAS). The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) demands highly accurate Path Planning Systems in autonomy for UAVs to be safe to fly in the NAS. With the use of Automatic Dependent Surveillance - Broadcast (ADS-B) sensor “in” and “out”, the position and velocity of the UAVs can be transmitted in real time. The ADS-B sensor “out” will allow UAVs to communicate with surrounding aircraft and neighboring ground stations, allowing for relative position and velocity data to be processed. This is crucial for collision detection and avoidance between UAVs in flight. The expected result will be a complete mathematical model of the aircraft that will be used for developing an obstacle avoidance algorithm for the UAV. This research will increase the level of UAV autonomy by allowing a more reliable and economical path planning system for the UAV to operate in the NAS.

Effect of Dietary Fiber on in vitro Bioavailability of Minerals in Fiber-enriched Pasta Products
Time:
2:00PM
Location:
15-1802

Yuguang Zheng, Thomas Dandin, Giselle Hernandez. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Yao Olive Li and Dr. Yan Liu

Synopsis: Food fortification is an effective means to deliver vitamins and minerals to the human body. Similarly, functional foods have been identified as effective delivery systems for various nutraceuticals including dietary fiber. However, there is a concern that increased intake of dietary fiber may cause a potentially negative effect on mineral absorption. Hence, it is necessary to investigate the potential interactions between dietary fiber and minerals when both are added in same food matrices such as pasta. Better understanding of this mechanism would warrant proper utilization and application of dietary fiber in new product development.

Abstract: Microencapsulation could be a solution to prevent the interaction between fiber and iron, which enables the development of novel functional foods that provide enhanced nutritional value from high dietary fiber content without sacrificing mineral bioavailability. Hence, the objective of this research is to investigate the potential interactions between dietary fiber and minerals when both are added in same food matrices such as pasta. The selected dietary fiber sources and two forms of ferrous fumarate were added to cereal grain flours based on a formulation design. Using a pasta extruder, the shaped pasta was collected and dried to be with shelf-stable moisture content. The total dietary fiber measurements were taken using an automated Ankom Dietary Fiber Analyzer. A Thermo GFS Atomic Absorption Spectrometer was used to quantify the total iron content and iron dissolution profile via a simulated iron in vitro bioavailability test. The results of total iron analysis suggested cooking might cause iron loss for samples fortified with powder ferrous fumarate, but not for samples made with microencapsulated iron premix. Similarly, iron in vitro bioavailability tests suggested the addition of various fiber sources did impede the iron release in pH 1 HCl solution for all uncooked pasta samples made with iron powder; however, there is no difference for iron release in cooked samples between samples made with iron powder versus encapsulated iron premix, suggesting cooking may offset the potential blocking effect from fibers on iron.


Calpollini- a rice flour-based gluten-free pasta enriched with protein and dietary fiber
Time:
3:45PM
Location:
15-1814

Tiffany Yang, Rafael Martin Del Campo, Julia Conchas, Ali Hasan, Giselle Hernandez. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Yao Olive Li

Synopsis: There is an increasing demand on gluten-free pastas in recent years from a group of consumers who are intolerant of gluten or suffer from celiac disease. The goal of this project is to create a cereal and legume based gluten-free pasta with high fiber and protein content compared to commercial competitors.

Abstract: Pasta is a staple food in most countries. Regular pasta is made with durum semolina flour, in which the gluten network plays a role in pasta's biological and technological functionalities. The objective of this project is to create a high fiber, high protein, and gluten-free pasta to compete with the other competitors on market. Challenges were faced when finding a substitute for "gluten" and making it novel with enhanced nutritional value. Calpollini is developed based on rice flour that is enriched with fava bean flour as the protein source, and dehydrated fruit and vegetable waste pomaces as fiber sources. The utilization of these waste materials in the ingredient formulation leads to a unique feature of Calpollini that is able to promote sustainable agro-food production. Calpollini is a spiral shaped pasta that is made by extrusion using a Rotini die shape plate. There are two color variations based on the fiber source used. Green fibers consist of dehydrated powders from pomaces of green apple, spinach, kale, and cucumber while orange fibers consist of dehydrated powders from pomaces of carrot, red apple, orange, tomato, and green apple. Upon cooking, Calpollini tastes similar to regular pasta, with a springy and chewy mouthfeel, proper consistency for desirable texture, and a hint of fruity or vegetable flavor depending on the fiber source used. Measurements of dietary fiber and protein contents confirmed that Calpollini provides 20% of the recommended daily intake (RDI) for both protein and fiber; therefore, it meets the USDA's high protein and high fiber standards.

