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5th Annual Student RSCA Conference

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The 5th Student RSCA Conference will be held on the 3rd of March, 2017 in the University Library and Bronco Student Center.


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Welcome to the 5th Annual Student RSCA Conference!

Dr. Winny Dong Today, for your pleasure, we have included not only research that takes place on campus, but creative activities as well. While research, STEM, and the social sciences provide us with the understanding of how our world works, creative activities and the humanities provide us with the understanding of how we interpret and understand the world around us.

Thank you for joining us in this celebration of the wide-ranging creative activities, research, and scholarship that showcase the Learn-by-Doing philosophy of Cal Poly Pomona. We would like to congratulate the students and their mentors for the work that is being presented here today. And thank you to all of the participants, including faculty moderators, judges, administrators, staff, alumni, and student volunteers who have made this event possible.

It is the goal of the Office of Undergraduate Research to highlight student creative activities, research, and scholarship and to provide them with opportunities to share their work with the campus and broader community. The work being presented here today is the finest work by faculty and staff in preparing our students to become tomorrow’s problem solvers, entrepreneurs, leaders, teachers, artists, and scholars.

It is our privilege and pleasure to host and present the 5th Annual Student Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activities Conference to the Cal Poly Pomona community, and we look forward to the many conferences that are to come.

Sincerely,

Dr. Winny Dong
Director, Office of Undergraduate Research

Keynote Address

Dr. Daniel Cua

Dr. Daniel Cua

I found my calling and success in the world of biomedical research. I currently lead a group of 5 postdoctoral fellows and 5 research scientists at Merck Research Laboratories in Palo Alto, California. My work focuses on the discovery of novel “Immuno-therapeutics” for the treatment of autoimmune diseases and cancer.

One of my passions is to work with scientists from around the world to solve biomedical challenges and to improve patients’ lives. I have the fortune to work with researches and postdoctoral fellows from the United Kingdom, Australia, France, China, India, Japan, Germany, Belgium, Sweden, and the US. Together, we have published 111 research articles, which were cited more than 24,000 times (h-index:54). I was recognized as one of the most influential scientific minds in biomedical research in 2013, 2014, and 2015 by Thomson Reuters.

While at Cal Poly Pomona, I earned two degrees – a bachelor’s in biology in 1988 and a master’s in biological science in 1993. With the “foundational” training I received at Cal Poly, I was able to complete my doctorate from the University of Southern California in the Department of Molecular and Cellular Immunology by 1996. The education I received at Cal Poly gave me the chance to push the boundary of “what is possible”. It opened up opportunities few can imagine.

Conference Schedule


Presentations Schedule


Session

Disciplines

Room
UL = University Library
BSC = Bronco Student Center

Time

1

Biological Sciences, Graduate

UL- 1802

12:00pm - 3:00pm

2

Political Science

UL- 1808

1:00pm - 3:00pm

3

Interdisciplinary

UL- 1814

12:00pm - 3:15pm

4

Biological Sciences, Undergraduate

UL- 1822

1:00pm - 3:00pm

5

Biological Sciences, Graduate

UL- 1828

12:00pm - 2:00pm

6

Biological Sciences, Undergraduate

UL- 2907

12:00pm - 3:15pm

7

Biologicial Sciences, Agriculture, Physical Sciences and Engineering

UL- 2913

12:00pm - 2:45pm

8

Psychology and Sociology

UL- Events (4th Floor)

12:00pm - 3:15pm

9

Political Science

UL- Special Collections (4th Floor)

12:00pm - 3:15pm

10

Engineering

BSC - Lyra (1611D)

12:00pm - 3:00pm

11

Engineering

BSC - Perseus (2337)

12:00pm - 3:30pm

12

Computer Science, Math, and Engineering

BSC - England Evans (2132)

12:00pm - 3:30pm


Poster and Creative Works Showcase Schedule


Bronco Student Center: Ursa Major


Time

2:30pm - 3:30pm


Reception Schedule

Speaker

Time

Awards Reception Welcome

Dr. Winny Dong, Office of Undergraduate Research

3:45pm

Conference Address

Dr. Sadiq Shah, Office of Research
Associate Vice
President Office of Research, Innovation and Economic Development

3:50pm

Keynote Address

Dr. Daniel Cua

4:00pm

Announcement of Distinguished RSCA Staff Award

Undergraduate Research Faculty Advisory Council (URFAC)
Committee Chair: Dr. Ruth Ahn

4:20pm

Announcement of Oral Presentation Nominations to CSU system-wide competition

Dr. Reza Lakeh, URFAC Chair

4:30pm

Closing Remarks

URFAC Members

4:50pm

Conclusion of Conference

5:00pm


Conference Maps

University Library - 1st Floor

University Library - 1st Floor

University Library - 2nd Floor

University Library - 2nd Floor

University Library - 4th Floor

University Library - 4th Floor

Bronco Student Center

Bronco Student Center

Science and Engineering

Bronco Student Center - Ursa Major
2:30pm to 3:30pm
Poster #: 1
Three-dimensional print of a seismic record
Authors: Juan Onate, Bem Gi Kim, Chin man Lam.
Faculty Mentor:
Gary McGavin.
Poster #: 2
Use of Membrane Technology to Purify Natural Colors from Red Cabbage
Authors: Carol Pow Sang, Shirin Mal Ganji, Shannen Hilse.
Faculty Mentor:
Harmit Singh.
Poster #: 3
CFD and Wind Tunnel Investigations of Aerodynamics of a New Type of Airfoil for Wings on the Cal Poly Pomona Formula SAE Car
Authors: Caleb Duescher, Danny Jierian.
Faculty Mentor:
Ali Ahmadi.
Poster #: 4
Image-Based 3D Reconstruction of the Russian Thistle: Lessons Learned
Authors: Jose Zuniga, Caitlin Tran, Eugene Canlas, Francisco Ponce.
Faculty Mentor:
Omar Mora, Erin Questad.
Poster #: 5
Investigation of Residential Solar PV Impact on Power Distribution System
Authors: Samir Wadhwani, Faisal Al-Rahmani, Danielle Chanes.
Faculty Mentor:
Ha Le.
Poster #: 6
Landslide Detection Using GIS and Remote Sensing Data: A Case Study in the Carlyon Beach Peninsula, Washington
Authors: Tin Lieu.
Faculty Mentor:
Omar Mora.
Poster #: 7
Microsoft Kinect Sensor Evaluation for 3D Reconstruction
Authors: Eric Hermoso.
Faculty Mentor:
Omar Mora.
Poster #: 8
Mobile Phone-Based 3D Reconstruction of Building Facades
Authors: Eugene Canlas, Francisco Armando Ponce, Jose Zuniga, Caitlin Tran.
Faculty Mentor:
Omar Mora.
Poster #: 9
Radial Velocity Modeling of Hot Jupiter-hosting Stars
Authors: Luis Nunez.
Faculty Mentor:
Jorge Moreno, John Johnson.
Poster #: 10
Response of Streamflow and Spring Discharge from Precipitation Recharge Events in Icehouse Canyon Watershed, Eastern San Gabriel Mountains, California
Authors: Danny Miranda.
Faculty Mentor:
Jonathan Nourse.
Poster #: 11
The Effect of Simultaneous Milling and Coating on Cohesive Properties and Solubility of Pharmaceutical Powders
Authors: Noor-Eldeen Moubayed, Alexander Murphy, Jessica Trinh, Inseo Baik.
Faculty Mentor:
Laila Jallo.
Poster #: 12
80 Million Years of Prolonged and Localized Fluid Flow on Shatsky Rise
Authors: Karissa Vermillion.
Faculty Mentor:
Nicholas Van Buer.
Poster #: 13
Mechanistic Study of Ring Opening Metathesis of Cyclooctene
Authors: Matthew Galazzo.
Faculty Mentor:
Floyd Klavetter.
Poster #: 14
Mosaic Numbers of 9-Crossing Alternating Knots
Authors: Alexis Ayala, Joshua Brajas, Austin Sakamoto.
Faculty Mentor:
Robin Wilson.

Interdisciplinary

Bronco Student Center - Ursa Major
2:30pm to 3:30pm
Poster #: 15
Hair Misorientation in African American Communities: A Substructure to Mental Illness
Authors: Kevon Williams.
Faculty Mentor:
Alejandro Morales.
Poster #: 16
Graph-Theoretical Analysis of the Long-term Memory Retrieval Functional Connectome
Authors: Livier Capristo, Tatiana Manriquez.
Faculty Mentor:
Robert Blumenfeld.
Poster #: 17
Sex Differences in Food Anticipatory Activity
Authors: Camille Martin, Maya Ogawa-Okada.
Faculty Mentor:
Andrew Steele.
Poster #: 18
Perceptions of Rabbit Behavior During Handling Varies with Veterinary Experience
Authors: Amika Yamamoto, Kierra Kuhlman, Courtney Fukushima.
Faculty Mentor:
Cord Brundage, James Alderson, Cindy Tessler.
Poster #: 19
Development of a Standardized Process to Measure Delivery of Nebulized AmBisome®
Authors: Janam Dave.
Faculty Mentor:
Jill Adler-Moore.
Poster #: 20
Effect of Caffeine on Biofilm Formation, Capsule Size, and Flagella on Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Authors: Byron Trinh, Cynde Mai.
Faculty Mentor:
John Chan.
Poster #: 21
Individual-level variation in honey bee (Apis mellifera) revisitation behavior on watermelon flowers
Authors: Jon Sacro.
Faculty Mentor:
Joan Leong.
Poster #: 22
Preliminary Molecular Identification of North Pacific Nudibranchs (Nudibranchia: Gastropoda: Mollusca) using Mitochondrial Cytochrome c Oxidase Subunit I (COI)
Authors: Dae-Wui Jung.
Faculty Mentor:
Ángel Valdés, Chang-Bae Kim.
Poster #: 23
The effects of caffeine on the S phase checkpoint in S. cerevisiae
Authors: Mandi Persons, Stephanie Truc Nguyen, Justin Pham.
Faculty Mentor:
Wendy Dixon.
Poster #: 24
Effects of food composition and sucrose levels on FAA in mice
Authors: Amanda Ng, Camille Martin.
Faculty Mentor:
Andrew Steele.
Poster #: 25
The Microbial Quality Analysis of Raw Chicken from Small Scale Production Facilities
Authors: Omar Innabi, Benjamin Wu, Rosa Vargas.
Faculty Mentor:
Wendy Dixon.

Design and Creative Works

Bronco Student Center - Ursa Major
2:30pm to 3:30pm
Poster #: 26
Fidget Gadget
Authors: Ayris Cornwell, Panik Moradian, Bradley Postovoit, Adrian Brito, Alfredo Giron, Jiang Tao Li.
Faculty Mentor:
Winny Dong, Olukemi Sawyerr, Erkan Ozkaya.
Poster #: 27
Eco Friendly Dish Rack
Authors: Berlyn Gallardo, Ana Huerta Guerrero, Jacquelyn Tse, Harjot Singh, Je'Don Carter, Joseph Butterfly, Karsten Bush, Andrew Gatley.
Faculty Mentor:
Olukemi Sawyerr.
Poster #: 28
Apparel Product Development using Industry Technology
Authors: Taryn Foley.
Faculty Mentor:
Saemee Lyu.
Poster #: 29
Influence of Model Size on Purchase Intention
Authors: Lauren Phillips, Olivia Walker.
Faculty Mentor:
Chitra Dabas.
Poster #: 30
Plastic Crafted
Authors: David Pena, Jesus Mancera, Jorge Saucedo, Jennifer Nguyen, Oscar Sanchez, Adi Halim.
Faculty Mentor:
Truyan Kushev.
Poster #: 31
Designing the Reserve Educational Center: Exploration, Education, Restoration at Rancho Mission Viejo
Authors: Timothy Curran, Christopher Carrillo, Di Liu, Jing Wei Zhou.
Faculty Mentor:
Weimin Li.
Poster #: 32
Calm Nest
Authors: Kojchakorn Ngamnimitthum.
Faculty Mentor:
Katrin Terstegen.
Poster #: 33
Serenity Within
Authors: Shree Ravichandran.
Faculty Mentor:
Katrin Terstegen.
Poster #: 34
Together
Authors: Esmeralda Urias.
Faculty Mentor:
Angela Kim.
Poster #: 35
MaxRep
Authors: Santino Lojero, Ali Rafie, Shayan Khan, Kabir Sethi, Joshua Knapp, Jeffrey Schmitendorf, Eric Liang.
Faculty Mentor:
Winny Dong.
Poster #: 36
The Shell Pavilion
Authors: Abigail Robles, Pedro Cuin, Gabriella Compolong, Alejandra Novelo, Luis Montoya, Henry Alcantra, Tiffany Dela Cruz, Sklyer Maroste, Paola Murillo, Mariana Uy.
Faculty Mentor:
Marc Schulitz.
Poster #: 37
The Life of Jane Austen: Influences of Pride and Prejudice
Authors: Rebecca Ojeda.
Faculty Mentor:
Linda Bisesti.
Poster #: 38
Sad Gurl Empathy
Authors: Danielle Baca.
Faculty Mentor:
Matthew Whittle.

Session 1: Biological Sciences (Graduate)

University Library - 1802
12:00pm - 12:15pm
Study of CMI liposomes containing gD3pep-Cys with dsRNA in the BALB/c mouse model of intravaginal Herpes Simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) challenge
Authors: Marie Gomez. Faculty Mentor: Jill Adler.
12:15pm - 12:30pm
Protective Immune Response Generated Against Influenza Challenge in Mice Vaccinated with Liposomes Containing Different Adjuvants and No Proteins
Authors: Eden Faneuff, Fady Guirguis. Faculty Mentor: Jill Adler-Moore.
12:30pm - 12:45pm
Pseudocryptic speciation of two Hermissenda sea slug species
Authors: Austin Estores-Pacheco. Faculty Mentor: Ángel Valdés.
12:45pm - 1:00pm
Investigating the effects of ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol on cytokine production from splenocytes derived from immune competent and immunocompromised mice infected with Candida albicans
Authors: Hansini Vitharanage. Faculty Mentor: Nancy Buckley.
Break 1:00 - 1:15pm
1:15pm - 1:30pm
It loves me, it loves me not: Counting species of the "rose petal sea slug," Polybranchia (Mollusca: Gastropoda) with a molecular systematics approach
Authors: Sabrina Medrano. Faculty Mentor: Ángel Valdés.
1:30pm - 1:45pm
Effective Treatment of Azole Resistant Candida albicans in a Murine Ascending Urinary Tract Infection with Liposomal Amphotericin B Delivered by Bladder Lavage
Authors: Cole Frazier. Faculty Mentor: Jill Adler-Moore, Jon Olson.
1:45pm - 2:00pm
Efficacy Against Vaginal Infection of Mice Following Vaccination with a Liposome Containing the Immunogenic Herpes simplex (HSV-2)gDTripeptide and the Immunostimulating Adjuvant Tucaresol
Authors: Yasmin Elhajmoussa. Faculty Mentor: Jill Adler Moore.
Break 2:00 - 2:15pm
2:15pm - 2:30pm
The Role of Epigenetic Regulator SUV39H1 in Human Adipogenesis
Authors: Lun Tan, Derek Dinson, Esra Ibili. Faculty Mentor: Yuanxiang Zhao.
2:30pm -2:45pm
Using Native Shrubs as Nurse Plants for Seedling Establishment in Response to Drought and Herbivory in Degraded California Sage Scrub
Authors: Lauren Quon. Faculty Mentor: Erin Questad.
2:45pm -3:00pm
Efficacy of Liposomal Amphotericin B for the Treatment of Systemic Candidiasis in a Murine Model of Type II Diabetes
Authors: Shirleen Simargi. Faculty Mentor: Jill Adler-Moore, Jon Olson.

Session 2: Political Science

University Library - 1808
1:00pm - 1:15pm
Alternative Transportation in the United States: How partisan politics gets us nowhere
Authors: Jennifer Hunter. Faculty Mentor: Mario Guerrero.
1:15pm - 1:30pm
Does social media have a positive or negative influence on public society and their political participation?
Authors: Audria Barrios. Faculty Mentor: Mario Guerrero.
1:30pm - 1:45pm
How the media influenced the 2012 and 2016 American presidential elections
Authors: Melissa Madrigal. Faculty Mentor: Mario Gurerro.
1:45pm - 2:00pm
Late Responses, Careless Actions: Non-transparency in Environmental Catastrophes
Authors: Samantha Zometa. Faculty Mentor: Mario Guerrero.
Break 2:00 - 2:15pm
2:15pm - 2:30pm
Legislative Failure: Climate change and campaign contributions in Congress
Authors: Robert Martinez. Faculty Mentor: Mario Guerrero.
2:30pm - 2:45pm
The Demeanor of Police officers leading to Policy Change/ Creation
Authors: Arturo Serrano. Faculty Mentor: Mario Guerrero.
2:45pm - 3:00pm
The Relevance of the Congressional Black Caucus
Authors: Gabriel Smith. Faculty Mentor: Mario Guerrero, Nelian Chaterverdi.

Session 3: Interdisciplinary

University Library - 1814
12:00pm - 12:15pm
Classifying Comedy: Female Comedy in Love's Labour's Lost
Authors: Amanda Riggle. Faculty Mentor: Aaron DeRosa.
12:15pm - 12:30pm
The Role of Socioeconomic Factors in Community Engagement
Authors: Joanne Loeza. Faculty Mentor: Mario Guerrero.
12:30pm - 12:45pm
Destabilizing Fictions: Defamiliarization and Biopolitics in Rankine's Citizen
Authors: Mark Dietzel. Faculty Mentor: Aaron DeRosa.
12:45pm - 1:00pm
YouTube and Ethics: Users' Understanding of the Ethical Dilemma on YouTube and the Moral Obligations of Content Creators
Authors: Bianca Chang. Faculty Mentor: Nell Horowitz.
Break 1:00 - 1:15pm
1:15pm - 1:30pm
Determinants of Salaries for MLB Pitchers
Authors: Shunto Kobayashi. Faculty Mentor: Craig Kerr.
1:30pm - 1:45pm
The Power of Pawns: An Analysis of Parisian Identity and Loyalty during the Anglo-Burgundian Occupation, 1420-1436
Authors: Isabel Melendez. Faculty Mentor: Robert Lewis, Georgia Mickey.
1:45pm - 2:00pm
Time-Less Trauma: Exploring Billy Pilgrim's Posthuman Other
Authors: Alfredo Raygoza. Faculty Mentor: Aaron DeRosa.
2:00pm - 2:15pm
Do Social Networks Mirror the Ideals of a Deliberative Democracy?
Authors: Daniel Raad. Faculty Mentor: Mario Guerrero.
Break 2:15 - 2:30pm
2:30pm - 2:45pm
Finding Evelyn: The Lost Women of 1980s Feminism in Flagg's Fried Green Tomatoes
Authors: Samantha St. Claire. Faculty Mentor: Aaron DeRosa.
2:45pm - 3:00pm
The Effect of Rape culture on the Reporting and Handling of Rape Cases
Authors: Tammy Wong. Faculty Mentor: Kahena Viale.
3:00pm - 3:15pm
The effects of social media on Millennial's shopping behaviors
Authors: Esmeralda Urias, Vanessa Hernandez. Faculty Mentor: Angella Kim.

Session 4: Biological Sciences (Undergraduate)

University Library 1822
1:00pm - 1:15pm
Analyzing honey bees (Apis mellifera) foraging differently on Watermelon Flowers (Citrullus lanatus)
Authors: Marisol Torres. Faculty Mentor: Joan Leong.
1:15pm - 1:30pm
Conversion of Biomass-derived Glycols and Polyols to Hydrocarbons through Deoxydehydration
Authors: Hector Alarcon. Faculty Mentor: Chantal Stieber.
1:30pm - 1:45pm
Decoding the Resistance to Alzheimer's Disease
Authors: Vivianne Mitri. Faculty Mentor: Glenn Kageyama.
1:45pm - 2:00pm
The effects of elevated soil P and N on the health and reproduction of African fountain grass, Pennisetum setaceum
Authors: Glen Morrison. Faculty Mentor: Erin Questad.
Break 2:00 - 2:15pm
2:15pm - 2:30pm
Juglone concentration in soil underneath the Southern California black walnut (Juglans californica) throughout the growing season
Authors: Asma Ayyad. Faculty Mentor: Erin Questad.
2:30pm - 2:45pm
Effects of juglone on the germination of Southern California native and invasive plant species
Authors: Sierra Lauman. Faculty Mentor: Erin Questad.
2:45pm - 3:00pm
Use of PCR for Detection of Mastitis-Causing Pathogens Isolated from Bovine Quarter Milk Samples
Authors: Patricia Galvan. Faculty Mentor: Shelton Murinda.

Session 5: Biological Sciences (Graduate)

University Library - 1828
12:00pm - 12:15pm
Vernalization is key to flowering in Aquilegia coerulea
Authors: Timothy Batz. Faculty Mentor: Bharti Sharma.
12:15pm - 12:30pm
Asymmetric genetic introgression of an invasive sea slug in a native Mediterranean species
Authors: Haleh Golestani. Faculty Mentor: Angel Valdes.
12:30pm - 12:45pm
Comparative Efficacy of a Liposomal Aspergillus Protein Vaccine in Combination with AmBisome® Antifungal Treatment to Prevent Murine Pulmonary Aspergillosis
Authors: Hernan Reza. Faculty Mentor: Jill Adler-Moore.
12:45pm - 1:00pm
Comparative Efficacy of Liposomal Vaccines Containing Different HSV2 gD Peptide Sequences Following Intravaginal HSV2 Challenge of BALB/c Mice
Authors: Jennifer Rubio. Faculty Mentor: Jill Adler-Moore.
Break 1:00 - 1:15pm
1:15pm - 1:30pm
The slug within the bivalve: Reconciliation of shell-based taxonomy and molecular data in Juliidae (Heterobranchia: Sacoglossa)
Authors: Jennifer McCarthy. Faculty Mentor: Angel Valdes.
1:30pm - 1:45pm
The phylogenetic reconstruction of the sea slug genus Berthella using molecular and morphological traits
Authors: Hessam Ghanimi. Faculty Mentor: Angel Valdes.
1:45pm - 2:00pm
Southern Invasion: Population Genetics of Phidiana hiltoni
Authors: Clara Jo King. Faculty Mentor: Angel Valdes.

Session 6: Biological Sciences (Undergraduate)

University Library - 2907
12:00pm - 12:15pm
Trazodone Hydrochloride Improves Laboratory Rabbit Handling
Authors: Courtney Fukushima, Kierra Kuhlman, Cindy Tessler, Yumiko Jin, Jim Alderson, Cord Brundage. Faculty Mentor: Cord Brundage.
12:15pm - 12:30pm
Virus-induced gene silencing-A reverse genetics approach to study gene function in columbines
Authors: Jesus Preciado. Faculty Mentor: Bharti Sharma.
12:30pm - 12:45pm
Analysis of garlic's (Allium sativum) effects on Lipopolysaccharide and C. albicans induced immune response in J774A.1 and RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cell lines
Authors: Benjamin Soto. Faculty Mentor: Nancy Buckley.
12:45pm - 1:00pm
Determining the ability of AmBisome® to penetrate a Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm in In Vitro Modeling of Bacterial and Fungal Lung Infections in Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Authors: Matthew Slarve. Faculty Mentor: Jill Adler-Moore, Jon Olson.
Break 1:00 - 1:15pm
1:15pm - 1:30pm
The Effects of Phlorotannin Concentrations of Brown Seaweeds (Phaeophyceae) on the feeding rates of the Black Sea Hare, Aplysia vaccaria
Authors: Danielle McHaskell. Faculty Mentor: Jayson R. Smith.
1:30pm - 1:45pm
Effects of THC on the severity of Candida albicans Vulvovaginal Candidiasis in Mice
Authors: Elizabeth Marquez. Faculty Mentor: Nancy Buckley.
1:45pm - 2:00pm
Effects of the Allelopathic Compound, Juglone, on the Germination and Seedling Success of Eriogonum fasciculatum, Frangula californica, Rhamnus ilicifolia, Salsola tragus, and Salvia mellifera
Authors: Daisy Hernandez. Faculty Mentor: Edward Bobich.
Break 2:00 - 2:15pm
2:15pm - 2:30pm
Investigating activation mechanism of a mechanosensitive Piezo channel small molecule agonist
Authors: David Kent, Brennan Kidder, John Fly. Faculty Mentor: Jerome Lacroix.
2:30pm - 2:45pm
Mutation of a highly conserved, intronic sequence prompts temperature-dependent aberrant splicing of precursor mRNA
Authors: Thomas Sokolich, Gaurav Prajapati. Faculty Mentor: Craig LaMunyon.
2:45pm - 3:00pm
Sulfolobus Turreted Icosahedral Virus Genome Excision from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius
Authors: Veneese Brown. Faculty Mentor: Jamie Snyder.
3:00pm - 3:15pm
Molecular Dynamics and Virtual Screening of Pituitary Adenylyl Cyclase Type I Receptor Antagonists
Authors: Bryan Herrera. Faculty Mentor: John Chan, Lyna Luo, Kabir Lutfy

Session 7: Biological Sciences, Agriculture Physical Sciences and Engineering

University Library - 2913
12:00pm - 12:15pm
Feasibility of Utilizing Orange Pomace for Food Applications
Authors: Cassandra Maya, Jonathan Guo, Helene Mecate. Faculty Mentor: Olive Li.
12:15pm - 12:30pm
Formation and Evaluation of Ternary Soluble Complexes of Pea Protein Isolate and Mesquite Gum to encapsulate and protect Quercetin.
Authors: Francisco M Leyva-Gutierrez, Juan Carlos Cuevas-Bernardino. Faculty Mentor: Gabriel Davidov-Pardo.
12:30pm - 12:45pm
Preliminary study on the control release of flavor encapsulated in filled hydrogels triggered by pH
Authors: Anya Kwan. Faculty Mentor: Gabriel Davidov-Pardo.
12:45pm - 1:00pm
Drug Delivery to the Human Eye
Authors: Dampiya Mahathanthila, Zoheth Fernandes. Faculty Mentor: Maryam Shafahi.
Break 1:00 - 1:15pm
1:15pm - 1:30pm
Improving the Limit of Detection and Reliability of Fiber Optic Biosensors Embedded within Microfluidic Channels
Authors: Dona Elline Hettiaratchy, Brandi Wooten, Bianca Cruz. Faculty Mentor: Ertan Salik.
1:30pm - 1:45pm
Structure Sense
Authors: Vincent Moya. Faculty Mentor: Stacy Musgrave.
1:45pm - 2:00pm
Fabrication of Gecko-Inspired Dry Adhesives
Authors: Jade Lim, Julia Franco, Jonathan Harris, Natanael Ariawan, Jan Emil Collado, Brandon Kouch, Madeline Durling, Tommy Pham. Faculty Mentor: Jonathan Puthoff.
Break 2:00 - 2:15pm
2:15pm - 2:30pm
Gelatin Modulus of Elasticity
Authors: Juan Onate, Bem Gi Kim, Chin man Lam. Faculty Mentor: Gary McGavin.
2:30pm - 2:45pm
Hibiscus Stained Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells
Authors: Cinthia Ayala-Heredia, Jose Garcia, Eric Gruenberg, Gerson Trejo, Leoncio Marquez, Kuamail Ali. Faculty Mentor: Jonathan Puthoff.