Simulation Enviroment for Testing UAS Collision Avoidance System
Time:
1:15PM
Location:
15-1828

Edward Gomez, David Hunter, Daniel Garcia. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Subodh Bhandari

Synopsis: A method to create a complete software-in-the-Loop simulation for the testing of autonomous collision avoidance programs involving two unmanned aerial vehicles.

Abstract: Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) have risen in popularity in recent years in both military and civilian applications. With their low operating cost and ability to operate autonomously for long periods of time, UAVs are utilized for various application including but not limited to search and rescue, surveillance operations, natural disasters, and more. However, the lack of collision and obstacle avoidance capabilities have limited the widespread use of these vehicles. Cal Poly Pomona is currently working on many projects that involve development of collision and obstacle avoidance system for UAVs. This presentation talks about a method to create a complete software-in-the-Loop simulation for the testing of autonomous collision avoidance programs involving two or more UAVs. Using a simulation environment allows for new UAV systems to be tested without the risks involved with using an actual aircraft in flight. Also, implementing a simulation environment allows for rapid prototyping of new UAV designs, which significantly reduces the cost and time during the testing and verification phases. This simulation system uses openly available software including Athena Vortex Lattice and FlightGear, Virtual models of existing UAVs are created and integrated into the simulation environment. A built-in feature of the ardupilot software is used in conjunction with collision avoidance program to create a closed-loop where inputs such as position, heading and velocity are passed through a collision avoidance algorithm into the autopilot software. Outputs are likewise sent from the autopilot software into the flight simulator in the form of GPS waypoints. Simulation results will be shown.


Regenerative Aerospace
Poster:
P.31
Location:
Ursa Major

Rita Eick, Emerson Baker, Hali Arriaga, Jorge Rivera, Wesley Miller, David Hunter, Eric Johnson. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Steven K. Dobbs

Synopsis: Regenerative Aerospace is in the research and development phase of designing and 3-D printing a composite wing implemented with power generation systems that will be used to study aeroelastic phenomena.

Abstract: Regenerative Aerospace is currently working towards proving the viability of a 3-D printed composite wing in addition to the application of energy harvesting during the aeroelastic phenomenon. As the aviation industry continues to push for more fuel efficient flight, different methods have been researched. One of them includes the method of high aspect ratio wings, however, these wings are susceptible to the aeroelastic phenomena at much lower speeds than that of lower aspect ratio wings. Regenerative Aerospace seeks to take advantage of the vibrations produced by aeroelasticity and use them to generate electricity. Currently, three devices have been studied: linear power generators, rotational power generators and piezo-electric materials. Preliminary tests have proven that the piezo-electric generators and rotational power generators generate electricity. These devices generate the electricity as a result of the vibrations the wing experiences during flight. The devices will be tested on a 3-D printed wing made of a rubber polymer material embedded with fibers made of poly lactic acid. This is to add stiffness in bending so the wing does not flutter uncontrollably. This 3-D printed wing allows for a strong light weight structure and is easy to manufacture. So far, the team has been able to successfully build an 8-inch prototype of the wing proving the reliability of 3-D printing as a means to manufacture wings. Wind tunnel testing is planned in the immediate future and the team hopes to prove that energy harvesting through flutter can be achieved.

A Girlish Nature: Ecofeminism in Samuel Taylor Coleridge's "Christabel"
Time:
1:30PM
Location:
Sp Collections

Kristin Kawecki. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Dewey Hall

Synopsis: This essay examines Samuel Taylor Coleridge's poem "Christabel" with an ecofeminist lens, identifying the similarity between the plight of the natural world and that of the protagonist Christabel.