Session 8: Psychology/Sociology

University Library - Special Events (4th floor)
12:00pm - 12:15pm
Strengths of Hispanic/Latino Adults that Facilitated the Desistance of Gang Membership
Authors: Sergio Maldonado. Faculty Mentor: Alejandro Morales.
12:15pm - 12:30pm
The Development of the Passion for Teaching Scale
Authors: Jessica Saucedo, Anna Liu. Faculty Mentor: Sara Langford.
12:30pm - 12:45pm
Transitioning from Within: Internalized Power Dynamics and Social Constructs of the Transgender Identity
Authors: Megan Francisco. Faculty Mentor: Shayda Kafai.
12:45pm - 1:00pm
Parental Inclusivity Within Higher Education Institutions
Authors: Kimberly Alvarez. Faculty Mentor: Jose Aguilar-Hernandez.
Break 1:00 - 1:15pm
1:15pm - 1:30pm
Effects Of Age-Related Changes In Cognition On Language Comprehension
Authors: Megan Nakamura. Faculty Mentor: Eleonora Rossi.
1:30pm - 1:45pm
Examining the Functional Network Structure of the Frontal Lobes Across Domains of Cognition
Authors: Jordan Garrett. Faculty Mentor: Robert Blumenfeld.
1:45pm - 2:00pm
Exploring the Effect of a Utility Value Intervention to Reduce Achievement Gaps in Introductory Biology
Authors: Sy Truong. Faculty Mentor: Paul Beardsley.
2:00pm - 2:15pm
Women at the Intersection and Workplace Policies
Authors: Jamilex Rodriguez. Faculty Mentor: Mario Guerrero.
Break 2:15 - 2:30pm
2:30pm - 2:45pm
The Dynamics of Sexuality and Slut-Shaming Discourse Among Latina College Students
Authors: Marysol Gonzalez. Faculty Mentor: Alejandro Morales.
2:45pm - 3:00pm
Veteran Students: Insiders vs. Outsiders
Authors: Haley Dunaj, Chantel Ylaya. Faculty Mentor: Anjana Narayan, Erica Morales.
3:00pm - 3:15pm
The effects of spatial mismatch on disadvantaged neighborhoods with poor public transportation in the Coachella Valley
Authors: Luis Rubalcava. Faculty Mentor: Alvaro Huerta, Abhishek Tiwari.

Session 9: Political Science

University Library - Special Collections (4th floor)
12:00pm - 12:15pm
Administrative Plights and Potentials in Universal Mental Health Screening for Public Schools
Authors: Eli Dowens. Faculty Mentor: Mario Guerrero.
12:15pm - 12:30pm
Are Universal Human Rights Laws Globally Applicable To Combat Cultural Pathways That Lead To Modern Day Slavery Dilemmas?
Authors: Sumaya Bamakhrama. Faculty Mentor: Marc Scarcelli.
12:30pm - 12:45pm
Can both counterterrorism and counterinsurgency operations be compatible and mutually reinforcing, or do both inherently operate at cross-purposes?
Authors: Mirette Morcos. Faculty Mentor: Marc Scarcelli.
12:45pm - 1:00pm
What's a First Lady to Do?: A comparative study on traditional First Lady Nancy Reagan and modern First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton
Authors: Raquel Ortega. Faculty Mentor: Mario Guerrero.
1:00pm - 1:15pm
Policy, Gender, and Experience on the Use of Force by Police Officers
Authors: Daisy Campuzano. Faculty Mentor: Mario Guerrero.
Break 1:15 - 1:30pm
1:30pm - 1:45pm
Divided We Stalemate: Legislative Gridlock and Party Fracturing in the U.S. House of Representatives
Authors: Thomas Davis. Faculty Mentor: Mario Guerrero.
1:45pm - 2:00pm
Do Fact Checks Matter? An Assessment on the Impact of Fact-Checking in a "Post-Truth" World
Authors: Aisling Kelly. Faculty Mentor: Mario Guerrero.
2:00pm - 2:15pm
Effects of Terrorism on Military Enlistment
Authors: Paul Gonzales. Faculty Mentor: Mario Guerrero.
2:15pm - 2:30pm
Informal Land Rights: Why the process of formalization worked in some countries, but not others.
Authors: Joshua Palacios. Faculty Mentor: Marc Scarcelli.
Break 2:30 - 2:45pm
2:45pm - 3:00pm
The Underrepresentation of Women In Politics
Authors: Brittany Banner. Faculty Mentor: Mario Guerrero.
3:00pm - 3:15pm
Trading Away Power and Influence
Authors: Thomas Gonzalez. Faculty Mentor: Mario Guerrero.

Session 10: Engineering

Bronco Student Center - 1611D (Lyra)
12:00pm - 12:15pm
Autonomous 3-D Mapping and collision avoidance using LIDAR and Unmanned Aerial Vehicle.
Authors: Christian Carreon-Limones. Faculty Mentor: Subodh Bhandari.
12:15pm - 12:30pm
Collision Avoidance System for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles using Stereoscopic Vision
Authors: Kishan Patel, Erwin Perez. Faculty Mentor: Subodh Bhandari.
12:30pm - 12:45pm
Development and Validation of Maglev Halbach Array Design
Authors: Anthony Perez, Wayne Page, Benjamin Younes. Faculty Mentor: Nolan Tsuchiya.
Break 12:45 - 1:00pm
1:00pm - 1:15pm
Formation of Xerogel Composites via Reactive Electrospinning
Authors: Carlos Zamora Salgado, Cody Long, Shayan Askari, Cristian Hernandez. Faculty Mentor: Keith Forward.
1:15pm - 1:30pm
Triboelectrification of Insulator Materials
Authors: William Chen, Joey Heraldez, Brian Nguyen, Alexander Castro. Faculty Mentor: Keith Forward.
1:30pm - 1:45pm
Thermal Performance of Cylindrical Heat Pipes
Authors: Sharoon Samuel, Erik Gutierrez, Jay Ohm. Faculty Mentor: Maryam Shafahi.
Break 1:45 - 2:00pm
2:00pm - 2:15pm
Efficiency of Prandtl's Bell Span Load Wing
Authors: Anthony Klaib, Tomoyuki Imai, Loris Mousessian, Nigam Dudhat, Talah Qasim, Martha Njuguna, Jorge Rivera. Faculty Mentor: Ali Ahmadi.
2:30pm - 2:45pm
Flight Testing, Data Collection, and System Identification of a Multicopter UAV
Authors: Paul Navarro, Sung Cho. Faculty Mentor: Subodh Bhandari.
2:45pm - 3:00pm
Biofilitration Cells: Stormwater Management Utilizing Low Impact Development Principles
Authors: Jomel Bautista, Gerson Ribas, Jorge Figueroa. Faculty Mentor: Monica Palomo.

Session 11: Engineering

Bronco Student Center - 2337 (Perseus)
12:00pm - 12:15pm
A predictive approach to cosmetic powder mixing using surface energy
Authors: Huong Tran, Danielle Meechan, Taylor Hennessy. Faculty Mentor: Laila Jallo.
12:15pm - 12:30pm
Analysis of Particle Size and Metal Content of a Decentralized Wastewater Treatment System in South Africa
Authors: Jaclyn O'Hara, Rianne Okamoto. Faculty Mentor: Monica Palomo.
12:30pm - 12:45pm
Decentralized Renewable Off-Grid Wastewater Treatment (DROWT)
Authors: Crystal Mena, Justine Nguyen, Josh Pham, Bowen Du, Thuan Ngoc Nguyen, Daniel Andrade, Ryan Gar, Pui Yuen Ng, Kyle Miller, Mohammad Masoud Modabernia. Faculty Mentor: Reza Lakeh, Ali Sharbat, Kevin Anderson
12:45pm - 1:00pm
Effect of Surface Modification on Cohesive Properties of Fine Pharmaceutical Powders
Authors: Amanda Tylosky, Emma Williams, Walter Quintos, Matthew Ibarra. Faculty Mentor: Laila Jallo.
Break 1:00 - 1:15pm
1:15pm - 1:30pm
Effect of Aluminum on Co2NiGa Heusler Type Ferromagnetic Shape Memory Alloys
Authors: Sang Bum Kim, Paul Y. Lee, Henry T. Wang. Faculty Mentor: Haamun Kalaantari.
1:30pm - 1:45pm
Reclaimed Water Quality Dynamics Throughout a Distribution System
Authors: Lonnie Chung, Jaclyn O'Hara. Faculty Mentor: Monica Palomo.
1:45pm - 2:00pm
The Effects of Rain on Freeway Traffic in Southern California
Authors: Sawanpreet Singh Dhaliwal. Faculty Mentor: Xinkai Wu.
2:00pm - 2:15pm
Free Surface Electrospun Polyvinylidene Fluoride Membranes for Direct Contact Membrane Distillation
Authors: Garret Engen, Nicholas Belgau, Zach Walsh, Austin Lee, Jonathan Hatamoff, Monique Montague. Faculty Mentor: Keith Forward.
Break 2:30 - 2:45pm
2:45pm - 3:00pm
Continuous Pharmaceutical Production by means of Free Surface Electrospinning
Authors: Katarina Guzman, Jack Lift, Uyen Phan, Hovhannes Gregorchuk, Thai Nguyen. Faculty Mentor: Keith Forward.
3:00pm - 3:15pm
Tunable Control of Ferrofluidic Jet Instability and Localized Fiber Deposition via Magneto-Electro-Assisted Spinning (MEAS)
Authors: Christopher Calle. Faculty Mentor: Yong Gan.
3:15pm - 3:30pm
Thermal Vacuum Chamber Thruster Test Stand
Authors: Ali Chahine. Faculty Mentor: Frank Chandler.

Session 12: Computer Science, Mathematics & Engineering

Bronco Student Center - 2132 (England Evans)
12:00pm - 12:15pm
DDoS Attack using Amazon's Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) Servers
Authors: Paul Chiou. Faculty Mentor: Yu Sun.
12:15pm - 12:30pm
Distinguishing Music from Advertisement by Using Machine Learning Techniques for Audio Classification
Authors: Mostafa Vahidi. Faculty Mentor: Yu Sun.
12:30pm - 12:45pm
Extension of the Simon invariant to K_p graphs
Authors: Kim Reece. Faculty Mentor: Robin Wilson.
12:45pm - 1:00pm
Religious Radicalization Model: Branch Davidians
Authors: Hsien-Te Kao. Faculty Mentor: Jennifer Switkes.
Break 1:00 - 1:15pm
1:15pm - 1:30pm
The Milky Way Project: Mapping Our Galaxy One Click At a Time
Authors: Tharindu Jayasinghe, Don Dixon. Faculty Mentor: Matthew Povich.
1:30pm - 1:45pm
Kinematic Characteristics of Galaxy Mergers in FIRE
Authors: José Flores. Faculty Mentor: Jorge Moreno.
1:45pm - 2:00pm
Gas Stripping in the Simulated Pegasus Galaxy
Authors: Francisco Mercado. Faculty Mentor: Jorge Moreno.
2:00pm - 2:15pm
UAV Collision Detection and Avoidance using ADS-B Sensor and Custom ADS-B Like Solution
Authors: Nicole Curtis-Brown, Isaac Guzman, Tristan Sherman, Joshua Tellez. Faculty Mentor: Subodh Bhandari.
Break 2:15 - 2:30pm
2:30pm - 2:45pm
All-Solid-State Ion Selective Electrode
Authors: Rikesh Patel, Jorge Sandoval. Faculty Mentor: Peng Sun.
2:45pm - 3:00pm
Search and Rescue in Indoor Environments using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles
Authors: Aireal Tran, Zachery Villanueva, Thinh Nguyen. Faculty Mentor: Subodh Bhandari.
3:00pm - 3:15pm
Improving the Efficiency of Radio Frequency Filter Designs
Authors: Jesus Acevedo. Faculty Mentor: Hyoung Soo Kim.
3:15pm - 3:30pm
Demonstration of Peer-to-Peer Human-Robot Teaming under Sliding Autonomy
Authors: Joseph Gunderson. Faculty Mentor: Daisy Tang.
Classifying Comedy: Female Comedy in Love's Labour's Lost
Oral Presentation
12:00pm - 12:15pm
Location:
University Library - 1814

Amanda Riggle. Faculty Mentor: Aaron DeRosa.

Abstract: Shakespeare's popular comedic women like Viola from Twelfth Night and Portia from The Merchant of Venice have received a wealth of critical analysis on their roles as comedy-creators within their plays. The five female characters in Love's Labour's Lost, however, receive little analysis outside of their roles as love-objects for their male counterparts. Poststructuralist Marxists like Fredric Jameson assert that all texts are reflective of the class and cultural struggles happening during the time in which they are written. If Jameson is correct that all text contains, however minutely, evidence of conflicts that structure a society, then Love's Labour's Lost is no exception. The Elizabethan Era was wrought with conflicts that could have influenced Shakespeare's construction of his female characters and their use in comedy: from the introduction of capitalism and the end of feudalism to the reign of the first unmarried queen in a society that saw women as less-than men. A Poststructural Marxist reading of Love's Labour's Lost will not only lend itself to filling the gap in scholarship around the women in the play but will illustrate how socioeconomics play a role in the construction of female comedy.

Keywords: Comedy, Shakespeare, Love's Labour's Lost, Feminism, Marxism, Conflict Theory, Fredric Jameson

The Power of Pawns: An Analysis of Parisian Identity and Loyalty during the Anglo-Burgundian Occupation, 1420-1436
Oral Presentation
1:30pm - 1:45pm
Location:
University Library - 1814

Isabel Melendez. Faculty Mentor: Robert Lewis, Georgia Mickey.

Abstract: At the height of the Hundred Years' War, from 1420 to 1436, the city of Paris was occupied by an alliance between the King of England and the Duke of Burgundy. Most studies of Paris during this period utilize a top-down perspective, basing their analyses on the actions of nobility; my research paper analyzes Parisian identity from the perspective of the lower classes. Drawing off a 15th-century primary source, the Journal d'un Bourgeois de Paris, which survives as an invaluable record of Parisian opinions during the Anglo-Burgundian occupation, my paper argues that Parisian identity was rarely expressed in relation to the French crown, and was mostly understood in local terms. I support my claim by assessing the importance of noble clout among locals, analyzing Parisian reactions in French and Anglo occupied times, and comparing the Parisian experience to that of other occupied regions in 15th century France. Ultimately, I suggest that any loyalties that Parisians held for those nobles and kings competing for their support, from the Duke of Burgundy to the French loyalist coalition known as the Armagnacs, were largely driven by Parisian self-interest..

Keywords: Paris, Hundred Years War, Anglo-Burgundian Occupation, Identity, 15th Century France

The effects of social media on Millennial's shopping behaviors
Oral Presentation
3:00pm - 3:15pm
Location:
University Library - 1814

Esmeralda Urias. Coauthors: Vanessa Hernandez. Faculty Mentor: Angella Kim.

Abstract: There is increased use of social media among consumers as the new media allow users to network with each other, exchange information, and shop via social media platforms. The aim of this research is to examine the influence of social media on Millennials shopping behavior. We were particularly interested in the shopping behaviors of Millennials (age 18 to 34) because this generation is heavy users of social media and it is important for retailers to know how to effectively use social media to target Millennials. In our study, we examined the influence of Millennials involvement with social media on shopping related outcomes such as impulse buying, peer-influenced shopping, and frequency of shopping. Data were collected via online survey and regression analysis was conducted to test hypotheses. The findings show that social media involvement significantly influence impulse buying and purchase influenced by the influencers on social media. However, social media involvement did not have significant relationship with shopping frequency..

Keywords: social media, social networks, vblog, hashtag, social media influencers, likert scale, cronbach's alpha

Sad Gurl Empathy
Poster and Creative Works Showcase
2:30pm - 3:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - Ursa Major

Danielle Baca. Faculty Mentor: Matthew Whittle.

Abstract: It isn't always easy living the life of the educated. The more you know the more you are encompassed by the pain and suffering of the world that surrounds you. Being an anthropologist, you see the world unfold in a dangerous and threatening way, with a turn of each page of books and articles and through research. From my Western eyes, being in touch with the peoples of this planet means to touch suffering, especially when you learn about the misfortunes within the countries of Africa and the many different groups that make up this continent. No greater example of human suffering comes to mind other than Africa with its countries being barely held together. The ramifications of colonialism have not left the scene. They have simply changed form in a way that leaves the people within Africa even more exploited and vulnerable than ever before. Without suffering the world I know and love would not keep turning. The greater part of humanity pays a toll that they did not wish to pay. The injustices against the human race, at the hands of humans, forever and always remains in my mind. Such is pain I have never truly experienced for myself, yet I feel it within me and feel rather responsible for it. My existence is no better than any one else's..

Keywords: original art, artwork, abstract art, watercolor, student artwork, political statement, suffering

CFD and Wind Tunnel Investigations of Aerodynamics of a New Type of Airfoil for Wings on the Cal Poly Pomona Formula SAE Car
Poster and Creative Works Showcase
2:30pm - 3:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - Ursa Major

Caleb Duescher. Coauthors: Danny Jierian. Faculty Mentor: Ali Ahmadi.

Abstract: CFD and wind tunnel investigations of the aerodynamics of a new type of airfoil for front and rear wings on Cal Poly Pomona SAE Formula cars were conducted. The new airfoil is based on the Selig 1223 airfoil and called the top-surface airfoil, as it only has the suction side of the airfoil, and produces increased lift (downforce) and is easier to manufacture. Both the baseline and top-surface airfoils were analyzed using ANSYS Fluent and half-scales models were constructed and wind tunnel tested. Wind tunnel tests demonstrated that the new airfoil can produce up to 15% more lift, and more drag, than the baseline airfoil at the large operating angles of attack used on the cars.

Keywords: ARO, Aerospace, FSAE, Formula SAE, Engineering, Rapid Prototype, Carbon Fiber, Wind Tunnel, CFD, Race Car, 3D Printing, Downforce, Drag, Lift, Subsonic, Airfoil, Top Surface Airfoil

Religious Radicalization Model: Branch Davidians
Oral Presentation
12:45pm - 1:00pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - 2132 (England Evans)

Hsien-Te Kao. Faculty Mentor: Jennifer Switkes.

Abstract: A radical religious sect Branch Davidians was established at the Mount Carmel Center in Waco, Texas during 1955. The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives raided the center on February 28, 1993 for weapons violations. After 51 days of standoff, the Federal Bureau of Investigation called for Waco Siege which resulted in a total of 86 deaths. We examine the critical factors in recruitment and government assistance through agent-based modeling that simulates the social interaction between Branch Davidians and Waco city residents by recreating Branch Davidians recruitment, structure and behavior to prevent this tragedy. We regenerate the population demographics, race, gender and class, using 1990 Texas Census data. We formulate the influential variation based on unemployment and crime news coverage and United States economy status. We introduce a rank system in the sect to represent the power dynamics associated with racial, gender and rank status tensions that cause sexual and physical assault. The agency may ignore the help signals, thus causing delay in assistance; in addition the agency would only provide assistance if the reported cases exceed a significant amount. A Branch Davidians member will have a higher chance to withdraw from religious radicalization with government assistance. In this research, we aim to disband the Branch Davidians through recruitment intervention and government assistance that could prevent the Waco siege and minimize the potential death and injury. Our research provides strategic containment and eradication of a radical religious sect to diminish the progression of radicalization and violence..

Keywords: Branch Davidians, agent-based model, religious radicalization

80 Million Years of Prolonged and Localized Fluid Flow on Shatsky Rise
Poster and Creative Works Showcase
2:30pm - 3:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - Ursa Major

Karissa Vermillion. Faculty Mentor: Nicholas Van Buer.

Abstract: Shatsky Rise is a large igneous province in the northwest Pacific Ocean, which formed at the Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary, 147 Mya. 40 Ar/ 39 Ar incremental heating ARGUS-VI analyses of samples from TAMU and Ori Massif, two large scale volcanic features on Shatsky Rise, yield mixing ages between fresh plagioclase and sericite alteration phases that range from several million years younger than the eruption ages of 147 and 140 Mya, respectively, to three analyses that are approximately 55 to 75 Myr younger than the eruption age. Since the sericite 40 Ar/ 39 Ar ages obtained are a mixture between fresh plagioclase and sericite alteration in the plagioclase, we estimated the true age of alteration using the Verati and Jourdan (2015) mixing model, showing that in IODP Hole U1350A (140 Mya eruption age) the sericite formed around 127 Mya or much later between 85 and 60 Mya. Heat flow modeling shows that throughout Shatsky Rise prolonged fluid flow may occur and could be responsible for sericite alteration up to approximately 22 Myr after eruption. The overall mechanism driving the additional heat required to form sericite so much later and locally at Ori Massif is still under investigation, but our evidence points to extended residence of the fluids in a deep ocean crust aquifer, where it can heated up over millions of years. Special thanks must be contributed to Dr. Anthony Koppers of OSU, who mentored this REU project in the summer of 2016, and in a way can be considered a co-author..

Keywords: Shatsky Rise, 40Ar/39Ar, Geochronology, Plagioclase, Sericite, Alteration, TAMU, Ori, Massif, Mixing Age,

Parental Inclusivity Within Higher Education Institutions
Oral Presentation
12:45pm - 1:00pm
Location:
University Library - Special Events (4th floor)

Kimberly Alvarez. Faculty Mentor: Jose Aguilar-Hernandez.

Abstract: The featured presentation will showcase research conducted with the purpose of offering awareness and advocacy for equity in support of undergraduate mothers of color, through an analysis of student support services offered across Cal State University institutions. Presently, many campus environments are inadequately supporting undergraduate student parents. This presentation will offer suggestions to assist in the inclusivity of undergraduate student mothers of color. Using a multi-method critical action and critical ethnographic qualitative research approach, I will analyze examples of undergraduate mothers of color working towards representation and academic support. References to sources such as, Mothers in Academia a collective text edited by Mari Castaneda and Kirsten Isgro (2013), examines the inequities faculty and student mothers in higher education face. I will also refer to Opting Out? by Pamela Stone (2007), which offers further insight into women who have been pushed out of their career due to demanding responsibilities of an institution. Lastly, I will note Mothers of Color in Academia de UCLA (2016) who represent a collaborative effort of student mothers striving to accomplish equitable student support services for our marginalized community. The themes of my presentation will cover awareness of a marginalized community, awareness of student support service needs, and a platform from which mothers on campus may voice their experiences. While there may be alternative ways for activism in favor of student parents, my research is one step towards visibility and acceptance..

Keywords: Inclusivity, Undergraduate Mothers, Women of Color

Sulfolobus Turreted Icosahedral Virus Genome Excision from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius
Oral Presentation
2:45pm - 3:00pm
Location:
University Library - 2907

Veneese Brown. Faculty Mentor: Jamie Snyder.