Abstract: Examining Samuel Taylor Coleridge's narrative poem "Christabel" under an ecofeminist lens, this essay identifies the interconnectedness between femininity and the natural world within the poem. The pure and delicate character Christabel is a female embodiment of the natural world, a life giving force that is eventually corrupted through the seduction by the character Geraldine who represents forces unnatural and not understood. Christabel unsuspectingly acts as a welcoming and life-preserving host to the otherworldly Geraldine who not only sexually pollutes the unsullied and altruistic Christabel, but invokes a lust for her by Christabel's own father, Sir Leoline. As only a motherless daughter could, Christabel's plight embodies the violence imparted upon an unsuspecting Earth; the chastity of Christabel is itself paradise lost. In Coleridge's "Christabel" the power and vulnerability of the natural world is intimately intertwined with femininity.


Propping up Folk Tales, Frozen in Time: Analysis of "The Snow Queen" and Frozen with Propp's 31 Narratemes
Poster:
P.16
Location:
Ursa Major

Kristin Kawecki. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Allison Baker

Synopsis: An essay outlining a comparison of the film "Frozen" and the tale it was loosely based upon, "The Snow Queen" using Propp's approach of 31 narratemes; evincing the similarity of the two as well as the validity of Propp's approach and the eternal popularity of the folk genre.

Abstract: Frozen, the most popular fairy-tale type movie of recent release is usually declared as nothing like the Hans Christian Anderson tale upon which it was based, "The Snow Queen". Vladimir Propp's 31 Narratemes, outlined in his "Morphology of the Folktale", is a system designed to numerically sequence plot occurrences in Russian folktales. This system was applied to both tales in order to have a more solid manner of comparing the two. The results indicated that while the two differ in detail, the general plot occurrences largely remained the same. Furthermore, the ability to apply Propp's formula to both tales evidenced the dexterity and validity of Propp's approach: although Danish, and crafted, "The Snow Queen" fit perfectly within Propp's approach originally designed for orally passed Russian tales; additionally, the plot of Frozen-American, and crafted for the cinema-was generally able to fit within Propp's approach, stretching it on occasion in order to allow for plot complexity. This general applicability of Propp's 31 Narratemes evinces the standing of both of these crafted tales as belonging within the folk tale genre; the popularity of both indicating the resilient power and continuing resonance of this genre.

Electrochemical Study of Pt Nanoparticles
Time:
2:15PM
Location:
15-1814

Jordan Kitt, Mytruc Dang. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Peng Sun

Synopsis: Electrochemical Study of TOA+ Facilitated Transfer of PtCl62- Across the Aqueous/1,2-Dichloroethane Interface Author: Jordan A Kitt, Cal Poly Pomona Mentor: Dr. Peng Sun, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Cal Poly Pomona

Abstract: The study of Pt nanoparticles is leading to the discovery of innovative techniques in diagnosing and treating diseases, assisting in drug delivery and catalyzing chemical reactions that promote fuel efficiency, solar energy conversion and removal of pollutants in wastewater. So far, the most commonly used method to synthesis Pt nanoparticles is the Brust-Schiffrin method in which PtCl62- is extracted into the organic phase under the assistance of very hydrophobic Tetryloctylammonium ion. PtCl62- is then reduced to Pt nanoparticles in the organic phase. One fundamental question about the synthesis is what mechanism is used for the transfer of PtCl62- ion from aqueous phase into the organic phase. In our research, a potential is added onto an interface between a PtCl62- ion aqueous solution and a Tetryloctylammonium ion organic solution. Under the influence of the electric field, the transfer of PtCl62- ion from aqueous phase into the organic phase can be controlled, and thus the transfer mechanism can be studied. We found the transfer of PtCl62- ion from aqueous phase into the organic phase is a Tetryloctylammonium ion facilitated transfer process. We have also studied how many Tetryloctylammonium ions can facilitate the transfer of one PtCl62- ion.


Voltammetry on a Nanometer-sized Electrode in Solution Containing Very Dilute Electroactive Species
Poster:
P.20
Location:
Ursa Major

Rachel Wampler, Jordan Kitt, Nina Tran, Daniel P. Saavedra, Jungik Hong. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Peng Sun

Synopsis: A homemade potentiostat with a peak-peak noise of 5fA can use a nm-sized voltammetric electrode to measure micromolar ferrocenmethanol.

Abstract: A nanometer-sized Pt electrode is becoming a routine tool in nano-electrochemical research. But the dissolution of Pt in aqueous solution is quite common, and the rate of Pt dissolution is related to the current density across the electrode. This means a nanometer-sized Pt electrode could be recessed if a large current goes across the electrode, but the information extracted from the electrode could be problematic. Conducting measurements on a nanometer-sixed electrode in solution containing very dilute electroactive species decreases the extent of the dissolution of the nanometer-sized Pt electrode. So far, a commercial potentiostat, which has a peak-peak noise of less than 10 fA, is uncommon. In this paper, a homemade potentiostat, which has a peak-peak noise of less than 5 fA, was made. By using the instrument, voltammograms, with a limiting current of less than 20 fA, can be obtained on a nanometer-sized electrode in solution containing micromolar ferrocenmethanol. Our results show that the standard rate constant of the oxidation of ferrocenemethanol measured in a micromolar ferrocenmethanol solution is a little bit bigger than that measured in milimolar ferrocenemethanol solution. This indicates that kinetic parameter may be affected by the amount of electroactive molecules being measured.

An All-Solid State pH Sensor Based on Pd Nanoparticle Sensing
Poster:
P.13
Location:
Ursa Major

Daniel Saavedra, Daniel Saavedra, Clinton Tong, Monica Paz, Dulce Ayala. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Peng Sun

Synopsis: An all-solid state pH sensor with palladium is tested to determine if there is a viable replacement for contemporary pH sensors.

Abstract: Contemporary pH meters are bulky, fragile, and expensive. The purpose of the project is to determine if there is a way to create a portable and disposable pH sensor with a low cost. The pH sensor is a small titanium wire held within a glass capillary. Cyclic voltammetry was used to oxidize the Ti wire in 0.1 M H2SO4. After this step, a layer of TiO2 can be formed on the Ti wire's surface. An additional cyclic voltammetry in 0.1 mM K2PdCl4, was used to deposit Pd particles onto the wire. The pH sensor has many advantages: the sensor is all-solid state, durable, cheap, disposable, and portable. Results show that the pH sensor is linearly response to the pH change with a linearity range at 0.8091- 0.9986. The pH sensor is most stable a pH range from 5 to 11. The reproducibility of the sensor was also tested, and results were consistent between twelve electrodes produced through the above methods.


Voltammetry on a Nanometer-sized Electrode in Solution Containing Very Dilute Electroactive Species
Poster:
P.20
Location:
Ursa Major

Rachel Wampler, Jordan Kitt, Nina Tran, Daniel P. Saavedra, Jungik Hong. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Peng Sun

Synopsis: A homemade potentiostat with a peak-peak noise of 5fA can use a nm-sized voltammetric electrode to measure micromolar ferrocenmethanol.

Abstract: A nanometer-sized Pt electrode is becoming a routine tool in nano-electrochemical research. But the dissolution of Pt in aqueous solution is quite common, and the rate of Pt dissolution is related to the current density across the electrode. This means a nanometer-sized Pt electrode could be recessed if a large current goes across the electrode, but the information extracted from the electrode could be problematic. Conducting measurements on a nanometer-sixed electrode in solution containing very dilute electroactive species decreases the extent of the dissolution of the nanometer-sized Pt electrode. So far, a commercial potentiostat, which has a peak-peak noise of less than 10 fA, is uncommon. In this paper, a homemade potentiostat, which has a peak-peak noise of less than 5 fA, was made. By using the instrument, voltammograms, with a limiting current of less than 20 fA, can be obtained on a nanometer-sized electrode in solution containing micromolar ferrocenmethanol. Our results show that the standard rate constant of the oxidation of ferrocenemethanol measured in a micromolar ferrocenmethanol solution is a little bit bigger than that measured in milimolar ferrocenemethanol solution. This indicates that kinetic parameter may be affected by the amount of electroactive molecules being measured.