Abstract: It is a biological constant that viruses are found associated with all known life and that they play an essential role in the ecology and evolution of all life forms. Lytic viruses have now been discovered that infect organisms from each of the three domains of life. Recently, a new lysis system has been described for two unrelated archaeal viruses. This lysis system appears to be novel and distinct from previously described virus-encoded lysis systems. One of those viruses, STIV, infects the hyperthermophilic acidophile, Sulfolobus. We recently discovered that this species contains a copy of the STIV genome integrated into its chromosome. An integrated form of STIV had never been detected prior to this discovery. This project focuses on trying to excise the viral genome from the host chromosome. By doing so, we hope to learn more about the replication cycle of this unique virus..

Keywords: Sulfolobus, Archaea, Archaeal virus, virus, virus genome, genome

Designing the Reserve Educational Center: Exploration, Education, Restoration at Rancho Mission Viejo
Poster and Creative Works Showcase
2:30pm - 3:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - Ursa Major

Timothy Curran. Coauthors: Christopher Carrillo, Di Liu, Jing Wei Zhou. Faculty Mentor: Weimin Li.

Abstract: This project is a redesign for the headquarters of the Reserve at Rancho Mission Viejo. This site is and will be an education center for groups of elementary school children. The Reserve is a subsidiary of Rancho Mission Viejo and a unique organization focused on Public Education, School Education, Community outreach, stewardship, monitoring, and research. The goals and objectives were used to create a design. The final plan evolved from our concepts which is based on our goals of education, exploration restoration, and incorporates all of our various objective. Proposed new changes includes moving vehicle circulation to the perimeter and concentrating the human foot print to provide better education and restoration areas. Other changes include creating unique zones that have education stations where the zones meet and improving water conditions and habitat function..

Keywords: Design, Restoration, Outdoor classrooms, Landscape Architetcure, Education

Decoding the Resistance to Alzheimer's Disease
Oral Presentation
1:30pm - 1:45pm
Location:
University Library - 1822

Vivianne Mitri. Faculty Mentor: Glenn Kageyama.

Abstract: In clinical trials, patients diagnosed with "Alzheimer's disease (AD)" typically exhibit dementia and brain histopathology consisting of amyloid "plaques" and protein "tangles". However, non-demented control subjects may exhibit the same degree of histopathology. The latter patients, collectively referred to here as Non-Demented with Alzheimer's (NDAN), deserve a more detailed investigation. It is coming to surface that the factor underlying AD is a severe compromise of oxygen and metabolism in the brain. This recognition prompts a clearer understanding of similar diseases, such as Down Syndrome (DS). In those with DS, cardiovascular and respiratory systems are primarily affected. Past the age of 30, individuals withDS will bear plaques and tangles that are indistinguishable from that of an AD patient. As a resultof such findings, the role of hypoxia in Alzheimer's is of increasing interest. However, oxygen deprivation and its relationship to NDAN has not been sufficiently investigated. Considering thatNDAN individuals do not demonstrate the cognitive deficits associated with hypoxia/Alzheimer's, it is possible that they have somehow developed an adaptation that has allowed them to escape hypoxic damage. Indeed, NDAN individuals demonstrate the effects of hypoxic adaptation, such as an increase in hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) mediated repressor element 1-silencing transcription (REST) protein. Intriguingly, brain-derived neurotrophic factor,BDNF has been shown to be severely depleted in Alzheimer's. It's apparently protective ability yielded the protein as a therapeutic treatment. However, its level of expression in AD versus NDAN are the same. This data supports the high heterogeneity of Alzheimer's which can yield symptomatic treatment to be uncertain. A thorough understanding of NDAN etiology guided by hypoxic adaptive mechanisms could help narrow the crucial determinants for permitting preserved cognition despite elevated levels of AD pathology.

Keywords: Down syndrome, Neurology, Neuroscience, Alzheimer's, Hypoxia

Calm Nest
Poster and Creative Works Showcase
2:30pm - 3:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - Ursa Major

Kojchakorn Ngamnimitthum. Faculty Mentor: Katrin Terstegen.

Abstract: This project consists of a church and its supporting programs (community room, classrooms, chapel, etc.) and a cafe. A hierarchy of sacredness of each spaces is emphasized through the treatment of each spaces through materials, circulation, height, light, and form. The main church space was generated through the idea of tension between the exterior perimeter fence and the forms that resides within it. The residual spaces between the fence and the church became the garden spaces that the users can meditate in and view from the interior. A large peaceful garden is revealed at the main entrance, allowing the user to be taken away from the urban settings. The church is separated into 3 main spaces, each with entities and symbols that are commonly found in mainstream religious spaces. Although the church bares no connection to a single religion, it is meant to be used as a non-denominational meditation space. The first space contains "confession rooms" that are scattered throughout to allow users to further isolate themselves into smaller meditation rooms. The second space is open and minimal with only a water feature, symbolic of purity, in the center so the user may sit and reflect. The third space is the congregation room where large group meetings or performances may take place. This church project allows users of different backgrounds and religious differences to meditate and contemplate, creating a safe space for the community..

Keywords: Architecture, Church, Community, Safe

Effect of Caffeine on Biofilm Formation, Capsule Size, and Flagella on Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Poster and Creative Works Showcase
2:30pm - 3:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - Ursa Major

Byron Trinh. Coauthors: Cynde Mai. Faculty Mentor: John Chan.

Abstract: Caffeine is a stimulant that is consumed daily by millions of people in various beverages and pills. The average dosage of caffeine observed in the human body was reported to be 1x10-3 M. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is a gram-negative opportunistic microbe known to be the main cause for pneumonia in cystic fibrosis patients and is reported in many hospital-acquired infections. The number of flagella, length, and capsule formation may play a role in influencing the ability of PA to form biofilms. The objective of this study is to examine how caffeine affects the biofilm formation, capsule size, and flagella number and length. To determine the effect of caffeine on biofilm formation, different concentrations of caffeine ranging from 1x10-2 M to 1x10-12 M were added to a flat bottom 96-well microtiter plate containing a 1:5 dilution of the 24-hour culture of PA (ATCC 10145) in M63 liquid media. After 48 hours of incubation, biofilm was quantified by uptake of crystal violet and measured using a SpectraMax 190. To study capsule size and flagella, Maneval's capsule stain and Ryu stain were used, respectively. ImageJ was used to measure the sizes of bacteria, capsule, and flagella. All data represent quadruplicate runs and were analyzed using a two sample T-test and measured at a significance of p<0.05. the="" current="" findings="" indicate="" that="" caffeine="" suppressed="" biofilm="" formation="" and="" bacteria="" size="" there="" was="" an="" increase="" in="" number="" of="" flagella="" length="" however="" did="" not="" affect="" capsule="" overall="" growth="" p="">

Keywords: caffeine, pseudomonas aeruginosa, biofilm, flagella, capsule, pseudomonas, aeruginosa,

Demonstration of Peer-to-Peer Human-Robot Teaming under Sliding Autonomy
Oral Presentation
3:15pm - 3:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - 2132 (England Evans)

Joseph Gunderson. Faculty Mentor: Daisy Tang.

Abstract: From autonomous automotives to advertising, society is transitioning into a world where Artificial Intelligence is becoming an increasingly more integrated component of humanity. This seemingly seamless transition has brought about much concern of a robot mutiny to the layman, on the contrary, humans will be working in conjunction with robots. Traditionally, humans always act like supervisors to give commands to robot. In this research, we will focus on humans and robots working as peers. This research will demonstrate the inclusion of peer-to-peer interaction under sliding autonomy of control for applications that require tight collaboration among agents. While multiple robots are attempting to complete a task, inevitably problems will arise. How those problems are communicated to a human coworker and how those problems are solved via human intervention will require multiple degrees of autonomy. The purpose of this study will be to show that varying levels of sliding autonomy will allow a dynamic balance of fully autonomous robots and human involvement resulting in the completion of tasks in the most efficient manner..

Keywords: Artificial Intelligence, Sliding Autonomy, Peer-to-Peer

Formation and Evaluation of Ternary Soluble Complexes of Pea Protein Isolate and Mesquite Gum to encapsulate and protect Quercetin.
Oral Presentation
12:15pm - 12:30pm
Location:
University Library - 2913

Francisco M Leyva-Gutierrez. Coauthors: Juan Carlos Cuevas-Bernardino. Faculty Mentor: Gabriel Davidov-Pardo.

Abstract: Consumers are tending to purchase functional food products, which are products that claim to provide additional health benefits beyond their normal nurturing effects. In addition, an important trend in the modern food industry is for products that are manufactured ''without artificial additives" as preservatives, flavorings, and colorings. Phenolic compounds, such as quercetin (Q), are natural compounds with well-documented benefits to human health. As a result, these bioactive compounds are receiving increased attention and have become very popular in the design of functional food products. Nevertheless, their incorporation into food proves a challenge due to their chemical instability and low water solubility. Phenolic compounds have a distinct affinity for proteins, and bind themselves to them to form strong, water soluble complexes; in this manner, the protein acts as an effective delivery system for the phenolic compounds. Additionally, electrostatic attachment of polysaccharides in protein-phenolic complexes may further increase their solubility near the isoelectric point and delay the chemical degradation of the encapsulated PCs. The purpose of this study was to prepare and evaluate the chemical and physical properties of an all-natural delivery system based on protein-polysaccharide biopolymer complexes composed of pea protein isolate (PPI) and mesquite gum (MG), in order to encapsulate quercetin.

Keywords: Nanoencapsulation, Ternary soluble complexes, Polyphenols

Effects of the Allelopathic Compound, Juglone, on the Germination and Seedling Success of Eriogonum fasciculatum, Frangula californica, Rhamnus ilicifolia, Salsola tragus, and Salvia mellifera
Oral Presentation
1:45pm - 2:00pm
Location:
University Library - 2907

Daisy Hernandez. Faculty Mentor: Edward Bobich.

Abstract: Juglone is an allelopathic chemical produced by members of the genus Juglans, which includes all walnuts, that inhibits the seed germination and/or growth of many plant species. In the current study, the allelopathic effects of juglone on the seed germination and early seedling growth of native and nonnative plant species is explored. It is hypothesized that the native species in this study, Eriogonum fasciculatum, Frangula californica, Rhamnus ilicifolia, and Salvia mellifera, will have higher percentages of seed germination and greater seedling growth when exposed to different concentrations of juglone than non-native species, such as Salsola tragus. Prior to juglone treatment, pretreaments that lead to optimal germination need to be determined for all of the native species; Salsola tragus does not require pretreatment for germination..

Keywords: juglone, walnut, germination, seedling,

Influence of Model Size on Purchase Intention
Poster and Creative Works Showcase
2:30pm - 3:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - Ursa Major

Lauren Phillips. Coauthors: Olivia Walker. Faculty Mentor: Chitra Dabas.

Abstract: Purpose- The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of average size models on the brand perception, purchase intention, and body image perception of a college-aged consumer. Design/methodology/approach- An online questionnaire was developed to assess the way a consumer feels about the attractiveness of average size models versus thin models. Based on this attractiveness, questions were asked about their perception on brands that use average size models and thin models, their intent to purchase from brands that use average size models, and the way average size models make affects their body image perception. Participants included students enrolled at Cal Poly Pomona. Findings- Participants indicated that they found average size models to be more attractive than thin models. This view of attractiveness increases the respondent's perception of brands that use average size models as well as their intent to purchase from those brands. Viewing the average size models also positively increased the respondent's body image perception. Practical Implications- This study shows apparel companies that they should use average size models in their advertisements because college-aged consumers respond better to them than to thin models. Originality/Value- The findings of this study are useful in understanding the relationship between attractiveness of average size models, brand perception, purchase intention, and body image perception. Previous research on this topic did not go into depth on the way average size models affects brand perception and purchase intention. Keywords - Average size models, Attractiveness, Thin models, Body image, Brand perception, Intent to purchase .

Keywords: Average size models, Attractiveness, Thin models, Body image, Brand perception, Intent to purchase

Southern Invasion: Population Genetics of Phidiana hiltoni
Oral Presentation
1:45pm - 2:00pm
Location:
University Library - 1828

Clara Jo King. Faculty Mentor: Angel Valdes.

Abstract: Phidiana hiltoni (Synonym: Phidiana pugnax), a species of nudibranch sea slug, is known for its pugnacious behavior as it often attacks and eats other aeolids along with its more common diet of hydroids (McDonald, 1983). Its historical range was from the Gulf of California to central California. However, starting in the 1990's, the species has been found as far north as the San Francisco Bay Area (Goddard et al, 2011). The dispersal of P. hiltoni has already proven a problem for the native species of sea slugs in the San Francisco Bay Area. P. hiltoni is not only showing signs of competing with northern California native sea slugs for hydroids, but has also been observed fighting and consuming these native species when encountered. Nothing is known about the causes for this dispersal events. For this project, I will sequence mitochondrial and nuclear markers of specimens of P. hiltoni collected from all along the entire range of the species, historical and new. This data will help understand the genetic structure of this species and develop hypotheses on the origin of the new population..

Keywords: Population genetics, microsatellites

Strengths of Hispanic/Latino Adults that Facilitated the Desistance of Gang Membership
Oral Presentation
12:00pm - 12:15pm
Location:
University Library - Special Events (4th floor)

Sergio Maldonado. Faculty Mentor: Alejandro Morales.

Abstract: Research in gang desistance has been ignored by researchers in psychology. Although researchers have started examining the desistance process, all studies have been looked at from a deficiency perspective and ignoring the strengths that may help them leave the gang. Desistance in this study is defined as the final and permanent cessation of all offenses and gang related-criminal activities. The purpose of this exploratory qualitative study is to identify the personal strengths of former Hispanic/Latino male gang members that facilitated their desistance from gang membership. Three questions we will be investigating are: 1) What are the specific strengths that promote desistance? 2) How did the strengths assist in desistance? and 3) Which strengths helped participants stay desisted? Participants will include 5 male Hispanic/Latino adults between the ages of 18-60 who are former gang members from a Southern Californian gang. Participants will be interviewed in regards what helped them leave the gang. Upon completion of the interviews, the audio recorded interviews will be transcribed and coded utilizing HyperResearch through thematic analyses. The goal is to illuminate what are specific strengths that are making gang members leave the gang and how to develop programs that are more strength based for Hispanic/Latino males..

Keywords: Positive Psychology, Strengths, Desistance, Gangs

YouTube and Ethics: Users' Understanding of the Ethical Dilemma on YouTube and the Moral Obligations of Content Creators
Oral Presentation
12:45pm - 1:00pm
Location:
University Library - 1814

Bianca Chang. Faculty Mentor: Nell Horowitz.

Abstract: The desire to become the next big YouTube star has spurred much competition among content creators to produce extraordinary videos that enables one to shine through the infinite, vast YouTube world. However, the term "extraordinary" is interpreted by some YouTubers as being "dramatic"; thus, unethical doings to generate viewership and gain subscribers emerged from the intentional creating or reporting of dramas. As a result, the so-called "YouTube Drama" -a phenomenon in the YouTube community where YouTubers intentionally create dramatic videos to attract views- was born and had become the hot topic in April 2016. The purpose of this study was to understand how users comprehends unethical behaviors in the YouTube community. This study used qualitative content analysis to categorize 561 comments extracted from the videos of DramaAlert, KSI, Markiplier, and PewDiePie. The total number of likes and dislikes of the videos and comments were also coded to examine whether users recognize the ethical dilemma behind DramaAlert and how users reacted to other YouTubers' dialogue about "YouTube Drama". The study found users generally exhibit a passive attitude towards DramaAlert and the "YouTube Drama" phenomenon despite they were concerned with the ethical issues behind the channel and the current condition of YouTube. The research concluded by providing suggestions for improvement on the ethical dilemma currently confronting in the YouTube community.

Keywords: social media ethics, media responsibility, content creator, YouTube

Flight Testing, Data Collection, and System Identification of a Multicopter UAV
Oral Presentation
2:30pm - 2:45pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - 1611D (Lyra)

Paul Navarro. Coauthors: Sung Cho. Faculty Mentor: Subodh Bhandari.

Abstract: This presentation presents the flight dynamics model development of a multicopter using a system identification technique. The multicopter is flown for frequency sweep and doublet inputs in all four axes. The collected flight data is post processed to remove any noise. The processed data is converted to frequency response using CIFER software. The frequency response is then used in the identification of transfer function and state-space models for the multiocpter. The identified model response is compared with the flight data, both frequency sweep and doublet data, for verification. Methods of frequency sweep data collection, data processing, and model verification are presented. The results show the identified model responses show high degree of correlation with the flight data..

Keywords: CIFER, System Identification, UAV, Multicopter, X8, 3DR, Frequency Sweep

Search and Rescue in Indoor Environments using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles
Oral Presentation
2:45pm - 3:00pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - 2132 (England Evans)

Aireal Tran. Coauthors: Zachery Villanueva, Thinh Nguyen. Faculty Mentor: Subodh Bhandari.

Abstract: One of the applications of unmanned aerial systems (UAS) is for search and rescue missions. UAS can be employed to search for victims in cases of natural disaster such as earthquake, flood, and fire. Deploying manned aircraft in some of these situations can pose a significant threat to the pilot and the aircraft. In fact, manned aircraft is not applicable when the search and rescue mission is conducted in indoor environments. Often times, it is difficult to assist victims trapped inside buildings without endangering the lives of rescue teams. Rotary-wing UASs such as multicopters show an enormous potential to be used for search and rescue missions in the indoor environments. However, there may be some challenges and limitations in deploying them such as the size of the vehicles, the amount of the payload, the lack of GPS signal and map of the environment, and the obstacles such as walls. In this project, two small multicopters are used for search and rescue missions in the indoor environment. One of the multicopters is used as a search vehicle, and the second is used as a rescue vehicle. The main advantage of this method is the fact that the agility of small-sized vehicles can be utilized without compromising the mission through payload distribution. This presentation will explain the methods of coordination between the two vehicles, the sensors and algorithms used, the methods of mapping the indoor environment, navigation in the GPS-denied environment, obstacle avoidance, and the delivery mechanism..

Keywords: search and rescue, UAV, inddoor

Efficacy Against Vaginal Infection of Mice Following Vaccination with a Liposome Containing the Immunogenic Herpes simplex (HSV-2)gDTripeptide and the Immunostimulating Adjuvant Tucaresol
Oral Presentation
1:45pm - 2:00pm
Location:
University Library - 1802

Yasmin Elhajmoussa. Faculty Mentor: Jill Adler Moore.

Abstract: HSV-2causes a sexually transmitted genital disease whichspreads to sensory neurons.Although anti-viral drugs can control the symptoms, there is no vaccine to prevent it.We investigated the protective effects of the gD HSV-2 tripeptide (gD3pep) in liposomes with lapidated tucaresol adjuvant (LT1) and its analogues Amido-LT1, LT2, LT3 and LT4 (Molecular Express, Inc. VesiVax®CMI liposomes).Mice (n=12/gp) were vaccinated subcutaneously d0, d14, d28 with buffer or liposomes containing 15µg/dose gD3pep along with 3 or 6 µg/dose of an LT adjuvant. Serum and spleens (n=5/gp) were collected d31/d32 for anti-gD3pep IgG isotypes, HSV-2 neutralizing antibody titers and cytokine production by spleenocytes. Mice (n=7/gp) were challenged intravaginally with HSV-2 d35, and monitored for morbidity for 28 days. Vaginal swabs were collected d37 for viral burden using a Plaque Forming Unit assay. Survival was 83% for mice given LT1 or LT2, followed by LT4 (60%), Amido-LT1 (50%), PBS (25%) and LT3 (0%). Disease signs and weight loss paralleled survival data. All LT groups showed less viral burden and higher neutralizing antibodies titers versus buffer (p<0.03).All LT groups stimulated a Th2 response based on anti-gD3pep IgG isotyping and increased numbers of splenocytes producing IL-4.Only splenocytes from the best survival groups secreted elevated levels of IL-6, IL-10 and IL-4. In conclusion, LT1 and LT2 adjuvants stimulated the most protection indicating that minor changes in the LT1 structure have a pronounced effect on the immunoprotection generated by the liposomal gD3pep vaccine..

Keywords: Herpes virus, HSV-2, BALB/c mice, lipidated tucaresol, adjuvants

Distinguishing Music from Advertisement by Using Machine Learning Techniques for Audio Classification
Oral Presentation
12:15pm - 12:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - 2132 (England Evans)

Mostafa Vahidi. Faculty Mentor: Yu Sun.

Abstract: Many individuals are constantly bombarded by a slew of advertisements when listening to songs on their favorite music streaming platforms. These interruptions can be disruptive and damaging to the overall experience of the user. However, if our smart devices could automatically distinguish music from advertisements and correctly classify the audio that is being played, they could then turn down the volume, mute, or even switch to another music streaming service. This research project tackles the idea of classifying audio as either music or advertisement by creating a learning algorithm that can analyze the frequencies, build a classification model, and predict the type of an audio input. Various techniques and libraries such as Machine Learning, Fast Fourier Transformation, and 'Weka' have allowed me to accurately classify a piece of audio that is being fed to this algorithm..

Keywords: machine, learning, machine learning, artificial intelligence, artificial, intelligence, music, advertisement, audio, classification, fast fourier transform, weka, streaming, service, streaming service, web, application, web application, learning, algorith

UAV Collision Detection and Avoidance using ADS-B Sensor and Custom ADS-B Like Solution
Oral Presentation
2:00pm - 2:15pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - 2132 (England Evans)

Nicole Curtis-Brown. Coauthors: Isaac Guzman, Tristan Sherman, Joshua Tellez. Faculty Mentor: Subodh Bhandari.

Abstract: The integration of UAVs in the National Airspace is an exciting topic and a major challenge. Many commercial applications such as package delivery, aerial photography, precision agriculture, et cetera await the mass integration of UAVs into the NAS. Safety is the number one concern for the integration of UAV's into the NAS. UAVs need to be able to avoid each other and other obstacles over the course of their flights. Collision avoidance algorithms allow for UAVs to fly without constant user input. Implementation of such algorithms would allow UAVs to fly safely around obstacles, increasing the safety of vehicles, property, and other manned and unmanned aircraft greatly. Large scale operations involving UAVs in the civilian airspace has yet to be approved by FAA. This presentation talks about the implementation of collision avoidance algorithms for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) using ADS-B sensors or ADS-B like solution for collision detection. The algorithm is tested in both simulation and flight tests. Simulation environment uses flight dynamics model of the UAVs. Both hardware-in-the-loop and software-in-the-loop simulations are utilized. The UAVs are equipped with Pixhawk autopilot for autonomous flight. An Intel Nuc processer board is used for the implementation of the collision avoidance algorithm. The board communicates with the autopilot, and sends the avoidance waypoints that the UAVs fly to after collision avoidance maneuver. Simulation and flight test results will be shown..

Keywords: UAV, Collision Avoidance, ADS-B

Mobile Phone-Based 3D Reconstruction of Building Facades
Poster and Creative Works Showcase
2:30pm - 3:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - Ursa Major

Eugene Nicko Canlas. Coauthors: Francisco Armando Ponce, Jose Zuniga, Caitlin Tran. Faculty Mentor: Omar Mora.

Abstract: 3D reconstruction of environments from imagery has become a norm in the modern era. There are a vast amount of applications from a wide range of fields. Mobile devices have revolutionized data collection making it accessible and affordable. In particular, the imagery acquired from mobile phones, this in specific has made 3D reconstruction possible. For these reasons, an evaluation of the potential contributions from the mobile phone is necessary. This feasibility study is focused on assessing the potential of using photogrammetric data through mobile phones to reconstruct 3D models aimed at mapping infrastructure. First, various cameras from mobile phones are analyzed to determine whether they can map and model building facades. Next, data are collected from various angles to evaluate if the building structure can be reconstructed in 3D. Finally, the data are analyzed to determine if 3D reconstruction is feasible from the methods tested. This study summarizes the initial findings of this investigation..

Keywords: Modeling, Infrastructure, Photogrammetry, 3D Reconstruction, DSM

Efficacy of Liposomal Amphotericin B for the Treatment of Systemic Candidiasis in a Murine Model of Type II Diabetes
Oral Presentation
2:45pm -3:00pm
Location:
University Library - 1802

Shirleen Simargi. Faculty Mentor: Jill Adler-Moore, Jon Olson.

Abstract: Background: Limited studies have been done to determine how Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) affects antifungal drug efficacy. We used a T2DM murine model of systemic candidiasis to examine the efficacy of the antifungal drug liposomal amphotericin B (AmBisome®, AmBi). Methods: ICR male mice (13/group) fed a 60% high fat diet for 3wks, were given intraperitoneal nicotinamide (60mg/kg) and streptozocin (100mg/kg) to induce T2DM, based on blood glucose levels of >301mg/dL by day 14. Mice were challenged IV with C. albicans and 24h later, treated for 6 days IV with 3, 5 or 7.5mg/kg AmBi or 5% dextrose (D5W). Mice (7/group) were monitored for survival to d21 and tissues were collected d7 (6/gp) to determine fungal burden, drug concentrations and cytokine levels. Results: AmBi produced significantly less weight loss (p ≤ 0.004) and disease signs (p ≤ 0.0006) with 100% survival versus D5W (0% survival). A dose-dependent decrease in fungi and increase in drug concentration was observed in kidneys, fat and pancreas (p ≤ 0.028). Proinflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-1-alpha and IL-1-beta in kidneys were significantly lower with AmBi versus D5W (p < 0.01), while IL-4, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, IL-10 and IL-12p70 levels were significantly higher in kidneys with AmBi versus D5W (p < 0.02). Conclusions: AmBi at 3 to 7.5mg/kg was effective in protecting T2DM mice against systemic candidiasis based on survival, weight loss, disease signs and fungal burden. Cytokine profiles in diabetic control D5W mice showed an elevated proinflammatory response, which was not present in diabetic mice given AmBi.