Efficacy against vaginal Herpes virus infection by Lipidated or Non-Lipidated Tucaresol adjuvants in a Herpes gD tripeptide liposomal vaccine
Time:
3:00PM
Location:
15-1802

Jennifer Rubio, Eleana Guardado. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jill Adler-Moore

Synopsis: Liposomes with Herpes virus gD tripeptide and lipidated Tucaresol or MPL adjuvants each generated significant protection against a murine intravaginal HSV-2 challenge.

Abstract: Introduction: Herpes Simplex Virus 2 (HSV-2) causes recurrent genital lesions. This study examined the efficacy against murine vaginal Herpes infection using an HSV-2 gD tripeptide (gD3pep) liposomal vaccine (LV) with Lipidated or Non-Lipidated Tucaresol (LipT or NLipT) adjuvants. Methods: LV or phosphate buffer (PBS) were administered 3X subcutaneously(SQ) to BALB/c mice on d0, d28, d56. LV contained gD3pep (15μg/dose) and LipT (3μg or 5.6μg/dose), NLipT (5.6μg/dose), MPL (monophosphoryl Lipid A,15μg/dose) or LipT (3ug/dose) plus MPL (7.5ug/dose); controls were LipT or NLipT (5.6μg/dose) without gD3pep, or PBS. Medroxyprogestrone was given SQ d63 and d69 to enhance virus infectivity and mice challenged intravaginally with HSV-2, d70. Disease signs and morbidity were monitored 2X/day for 28 days. Vaginal swabs collected d72 were analyzed for vaginal viral burden. Results: Survival with gD3pep and LipT (3ug/dose) plus MPL (7.5ug/dose) (100%), MPL (15ug/dose) (100%) or LipT(5.6μg/dose) (90%) was significantly better than vaccination with NLipT (5.6μg/dose) with no protein (11%) or PBS (0%) (¬¬p <.0047). Disease signs and viral burden paralleled survival data. There was also a significant difference in viral burden between the gD3pep liposomes having different LipT doses or the combination of LipT plus MPL versus PBS (p<0.0129). Conclusions: gD3pep liposomes containing LipT at 5.6μg/dose, LipT (3ug/dose) plus MPL (7.5ug/dose) or MPL (15ug/dose) each generated significant protection against a murine intravaginal HSV-2 challenge. The marked efficacy seen using the combination of LipT plus MPL at lower doses, indicate that these adjuvants are not antagonistic and may further enhance the immune response when used in combination.


Evaluation of Lipidated and Non-Lipidated CDN Adjuvants in a gD Peptide Liposomal Vaccine for HSV-2 Murine Intravaginal Infection
Time:
1:30PM
Location:
Sp Events

Eleana Guardado, Jennifer Rubio. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jill Adler-Moore

Synopsis: A liposomal vaccine against HSV-2 was protective in mice when the vaccine contained the viral gD tripeptide and a Lipidated or non-Lipidated cyclic dinucleotide adjuvant.

Abstract: Background: An effective vaccine is needed for HSV-2 genital infections. A liposomal (Ls) viral gD tripeptide (gD3pep) vaccine was formulated with gD3pep plus a protein hydrophobic domain(HD) or gD3pep conjugated to Ls via maleimide (Cys). Lipidated (Lip) or Non-lipidated (NLip) cyclic dinucleotide (CDN) were used as adjuvants in the Ls. Methods: Ls vaccines were administered subcutaneously d0, d28, d56 to BALB/c mice (n=17/group) as follows: Ls-NLip CDN+/- gD3pep-HD or gD3pep-Cys, Ls-Lip CDN +/- gD3pep-HD or gD3pep-Cys, or phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Splenocytes and serum were collected on d59/d60 and assayed for Neutralizing antibodies (NAb), anti-gD3pep IgG Isotypes, and cytokine levels. Mice were given medroxyprogesterone d63/d69, challenged intravaginally with HSV-2 d70, vaginally swabbed d72 for viral burden and monitored for disease signs for 28 days post-challenge. Results: Vaccination with Ls-NLipCDN or Ls-LipCDN plus gD3pep-HD or gD3pep-Cys had prolonged survival following HSV-2 challenge versus PBS controls. Weight loss, disease signs, viral burden, and NAb titers paralleled survival data. Gamma interferon and IL-4 levels were elevated in mice given Ls-NLipCDN with gD3pep-HD or gD3pep-Cys versus PBS controls. IgG1 and IgG2a isotype levels were elevated in Ls-NLipCDN with gD3pep-HD or gD3pep-Cys vs PBS controls. Discussion: Ls-NLipCDN or Ls-LipCDN plus either form of gD3pep were protective against HSV-2 infection. Enhanced Th1 and Th2 immune responses were generated with elevated levels of serum IgG2a (Th1) and IgG1 (Th2) and enhanced production of Gamma interferon (Th1) and IL-4 (Th2) cytokines following vaccination with Ls-NLip CDN plus gD3pep-HD or gD3pep-Cys.

Investigation of changes in monomeric anthocyanins during sulfite treatment
Time:
1:15PM
Location:
15-1814

Yee Teng Moo, Lauren Chuman, Carol Pow Sang. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Harmit Singh

Synopsis: RP-HPLC analysis of ACNs-sulfite solution showed different trends which indicated the presence of different reaction when different ACNs were used

Abstract: Sulfites are widely used in food processing due to their antioxidant and preservation properties. Examples of the common uses of sulfites are during wine production and browning prevention of fruits and vegetable. Different anthocyanins ACNs react differently when encountered with sulfites. ACNs samples from red cabbage, grape juice concentrate, grape skin, and elderberry were prepared at pH 3.0 and with additions of 50 uL, 100 uL, and 150uL of 20% sulfite solution with a resulting concentration of 0.02%. The samples were heated in a water bath at 80 °C and 105 °C and were analyzed by HPLC and spectrophotometric method before and after sulfite addition and heating. The absorbance decrease showed an approximately 99% decrease in ACNs from Red Cabbage and Elderberry Whereas grape juice and grape skin ACNs showed a 83 % decrease. The HPLC data showed different trends as compared to spectral data for various monomeric ACNs reaction with sulfites. These results indicate that grape juice and grape skin ACNs reacted differently with sulfite solutions. The results also suggested the possibility of grape juice and grape skin ACNs being more stable or less reactive to sulfites as compared to elderberry and cabbage colors. Understanding the variability in the reaction of sulfites and ACNs from various sources will help in the selection of appropriate sources and application conditions for using natural colors in food products.


Investigation of the rate of degradation of grape anthocyanins in the presence of ascorbic acid using an accelerated shelf life test (ASLT) method
Poster:
P.9
Location:
Ursa Major

Lauren Chuman, Yee Teng Moo, Carol Pow Sang, Abdulrahman Al-azazi. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Harmit Singh

Synopsis: This study investigated the degradation of ACNs from grape juice with ascorbic acid using an (ASLT) method with different thermal treatments for various time intervals.

Abstract: Anthocyanins (ACNs) are dark colored natural pigments used in food products and are sensitive to pH, temperature and ascorbic acid (AA). AA is naturally present in fruit juices and can cause the degradation of ACNs and decrease in shelf life of the products. The aim of this study was to investigate the degradation of ACNs from commercial grape juice concentrate color in the presence of AA using an accelerated method at 85°C for various time intervals. The stability of grape ACNs was determined by the rate of degradation of monomeric ACNs on heating. The change in the polymeric color, the color density and polymeric color percentage (PCP) were determined using a potassium metabisulfite solution (20%) based on spectrophotometric method. Monomeric ACNs were determined using RP-HPLC methods. For each treatment, 2.8mL of color was added into the cuvette along with 0.2mL of potassium metabisulfite. Eight monomeric ACNs were identified using HPLC and total area was calculated to compare the degradation. Unexpected results were obtained indicating that AA either did not change the degradation rate or prevented the degradation of ACNS. The spectrophotometric analysis showed that even 8 hours, the control w/o AA showed a minimal difference in PCP as compared to with AA sample indicating no effect of AA on the degradation of ACNs. The heated control w/o AA showed a decreased in total HPLC area by 1064.34, whereas with AA sample showed an increase in total HPLC area by 1535 indicating protective affect of AA for grape juice ACNs.