Keywords: Liposomal Amphotericin B, Systemic Candidiasis, Murine Model of Type II Diabetes

Gelatin Modulus of Elasticity
Oral Presentation
2:15pm - 2:30pm
Location:
University Library - 2913

Juan Onate. Coauthors: Bem Gi Kim, Chin man Lam. Faculty Mentor: Gary McGavin.

Abstract: Young's Modulus (E) or Modulus of Elasticity describes the tendency of an object to deform when opposing forces are applied to said object. It is often defined as the ratio between tensile stress to tensile strain; in other words, the modulus of elasticity of a material is simply the slope of the curve generated comparing the tensile stress versus tensile strain of a given material. Modulus of Elasticity is often thought to deal solely to structural materials, such as steel, concrete, wood, glass and other metals. In reality, however, any solid material possesses this property. The purpose of this experiment is to determine the modulus of Elasticity of common gelatin through different tensile, compressive, and shear tests. By testing gelatin samples at different temperatures and different grenetine concentrations we will determine the effects of temperature and grenetine concentrations in the Modulus of Elasticity of gelatin. Our results may infer important analogies to other materials, such as the behavior of tectonic plates and oscillation dampers..

Keywords: gelatin, jello, strenght, materials, modulus, elasticity, tension, compression, shear, stress

Three-dimensional print of a seismic record
Poster and Creative Works Showcase
2:30pm - 3:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - Ursa Major

Juan Onate. Coauthors: Bem Gi Kim, Chin man Lam. Faculty Mentor: Gary McGavin.

Abstract: In the event of an earthquake, the ground shakes in three dimension simultaneously: up and down, east to west, and north to south. The information obtained in seismographs is a representation of the ground shaking in each separate dimension. This project attempts to combine the information obtained in a seismograph and display it simultaneously in a three-dimensional manner. A procedure is followed in which each seismograph curve is placed on an axis and extruded three-dimensionally using CAD. The interception of each of the three dimensions is then isolated and a three-dimensional mass is created which represents the three dimensions of the earthquake..

Keywords: earthquake, seismograh, 3D Printing, 3D, graphs

Image-Based 3D Reconstruction of the Russian Thistle: Lessons Learned
Poster and Creative Works Showcase
2:30pm - 3:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - Ursa Major

Jose Zuniga. Coauthors: Caitlin Tran, Eugene Canlas, Francisco Ponce. Faculty Mentor: Omar Mora, Erin Questad.

Abstract: Russian thistle (Salsola spp.), also known as tumbleweed, is an invasive plant of Eurasian origin. This plant has become a troublesome nuisance, in particular during late fall and early winter when it breaks from the soil and travels across the surface when blown. Thus, making its control difficult. In addition, it reduces the yield and quality of various crops and creates a fire hazard. For these reasons identifying areas with high densities of Russian thistle is an important part of preventing the further spread of the species. This feasibility study is focused on assessing the potential of using photogrammetric data to reconstruct 3D models aimed at mapping Russian thistle and estimating its biomass. First, various RGB cameras are analyzed to determine whether they can map and model a single plant from an oblique angle. Next, data are collected from a nadir view using RGB cameras to evaluate if the Russian thistle can be differentiated from the natural ground surface. Finally, the data are analyzed to determine if 3D reconstruction is feasible from the methods tested. This study summarizes the initial findings of this investigation..

Keywords: Russian thistle, Tumbleweed, Photogrammetry, 3D Reconstruction, DSM

Study of CMI liposomes containing gD3pep-Cys with dsRNA in the BALB/c mouse model of intravaginal Herpes Simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) challenge
Oral Presentation
12:00pm - 12:15pm
Location:
University Library - 1802

Marie Gomez. Faculty Mentor: Jill Adler.

Abstract: HSV-2 infects 20% of the US population, causing genital and latent infections. Medications reduce disease signs, but do not eradicate the virus. In this study we tested a VesiVax® (Molecular Express, Inc.) liposomal HSV-2 vaccine containing an immunogenic HSV-2 gD tripeptide (gD3pep-Cys) bound to liposomes by comaleimide (CMI) and mixed them with dsRNA, which stimulates intracellular immune cell TLR3 receptors. BALB/c mice (n=12/gp) were vaccinated subcutaneously d0, d28, d56 with liposomes containing 15 ug/dose gD3pep-Cys and 50 ug/dose dsRNA or 15 ug/dose of the TLR4 ligand MPL (Monophosphoryl Lipid A). Controls were 50 ug/dose dsRNA with CMI or non-CMI liposomes or phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Serum and spleens (n=5/gp) were collected d59 for anti-gD3pep IgG isotype concentrations, neutralizing antibody titers, and cytokine production by spleenocytes. Mice (n=7/gp) were challenged intravaginally with HSV-2 d70, and monitored for morbidity for 28 days. Vaginal swabs were collected d72 for viral burden using a Plaque Forming Unit assay. Survival (%) was as follows: L-CMI-gD3pep + dsRNA (100%), L-CMI-gD3pep + MPL (100%), L-CMI + dsRNA (29%), L-Non-CMI + dsRNA (0%), PBS (0%). Disease signs and weight loss paralleled survival and mice given CMI-gD3pep +dsRNA or CMI-gD3pep+MPL had significantly less viral burden and higher neutralizing antibody titers versus controls (p<0.05). CMI-gD3pep+dsRNA stimulated a Th1 response and MPL stimulated a Th2 response based on anti-gD3pep IgG isotyping and cytokine profiles. In conclusion, gD3pep in CMI liposomes with dsRNA or MPL provided comparable protection against HSV-2 and should be investigated further using a combination of dsRNA and MPL..

Keywords: Herpes Simplex Virus 2, HSV-2, vaccine

Protective Immune Response Generated Against Influenza Challenge in Mice Vaccinated with Liposomes Containing Different Adjuvants and No Proteins
Oral Presentation
12:15pm - 12:30pm
Location:
University Library - 1802

Eden Faneuff. Coauthors: Fady Guirguis. Faculty Mentor: Jill Adler-Moore.

Abstract: Protective Immune Response Generated Against Influenza Challenge in Mice Vaccinated with Liposomes Containing Different Adjuvants and No Proteins Eden Faneuff, Fady Guirguis, Paulina Villanueva PI: Jill Adler-Moore Introduction: Several commercial influenza vaccines stimulate an adaptive immune response to yearly mutating influenza proteins. We have investigated a liposomal vaccine containing only adjuvant molecules and no proteins to stimulate an innate immune response for protection against influenza infection. Methods: In Study 1 different doses of a liposomal VesiVax® vaccine (Molecular Express Inc.) containing the adjuvant Pam3CAG, were used to vaccinate mice (n=9/group) and included: intranasal (IN) d4, d2 pre-challenge; subcutaneous (SC) d2 pre-challenge; IN d2, d4 post-challenge; SC d2 post challenge; SC buffer d2 pre-challenge. Mice were challenged d0 IN with influenza and monitored for morbidity 2X/day to d21. In Study 2 using the optimized regimen from Study 1 (IN d4, d2 pre-challenge), we examined the protection produced by different adjuvants incorporated into the liposomes. These adjuvants included Pam3CAG, cyclic dinucleotide (CDN), and mycoviral dsRNA; liposomes with no adjuvant or buffer were used as controls. Results: In Study 1, using the Pam3CAG liposomes, the dosing regimen that was significantly better than all other groups (89% survival) was the IN d4 and d2 pre-challenge (p ≤ 0.0006). In Study 2, survival was higher for the Pam3CAG liposomes (67% survival) compared to the liposomes containing CDN (p=0.03) or buffer control (p=0.06). Weight loss and disease signs paralleled survival.

Keywords: Influenza , Immunology, Immune Response, Liposomes, VesiVax® vaccine, adjuvants, Pam3CAG, mycoviral dsRNA, cyclic dinucleotide (CDN),

Determining the ability of AmBisome® to penetrate a Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm in In Vitro Modeling of Bacterial and Fungal Lung Infections in Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Oral Presentation
12:45pm - 1:00pm
Location:
University Library - 2907

Matthew Slarve. Faculty Mentor: Jill Adler-Moore, Jon Olson.

Abstract: Introduction: Cystic Fibrosis patients suffer from Pseudomonas aeruginosa pulmonary infection; this bacteria grows as a biofilm in their alveoli, leading to secondary fungal infections. To determine if AmBisome® an antifungal drug can penetrate the biofilm to reach the fungi, we standardized an in vitro model of lung alveoli., Methods: Using a 24-well plate with transwell insert membranes, different doses of AmBisome (8-32ug/ml) were added to the top of the well to evaluate AmBisome penetration of the membrane. We then added Candida albicans to the bottom of the wells to determine if AmBisome penetrated through the membrane and could kill the yeast. A P. aeruginosa biofilm was formed on the transwell membrane to evaluate whether AmBisome could penetrate the biofilm and get to the bottom of the wells. Results: AmBisome at all concentrations penetrated the membrane to yield 6.8ug/ml to 17.6ug/ml; this amount increased by 43% on average when yeast were added to the well bottom. When 16ug/ml was added to the well top, enough drug penetrated the membrane to kill 100% of the yeast. The P. aeruginosa biofilm on the membrane, markedly inhibited the amount of AmBisome that penetrated the membrane when no yeast was present by 92%. Conclusions: AmBisome penetrated the membrane at concentrations lethal for C. albicans although the P. aeruginose biofilm inhibited this penetration when no yeast was present in the well bottom. Future studies will examine if yeast in the well bottom will attract more AmBisome into this area.

Keywords: AmBisome, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, biofilm, fungi, pulmonary infection, co infection, in vitro

Determinants of Salaries for MLB Pitchers
Oral Presentation
1:15pm - 1:30pm
Location:
University Library - 1814

Shunto Kobayashi. Faculty Mentor: Craig Kerr.

Abstract: Major League Baseball is a common subject to be studied with statistics and economics. Although analyes of salary determinants show some success for hitters, such analyses encounter difficulties for pitchers. The salary of pitchers has potential problems that can cause erroneous estimations. Krautmann et al. (2003) illustrate that pitchers should not be aggregated like hitters since the structure of salaries differs significantly between starters, long relievers, and stoppers. Also, valuing pitcher contributions is difficult since run prevention is jointly produced by pitchers and fielders. Bradbury (2007) analyzes performance measures of pitchers and reports that defense-independent metrics (DIPS), such as strikeouts, walks, and home runs, should be used to measure pitchers' skills. For this research, I analyze determinants of salaries for MLB pitchers using data of free-agent pitchers from 2007 to 2011. Following Krautmann et al. (2003) and Bradbury (2007), I analyze each of the three types of pitchers individually and also utilize DIPS as performance measures. I also control for differences across teams, such as revenue..

Keywords: Labor Economics, Sports Economics, MLB

Landslide Detection Using GIS and Remote Sensing Data: A Case Study in the Carlyon Beach Peninsula, Washington
Poster and Creative Works Showcase
2:30pm - 3:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - Ursa Major

Tin Lieu. Faculty Mentor: Omar Mora.

Abstract: Landslides are geological events influenced by factors such as topography, geology, weather and human activity, which cause extensive damage to the environment and infrastructure on a global scale. One of the traditional methods of surveillance to develop accurate landslide readings is field mapping; however, the mapping process is expensive and time consuming as the state of the slide can change often. As a means of prevention, modern landslide mapping uses Digital Elevation Models (DEMs), and sophisticated algorithms to detect landslides as they are more efficient and have reduced the cost for landslide mapping. These methods are useful in detecting topographic signatures of landslide-prone areas through the recognition of spatial and temporal patterns. Within the last three decades the Carlyon Beach Peninsula in the state of Washington has experienced an increased amount of coastal landslide activity. To further analyze the surface topography and identify patterns in this area, we employed several feature extractors and an unsupervised classifier to analyze the surface roughness to identify and evaluate geomorphological features related to landslide and stable terrain. Initial comparisons between the landslide inventory map and our results indicate that stable and landslide terrain exhibit different patterns and that DEMs can provide important surface information necessary for landslide detection..

Keywords: DEM, remote sensing, landslide, detection, feature extraction, GIS

Preliminary study on the control release of flavor encapsulated in filled hydrogels triggered by pH
Oral Presentation
12:30pm - 12:45pm
Location:
University Library - 2913

Anya Kwan. Faculty Mentor: Gabriel Davidov-Pardo.

Abstract: Filled hydrogels are a delivery system in which emulsions are embedded into gels formed by electrostatic attraction of two oppositely charged biopolymers. While most polysaccharides have a negative charge throughout the pH scale, the overall charge of proteins changes depending on the pH of the system. Therefore, using polysaccharides and proteins is helpful in creating pH-dependent delivery systems. The goal of this research is to determine the optimal polysaccharide to protein ratio and corresponding pH to create a hydrogel that can encapsulate a nanoemulsion that contains flavor oils that bursts in artificial saliva. Low methoxyl pectin (LM) and whey protein isolate (WPI) were used as the biopolymers to form the hydrogel. Different pHs and ratios of LM:WPI, were tested to form the hydrogels. The criteria to select the pH and ratio was based on the solubility, size, stability and charge of the complexes. Optimal complexes were expected to be soluble, stable against aggregation and precipitation, and big enough to embed the nanoemulsions. The complexes where then subjected to artificial saliva to test the stability of the system, which gives an idea on the bursting effect and release of flavor. Orange oil, medium-chain triglyceride (MCT) and Tween or WPI, were used to make nanoemulsions. Different percentages of Tween 80 , ratios of Tween 80 and WPI, and ratios of MCT and orange oil were tested. The optimal percentage, ratio, and material was determined via size and stability of the nanoemulsions, where the optimal nanoemulsion is the one with the lowest droplet diameter..

Keywords: Control-release, Filled hydrogel complexes, Flavor nanoemulsions

Effective Treatment of Azole Resistant Candida albicans in a Murine Ascending Urinary Tract Infection with Liposomal Amphotericin B Delivered by Bladder Lavage
Oral Presentation
1:30pm - 1:45pm
Location:
University Library - 1802

Cole Frazier. Faculty Mentor: Jill Adler-Moore, Jon Olson.

Abstract: Introduction: With the frequent occurrence of urinary tract infections (UTI) in hospital ICUs and assisted-living settings, and the increasing incidence of UTI caused by azole resistant Candida spp., alternative treatments are needed. This study was done to investigate the efficacy of liposomal amphotericin B (L-AmBi) for UTI caused by an azole resistant strain of Candida albicans. Methods: Mice (n=10/group) were immunosuppressed with 6mg/kg Triamcinolone d-3 and d0, sedated with ketamine/xylazine d0 and challenged transurethrally with 4.7 X 10ex6 azole resistant C. albicans (ATCC 62342, L-AmBI MIC = 0.78ug/mL , Fluconazole MIC = 25ug/mL) followed by daily treatment d+1 to d+5 with 7.5mg/kg L-AmBi (AmBisome ) given IV, or with 0.2mg L-AmBi by bladder lavage (BLav). Controls received 5% dextrose (D5W) IV or BLav. Kidneys, bladders, livers and spleen were collected d+6, homogenized, and dilutions plated for mean Log10CFU/g. Results: Candida was reduced to undetectable levels in the Bladder with L-AmBi IV (10/10 mice) or BLav (9/10 mice) compared to high CFU in Bladder of D5W mice (1.1X10ex4 IV and 3.6 X 10ex3 BLav). In Kidney, L-AmBi given by IV or BLav significantly reduced the yeast burden versus controls (p<0.0079, IV- 3.6X10ex4 vs 2.7X10ex5; BLav-6.1X10ex4 vs 9.5X10ex5). There was no infection in the control livers or spleens. Conclusions: L-AmBi was significantly effective against azole resistant C. albicans UTI whether given as IV or bladder lavage. With the markedly decreased toxicity of L-AmBi compared to amphotericin B deoxycholate, L-AmBi is a promising alternative polyene treatment for azole resistant C. albicans UTI.

Keywords: Candida, Urinary Tract Infection, AmBisome, Antifungal Resistance, Murine Modling

The slug within the bivalve: Reconciliation of shell-based taxonomy and molecular data in Juliidae (Heterobranchia: Sacoglossa)
Oral Presentation
1:15pm - 1:30pm
Location:
University Library - 1828

Jennifer McCarthy. Faculty Mentor: Angel Valdes.

Abstract: Juliidae is a member of the order Sacoglossa, a clade of herbivorous heterobranch gastropods. Juliidae has a complex taxonomic history derived from the fact that these gastropods have bivalve shells. The current taxonomy of Juliidae is largely based on shell morphological traits and to a certain extent on internal and anatomical traits, such as radula and reproductive anatomy. Based on these data, Juliidae is considered to have two extant genera, Berthelinia and Julia, both with pan-tropical distributions. For this study a species-level molecular phylogeny of Juliidae has been produced using a combination of three genes, two mitochondrial (CO1, 16S), and one nuclear (H3). Based on Recent shells and fossil shells from the literature, a principal component analysis (PCA) was produced using geometric morphometric techniques to quantify and compare the shell morphologies. Based on preliminary molecular results, two clades are resolved agreeing with the two extant genera. The morphometric data will be integrated with the molecular phylogeny using comparative methodologies..

Keywords: Systematics, Sacoglossa, Taxonomy, Geomteric morphometrics

Examining the Functional Network Structure of the Frontal Lobes Across Domains of Cognition
Oral Presentation
1:30pm - 1:45pm
Location:
University Library - Special Events (4th floor)

Jordan Garrett. Faculty Mentor: Robert Blumenfeld.

Abstract: The frontal lobes implement control operations fundamental to flexible, goal-driven behavior. In the human, at least 19 cytoarchitectonically unique subregions comprise the frontal lobes, and a major aim of cognitive neuroscience has been to characterize the functional organization of these subregions. The aim of the present study was to investigate the topology of frontal lobes by examining patterns of co-activation amongst frontal subregions across a large number of studies in the neuroimaging literature. Using the BrainMap database, which contains activation foci from a large (>1600) set of studies in the neuroimaging literature, we derived meta-analytic co-activation matrices of the frontal lobes for the several specific cognitive domains (Memory, Attention, Working Memory, Language, Audition, Vision). Our initial results show several specific ways in which the functional wiring of frontal subregions varied according to behavioral domain. First, the density of these networks varied considerably with behavioral domain. Second, the modular structure of these networks varied considerably. Third, the anatomical location of some, but not all, central hub nodes varied with cognitive domain. In general, our initial results lend further credence to the notion that the frontal lobes as a whole, support domain-general control processing, however its functional wiring is highly adaptable and potentially allows different network configurations to support specialized domain-specific processes..

Keywords: Executive processes, working memory, functional connectivity, prefrontal cortex

MaxRep
Poster and Creative Works Showcase
2:30pm - 3:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - Ursa Major

Santino Lojero. Coauthors: Ali Rafie, Shayan Khan, Kabir Sethi, Joshua Knapp, Jeffrey Schmitendorf, Eric Liang. Faculty Mentor: Winny Dong.

Abstract: Within the fitness market there lacks the ability to personally track fitness hands free. Because of this insufficiency, people usually track their workouts and fitness progress via memory, a fitness gadget such as a smartwatch, or through manually writing down their exercises in a journal. In order to solve this customer problem, a device must account for the workout a person engages in, count the sets and repetitions of the workout, and also assist the user in setting fitness goals for their future workouts. With this problem solved, users will achieve their expectations more efficiently by focusing more on their workout opposed to focusing on tracking their exercise statistics. Solving this problem includes collecting potential customer opinions regarding the way they track their personal fitness during workouts as well as designing a convenient device that allows users to focus on their fitness. Attaching the MaxRep tracker to weights and machines at the gym eliminates the inconvenience of manually tracking workout progress and also results in accurate, usable workout data that can be used to refine the user's future workouts.

Keywords: fitness, health, fitness tracker, personal fitness, gym, weight, lifestyle, wellness, workout, exercise, gadget, fitness gadget

Do Fact Checks Matter? An Assessment on the Impact of Fact-Checking in a "Post-Truth" World
Oral Presentation
1:45pm - 2:00pm
Location:
University Library - Special Collections (4th floor)

Aisling Kelly. Faculty Mentor: Mario Guerrero.

Abstract: In the 2016 Presidential election, mistruths, half-truths, and conspiracy theories went mainstream like never before. At the same time, fact-checking has exploded onto the mainstream with more than 30 distinct fact-checking organizations taking shape since 2010. Fact-checking, which had previously been a niche field left to a few obscure news outlets, has now taken center-stage in journalism with almost every major news organization providing them in real-time. However, in spite of the ubiquity of fact-checking, the lies live on. We know that politicians have continued telling lies and voters keep believing them. Using survey results that examine advertisements from the 2012 Presidential election, this thesis seeks to examine the effectiveness of fact-checking in impacting voter perception, but also examine its limitations. The thesis also suggests ways that fact-checking approaches can be shifted to better influence politicians to be more honest..

Keywords: fact checking, elections, media, politics

Gas Stripping in the Simulated Pegasus Galaxy
Oral Presentation
1:45pm - 2:00pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - 2132 (England Evans)

Francisco Mercado. Faculty Mentor: Jorge Moreno.

Abstract: We utilize the hydrodynamic simulation code GIZMO to construct a non-cosmological idealized dwarf galaxy built to match the parameters of the observed Pegasus dwarf galaxy. This simulated galaxy will be used in a series of tests in which we will implement different methods of removing the dwarf's gas in order to emulate the ram pressure stripping mechanism encountered by dwarf galaxies as they fall into more massive companion galaxies. These scenarios will be analyzed in order to determine the role that the removal of gas plays in rotational vs. dispersion support (Vrot/σ) of our galaxy.

Keywords: Extragalactic Astronomy, Galaxy evolution, Dwarf Galaxies, Gas Stripping

Fidget Gadget
Poster and Creative Works Showcase
2:30pm - 3:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - Ursa Major

Ayris Cornwell. Coauthors: Panik Moradian, Bradley Postovoit, Adrian Brito, Alfredo Giron, Jiang Tao Li. Faculty Mentor: Winny Dong, Olukemi Sawyerr, Erkan Ozkaya.

Abstract: According to the American Psychological Association, 44% of Americans have reported that their stress levels have greatly increased over the past five years. Suffering from a high degree of stress often makes it difficult to focus, and go about everyday life. Our Fidget Gadget aims to remedy this problem. This gadget will allow users to increase focus by helping to relieve stress and nervous energy by way of fidgeting. Our innovative design has taken some of the popular features from existing fidget gadgets, and combined them to create a gadget that currently, cannot be found on the market. The design for our prototype was created using the software SolidWorks, and will be 3D printed using PLA filament, allowing our fidget gadget to sell for a more affordable price than some of the other competitors currently on the market. The gliding and spinning features of the gadget allow users to mindlessly "fidget" in class, work, or just about anywhere, without being a distraction to anyone around them. Our team plans to demonstrate our prototype at the RSCA showcase. Our goal was to create a gadget that is aesthetically pleasing, increases concentration, and ultimately, helps someone to lead a less stressful and more focused life.

Keywords: fidget, stress, focus, concentration, prototype

Investigation of Residential Solar PV Impact on Power Distribution System
Poster and Creative Works Showcase
2:30pm - 3:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - Ursa Major

Samir Wadhwani. Coauthors: Faisal Al-Rahmani, Danielle Chanes. Faculty Mentor: Ha Le.

Abstract: Solar PV systems are increasingly welcome by US households, especially in California where the solar resources are abundant. Residential PV systems are known to lower the electricity bills for families. However, they can also have negative impacts on their host distribution system. Our project aims to quantify the impacts of residential solar PV systems on a power distribution system and develop a solution based on energy storage system (ESS) to rectify their possible negative impacts. In the first phase of the project, a model for solar PV systems is developed using Matlab Simulink. Then, a number of the PV models will be connected to a distribution feeder for simulating their operation. Their impacts on the distribution system will be measured in terms of power loss and the system voltage profile. The distribution system is modeled based on realistic data provided by Southern California Edison (SCE). In the second phase, an energy storage system (ESS) will be integrated into the distribution grid. The ESS will utilize an optimized charging/discharging schedule to facilitate operation of PV systems. The ESS will interact with the grid and PV systems to alleviate the power demand on the grid. The expected outcomes of the project are: 1) To provide better understanding of the residential PV systems impact on distribution system and 2) To provide an efficient method based on ESS to alleviate negative impacts of PV systems while facilitate their power injection to the grid so as to bring benefits to both the PV system owners and the power grid. The broader impact of the project is that it will help increase the use of solar power and reduce carbon emissions, hence protecting the environment..

Keywords: Solar, Photovoltaic, Grid, Southern California Edison, System, Power, PV, MATLAB, Simulink, model, distribution, voltage, current, renewable, energy, feeder, electrical, IEEE, design, environment

Apparel Product Development using Industry Technology
Poster and Creative Works Showcase
2:30pm - 3:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - Ursa Major

Taryn Foley. Faculty Mentor: Saemee Lyu.

Abstract: With the use of industry technology to assist in developing a product from design to final prototype, it has shortened and simplified the product development process. In the apparel industry computer aided design (CAD) programs allow patternmakers to digitally make clothing patterns. By using the latest technology, patternmakers are able to adjust fit and some pattern flaws within minutes, compared to the traditional way of hand drafting which can take hours. The objective of the AMM 410 class project was to develop two clothing prototypes using an apparel CAD program. The purpose of the project was to learn a new beneficial technology speeding up the apparel production process. A skirt and a shirt dress were designed for prototype development, and an apparel CAD program, developed by Tukatech Inc, was used for the project. The technology provided an opportunity to manipulate the first pattern blocks to make new styles without having to completely make a whole new pattern. After developing the first patterns, I encountered some design flaws and fit issues due to measurement and fit estimation errors. After the fit evaluation session, revisions were quickly made using the CAD program and final decisions for patterns and prototypes were made in a timely manner. This project showed me the real-life process of an apparel product from start to finish and how the use of computer aided design programs has greatly enhanced the production process..

Keywords: Apparel product development, Computer aided design, Pattern making, AMM

Serenity Within
Poster and Creative Works Showcase
2:30pm - 3:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - Ursa Major

Shree Ravichandran. Faculty Mentor: Katrin Terstegen.

Abstract: In this day and age, religion has become a hindrance to someone who wants to find the Peace. There is a growing difference between religion and spirituality where spirituality freeing and religion is constraining. There are too many rules as to what to do and what not to do in finding Truth. All these rules are human interpretations from texts that we don't necessarily know where they come from. In that case, why do we keep going to churches that tell us how to behave? In Serenity Within, the focus is for the user to have an individualized experience. Though priests preach, it is ultimately the person applying what they have learned to their lives. The Church has become more of an establishment, it has become middle-man that is unnecessary. The proposal for this project is to take the middle man out of the equation which leaves just us and the higher power. The project can be described maze with two other components, open spaces and enclosed spaces. These spaces are meant for users that desire a relationship with the community but can also act as individual spaces for activities such as meditation or praying. The purpose of the design is to make the user understand that they are alone in this space, but realizing that being alone is not something to be afraid of. We come into this world alone and we leave this world alone. Finding peace is an act that we should be doing in solitude.

Keywords: architecture, design, church, spirituality, urban design,

Autonomous 3-D Mapping and collision avoidance using LIDAR and Unmanned Aerial Vehicle.
Oral Presentation
12:00pm - 12:15pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - 1611D (Lyra)

Christian Carreon-Limones. Faculty Mentor: Subodh Bhandari.

Abstract: This presentation talks about the work being done at Cal Poly Pomona on using unmanned aerial vehicle (UAVs) for autonomous 3-D terrain mapping. A Sig Kadet Senior Sport UAV airplane has been equipped with an autopilot for autonomous waypoint operation and a LIDAR for live-streaming 3-D Mapping. A flight management software is programmed to autonomously fly around selected pin-points in a targeted location. An Intel NUC processor is used for the implementation of the algorithm written in C programming language, storage of data received from VPL-16 LIDAR, and for implementing collision avoidance algorithm. A Bullet M transmitter is used to transmit live feed data from the LIDAR sensor to the VeloView Software at the ground station, which can be viewed and saved. Meanwhile, the NUC serves as a second interface which collects all the raw data and executes a script of the code to convert it into an xyz point cloud. The XYZ point cloud is meshed together according to their timestamp to solidify a 3-D Visualization using open source PointCloud Software. The LIDAR also measures the distance to any obstacles on the flight path on the UAV, thus allowing the UAV to avoid any collision with the obstacles..

Keywords: Autonomous, aerospace, 3-D Mapping, Collision Avoidance, UAV

Improving the Efficiency of Radio Frequency Filter Designs
Oral Presentation
3:00pm - 3:15pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - 2132 (England Evans)

Jesus Acevedo. Faculty Mentor: Hyoung Soo Kim.

Abstract: Radio frequency filters are an important part of much of the technologies we use today. Their advancement in design has allowed us to innovate technology continuously. By conducting this research experiment, I will attempt to expand the abilities of the radio frequency filters to operate in a much more efficient manner that allow for even more innovation in the future. The two main aspects I will be focusing on will be trying to widen the operating frequencies of the filter as well as sharpening the filtering of each signal. We will start the process by designing and testing material for the filter, followed by implementing the design, and then finally comparing its attributes to a computer software simulation to test for accuracy in our final design. Attempting to achieve this will be difficult because of the multiple factors that play a role in this experiment, but with the right design developing a more efficient filter becomes more realistic.

Keywords: Electrical, Engineering, Radio Frequency, filters

Development of a Standardized Process to Measure Delivery of Nebulized AmBisome®
Poster and Creative Works Showcase
2:30pm - 3:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - Ursa Major

Janam Dave. Faculty Mentor: Jill Adler-Moore.

Abstract: Background AmBisome® is a potent antifungal drug given intravenously for treating life-threatening fungal infections. However, some clinical studies have reported using this drug as an aerosol. Given the limited data on AmBisome aerosol administration, we focused on standardizing a method to examine this route of delivery in mice. Methods An aerosol chamber which had a nebulizer system that converted liquid into vapor was used. The chamber was divided into 12 uniform compartments. The chamber was sealed at all sites with a combination of parafilm and tape. AmBisome (4000 ug/ml) was vaporized for 2-20 minutes, to determine the amount of AmBisome delivered into each compartment. AmBisome was recovered by swabbing each compartment with a tared amount of cotton or polyester gauze. Drug was eluted from the gauze with methanol and assayed using a bioassay or spectrophotometry at 406 and 416nm. Results Optimal performance time for the nebulizer was 20 minutes and on average, 0.08 ml was recovered from the gauze in each compartment and it contained 204 ug of bioactive AmBisome as determined by the bioassay. The most accurate and reproducible determination was made using polyester blended gauze combined with the spectrophotometric assay at 416nm (293 ug in 0.08 ml). Conclusion The aerosol chamber has been standardized so that the apparatus can be used in future mouse studies to deliver 0.08 ml of aerosolized AmBisome into each compartment, with the amount of AmBisome in the 0.08 ml being about 100X above the antifungal minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC, 2-4ug/mL) for most fungi.

Keywords: Ambisome, drug, delivery, anti-fungal, nebulizer, aerosol, therapy, pulmonary, amphotericin B, liposome, aerosol drug delivery

Comparative Efficacy of Liposomal Vaccines Containing Different HSV2 gD Peptide Sequences Following Intravaginal HSV2 Challenge of BALB/c Mice
Oral Presentation
12:45pm - 1:00pm
Location:
University Library - 1828

Jennifer Rubio. Faculty Mentor: Jill Adler-Moore.

Abstract: Introduction: Herpes Simplex Virus 2 (HSV-2) causes genital infection in about 20% of the U.S. population and in 500 million people worldwide. This infection cannot be cured by antiviral drug therapy. Our laboratory has focused on developing a liposomal HSV-2 vaccine containing three of the most immunogenic peptide sequences within the viral envelope gD protein (PEP1, PEP2, PEP3). We have examined the efficacy of these peptides used alone or in combination. Methods: Buffer or liposomes were administered 3X subcutaneously to mice (n=12/group) d0, d28, d56. The liposomes contained the following: gD3PEP as a single tripeptide; a mixture of PEP1+2+3; PEP1; PEP1+2; PEP1+3, PEP2; PEP2+3; PEP3. Serum was collected d59 (n=5/group) to assess antibody titers. Remaining mice were challenged intravaginally with HSV2 d70 and monitored for disease signs, weight loss and morbidity 2X/day to d98. Vaginal swabs were collected d72 to assess viral burdens. Results: Liposomes with all three peptides (PEP1+2+3 or gD3pep), PEP1, PEP1+2 or PEP1+3 enhanced survival (85% to 100%) versus PBS, PEP2 or PEP3 (0%). Weight loss and disease signs paralleled survival. Mice given PEP1+2+3 or gD3PEP, PEP1 or PEP1 with PEP2 or PEP3 had significantly reduced vaginal viral burdens (P<0.0021) and significantly elevated Neutralizing Antibody titers (P<0.0165). Conclusions: PEP1 in liposomes was as effective as a mixture of the three gD peptides or the single tripeptide (gD3PEP). In comparison, PEP2 or PEP3 were not protective. By using just one peptide, vaccine production would be easier and less expensive..

Keywords: HSV, vaccine, liposomes

Preliminary Molecular Identification of North Pacific Nudibranchs (Nudibranchia: Gastropoda: Mollusca) using Mitochondrial Cytochrome c Oxidase Subunit I (COI)
Poster and Creative Works Showcase
2:30pm - 3:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - Ursa Major

Dae-Wui Jung. Faculty Mentor: Ángel Valdés, Chang-Bae Kim.

Abstract: The order Nudibranchia, characterized by having a shell-less body and an exposed gill, is estimated to contain 3,000 species worldwide. Nudibranchs occur from the equator to the both polar regions, and have diverse external morphologies and flamboyant colorations. Most species are recognized by their color patterns, which are lost during preservation, making it difficult to identify animals in museum and university collections. Because of this and the existence of cryptic species (undistinguishable by their external morphology and coloration), molecular identification using DNA is an indispensable method. In this study, we analyzed a number of specimens collected in Korea by calculating their genetic distance and reconstructing a phylogenetic tree. As the result of these molecular identification, a species recognized as Diaulula sandiegensis in Korea was identified as Diaulula odonoghuei, and a species considered to be Hermissenda crassicornis in Korea was now identified as Hermissenda emurai. In addition, intraspecific distance of both Bornella hermanni (0-0.155) and Phyllidiella pustulosa (0.016-0.093) were calculated to be significantly larger than other species. We discuss the efficiency of DNA barcoding methods to identify North Pacific nudibranchs by using mtDNA cox1, and provide preliminary molecular phylogenetic results for trans-Pacific species..

Keywords: Molecular identification, Nudibranchia, nudibranch, cox1, COI, cryptic species, trans-pacific species

Collision Avoidance System for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles using Stereoscopic Vision
Oral Presentation
12:15pm - 12:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - 1611D (Lyra)

Kishan Patel. Coauthors: Erwin Perez. Faculty Mentor: Subodh Bhandari.

Abstract: This presentation talks about using stereoscopic vision as a means to sensing and detecting obstacles and other aircraft for collision avoidance system for a small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). The importance of this research has become increasingly more relevant as increased use of UAVs in commercial and private sectors has led to increased FAA regulations. Implementation of collision avoidance systems can help integrate the UAVs in the National Airspace System without safety concerns. Stereoscopic vision provides a cheaper and light weight solution for collision detection. Using two cameras, it is possible to use depth perception to create a depth map that helps with the sensing of the obstacles and their distances. Two Point Grey Chameleon3 cameras with Fujinon lenses are mounted on a DJI S900 Hexacopter UAV to generate the images to create the disparity maps while using an Intel NUC board for onboard processing. The board communicates with the PixHawk 3DR, which transmits data to the ground control station via XBee radios. The Intel NUC generates a disparity map using an algorithm that uses the OpenCV library to process the images into the map. The algorithm generates the disparity map that will be provided to the collision avoidance algorithm, which will guide the UAV to the location within the map with the least dense area. The image processing algorithm is designed to remove noise in the image data. Disparity map generation using flight test data will be presented..

Keywords: stereoscopic vision, UAVs, OpenCV

Effects of juglone on the germination of Southern California native and invasive plant species
Oral Presentation
2:30pm - 2:45pm
Location:
University Library - 1822

Sierra Lauman. Faculty Mentor: Erin Questad.

Abstract: The Southern California black walnut, Juglans californica, is an endemic, native deciduous tree that commonly occurs in chaparral, coastal sage scrub, riparian communities, and woodlands throughout San Bernardino and Los Angeles Counties. Juglans californica, as well as other species in the genus Juglans produce the compound juglone (5 hydroxy-1,4-napthoquinone), which has been shown to inhibit the growth of understory plant species due to an allelopathic effect; however the effects of juglone have not been studied in California plant communities. We examined how juglone affects the germination of several invasive and native species, including Bromus diandrus, Bromus madritensis, Brassica nigra, Hirschfeldia incana, Carduus pycnocephalus, Silybum marianum, Deinandra fasciculata, Amsinckia intermedia, Phacelia distans, and Diplacus longiflorus. Seeds were sown in groups of 100 in petri dishes. They were exposed to 4mL of five concentrations of juglone: 0mM, 0.01mM, 0.05mM, 0.1mM, and 0.5mM, with four replicates per concentration. Germination was monitored daily and average radicle length was measured weekly. Juglone had an effect on seed germination for all tested species. Nine of the ten species showed a significant decline in germination mainly between the higher concentrations of 0.1mM and 0.5mM. Seed germination for D. fasciculata increased significantly when exposed to juglone concentrations up to 0.1mM. Radicle length was significantly affected in five of the ten species by juglone at concentrations between 0.05 and 0.5mM. The affected radicles were visibly smaller, and often appeared necrotic. Future native species to be tested include Artemisia californica, Pseudognaphalium californicum, and various other commonly occurring species..

Keywords: Seed germination, radicle length, juglone, Juglans californica

Extension of the Simon invariant to K_p graphs
Oral Presentation
12:30pm - 12:45pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - 2132 (England Evans)

Kim Reece. Faculty Mentor: Robin Wilson.

Abstract: Knot embeddings may be characterized by numerical invariants in order to explore their equivalence, chirality and other properties. We examined the extension of the Simon invariant from graphs K_5 and K_7 to larger complete graphs. By using a computer model of constraints and symmetry assumptions chosen, we explored the possibility of generating more than one generalized Simon invariant for some graphs and the question of what constraints could not be avoided. We found a generalized Simon invariant for K_13 under equivalent symmetries to those used for K_5 and K_7, and demonstrated the nonexistence of Simon-type invariants under that set of symmetries for K_11, K_17, K_19 and K_23. Following the pattern of prior work, we aim to use the invariant found along with known chirality results for K_13 to establish the existence of achiral embeddings for every odd value of the generalized Simon invariant. Additionally, we are generalizing the computer model to describe other types of graphs, with the intention of determining whether generalized Simon invariants exist for the Peterson family of graphs..

Keywords: Simon invariant, complete graph, graph embedding

Investigating the effects of ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol on cytokine production from splenocytes derived from immune competent and immunocompromised mice infected with Candida albicans
Oral Presentation
12:45pm - 1:00pm
Location:
University Library - 1802

Hansini Vitharanage. Faculty Mentor: Nancy Buckley.

Abstract: ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), decreased resistance to a secondary Candida albicans (C. albicans) infection in immune competent mice, but had no effect in immune compromised mice as assessed by survival and tissue fungal load. However, THC altered mouse serum cytokine levels. Since spleen plays a crucial role in cytokine production, we investigated the effects of THC on cytokine production from splenocytes derived from immune competent or suppressed mice infected with the yeast. Mice were given vehicle control or THC (16mg/kg) on days 1-4, 8-11 and 15-18. Some mice were immunosuppressed with 5-fluorouracil (5-F) on day 16. We used 2 infection models. For the acute infection model, mice received 5x105 C. albicans/mouse on day 19. For the secondary infection model, mice received 0.75x105 C. albicans/mouse on day 2 and 5x105 C. albicans/mouse on day 19. Splenocytes were obtained and cultured on day 22 and treated with Lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 1µg/ml), Concanavalin A (Con A, 5µg/ml) or heat killed (HK) C. albicans (6.25x106 yeast cells/ml). Splenocytes were incubated at 37oC and cell supernatants collected at 2h and 48h to determine secreted cytokine levels. Cytokine mRNA levels were determined from splenocytes treated for 2h. 5-F decreased Con A, LPS and C. albicans stimulated cytokine secretion. C. albicans stimulated interferon-γ (IFN-γ) levels were significantly lower in the THC group compared to the vehicle group. In the acute infection model, LPS-induced interleukin-6 (IL-6) secretion was reduced in the THC group compared to the vehicle group. These results strongly suggest that THC has an effect on splenic immune response.

Keywords: ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), Candida albicans, Immune competent mice, Immunocompromised mice

Effects of THC on the severity of Candida albicans Vulvovaginal Candidiasis in Mice
Oral Presentation
1:30pm - 1:45pm
Location:
University Library - 2907

Elizabeth Marquez. Faculty Mentor: Nancy Buckley.

Abstract: Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive component in marijuana, has been widely reported to alter immune response to various pathogens. Currently, it is known that THC decreases resistance to bacterial, protozoan, and viral infections but less is known of the effects of THC on yeast infections. Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) is a vaginal opportunistic fungal infection caused by Candida species. Over 75% of women experience VVC at least once in their life. Because approximately 10%-20% will suffer from chronic VVC requiring medical treatment, it is important to continue to broaden our understanding of VVC, especially in the context of marijuana users. Therefore, we aim to determine the effects of chronic THC on C. albicans induced VVC in mice. To carry out this study, c57BL/6 female mice will be treated chronically with THC (8-16mg/kg, i.p.) on days 1-4, 8-11 and 15-18. Mice will also receive a Depo-Provera hormone injection (2.67mg/mouse, s.c.) to promote uptake of C. albicans infection. The mice will be intravaginally infected with C. albicans (5x105 yeast cells/mouse). Four days' post C. albicans infection, the tissues will be collected for fungal load and cytokine production evaluation. We expect that THC will increase the severity of VVC.

Keywords: Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, THC, C. albicans, Vulvovaginal candidiasis, Marijuana

Analysis of garlic's (Allium sativum) effects on Lipopolysaccharide and C. albicans induced immune response in J774A.1 and RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cell lines
Oral Presentation
12:30pm - 12:45pm
Location:
University Library - 2907

Benjamin Soto. Faculty Mentor: Nancy Buckley.

Abstract: Garlic (Allium sativum) has been prescribed by ancient medicine men, such as Hippocrates, and is said to be a potent natural agent to fight infection. Home remedy books, which have been on the rise due to an upwell of abhorrence towards pharmaceuticals, suggest garlic for various forms of illness; garlic's anti-infection properties are due to its immune modulation properties. Macrophages are important immune cells involved in the first line of defense against pathogens. An important function of macrophages is the production of cytokines, important immune modulatory proteins used by immune cells to communicate with other cells in the attack of pathogens. In our laboratory, it has been found that garlic modulates cytokine expression from the female derived murine J774A.1 macrophages challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a bacterial cell wall component, and the yeast Candida albicans (C. albicans). The present project investigates whether garlic's effects are cell line specific. To this end, we compare garlic's effects between two cell lines, the female derived murine macrophage J774A.1 cell line and the male derived murine macrophage RAW264.7 cell line. Thus, J774A.1 and RAW 264.7 cells will be plated at 1.25x105 cells/ml and challenged with LPS (100mg/ml) and C. albicans (6.25x106 cells/ml). The cells will then be incubated at 37oC for 2h for the analysis of cytokine mRNA levels or for 24h for the analysis of cytokine secretion. Preliminary data suggests differential regulation by garlic in the two cell lines; if confirmed, it could indicate that garlic's effects are cell line specific..

Keywords: Candida albicans

Microsoft Kinect Sensor Evaluation for 3D Reconstruction
Poster and Creative Works Showcase
2:30pm - 3:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - Ursa Major

Eric Hermoso. Faculty Mentor: Omar Mora.

Abstract: Kinect's impact has extended far beyond the gaming industry. With its wide availability, many researchers are leveraging the kinect sensing technology to develop and create new methods to interact with machines. Several frameworks have been developed and tested with the current state of this technology, in particular the Kinect-assisted. This tool can be used to achieve some of the learning outcomes in human computer interaction. The Kinect sensor fuses RGB images along with depth information that comes from multiple sensors that have been applied in robotics, since it frequently results in increased robustness and accuracy of the final data collected. Kinect v2 sensor is a low-cost RGB-D device that provides spatial and color information and is currently used for mapping scenes in real time. In this study, we have conducted an analysis of the potential for mapping and reconstructing in 3D various scenes. This study summarizes the initial findings of this investigation..

Keywords: Kinect, Sensors, Cameras, Imaging, Laser Scanning, RGB-D, Point Cloud

Kinematic Characteristics of Galaxy Mergers in FIRE
Oral Presentation
1:30pm - 1:45pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - 2132 (England Evans)

José Flores. Faculty Mentor: Jorge Moreno.

Abstract: Galaxy mergers are believed to play a fundamental role in triggering starburts (Sanders & Mirabel 1996) and active galactic nuclei (Canalizo & Stockton 2000). To study these processes, hydrodynamic numerical simulations have been employed for many years (Barnes & Hernquist 1996, Moreno et al. 2015). Due to lack of sufficiently large observational samples, galaxy kinematics have not been utilized in depth in our understanding of mergers. With the advent of Integral Field Spectroscopic (IFS) Surveys, we can now analyze kinematic maps for large galaxy samples. The first such sample was created using the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area (CALIFA) survey (Barrera-Ballesteros et al., 2015), which includes 103 interacting galaxies. These authors report a significant misalignment between a visual semi-major axis and its projected kinematic axis. This misalignment is not found in galaxies in isolation. In this work we use the "Feedback in Realistic Environments" (FIRE) model (Hopkins et al. 2014) to simulate merging galaxies and investigate their kinematic structure. The central goal of this project is to construct the first framework for extracting kinematic information from galaxy merger simulations to investigate what causes the misalignment of the visual and kinematic axes in interacting galaxies, as observed by the CALIFA survey. So far, our framework has allowed us to construct angular profiles which allow us to the determine the projected kinematic axis in our galaxy merger simulations. Next steps would be to create synthetic images and determine their visual semi-major axes.

Keywords: Galaxy Mergers, Simulations, Galaxies, Astronomy, Theory, FIRE, Kinematics

Using Native Shrubs as Nurse Plants for Seedling Establishment in Response to Drought and Herbivory in Degraded California Sage Scrub
Oral Presentation
2:30pm -2:45pm
Location:
University Library - 1802

Lauren Quon. Faculty Mentor: Erin Questad.

Abstract: Prolonged drought has greatly influenced the regeneration of native vegetation in disturbed Coastal sage scrub habitats; these communities are especially sensitive to extended periods of water stress (Pratt and Mooney 2013). The use of nurse plants is a common revegetation approach used to improve the survival, growth, or fitness of a neighboring plant species by sharing limited resources such as water, light, and nutrients (Padilla and Pugnaire 2006). However, there is little information suggesting that dead shrubs may also provide similar services as live shrubs. Another benefit of nurse plants that is little studied is their ability to protect seedlings from herbivory pressure. I aim to explore the effect of nurse plants on seedling survival under drought and herbivory by determining whether survival depends on abiotic factors (microclimatic conditions), or on biotic factors (protection from herbivory). My study species are Artemisia californica and Salvia mellifera, two characteristic native shrub species that dominate endemic coastal sage scrub habitats. Results indicated a significant combined effect of nurse plant and cage treatments on A. californica growth, and an effect of cage treatment only on S. mellifera growth. There were observed differences in abiotic conditions of each nurse level; exposed areas had higher solar radiation, higher soil temperatures, and lower soil moisture. Leaf water potential, plant height, plant size data, and wildlife pictures will also be analyzed to determine abiotic and biotic effects on outplanted species under nurse shrub and caged treatments..

Keywords: Nurse plants, facilitation, drought, herbivory, seedling establishment, sage scrub, Artemisia californica, Salvia mellifera

Eco Friendly Dish Rack
Poster and Creative Works Showcase
2:30pm - 3:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - Ursa Major

Berlyn Gallardo. Coauthors: Ana Huerta Guerrero, Jacquelyn Tse, Harjot Singh, Je'Don Carter, Joseph Butterfly, Karsten Bush, Andrew Gatley. Faculty Mentor: Olukemi Sawyerr.

Abstract: New discoveries in the current sustainability movement are resulting in products which support environmental responsibility in ways that were never previously imagined. However, in a world where technology has created a fast-paced lifestyle, part of the weight of this movement involves enabling consumers to achieve this Eco trend through convenient methods. The eco Dish Rack product focused on providing a convenient eco-friendly product by allowing consumers the ability to neatly store clean dishware and repurpose the water which drains off of them to grow a plant of their choice. Our market research focused on interviewing students, faculty, and the local city population to help measure decisions for environmentally friendly products, price sensitivity, environmental consciousness, and use of a dish rack. The hypothesis was that creating an eco-friendly product that would conveniently repurpose water would achieve a simple eco-friendly method in an everyday activity such as washing dishes. The results opposed our hypothesis by showing that many interviewees were under the impression that the product completely solves the issues surrounding water waste when we were offering a simplified way to repurpose water. The research showed that the need that we addressed for the product is seen as important and the product itself is a valued idea, but skepticism keeps others from seeing it as an impactful solution for water conservation. Shifting focus on the convenience of the product and designing with the environment in mind rather than focusing on water conservation is the appropriate next step.