Solar-assisted Inland Brackish Water Desalination System
Time:
3:30PM
Location:
15-1814

Sean Yazdi, Andres Ceja, Abraham Morales, Vien Nguyen. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Reza Lakeh and Dr. Ali Sharbat

Synopsis: Feasibility of using renewable energy for water reclamation projects

Abstract: Reverse osmosis technology that utilizes both photovoltaic panels to power the system and concentrated solar panels to directly heat the brackish solution prior to desalination is a useful way to harness solar energy to produce drinkable water. The hydraulic system brings brackish water to 250 psi and directs the flow through a reverse osmosis membrane that separates the salt content from a permeated solution. The concentrated solar panel system heats the brackish water before it enters the reverse osmosis membrane, allowing for an increased separation rate of salt particles from purified water. This desalination system can remove about 99% of particulates per pass while using 0.63 kWh to purify each cubic meter of water. Based on Southern California Edison's rate of $0.46 per kWh, this unit saves $0.29 per cubic meter of desalinated water while, on average, producing 1 liter of permeate every 10 minutes. The Environmental Protection Agency defines potable water as having less than 500 mg/L of total dissolved solids within the solution. Assuming the salinity of brackish water is between 500 to 10,000 mg/L, this unit can produce fresh drinking water from a wide range of saline solutions of varying salt content. Sodium chloride has been the target solute to remove due to its majority presence in water resources around southern California, specifically in local inland aquifers. In conclusion, this desalination system can remove sodium chloride from brackish water and effectively produce potable water while solely using renewable energy to power each process.


Water Reuse
Poster:
P.30
Location:
Ursa Major

Kurt Paul, Danny Vera, Hector Cardenas, Sean Yazdi. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Ali Sharbat

Synopsis: This study was conducted to educate the public on water reuse and its benefits in solving the water supply shortage.

Abstract: Reclamation and reuse of waste water plays a vital part in cutting the gap between our water supply and water demand. Several water reuse technologies are introduced within the literature. Each of these technologies have been proven to be effective in treating the water to acceptable water standards. Water reuse can be found everywhere from a local, national or global level. Described in the literature is also the growth trends and how water reuse has been gaining popularity over recent years. Another topic of discussion that is covered within the literature review is the amount of waste produced by water reuse as well as different ways to treat and take care of this waste. Lastly, another main topic of discussion is the public perception on indirect and direct potable reuse. The public has a negative view point on reusing water for drinking water purposes. This negative perception stems from the fact that they are drinking water which was once waste. This negative view is due to a lack of knowledge by the consumer. As the drinking water that comes from waste is just as clean as water that is pumped from the ground water table.

Research in Dance-making
Time:
5:00pm
Location:
Ursa Major

Jennifer Gerry, Brenda Reyes-Chavez, Gabriela Garza-Vazquez, Manuel Macias, Amber Hauss, Cylinda Joy Haynes. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Gayle Fekete

Synopsis: Mechanism Dance Theatre, all current and former students of Cal Poly Pomona, will highlight their interest in research and scientific method in the dance-making process.

Abstract: Mechanism Dance Theatre is movement-centered project based in Pomona, CA. The collective consists of interdisciplinary members who are all current or former students of Cal Poly. Their interest is in the body's ability, regardless of its state of movement trajectory, to illuminate social issues and personal narratives. Mechanism's core values depend on the inclusion of non-traditional-dance forms and identities, cross discipline exploration and collaboration, and passing on the value of mentorship. In each of their works, attention is paid to research. Due to the interdisciplinary nature of the members, the scope of this research covers a wide spectrum of topics including cultural and gender studies, mathematics, history and literature, physics and so on as well as the intersections between them. Their contribution to the RSCA conference highlights the value of interdisciplinary research in dance-making, their process as it follows the scientific method, and will provide concrete examples of these aspects in a culminating performance. One such example is a current project drawing upon a particular flow-theory (physics) called the Constructal law. The law states that in order for a living flow-system to persist, or to "survive", it must evolve in such a way that it provides better access for its currents (Bejan, 2007). In a pattern known as tree-flow, imperfection and branching behavior is the vehicle for such access; a steady negotiation between resistance and optimization. With issues of power and control, in unsupportive architectures, how might we create movement that portrays the navigation of change, and shift the balance of value toward the branches?