Keywords: Sustainability, Entrepreneurship, ESTEME, Business, Marketing,

Radial Velocity Modeling of Hot Jupiter-hosting Stars
Poster and Creative Works Showcase
2:30pm - 3:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - Ursa Major

Luis Nunez. Faculty Mentor: Jorge Moreno, John Johnson.

Abstract: Hot jupiters are gas giant extrasolar planets that closely orbit their host stars in periods of roughly 10 days or less. There could be as many as 250 hot jupiters that have been detected over the years by projects such as the Kepler Mission. The formation of these exoplanets has yet to be fully understood. For a variety of reasons, it was previously believed that no other exoplanets could orbit in the vicinity of a hot jupiter, but a recently discovered star system contains a hot jupiter and additional smaller exoplanets. New theories suggest that these additional smaller exoplanets may have played a role in the formation and development of that hot jupiter. These new theories incentivize future potential detections of these additional planets. In this poster, I show how to model the stellar radial velocity time series data used to detect or confirm a hot jupiter and explain how similar models could be used to predict the existence of additional planets in these star systems..

Keywords: exoplanet, hot jupiter, radial velocity

Comparative Efficacy of a Liposomal Aspergillus Protein Vaccine in Combination with AmBisome® Antifungal Treatment to Prevent Murine Pulmonary Aspergillosis
Oral Presentation
12:30pm - 12:45pm
Location:
University Library - 1828

Hernan Reza. Faculty Mentor: Jill Adler-Moore.

Abstract: Background: Antifungal drugs for pulmonary aspergillosis yield about 50% survival, underscoring the need for an Aspergillus vaccine. The efficacy of a liposomal vaccine, containing Aspergillus proteins, Aspf3 or Aspf9 (LAsV), with the adjuvant lipidated Tucaresol (LT1), with or without antifungal AmBisome®, was tested in a murine pulmonary aspergillosis model. Methods: Mice were vaccinated with LAsV at 5ug Aspf3/dose and 5ug Aspf9/dose with 5ug LT1 d0 subcutaneously, d21 and d42 intranasally (IN); controls were LT1 liposomes (LT1lip) or buffer. Prior to challenge, serum and spleens were collected (n=5/gp) for cytokine analysis via ELISpot and to determine IgG1 and IgG2a antibodies via ELISA assays. d53, d55, d57 mice were immunosuppressed with triamcinolone acetonide and d56 challenged IN with Aspergillus fumigatus. Groups receiving AmBisome treatment were given 7.5 mg/kg intravenously (IV) at 12, 36, and 60h post-fungal challenge. Lungs and BAL were collected (n=7/gp) 3 days post-challenge for fungal burden; remaining mice (n=10/gp) were monitored for morbidity for 3 weeks. Results: LAsV with LT1 with the antifungal drug AmBisome, produced significantly better survival (75%) than buffer (24%) (p=0.04). The group that received LAsV and LT1 with AmBisome also showed reduced fungal burden in lungs and BAL compared to the buffer group. ELISA IgG isotyping and the ELISPot assay showed that LAsV with LT1 elicited a Th2 immune response to Aspf3 and Aspf9. Conclusion: LAsV with LT1 generated the most protection against pulmonary aspergillosis via a Th2 immune response to Aspf3 and Aspf9 which helped reduce fungal burden and prolonged survival..

Keywords: Aspergillosis, AmBisome, liposomes

The Effects of Rain on Freeway Traffic in Southern California
Oral Presentation
1:45pm - 2:00pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - 2337 (Perseus)

Sawanpreet Singh Dhaliwal. Faculty Mentor: Xinkai Wu.

Abstract: A number of studies in the past have quantified the impact of rain on traffic parameters but all of them were limited to wet areas. The research reported in this paper have expanded the literature by studying the impact of rain in a dry area such as Southern California, and investigating for regional differences in the impact. Traffic data (loop detectors) and precipitation data (rain gauges) from Los Angeles Metropolitan Area has been analyzed to access the impact of rain on traffic stream parameters such as free-flow speed, the speed at capacity, and capacity. Rainfall events have been categorized as light, medium, and heavy as discussed in Highway Capacity Manual (HCM) 2010. Density plots and fundamental diagrams for different rain types proved that free-flow speed, speed at capacity and capacity are reduced by 5.7%, 6.91%, and 8.65% respectively for light rain, 11.71%, 12.34%, and 17.4% respectively for medium rain, and 10.22%, 11.85% , and 15.34% respectively for heavy rain. The reductions for free-flow speed are lower, whereas, for speed at capacity and capacity are higher than those reported in HCM 2010. Moreover, the headway is increased during rain that exhibits cautious driving behavior. Multiplicative weather adjustment factors have been computed to compensate the loss of speed and capacity. This paper also demonstrates the spatial and temporal impact of rain on traffic. Downstream traffic is not much affected by a rainfall event while the upstream traffic is negatively impacted. This paper is expected to support weather-responsive traffic management strategies for dry areas..

Keywords: freeway, traffic, rainfall, dry area, free-flow speed, speed at capacity, capacity, weather-responsive

Exploring the Effect of a Utility Value Intervention to Reduce Achievement Gaps in Introductory Biology
Oral Presentation
1:45pm - 2:00pm
Location:
University Library - Special Events (4th floor)

Sy Truong. Faculty Mentor: Paul Beardsley.

Abstract: Many college students, especially those from underrepresented groups, do not complete their biology degree because they face motivational challenges during their introductory biology courses. To address this, we utilized a short-term, targeted psychological intervention called a utility value intervention (UVI) that has been shown to close achievement gaps. In our on-going study at a diverse public university, we found that achievement gaps exist among URM vs. non-URM (Cohen's d =.29), gender (d = 0.22), and FG vs. continuing (d = 0.26). Our goal is to determine the extent to which the UVI affects achievement gaps among disadvantaged groups. In this study, we implemented the UVI in an introductory biology course for biology majors.

Keywords: Student motivation, motivation, interest, utility value, achievement gap

Asymmetric genetic introgression of an invasive sea slug in a native Mediterranean species
Oral Presentation
12:15pm - 12:30pm
Location:
University Library - 1828

Haleh Golestani. Faculty Mentor: Angel Valdes.

Abstract: Aplysia parvula Mörch, 1863, is a hermaphroditic, circumtropical species of sea slug found across the Indo-Pacific region, the eastern Pacific, and the western Atlantic. Aplysia parvula has recently invaded the Mediterranean and the eastern Atlantic. Aplysia parvula was first identified in Turkey in 1961. Molecular data suggest that A. parvula is closely related to Aplysia punctata, which is native to the Atlantic coast of Europe and the Mediterranean Sea. Preliminary data obtained from sequencing two mitochondrial genes (16S and CO1) and one nuclear gene (H3) shows that A. parvula is a species complex. Preliminary data also shows evidence of hybridization and asymmetric genetic introgression between A. parvula and A. puncata. Mediterranean specimens sequenced showed no mitochondrial gene introgression of A. parvula in the Mediterranean but there was nuclear gene introgression of A. parvula. This is evidence of asymmetric genetic introgression, when one organism acts primarily as the sperm donor and the other as the sperm recipient. Morphological data was obtained by dissecting out radulae, jaws, and shells from specimens from different localities. Images of the radulae, jaws, and shells were obtained by scanning electron microscope. Future work will include penile dissection to further substantiate the morphological data. Phylogenetic and morphological data will be used to verify that A. parvula is a species complex..

Keywords: genetic introgression, species complex, sea slug, CO1, H3, 16S, Mediterranean, hybridization

The phylogenetic reconstruction of the sea slug genus Berthella using molecular and morphological traits
Oral Presentation
1:30pm - 1:45pm
Location:
University Library - 1828

Hessam Ghanimi. Faculty Mentor: Angel Valdes.

Abstract: Sea slugs are marine gastropod mollusks, often used as model organisms in various fields such as medical research, ecology and evolution. It is, therefore, crucial to define accurate and reliable taxonomic relationships amongst the members of this group. Berthella is one of the seven extant genera in the family Pleurobranchidae. Historically, the taxonomy of this group has been based on morphological characteristics. Studies have shown, however, that morphology alone is not a reliable tool in delineating many sea slug groups including Berthella. The use of DNA barcoding has led to the phylogenetic reconstruction of many sea slug groups over the years. However, there has been no comprehensive molecular study on the genus Berthella to date. Moreover, there are two nominal species of Berthella (B. stellata and B. californica) that are each hypothesized to be cryptic species based on their large disjunct geographic ranges. The goal of this study is to integrate molecular and morphological traits of the species in the genus Berthella to achieve a phylogenetic reconstruction of this group. Two mitochondrial genes (CO1 and 16S), as well as a nuclear gene (H3), have been sequenced. The morphology of the shell, radular teeth, jaw elements and the reproductive system will also be examined and compared. Preliminary results show that B. stellata from the eastern Pacific, the Caribbean and Europe are three different species, and Berthella californica from the northeastern Pacific and the southeastern pacific are two different species. Future work will aim to confirm these results by further analyses..

Keywords: Sea slugs, Pleurobranchidae, Berthella, Phylogenetics, DNA barcoding, 16S, CO1, H3

Effects Of Age-Related Changes In Cognition On Language Comprehension
Oral Presentation
1:15pm - 1:30pm
Location:
University Library - Special Events (4th floor)

Megan Nakamura. Faculty Mentor: Eleonora Rossi.

Abstract: Though the effects of aging on language production have been investigated extensively, less is known about how age-related changes in cognitive abilities affect language comprehension. To start answering this question, we examined age-related effects in processing syntactically ambiguous sentences, such as "Put the book on the table on the shelf" which could be temporarily (mis)interpreted as "put the book on the table and then put it on the shelf", while a correct interpretation would lead to the following reading: "Put the book that is on the table onto the shelf". We tested a group of 12 younger monolingual English speakers (age: 18-25), and 10 monolingual English older adults (65-85), during an on-line sentence comprehension task in which syntactically ambiguous and unambiguous sentences were presented auditorily. Participants listened to the stimuli and were subsequently asked to move corresponding objects on a computer screen according to their interpretation of the sentence using the mouse. Accuracy in moving the target object to the correct location and RTs were measured across conditions. We also collected a number of additional cognitive measures (including short-term memory -Operational Span-, inhibitory control -Flanker-) as measures that might explain variability in language comprehension performance. Preliminary results show that older adults are as accurate as younger adults in comprehension across conditions. We are currently finalizing the analysis for the RTs. We hypothesize that if older adults comprehension abilities change as a function of aging, we should observe a significant interaction between condition (ambiguous vs. non ambiguous), and group..

Keywords: linguistics, cognition, sentence processing, aging

Plastic Crafted
Poster and Creative Works Showcase
2:30pm - 3:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - Ursa Major

David Pena. Coauthors: Jesus Mancera, Jorge Saucedo, Jennifer Nguyen, Oscar Sanchez, Adi Halim. Faculty Mentor: Truyan Kushev.

Abstract: Plastic Crafted Sustainable Up-cycled Eyewear In today's world and generation there are plenty of issues at hand that require our attention and action as global citizens. The biggest issue today in my opinion is climate change. Our goal is to create eyewear made out of recycled ocean plastic that is sustainable and leaves a smaller carbon print and cleans up the oceans. If the ocean dies, we die, and plastic is killing our Oceans. Earth is like a vessel through Space and it is our home, we as a society need to start really allowing that to sink in when it comes to our mission to help promote more sustainability in our everyday consumerism products. This is where our eyewear takes stage, today's world most sustainable products for consumers are an issue because they aren't either modern enough, too bland, cool enough, too expensive, not convenient, and just not what they need in their fast paced life. We are tackling all these issues with our product and mission. Our eyewear will resonate with the past by taking style influenced by James Dean, Malcolm X, Audrey Hepburn, Martin Luther King JR., all the way to new influencers such as Leonardo DiCaprio, Ellen Degeneres, President Barack Obama. To finalize, Biomimicry is our goal to achieve through this product, that all life should be respected and protected. Once we recognized this we be able to become more part of the solution instead of the problem..

Keywords: sustainable , eco friendly, sustainability, climate change, eyewear, plastic , social plastic, ocean pollution

Decentralized Renewable Off-Grid Wastewater Treatment (DROWT)
Oral Presentation
12:30pm - 12:45pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - 2337 (Perseus)

Crystal Mena. Coauthors: Justine Nguyen, Josh Pham, Bowen Du, Thuan Ngoc Nguyen, Daniel Andrade, Ryan Gar, Pui Yuen Ng, Kyle Miller, Mohammad Masoud Modabernia. Faculty Mentor: Reza Lakeh, Ali Sharbat, Kevin Anderson.

Abstract: In California, the drought has become an important issue due to declines in surface water sources. Dependence on groundwater and importing water from the Colorado River increases in order to keep up with high water demands. The use of recycled water is necessary and the implementation of water reuse is being accepted by the community. Greywater is used water from bathroom sinks, showers, tubs, and washing machines, not including wastewater from toilets or kitchen sinks. The research team in Cal Poly Pomona, with the support of Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, are developing an off-grid solar-powered greywater treatment system for non-potable use. Treating greywater on site of homes can provide huge water savings and reduce people's carbon footprint. The system is comprised of a three-stage treatment which includes a microfiltration, solar-driven reverse osmosis, and a UV disinfection unit. The product of this project is capable of recovering 87% of residential greywater, while saving 5.4 MWh per single household. The design of the system will remove traces of organic chemicals, inorganic chemicals, and particulates of dirt, food, etc. The team is conducting a literature review to identify approaches of similar projects and determine key contaminants to effectively treat water. In addition, the team is working on a preliminary design of the greywater treatment system to address the mechanical, controls, and electrical parts of the overall system for future use..

Keywords: Greywater, solar-powered water treatment, water reuse, recycled water, RO membrane, off-grid system

The effects of caffeine on the S phase checkpoint in S. cerevisiae
Poster and Creative Works Showcase
2:30pm - 3:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - Ursa Major

Mandi Persons. Coauthors: Stephanie Truc Nguyen, Justin Pham. Faculty Mentor: Wendy Dixon.

Abstract: Cdc7/Dbf4 kinase triggers DNA replication in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and also plays role in the S phase checkpoint. The S phase checkpoint prevents incomplete DNA replication from proceeding to mitotic division. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, caffeine was shown to override the S phase checkpoint. Previous students' research on Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed that caffeine did not affect UV induced S phase delay in a statistically significant manner. We investigated caffeine and its ability to override the S phase checkpoint in Saccharomyces cerevisiae induced by hydroxyurea treatment, exemplifying arrested cells through DNA replication inhibition. We performed the experiment by adding caffeine to Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the regular cell cycle or in a hydroxyurea induced S-phase arrest. The results indicated that the addition of caffeine alone had no effect on the S phase checkpoint, while the addition of caffeine to hydroxyurea treated Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed an overridden S phase checkpoint. The combination of hydroxyurea and 10mM caffeine showed an increase of cells in G1 phase and cell death. Caffeine ultimately affects the cell cycle by triggering irregular mitosis in hydroxyurea arrested yeast cells..

Keywords: Saccharomyces cerevisiae, caffeine, hydroxyurea, S phase checkpoint, cell cycle, Schizosaccharomyces pombe

A predictive approach to cosmetic powder mixing using surface energy
Oral Presentation
12:00pm - 12:15pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - 2337 (Perseus)

Huong Tran. Coauthors: Danielle Meechan, Taylor Hennessy. Faculty Mentor: Laila Jallo.

Abstract: This work presents a predictive material sparing approach for cosmetic formulation development using dry coating techniques. Surface modification using mechanical dry coating has been shown to enhance the processability of fine powders due to its ability to achieve precise surface coating of nano-silica or other flow-aids, as compared to silica (or flow-aids) addition via conventional blending which is a typical cosmetic powder process. In this study, a predictive approach to powder mixing using surface energy is proposed to mix cosmetic powders with different particle sizes and bulk densities. This approach eliminates tedious trial and error. The prediction is validated using two material sparing equipment; a magnetically assisted impaction coater (MAIC) which operates in batch mode and a KOMO Fidibus 21 grinder that operates in continuous mode. The formulations will be characterized for packing enhancement and content uniformity using bulk density and Energy Dispersive X-ray EDX, respectively, to quantify the effectiveness of the mixing..

Keywords: surface energy, cosmetic powder, dry coating, powder mixing

The effects of elevated soil P and N on the health and reproduction of African fountain grass, Pennisetum setaceum
Oral Presentation
1:45pm - 2:00pm
Location:
University Library - 1822

Glen Morrison. Faculty Mentor: Erin Questad.

Abstract: Pennisetum setacuem (Forssk.) Chiov., commonly known as African fountain grass, is a perennial C4 bunchgrass native to Africa. The species is widely naturalized or invasive outside of its native range and is commonly found growing in habitats with characteristically high soil phosphorus availability. While fountain grass shows increased growth under nitrogen addition and increased flowering under mixed-nutrient fertilization, no previous research has directly tested the effects of elevated soil phosphorus on fountain grass. Here, a nutrient addition greenhouse experiment was used to test the effects of elevated availability of both phosphorus and nitrogen. Plants treated with nitrogen grew larger, had higher chlorophyll fluorescence, flowered earlier and produced more inflorescences than plants not treated with nitrogen, while plants treated with phosphorus showed no significant differences in the measured characteristics from plants not treated with phosphorus. Though this investigation found no evidence that fountain grass strongly responds to phosphorus addition, the results corroborate the increased growth of fountain grass under nitrogen addition found by other investigators and suggest that nitrogen may have mostly driven the effects of mixed-nutrient additions seen in previous investigations. This additional evidence that fountain grass strongly benefits from elevated nitrogen availability has possible implications for land managers seeking to prevent or mitigate the spread of fountain grass in wildlands, for whom it may prove a prudent strategy to prioritize management of the species in habitats known to have high nitrogen availability..

Keywords: fountain grass, Pennisetum setaceum, nitrogen, phosphorus

Conversion of Biomass-derived Glycols and Polyols to Hydrocarbons through Deoxydehydration
Oral Presentation
1:15pm - 1:30pm
Location:
University Library - 1822

Hector Alarcon. Faculty Mentor: Chantal Stieber.

Abstract: Future risk of fossil fuel depletion and documented climate change serve as incentives for studying alternative and sustainable sources of energy and chemical feedstock. Biomass from dry plant matter is the most abundant raw material on earth and is currently industrially underutilized. By removing oxygen from biomass, useful chemical feedstock could be generated that would otherwise be obtained from fossil fuels through cracking. The focus of this research is to improve the conversion of vicinal diols to alkenes, including 1,2 cycohexanediol to cyclohexene with new vanadium complexes. Vanadium complexes were synthesized using strongly electron-donating bidentate N-heterocyclic carbene ligands. Results were compared to previous reports by establishing reproducibility for reported reactions prior to testing new vanadium catalysts. Successfully improving the conversion of 1,2 cyclohexanediol could be useful in a transition to larger scale conversion of glycols to useful hydrocarbons. Further experimentation include modifying ligands on the vanadium catalyst and testing more difficult secondary glycols..

Keywords: vanadium, catalyst, biomass conversion

Molecular Dynamics and Virtual Screening of Pituitary Adenylyl Cyclase Type I Receptor Antagonists
Oral Presentation
3:00pm - 3:15pm
Location:
University Library - 2907

Bryan Herrera. Faculty Mentor: John Chan, Lyna Luo, Kabir Lutfy.

Abstract: The pituitary adenylyl cyclase type I (PAC1) receptor is a member of class B G-protein coupled receptors and is part of the glucagon superfamily of peptide hormones (Kumar et al.,2011). The physiological responses mediated by the PAC1 receptor, such as neuronal survival in the central nervous system, have been considered as potential therapeutic value (Bourgault et al., 2009). However, there is a lack of available compounds that function similarly to PACAP to selectively activate the PAC1 receptor (Vaudry et al., 2000). The current available agonists and antagonists for the PAC1 receptor are Maxadilan and small molecule hydrazides, respectively (Wu et al., 2014). Many types of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)/PACAP analogs have been studied as well (Ramos-Alvarez et al., 2015). The ectodomain structure of the PAC1 receptor has been determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and x-ray crystallography (Kumar et al., 2011; Sun et al., 2007). The interaction derived from NMR resulted in the most stable configuration through a 100-nanosecond molecular dynamics simulation using AMBER16 GPU version (Case et al., 2016). PAC1 receptor peptidomimetics were designed based on the contact map of the amino acid composition of PACAP, the natural selective activator of PAC1 (Humphrey et al., 1996). Furthermore, small molecular antagonists were selected for the best possible binding potential using AutoDock Vina Virtual Screening through the ZINC compound library (Morris et al., 2009). The peptidomimetics and small molecules will be used to investigate the role of the PAC1 receptor at the cellular and behavioral levels..

Keywords: Computational Biology, Biophysics, Biochemistry, Computer-aided Drug Design

Finding Evelyn: The Lost Women of 1980s Feminism in Flagg's Fried Green Tomatoes
Oral Presentation
2:30pm - 2:45pm
Location:
University Library - 1814

Samantha St. Claire. Faculty Mentor: Aaron DeRosa.

Abstract: Finding Evelyn: The Lost Women of 1980s Feminism in Flagg's Fried Green Tomatoes Fanny Flagg in Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Café (1987) adds to the contemporary feminist discourse concerning disillusionment and dissatisfaction with constrictive gender norms and performativity by revealing a group of women that second wave feminism of the 1980s left behind in its goal to dethrone the nuclear family: middle-aged housewives and mothers. Like these women, Evelyn Couch had grown up with and structured her life around the ideology of the nuclear family and its enforcement of the good/bad girl binary, leaving her unfulfilled with an identity crisis. Evelyn and her peers are attracted to the freedom from gender binaries and the ensuing self-discovery that second wave feminism promises, but Flagg reveals that this movement at this time did not know how to show these women how they were to accomplish that, leaving these lost women stuck between two major cultural movements, belonging to neither. Through Evelyn's identity crisis, Flagg argues that violent naming (the threat of being called sexual swear words) is what enforces these gender binaries and that these lost women can only achieve self-determination and self-expression when they unveil this hidden threat. Though Evelyn initially responds to this verbal violence with internal violence, she ultimately dismantles these restrictive good/bad girl binaries peacefully, freeing her to pursue another path that she chooses, rather than what subjugating gender roles, including the goals promoted by second wave feminism, has told her to pursue..

Keywords: Fanny Flagg, Fried Green Tomatoes, Evelyn Couch, Second Wave Feminism, 1980s, violent naming, gender norms, gender binaries, performativity, lost women, self-determination, fulfillment, nuclear family

Time-Less Trauma: Exploring Billy Pilgrim's Posthuman Other
Oral Presentation
1:45pm - 2:00pm
Location:
University Library - 1814

Alfredo Raygoza. Faculty Mentor: Aaron DeRosa.

Abstract: Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse-Five explores fragmented memories as the result of trauma, that are detached from time, which leads to a divergent identity. Scholars that have focused on trauma in literature such as Robert Eaglestone have described it as a "disruption of how we experience time." The effect of this fragmentation is to produce a new kind of identity represented by Billy Pilgrim, a survivor of the bombing in Dresden during World War II, who begins to experience his life holistically-viewing many moments all at once. The disconnection from time leads to a posthuman identity -a person that exists in a state beyond being human-that sets him apart from the world he is native to, and the universe he aspires to be a part of Memory is the catalyst to trauma symptoms which establishes the relationship interlinked by time. Vonnegut questions this connection by eliminating time, rendering memories as moments that are no longer organized in chronological order. His unique ability to travel amongst his memories leaves him with an unusual identity linked between two worlds. By analyzing the novel's metaphysics, Billy Pilgrim's phenomenal existence is better examined. Vonnegut questions the reality of a traumatized solider and his position in the world as they attempt to find their place in the world after suffering from trauma.

Keywords: Trauma, temporality, fragmentation, posthuman, alterity, identity, war, World War II

Juglone concentration in soil underneath the Southern California black walnut (Juglans californica) throughout the growing season
Oral Presentation
2:15pm - 2:30pm
Location:
University Library - 1822

Asma Ayyad. Faculty Mentor: Erin Questad.

Abstract: As the drought in California continues natural landscaping with native species is becoming a preferred choice among gardeners and landscape architects, the search for native drought resistant species is on the rise. One native tree species that has great potential is the allopathic Southern California black walnut (Juglans californica), which is known to release juglone into the soil and can interfere with the growth of neighboring plants. In order to better understand this species, a thorough study on the dispersal and effects of juglone from the J. californica could lead to vital information on how we can better utilize this tree. There has been an extensive amount of research done on J. californica's relative the eastern black walnut (Juglans nigra), but very little is known on our own native. In this study, we determine the soil conditions underneath J. californica trees, how these soil conditions could affect nearby plants, and how the juglone concentrations change during the growing seasons. Soil samples are analyzed for juglone concentrations through high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). With a better understanding on the soil conditions beneath the J. californica, we can discover what species of plants are unaffected by the juglone produced by the tree and possibly begin to use this tree in our landscaping.

Keywords: walnut, soil, native, drought

It loves me, it loves me not: Counting species of the "rose petal sea slug," Polybranchia (Mollusca: Gastropoda) with a molecular systematics approach
Oral Presentation
1:15pm - 1:30pm
Location:
University Library - 1802

Sabrina Medrano. Faculty Mentor: Ángel Valdés.

Abstract: Polybranchia (Gastropoda, Heterobranchia, Sacoglossa) is a wide spread pantropical group of herbivorous sea slugs consisting of nine valid species. The biology and the taxonomic relationships of these animals is poorly studied. Reasons for this include that these animals are easy to overlook because they are hide under rocks or coral rubble during the day suggesting nocturnal behavior. Secondly, the original descriptions describe these species with very similar morphological characteristics making identification very difficult in the field. The objective of this study is to 1) explain the distjunct range of Polybranchia viridis and 2) identify Polybranchia viridis as a valid species or two valid species. The objectives will be tested using nuclear gene H3 and two mitochondrial genes CO1 and 16S. A Bayesian analysis will be conducted on nuclear and mitochondrial genes to identify clades and misidentified species. Additionally, the validity of the Eastern Pacific and Caribbean Polybranchia viridis species will be evaluated using scanning electron microscopy to examine the morphology of the radulae and penis (simultaneous hermaphrodites). I expect the distribution pattern of Polybranchia to be explained by vicariant events that date back to the Tethys sea (~200mya). The disjunct range of P. viridis is expected to be a result of the Panama Isthmus that arose 3mya. Consequently, if P.viridis was separated 3mya, then based on genetic and morphology data I hypothesize that there is two valid species. The molecular results revealed a greater number of species than previously accepted..

Keywords: Sacoglossa, morphology, phylogenetics, nuclear, mitochondrial

Biofilitration Cells: Stormwater Management Utilizing Low Impact Development Principles
Oral Presentation
2:45pm - 3:00pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - 1611D (Lyra)

Jomel Bautista. Coauthors: Gerson Ribas, Jorge Figueroa. Faculty Mentor: Monica Palomo.

Abstract: Biofiltration cells are common stormwater management practices, which utilize Low Impact Development (LID) principles. Biofiltration cells provide the means of reducing surface runoff volume and pollution. This research project investigates the infiltration rates of biofiltration cells under different conditions. The objective of the research project is to evaluate current design standards using different soil mixtures of sand/compost and reduce infiltration rates (in/hr) by modifying media or design parameters.Following the City of LA LID manual, four different cells (3' by 3' by 4') were constructed and placed in the CPP Lyle Center facilities. Sand/compost mixtures were placed in layers (coarse gravel, P-gravel, soil mix and mulch). A 6" ponding depth was left from the top of the mulch to the overflow outlet. Saturated-static conditions were used to perform the maximum infiltration tests. The effluent line was opened and the water ponding depth reduction was timed until the water level reached the media. Infiltration tests were conducted with gravel alone and all media layers. Infiltration tests through gravel layers alone ( 34 inch gravel and 14 inch to 12 inch P-gravel) indicated infiltration rates from 25.5 in/hr to 28.5 in/hr. An added 18-inch of sand/compost layer of various ratios indicated infiltration rates from 10.0 in/hr to 17.0 in/hr. Further tests will determine the soil mixture that meets the infiltration rate required by the City of LA. Results will be used to provide LASAN with design recommendation(s) for the improvement of the design guidelines in the City's Planning and Land Development Handbook..

Keywords: Biofiltration, Civil Engineering, Stormwater, Infiltration Rates, Los Angeles, Low Impact Development, Soil

Effect of Surface Modification on Cohesive Properties of Fine Pharmaceutical Powders
Oral Presentation
12:45pm - 1:00pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - 2337 (Perseus)

Amanda Tylosky. Coauthors: Emma Williams, Walter Quintos, Matthew Ibarra. Faculty Mentor: Laila Jallo.

Abstract: Production of pharmaceutical tablets involves numerous steps where the flowability of the powder needs to be reliable. The inability of the powder to flow during this process can have a significant effect on the manufacturing of the tablets, therefore coatings are added to help allow for a more consistent flow. These coatings have an effect on the cohesive properties that directly affect the characteristics of the pharmaceutical powders. Recent work has shown that surface modification using mechanical dry coating is a more rigorous approach to flow enhancement of fine powders due to its ability to achieve precise surface coating of nano-silica or other flow-aids, as compared to silica (or flow-aids) addition via conventional blending. Unfortunately, most traditional methods of dry coating involve batch type devices, which are not easy to scale-up and not very conducive to continuous manufacturing. In this work, we propose the use of KoMo Fidibus 21 grinder that can be operated in a continuous mode to dry coat nano silica (hydrophobic and hydrophilic) on to model hydrophobic and hydrophilic pharmaceutical powders. Each powder was characterized using: bulk density, tap density, flow rate, angle of repose, particle size distribution, and electrostatic analysis. Preliminary results have shown that generally hydrophobic coated powders have better enhance flow characteristics than the hydrophilic ones.

Keywords: Pharmaceutical, Powders, Engineering

The Effect of Simultaneous Milling and Coating on Cohesive Properties and Solubility of Pharmaceutical Powders
Poster and Creative Works Showcase
2:30pm - 3:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - Ursa Major

Noor-Eldeen Moubayed. Coauthors: Alexander Murphy, Jessica Trinh, Inseo Baik. Faculty Mentor: Laila Jallo.

Abstract: Powdered materials are widely utilized in various industries in the manufacture of goods. The pharmaceutical industry, particularly, relies heavily on powders to produce a variety of products, such as compacted tablets for consumption. The physical and electrostatic behavior of pharmaceutical powders are properties that affect the bulk density. homogeneity and flowability of these materials during manufacturing processes. The study of these properties facilitates critical improvements to pharmaceutical processes, in turn lowering production costs for both the manufacturer and consumer. By altering the surface of these particles, it is possible to improve its physical and electrostatic properties in order to achieve a more homogenous powder with improved flowability. In this study, powdered ascorbic acid and ibuprofen were simultaneously coated and milled using a Magnetically Assisted Impaction Coating (MAIC) machine. The powders were treated using varying milling times, magnet to powder mass ratios, coating types and percentages. Treated powders were subjected to bulk and tap density tests, and analyzed using a Thermogravimetric Analyzer (TGA) as well as a Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC). Preliminary data shows an improvement in bulk density, tap density, and flowability of powders treated.

Keywords: pharmaceutical, milling, coating, engineering, powders,

Effects of food composition and sucrose levels on FAA in mice
Poster and Creative Works Showcase
2:30pm - 3:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - Ursa Major

Amanda Ng. Coauthors: Camille Martin. Faculty Mentor: Andrew Steele.

Abstract: Circadian rhythms are biological rhythms with a period length of about 24 hours. These rhythms affect almost all behavior and physiology and can be observed in plants, animals, fungi, and even bacteria. The synchronization of these diverse rhythms is accomplished by a network of proteins that constitute a biological clock. The best studied influence on circadian rhythms is sunlight. However, there is evidence that feeding is another profound influence on an animal's circadian rhythm. We study how feeding influences circadian rhythm by measuring the behavior of laboratory mice in their home cage. When fed a limited amount of food at the same time each day, mice will develop food anticipatory activity (FAA)--a characteristic increase in activity in anticipation of scheduled mealtime. We tested whether the type and composition of the food influences the amount of FAA. First, we mice fed either an unformulated or a formulated diet. We observed that the formulated diet moderately increased FAA. We observed that the mice on the formulated diet lost significantly more weight compared to the non-formulated diet, which could possibly explain why the latter mice showed a trend toward decreased FAA. In parallel we tested whether different sucrose levels in the formulated diet (hence a sweeter taste) would influence FAA. Although mice showed an overall preference for higher sucrose content food, sucrose levels did not play substantially affect the amount of FAA..

Keywords: Circadian rhythm, mice. FAA, feeding

Improving the Limit of Detection and Reliability of Fiber Optic Biosensors Embedded within Microfluidic Channels
Oral Presentation
1:15pm - 1:30pm
Location:
University Library - 2913

Dona Elline Hettiaratchy. Coauthors: Brandi Wooten, Bianca Cruz. Faculty Mentor: Ertan Salik.

Abstract: Biconically tapered optical fibers (BTOF) are refractive index sensors with potential applications in chemical and biological sensing. Tapered regions are created by pulling on the optical fibers while exposing them to heat. Taper waist diameters of about 5 micrometers were achieved. Although the sensors are very sensitive, they need to be made more robust. To provide mechanical strength, we have embedded BTOF within microfluidic channels. Microfluidic channels provide mechanical support, reduce the volume of expensive reagents used, and improves fluid delivery. We will present our preliminary results on reliability and the limit of detection of our BTOF. We investigate noise sources in our system, which includes changes to the polarization of light, temperature of the surrounding environment and artifacts in our analysis software and discuss the limitations of our current embedding process..

Keywords: Biconically tapered optical fibers, BTOF, Refractive index sensors, Biological sensing, Tapered, Sensors, fabrication, Microfluidic channels

Structure Sense
Oral Presentation
1:30pm - 1:45pm
Location:
University Library - 2913

Vincent Moya. Faculty Mentor: Stacy Musgrave.

Abstract: Common Core Mathematical Practice 7 states that one goal for students is to learn how to look for and make use of structure in their mathematical activity. In order to support students in reasoning in this way, teachers must be able to engage in structural reasoning themselves. Thus, this research investigates the mathematical reasoning of undergraduates who are enrolled in courses for developing content competency for K-12 mathematics teaching. These potential future teachers complete a 10-minute questionnaire that contains two mathematical tasks. Their responses will be analyzed and categorized to highlight various ways of reasoning. We will invite 3-6 students whose responses suggest different ways of thinking to participate in semi-structured clinical interviews so that we can further probe their thinking. The collection of written and interview data will be analyzed for common themes and for distinct reasoning in order to better understand what triggers an individual to rely on structural reasoning versus non-structural reasoning problem solving strategies..

Keywords: Structure Sense, Math Education, Common Core

Informal Land Rights: Why the process of formalization worked in some countries, but not others.
Oral Presentation
2:15pm - 2:30pm
Location:
University Library - Special Collections (4th floor)

Joshua Palacios. Faculty Mentor: Marc Scarcelli.

Abstract: In the effort to fight poverty across Less Developed Countries (LDCs), there have been political, economic, and social movements towards reshaping institutions to reach prosperity. Recently, the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe, The United Nations Development Program (UNDP), USAID, and a variety of other leading organizations have published program proposals, policy proposals, and papers to increase formalization of land rights in order to have greater results in development. Formalization is the process in which informal institutions, in particular, informal land ownership becomes a formal institution and is recognized by the state. However, while the political left and right have praised these policies, implementation has gained mixed results. This paper seeks to answer a simple question; why has the policy of land formalization found success in some states, but not others?.

Keywords: Land Rights, Formalizations, Political Science, Political Economy, Development, New Institutional Economics, Comparative Politics

Free Surface Electrospun Polyvinylidene Fluoride Membranes for Direct Contact Membrane Distillation
Oral Presentation
2:00pm - 2:15pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - 2337 (Perseus)

Garret Engen. Coauthors: Nicholas Belgau, Zach Walsh, Austin Lee, Jonathan Hatamoff, Monique Montague. Faculty Mentor: Keith Forward.

Abstract: More than 1.2 billion people currently lack access to potable drinking water, while 2.8 billion people are affected by water scarcity at least one month out of the year. There are two phenomena that are considered the driving force behind water scarcity: growing fresh water use, and depleting usable freshwater resources. By the year 2025, over 4 billion people are expected to be affected by water scarcity. There exist several current methods of water purification to address this problem. The most popular methods include reverse osmosis, electrodialysis reversal, multistage flash distillation, and direct contact membrane distillation. In their current state, these pioneering methods are proving to be costly, inefficient, and dwindling in their economic viability. Among the most promising technologies associated with water distillation, Direct Contact Membrane Distillation (DCMD) is advantageous due to low manufacturing and operating costs. The current process for commercial manufacturing of DCMD membranes is expensive, inefficient, and does not allow for the optimization of desirable membrane properties. In this research, free surface electrospinning was utilized as an alternative fabrication method. This process allowed for the control of desirable properties such as fibre diameter, pore size, and membrane thickness. DCMD membranes were produced by means of electrospinning using a solution of 22 wt% polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and 78 wt% dimethylacetamide (DMAC). The free surface electrospinning technique used a rotating wire spindle that was partially submerged in the PVDF/DMAC solution. A 40 kV voltage was applied over a 6.5 inch working distance, humidity was varied from 60%-80% and spin time was varied from 30 min to 60 min. The grounded rotating drum collected the gelled fibers which then solidified. Membranes were then characterized by taking scanning electron micrograph (SEM) images and thickness readings. A DCMD apparatus was then used to test the productivity by distilling salt water through the membranes.

Keywords: membrane, distillation, research, electrospinning, electrospun

Analysis of Particle Size and Metal Content of a Decentralized Wastewater Treatment System in South Africa
Oral Presentation
12:15pm - 12:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - 2337 (Perseus)

Jaclyn O'Hara. Coauthors: Rianne Okamoto. Faculty Mentor: Monica Palomo.

Abstract: Decentralized Wastewater Treatment Systems (DEWATS) are sustainable, economical, and low maintenance wastewater treatment systems that can provide sanitation in areas with low population density. Understanding the dynamics of metals and particulate organic matter in DEWATS biosolids provides important information to achieve safe application as soil amendment in agricultural activities. An evaluation of a DEWATS that treats domestic waste from 84 low-medium income households in the Newlands suburb in Durban, South Africa was conducted using an anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR) followed by anaerobic filter (AF) treatment. Particle sizes of suspended solids were observed using Fluorescence microscopy, SEM and elemental composition analysis. Additionally, raw samples and five particle fraction ranges (11 μm to 20 μm, 1.5 μm to 11 μm, 0.7 μm to 1.5 μm, and 0.45 μm to 0.7 μm) were separated using filtration and investigated by total suspended solids and volatile suspended solids. Chemical oxygen demand was studied using the filtrate from each successive filter. Sludge metal content was determined via inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The results suggest that this system has potential not only for water reuse but biosolids reuse purposes and promotes a low-maintenance, low-cost, sustainable alternative to centralized plants that may not be feasible in rural or sparsely populated areas..

Keywords: DEWATS, Reclaimed Water, Wastewater, South Africa, Particle Size Analysis, COD, Metal Conetent, ICP- OES

Divided We Stalemate: Legislative Gridlock and Party Fracturing in the U.S. House of Representatives
Oral Presentation
1:30pm - 1:45pm
Location:
University Library - Special Collections (4th floor)

Thomas Davis. Faculty Mentor: Mario Guerrero.

Abstract: Scholars of political science have long debated the efficacy of legislative output in times of unified and divided party governance. Literature on the issue has no resounding conclusion as to the effects of divided governance on legislative outputs, leading scholarly research to examine a caveat of different variables associated with gridlock. One possible variable contributing to legislative gridlock is the collective actions of intraparty caucuses. A quantitative analysis of Tea Party members in the U.S. House of Representatives, under conditions of unified and divided government, suggests that ideological caucuses do have an effect on legislative outputs. Quantitative analysis of varied roll call votes (procedural, passage, and Senate related) on tax related bills suggests that in times of a divided Congress, Tea Party members vote differently on issues of tax policy. However, the presence of divided governance has not proven to be a strong indicator of divergent voting patterns amongst House Tea Party members. These findings suggest that gridlock will continue to be a product of a multitude of variables instead of the simple presence of divided governance..

Keywords: divided government, Tea Party, intraparty caucuses, party unity

Triboelectrification of Insulator Materials
Oral Presentation
1:15pm - 1:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - 1611D (Lyra)

William Chen. Coauthors: Joey Heraldez, Brian Nguyen, Alexander Castro. Faculty Mentor: Keith Forward.

Abstract: Triboelectrification is a naturally occurring phenomenon that can have a negative impact on manufacturing. This charging phenomenon occurs when a charge is built up and transferred between materials. The three mechanisms of this charge transfer are ion, electron, and mass transfer. There are several factors that may impact the amount of charge transferred such as the type of material or humidity. In this experiment, we investigate the amount of charge that is produced between specific beads and tubing by utilizing a spiral tube apparatus. The spiraled tube was placed into a box where the humidity was controlled and kept to near zero, and a series of tests were performed. The test involved the glass bead rolling down the tube by gravity, building up a charge, where it would then release the accumulated charge once inside the faraday cup. The charges were calculated and recorded using a computer program then graphed and analyzed. In order to comprehend the effects of triboelectrification, specific materials were chosen based off partial charges and hydrophilic properties. For the particles, soda lime glass and polystyrene were chosen. For tubing, nylon and teflon were the best candidates. This procedure's purpose was to solidate the relationship between particle charge and humidity. Ultimately, we want further understanding of the mechanisms responsible for triboelectric charging.

Keywords: Contact charging, triboelectrification, humidity, insulators, ion transfer, electron transfer, mass transfer

Trazodone Hydrochloride Improves Laboratory Rabbit Handling
Oral Presentation
12:00pm - 12:15pm
Location:
University Library - 2907

Courtney Fukushima. Coauthors: Kierra Kuhlman, Cindy Tessler, Yumiko Jin, Jim Alderson, Cord Brundage. Faculty Mentor: Cord Brundage.

Abstract: To decrease the risk of harm or stress in handling and housing laboratory rabbits, Oryctolagus cuniculus, a sedative may need to be considered. Trazodone hydrochloride (TZN), a selective serotonin and antagonist and serotonin reuptake inhibitor, has been useful in sedating anxious behavior in humans as well as anxiety and aggression in dogs and cats for clinical purposes, but has yet to be used in rabbits. Veterinary examinations were performed on 15 laboratory rabbits prior to receiving TZN or a placebo. Each rabbit was given a score based on their levels of tension, struggle, aggressive behavior, and overall tractability during the examination. In this double blind placebo controlled randomized cross-over study the rabbits were also recorded/monitored for a three hour period after treatment was administered, followed by a re-examination and scoring at the end of the three hours. Rabbits that received TZN showed a reduction in the levels of tension, struggling, aggression, and overall handling tractability compared to rabbits receiving the placebo. TZN decreased the level of tension (26%), struggling (38%), aggressiveness (81%), overall tractability (19%), and complete a composite handling composite score (34%). Rabbits that received placebo had minimal decreases in tension (4%), tractability (8%), complete handling composite score (3%), and increased struggling by 5%. These results suggest that TZN may be an appropriate sedative/anti-anxyolitic option for laboratory rabbits during handling or veterinary examinations..

Keywords: trazodone, rabbits, tractability, Oryctolagus cuniculus, sedative, aggressive

The Microbial Quality Analysis of Raw Chicken from Small Scale Production Facilities
Poster and Creative Works Showcase
2:30pm - 3:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - Ursa Major

Omar Innabi. Coauthors: Benjamin Wu, Rosa Vargas. Faculty Mentor: Wendy Dixon.

Abstract: Foodborne illness is a preventable gastrointestinal infection caused by food consumption that is contaminated with harmful microorganisms, i.e. Salmonella. Salmonella is a gram negative bacteria of the Enterobacteriaceae family and according to CDC, causes estimates of 1.2 million illnesses and 450 deaths in the United States every year. Foster Farms, one of the nation's leading poultry producers, has also had serious sanitation problems and Salmonella contamination within the last few years. Furthermore, the microbial quality of chicken is an ongoing concern. For these reasons, this research project focused on detecting and analyzing the microbial quality of raw chicken processed by small scale production facilities and comparing them to large poultry producers such as Foster Farms. Selective media and Triple Sugar Iron (TSI) slants were used to grow and isolate gram negative bacteria. The RapID One Identification was then used to determine the type of microbial species. From the RapID One test, E. coli and Salmonella contamination was found in 16.6% of the chicken while Shigella flexneri was found in 33.3% of the chicken. These results are comparable to the level of harmful microbial contamination found in a previous study of Foster Farms and other large brand chicken companies. While further testing is needed to confirm these findings, the results suggest that the microbial quality of chicken from small scale facilities is no better than that of large scale chicken brands and that issues with harmful microbial contamination are a continuous concern for chicken production in general..

Keywords: Salmonella, Shigella, SS agar, Nutrient Agar , Triple Sugar Iron Slants , Gram Staining, RapID One Identification, Microbial Quality , Raw, Chicken

Hair Misorientation in African American Communities: A Substructure to Mental Illness
Poster and Creative Works Showcase
2:30pm - 3:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - Ursa Major

Kevon Williams. Faculty Mentor: Alejandro Morales.

Abstract: For centuries, people of European descent have been deemed the epitome of beauty (Ellis-Hervey, Doss, Davis, Nicks, and Araiza, 2016). Globally, governments and media enforce this notion, inhibiting the freedom of expression and accenting the experience of marginalization amongst people of color (Imarogbe, 2003). In attempt to assimilate European culture, African Americans have become what researchers identify as psychologically misoriented, denouncing their African Self Consciousness to be identified as "beautiful" and/or appropriate (Atwell & Azibo, 1992). The purpose of this poster is to present a critical analysis of psychological literature on Hair Misorientation, highlighting the psychological effect of hair discrimination on African American women. Hair Misorientation is a consequence of hair discrimination experienced by people of African descent, stemmed from the internalization of the ideal that straight European hair is "good" and kinky/curly African hair is "bad"; therefore, motivating a desire to change or hide their natural hair texture to assimilate European ideals of beauty (Imarogbe, 2003). Although, Hair Misorientation is proposed as a mental illness by Kamau Atu Imarogbe (2003), I will present it as a substructure of mental illness. The data is currently being collected through PsychInfo and other databases; and the results are expected to be complete in the next couple of months. The results will illuminate the psychological effects of Hair Misorientation through illustrating, the effects of scientific racism, history of hair discrimination, and the context of hair grooming among African Americans..

Keywords: hair, misorientation, discrimination, assimilation, internalization

The Effect of Rape culture on the Reporting and Handling of Rape Cases.
Oral Presentation
2:45pm - 3:00pm
Location:
University Library - 1814

Tammy Wong. Faculty Mentor: Kahena Viale.

Abstract: In response to the growth of rape culture in our society, rape cases and the reporting of rapes have been compromised. Police officers and jurors often start with a suspicion of the rape victim and take irrelevant circumstances into consideration when analyzing rape cases which is unjust and does a disservice to rape survivors. Consequently, these aspects often provide sympathy for the rapists while passively condoning their actions. The purpose of this research is to evaluate how rape culture affects the treatment of how college rape cases are handled to reveal the association between rape culture and the prevalence of rape incidents on college campuses to indicate the need for policy measures that reshape our attitudes toward rape victims. My research method is a meta-review of scholarly academic journals on the justice system, how rape cases are handled, college sexual assault protocol and people's reactions on rape survivors. The primary topics I am specializing on are sexual assault cases on college campuses in the U.S. and the protocols of reporting sexual assaults on campus. I analyze academic journals, statistics and data in order to effectively draw conclusions to test my theories for my research. In order to implement the knowledge accumulated from my research, I examine two major controversial rape cases that were scrutinized by the media and the treatment of them.

Keywords: Women's Studies, Rape Culture, Public Policy

Thermal Vacuum Chamber Thruster Test Stand
Oral Presentation
3:15pm - 3:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - 2337 (Perseus)

Ali Chahine. Faculty Mentor: Frank Chandler.

Abstract: A Thermal Vacuum Chamber is a sealed and enclosed chamber which recreates the environment found in space and allows researchers to test the radiation effects which these satellites are exposed to. Because of the vacuum chamber, man has been able to overcome some of the greatest obstacles initially restricting space flight, such as the Van Allen radiation belts, solar energetic particles, solar proton events, and galactic cosmic rays. Accordingly, there is a need to improve the performance of miniature satellites and electric propulsion systems which hold promise for future space applications. The objective of this research is to design instruments which will be embedded in a Thermal Vacuum Chamber and be capable of analyzing the performance capabilities of miniature satellites and electric engines. A cryogenic vacuum pump is selected, which will flow through the chamber walls and produce a vacuum of around 〖10〗^(-7) Pascals. A test stand was designed to house the tested appliances, and a measuring system was designed to calculate the thrust produced. These testing instruments will measure performance via fiberglass sensors which will relay the information to a nearby computer. The chamber will also be equipped with viewport flanges, constructed of Corning Type 7056 glass with fused Silica or UV grade synthetic sapphire. These materials will be capable of sustaining its structure under the stress induced by the vacuum.

Keywords: Thermal Vacuum Chamber, Vacuum Chamber, Vacuum, Cryogenic, CubeSat, Electric Propulsion

The Development of the Passion for Teaching Scale
Oral Presentation
12:15pm - 12:30pm
Location:
University Library - Special Events (4th floor)

Jessica Saucedo. Coauthors: Anna Liu. Faculty Mentor: Sara Langford.

Abstract: The purpose of this study is to develop a passion scale in the context of teaching occupations. While general passion scales exist, and are often used in various work contexts, experts agree that the construct, "passion," is a context-dependent construct and would be better-served by more specialized scales. However, very few context-dependent passion scales have been developed, with the exception of the Entrepreneurial Passion Scale and the Passion for Work scale. The Passion for Teaching Scale is currently being developed through a multi-pronged approach. First, items from a general passion scale have been adapted to address teaching. Additional items have been developed from criteria used to judge an Excellence in Teaching Award, as well as from other current web resources for teachers looking to explore the topic of passion for teaching. Finally, researchers are in the process of conducting interviews with a number of award winning teachers. The data from the interviews is being content analyzed and used for developing even more items. Using expert judgments, items that do not fit the construct, passion for teaching, will be eliminated. All of the remaining items will be administered to a large group of general faculty in spring 2017. Finally, correlational scale construction methods will help to further reduce the item pool. The resulting scale will be beneficial for educators, employers in educational contexts, and more generally for anyone engaged in the scholarship of teaching. A follow-up study is also being planned to test the reliability and validity of the scale..

Keywords: passion, passion for teaching, passion for work, passion scales

Formation of Xerogel Composites via Reactive Electrospinning
Oral Presentation
1:00pm - 1:15pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - 1611D (Lyra)

Carlos Zamora Salgado. Coauthors: Cody Long, Shayan Askari, Cristian Hernandez. Faculty Mentor: Keith Forward.

Abstract: Climate change within the last decade has brought about a rise in the discussion of the effects caused by constantly increasing emissions of greenhouse gasses throughout the globe. The most destructive of these effects is the global rise in temperatures which will have long term effects on the environment around us. In order to avoid causing any more drastic changes, Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology is being developed and utilized throughout universities and research laboratories. Our research project was established in order to contribute to the advancement of CCS technology through the use of Xerogels being processed through Reactive Electrospinning in order to develop metal oxide mats. These metal oxide mats have a variety of applications, but pertaining to our research, they are developed into a fibrous mat with a large surface area. This mat can then be used in order to capture greenhouse gases within the web of metal oxide ceramic fibers, thereby reducing the amount of gases in the atmosphere. Due to the large surface area and size of the fibers, large amounts of greenhouse gases may be captured, thereby providing a CCS system that is highly effective and easy to produce..

Keywords: Carbon Capture, Electrospinning, Greenhouse, Xerogels, Xerogel, Sol-gel, Sol-gels, Sol gel, Sol gels

Can both counterterrorism and counterinsurgency operations be compatible and mutually reinforcing, or do both inherently operate at cross-purposes?
Oral Presentation
12:30pm - 12:45pm
Location:
University Library - Special Collections (4th floor)

Mirette Morcos. Faculty Mentor: Marc Scarcelli.

Abstract: In the shadows of failed enemy-centric counter terrorism policies in The Iraq war, a new counterinsurgency manual has been adopted by the United States military. While the official US policy on countering terrorist and insurgent groups in the Middle East is inherently a counterinsurgency doctrine, which understands that success lies within gaining support of the local populations and working towards political solutions; there has been an upsurge of targeted killings, drone strikes and enhanced interrogation facilities in undeclared warzones working in the shadows to hunt and kill those suspected to be involved with Al Qaeda and their affiliates. Although these tactics can be effective short term, questions remain regarding their long-term effect on the United States' overall policy in the region. This paper will discuss the United States' official counterinsurgency policy in the Middle East, and its stated long term goals. It will then analyze the short and long term effects of these seemingly paradoxical shadow operations and conclude that over reliance on such force tactics is counterproductive to the long term goals intended to maintain security both in the host countries and on an international level.

Keywords: counterinsurgency, counterterrorism, drone strikes, JSOC operations, terrorism, war, Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, enhanced interrogation, international relations, gureilla warfare, insurgency, political science, research

Reclaimed Water Quality Dynamics Throughout a Distribution System
Oral Presentation
1:30pm - 1:45pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - 2337 (Perseus)

Lonnie Chung. Coauthors: Jaclyn O'Hara. Faculty Mentor: Monica Palomo.

Abstract: As drought conditions in California continue to deplete fresh water reserves, the adoption of alternative water sources, such as reclaimed water, is expedient for non-potable uses. As studies have shown that microbial growth occurs in drinking water networks, a concern of reclaimed water service, such as irrigation and groundwater replenishment, is the remnant of certain compounds after treatment. It is hypothesized that the quality of flowing reclaimed water varies throughout the distribution system, encouraging an increase of activity from microorganisms. Reclaimed water was sampled at three locations on the campus of California Polytechnic University, Pomona (CPP), by tapping into the distribution pipeline network. The locations sampled were, Manor House (A), Rose Garden (B), and Music Building (C), located northwest, northeast, and southwest, from the center of CPP, respectively. Water quality tests were conducted for a number of parameters and constituents, including true and apparent color, temperature, pH, total organic carbon (TOC), alkalinity, nitrate, and nitrite. Results indicate that the presence of TOC, nitrate, and nitrite, display a continuous trend of succession from locations A, B, and C. On the contrary, alkalinity values results are similar at all three locations, but seem to vary day by day, from 139 - 177 mg/L CaCO3. Prospective experimental assessments include total chlorine, total coliforms, ATP, and heterotrophic plate count (HPC). Moreover, additional research must be conducted, in order to establish spatial statistical, seasonal trends, and to confirm the microbial changes in the pipeline distribution system..

Keywords: Reclaimed Water, Distribution System, CPP, Water Quality

DDoS Attack using Amazon's Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) Servers
Oral Presentation
12:00pm - 12:15pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - 2132 (England Evans)

Paul Chiou. Faculty Mentor: Yu Sun.

Abstract: DDoS Attacks can pose a serious problem in our internet-driven society today. Exploiters can use massive internet traffic coming from multiple compromised sources to cripple networks at their will. Whether the victim is financial, commercial, or national security, cyber warfare is the war of the future and as a Computer Scientist, it is essential to understand such DDoS attacks so we can even attempt to counter them. In our research, we simulated an attack on a live environment using Amazon's Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) Servers. We modeled this small-scale distributed attack with over 300 EC2 Instances (attackers), each injected with DoS code. This code is implemented using the Java Spring Web Service as skeleton to send massive HTTP GET Requests with Multi-Threading. These zombie EC2 Instances are deployed by an AMI each configured to run the Web Service .jar file on boot and ready-to-attack upon initialization. To overcome each zombie EC2 Instance's changing IP Address each time they are initialized, we implemented a Controller (another constantly running EC2 Instance) that acts as an IP Server to monitor to all the zombie's location. Each zombie instances are also coded to periodically send HTTP POST Requests to check in with the Controller instance to keeps track of a list of current active zombies (this is to model the possible dynamic IPs of infected computers in real world scenarios). With our implementation, we were able to successfully carry out such DDoS attacks on two websites, substantially constraining their performance..

Keywords: ddos, amazon ec2, ec2, multi threading, ddos attack, attack, threada,

The Milky Way Project: Mapping Our Galaxy One Click At a Time
Oral Presentation
1:15pm - 1:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - 2132 (England Evans)

Tharindu Jayasinghe. Coauthors: Don Dixon. Faculty Mentor: Matthew Povich.

Abstract: We present a revamped version of the Milky Way Project, a citizen science initiative that provides astronomers with the tools to map our Galaxy for star birth and supersonic massive stars. This collaboration has engaged 35,000 citizens in astronomy since 2010. The Milky Way Project (MWP) presents internet users with images from the Spitzer Space Telescope along with a set of classification tools for the identification of bubbles, bow shocks and other astronomical phenomena. We analyzed user classifications of bubbles drawn after the first Milky Way Project data release to improve upon the initial bubble catalog, which listed 5,106 Galactic bubbles. To create a catalog of objects, we use a density based clustering algorithm which identifies regions where many users made classifications. We created a catalog of over 4000 bubbles using 2 million user classifications gathered between 2012 and 2015. Currently we are comparing the growing MWP bow shock catalog to the largest existing infrared bow shock catalog which contains several hundred candidates. Initial MWP bow shock results suggests we will discover a few hundred new bow shock candidates. We expect to use the MWP bow shock catalog to enhance the existing bow shock catalog. To collaborate in achieving any of the goals of the MWP volunteer at https://www.milkywayproject.org. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under grants CAREER-1454334 and AST-1411851..

Keywords: astronomy, physics, stars, citzen science

Women at the Intersection and Workplace Policies
Oral Presentation
2:00pm - 2:15pm
Location:
University Library - Special Events (4th floor)

Jamilex Rodriguez. Faculty Mentor: Mario Guerrero.

Abstract: Gender and race inequality in America's society is an issue that affects most, if not all of the women in the United States. Patriarchy and sexism in the workforce has remained an issue that tends to marginalize and oppress the lives of women on a day-to-day basis. Therefore, this paper will be defending a theory about unequal work pay within women identity intersections. The theory is that structural issues within the US's governmental system, causes legal issues within the interpretation of equal work pay within society due to the sociological harms instilled against certain identities of women, and women's abilities within the workplace. The research implied in the paper is a critical and an analytical analysis of identity exclusion within legal movements, cases, and policy. Furthermore, the outcomes of the movements will be evaluated through the observation of the involvement of the National Women's Party, and other advocates like Alva Belmont, in the fight towards equal women social, political and economic rights. To document and evaluate the change, an examination of the societal outcomes that arise from the legal, political, and economic effects is studied. To understand the changes, this paper performs an investigation on the impact that Women's legal movements have on the rights of women within society, all to learn how much of an influence our legal system has on the socialization of its citizens in pursuing what is just. Women must Unite! Women must Fight! All to achieve equal rights! .

Keywords: Feminism, Philosophy, Policy, Women Inequality, Workplace, Work Pay

Are Universal Human Rights Laws Globally Applicable To Combat Cultural Pathways That Lead To Modern Day Slavery Dilemmas?
Oral Presentation
12:15pm - 12:30pm
Location:
University Library - Special Collections (4th floor)

Sumaya Bamakhrama. Faculty Mentor: Marc Scarcelli.

Abstract: There is an ongoing debate between Universalism and Relativism, which highlights the never-ending dilemma regarding absolute morality versus cultural relativism. These theories complicate political stances regarding universal laws against modern day slavery and raise questions about whether or not universal human rights law is truly universal in its nature, or if it is an example of western imperialism, in which a set of western laws are forced upon non-western populations who may not want to abide by them. Although both Universalists and Relativists agree that slavery is morally wrong, there is a gray area in the definition of slavery in which cultural practices become an obstacle to defining and targeting modern day slavery cases.Using the current objective definitions of slavery, modern day slavery, freedom, coercion, and consent, this paper examines cases which represent a gray area in the definition of modern day slavery: child labour, child brides, arranged marriages, the guardianship system, and the sponsorship system. This study also analyzes the actual underlying factors that led to these practices in order to conclude whether it is indeed a cultural practice and therefore should be protected from outside interference, or an attempt to exploit persons under the umbrella of "culture". Finally, this paper concludes that Universal Human Rights laws are not globally applicable in their nature. Therefore a holistic approach geared toward considering different aspects, such as countries' cultural practices, is needed in order to appropriately combat the cultural pathways that lead to modern day slavery.

Keywords: modern day slavery, modern, slavery, human trafficking, child labor, child brides, sponsorship system, guardianship system, universalism, culture, relativism, religion, politics, research, political science, arranged marriage, theory, theological, philoso

Mosaic Numbers of 9-Crossing Alternating Knots
Poster and Creative Works Showcase
2:30pm - 3:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - Ursa Major

Alexis Ayala. Coauthors: Joshua Brajas, Austin Sakamoto. Faculty Mentor: Robin Wilson.

Abstract: An unusual branch of mathematics is knot theory, which is the study of mathematical knots and their applications to other fields, such as biology, chemistry, physics, and topology to name a few. A relatively new subject of knot theory is the study of mosaic knots and mosaic numbers, which have specific applications to quantum computing. To specify, a mosaic number of a knot is the smallest number "n" such that the knot fits on a nxn mosaic board. In this project, we study mosaic knots and to attempt to compute the mosaic numbers of all the 9-crossing alternating knots, of which there are 41..

Keywords: Mathematics, Knot Theory

The Effects of Phlorotannin Concentrations of Brown Seaweeds (Phaeophyceae) on the feeding rates of the Black Sea Hare, Aplysia vaccaria
Oral Presentation
1:15pm - 1:30pm
Location:
University Library - 2907

Danielle McHaskell. Faculty Mentor: Jayson R. Smith.

Abstract: In marine ecosystems, herbivory plays a vital role in ecosystem function and can drive seaweed community structure. In response to herbivory, some seaweeds produce chemical defenses to deter consumption, such as the production of phlorotannins by brown algae (Phaephyceae). Phlorotannins are a phenol-based chemical deterrent and these secondary metabolites have been found to reduce herbivory by decreasing seaweed palatability. The black sea hare, Aplysia vaccaria, is one of the largest marine herbivorous gastropods in our coastal ecosystems. It is a voracious grazer, reaching 14 kg within its 1-year life span, and consumes primarily, if not exclusively, brown algae. While phlorotannin concentrations have been previously shown to reduce consumption in some herbivores, little research has been conducted with large herbivores exhibiting high consumption rates, such as A. vaccaria. The phlorotannin concentration of a series of brown seaweeds from shallow-waters off the southern California coast was determined using a standard Folin-Ciocalteau method. As found in other regions, the kelps tended to have a lower amount of phlorotannins, such as Undaria pinnatifida with a 0.72% concentrations, whereas Fucoids tended to have a higher amount, such as Silvetia compressa with a concentration of 10.8%. Currently, we are determining the consumption rates A. vaccaria for each of these seaweeds in controlled laboratory feeding experiments to examine the relationship between feeding rates and phlorotannin concentrations.

Keywords: Marine Ecology, Ecology, Marine, Aplysia, Aplysia vaccaria, Phlorotannins, herbivory

Alternative Transportation in the United States: How partisan politics gets us nowhere
Oral Presentation
1:00pm - 1:15pm
Location:
University Library - 1808

Jennifer Hunter. Faculty Mentor: Mario Guerrero.

Abstract: The continued growth of populations within U.S. cities has rendered the use of personal vehicles unsustainable. As roads have become more densely impacted, the effects of Americans' robustly individualistic, private-car-driving, white picket-fence culture have surmounted an increasing burden on both the environment and America's lower classes. Comprehensive alternative transportation infrastructure offers an opportunity for relief from modern problems such as pollution and spatial mismatch. Despite the promising benefits of, and definite need for, comprehensive alternative transportation infrastructure throughout US cities, it's implementation has been inadequate. This study seeks to unmask the role that partisan politics plays in the implementation of alternative transportation infrastructure. Through the analysis of multiple case studies of U.S. cities that underwent a partisan shifts in political leadership, it is evident that partisan politics is a major contributing factor in transportation infrastructure.The relevance of these findings are that -- in contrast to the normative ideology in which policy is developed to serve the needs of the people-- partisanship has fostered ambivalence towards necessary policies that would help to sustain limited resources and ameliorate the effects of economic inequality in the United States..

Keywords: Transportation, infrastructure, partisan, party politics, bike lanes, buses, trains,sustainability

Fabrication of Gecko-Inspired Dry Adhesives
Oral Presentation
1:45pm - 2:00pm
Location:
University Library - 2913

Jade Lim. Coauthors: Julia Franco, Jonathan Harris, Natanael Ariawan, Jan Emil Collado, Brandon Kouch, Madeline Durling, Tommy Pham. Faculty Mentor: Jonathan Puthoff.

Abstract: Gecko feet exhibit adhesive capabilities due to nanoscale fiber arrays that magnify the Van der Waals forces acting between the hairs and an underlying surface. Synthetic adhesives inspired by this natural gecko material that reproduce its releasable and non-specific adhesion properties are in development but are difficult to fabricate due to the scale and intricacy of the structures required. We fabricated gecko-inspired dry adhesives using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a nontoxic polymer that is easy to mold at the micro level as an uncured liquid. The silicon templates in which the PDMS was cured were manufactured using a microsphere lithography process, which involves the deposition of a dense packing of microspheres which is subsequently etched. This procedure is cost-effective and allows us to gain greater, and more repeatable, control over the resulting sample's characteristics as well as producing reusable molds. We developed an instrumentation platform using the LabVIEW development environment to measure the adhesive forces acting on the resulting samples..

Keywords: Gecko, Dry Adhesives, Polymers, Materials Engineering, Microsphere Lithography, Van derWaals

Feasibility of Utilizing Orange Pomace for Food Applications
Oral Presentation
12:00pm - 12:15pm
Location:
University Library - 2913

Cassandra Maya. Coauthors: Jonathan Guo, Helene Mecate. Faculty Mentor: Olive Li.

Abstract: Processed foods, such as orange juice, result in a large amount of byproducts, which are typically discarded. However, this orange pomace contains many valuable ingredients. Therefore, the goal of this project is to investigate its utilization in various food applications by examining various properties of dehydrated orange pomace powder and the food products developed with it. Fresh orange pomace was collected right after the juicing process. The wet state orange pomace was subject to a series of unit operations including dehydration, grinding, and sieving. The samples at various particle sizes were incorporated into different formulations to make pasta, meatballs, and jelly candies. Physico-chemical parameters including water activity, moisture content, and color were tested on the powder and the food products developed. A pre-treatment using a meat grinder was effective to convert the pomace into uniform mass, which made dehydration and grinding easier and more productive in terms of higher smaller particle yield. An infrared food dehydrator and convection oven were equally sufficient in producing dried samples with low residual moisture content and water activity. A spice knife grinder was more effective than a grain burr mill, resulting in higher yield of finer particles. The particle size of dried pomace powder had apparent effects on sensory properties of the food products developed. Pasta and meatballs could be formulated using the powder at 10% addition level. The candies required the incorporation of much finer pomace and lower addition level. All formulations are currently under optimization by monitoring their physico-chemical and sensory properties.

Keywords: Orange pomace, dehydration, functional foods

Drug Delivery to the Human Eye
Oral Presentation
12:45pm - 1:00pm
Location:
University Library - 2913

Dampiya Mahathanthila. Coauthors: Zoheth Fernandes. Faculty Mentor: Maryam Shafahi.

Abstract: Topical drug delivery is the most common treatment for diseases of the anterior segment of the eye such as glaucoma and uveitis. But treatment is limited by the low permeability of the multilayered cornea, rapid clearance by tear drainage, and absorption into the conjunctiva. Hence, the bioavailability of topically administered drugs is very low. A numerical model of topical drug transport in the anterior human eye is developed in this project, which is coupled with heat transfer and fluid flow in the anterior eye. Space and time-dependent evolution of drug concentration is then investigated numerically, with an emphasis on the drug concentration at three targets: the trabecular meshwork, iris and lens. An axisymmetric 2D eye model and a 3D eye model have been developed based on the data of past research work. The model has been developed using commercial software COMSOL Multiphysics contains anterior and posterior segment including the cornea, sclera, anterior chamber, posterior chamber, lens, vitreous, iris, Trabecular meshwork and ciliary body. Numerical results of the temperature distribution in the entire eye, steady-state aqueous humor flow field and the drug concentration distribution in the anterior eye have been generated. The results will help to understand the drug transport process in the anterior human eye, and provide guidelines of drug administration in order to improve the delivery efficacy.

Keywords: Drug delivery+ Human eye+Numerical Simulation

Graph-Theoretical Analysis of the Long-term Memory Retrieval Functional Connectome
Poster and Creative Works Showcase
2:30pm - 3:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - Ursa Major

Livier Capristo. Coauthors: Tatiana Manriquez. Faculty Mentor: Robert Blumenfeld.

Abstract: The ability to encode and retrieve memories of for events or Episodic long-term memory (LTM) is a wholly complex, but fundamentally important capacity. LTM retrieval is supported by a network of brain regions, most notably, the hippocampus and medial temporal cortical regions. There has a been a wealth of human neuroimaging studies investigating the role of these regions as well as others including the lateral prefrontal cortex, in LTM retrieval. However, there is less known about how these regions that are important for memory functionally interact during different LTM retrieval conditions. In the present study, we investigate the functional interactions within this network using a meta-analytic and graph-theoretical approach (meta-analytic functional connectivity mapping). We gathered and annotated the results from 72 neuroimaging studies investigating different LTM retrieval conditions. From these results, we will derive network models quantifying the co-activation strength amongst regions during LTM retrieval. We expect medial temporal lobe and lateral prefrontal regions to act as hub nodes, playing a central role communication in the network. We believe our findings will be an important compliment to the established body of research implicating the medial temporal and frontal lobes in LTM.

Keywords: Brain, Memory, fMRI, Network

Perceptions of Rabbit Behavior During Handling Varies with Veterinary Experience
Poster and Creative Works Showcase
2:30pm - 3:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - Ursa Major

Amika Yamamoto. Coauthors: Kierra Kuhlman, Courtney Fukushima. Faculty Mentor: Cord Brundage, James Alderson, Cindy Tessler.

Abstract: Veterinarians in practice are asked to work with a number of species some of which they are less familiar. A lack of confidence and limited experience with restraint can have significant health consequences for both the animal and restrainer. this is especially true in rabbits who frequently suffer injuries from poor animal handling. We tested the hypothesis that the experience of the animal handler would have a significant impact on the behavior and demeanor of non-human-socialized rabbits. A set of physical examination procedures were performed by both a seasoned veterinarian (37 years of practice) with considerable rabbit experience and a recent graduate (1 year of practice) with minimal rabbit experience. During each procedure the animals (n=15) level of tension, amount of struggling and signs of aggression were recorded to determine overall handling difficulty. The general demeanor of the rabbit was also scored after the exam, by the veterinarian and an outside observer. All handling parameters were elevated in the recent graduate with significantly more struggling reported (P=<.05). Despite an increase in overall difficulty in reported handling animal demeanor was unaffected by the experience of the handler. Overall this suggests that recent graduates may over interpret the amount of handling in an examination..

Keywords: Confidence, experience, animal handling

Continuous Pharmaceutical Production by means of Free Surface Electrospinning
Oral Presentation
2:45pm - 3:00pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - 2337 (Perseus)

Katarina Guzman. Coauthors: Jack Lift, Uyen Phan, Hovhannes Gregorchuk, Thai Nguyen. Faculty Mentor: Keith Forward.

Abstract: An estimated 90% of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) in research and development are poorly soluble or insoluble in water. These APIs exhibit poor bioavailability in solid dosage forms due to their poor solubility. In order to increase the release rate of APIs, free surface electrospinning of a microemulsion was used as means to produce submicron size domains of API dispersed in an amorphous excipient. Microemulsions containing fenofibrate, a poorly soluble API, Kolliphor EL, a surfactant, and a mixture of Polyvinylpyrrolidone and Polyethylene Glycol, excipients, are electrospun to produce highly porous nanofibers with high surface area, which promotes rapid drug release. Turbidity measurements served as a test of the stability of microemulsions, and was used to standardize the procedure for preparing the microemulsion. The amount of API used in the microemulsions and its effect on product encapsulation was examined. The applied potential and working distance of the electrospinning process and how they each affect the product were also investigated The electrospun nanofibers were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and high performance liquid chromatography to determine the morphology of the fibers and the bioavailability of the final material. The fibers contained significant amounts of fenofibrate encapsulated within the excipients, and release rates were significantly improved over commercial products. This technique can be utilized to streamline the downstream production of pharmaceuticals, which would result in lower operating costs and improved uniformity over current batch manufacturing processes.

Keywords: Pharmaceuticals, Electrospinning, Fenofibrate

Thermal Performance of Cylindrical Heat Pipes
Oral Presentation
1:30pm - 1:45pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - 1611D (Lyra)

Sharoon Samuel. Coauthors: Erik Gutierrez, Jay Ohm. Faculty Mentor: Maryam Shafahi.

Abstract: In this presentation, the experimental results of a water-based heat pipe's thermal performance is compared to the analytical results by measuring a temperature profile across the length of the 10mm diameter heat pipe using a custom made testing apparatus that applies heat at the evaporator section and rejects heat at the condenser section. The overall testing apparatus consists of a chiller unit (NESLAB RTE-211) that provides the cooling water in the condenser section, an assortment of PVC pipe and valves/fittings that serve as the condenser, a 12-inch pipe surface heating element, a variable voltage transformer that allows for a variable power input and an 8-channel DaqPro data logger with eight K-type thermocouples. The results of the water-based heat pipe thermal performance are calibrated to the analytical models presented by Borna et al. and will be used to characterize the performance of a nano-fluid based heat pipe at various diameters..

Keywords: Heat Pipe+Thermal Performance+Electronic Cooling

How the media influenced the 2012 and 2016 American presidential elections
Oral Presentation
1:30pm - 1:45pm
Location:
University Library - 1808

Melissa Madrigal. Faculty Mentor: Mario Gurerro.

Abstract: My research will show how the media influenced voter behavior, and I will be specifically using the 2012 and 2016 presidential electionz..

Keywords: Media influence

Use of Membrane Technology to Purify Natural Colors from Red Cabbage
Poster and Creative Works Showcase
2:30pm - 3:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - Ursa Major

Carol Pow Sang. Coauthors: Shirin Mal Ganji, Shannen Hilse. Faculty Mentor: Harmit Singh.

Abstract: With membrane technology, unwanted molecules can be removed from crude extract of natural colors. Additionally, higher temperature can be avoided during the concentration step and avoid thermal degradation of the product. The study was designed to purify crude anthocyanin (ACN) extract using different types of membranes and compare the color intensity, antioxidant capacity, aroma and chemical composition of the product at various steps of the extraction and concentration. ACNs were extracted from red cabbage by constant agitation using a 0.5%HCl solution. The extracted suspension was centrifuged and then clarified using Microfiltration (MF). The resulting permeate was collected and concentrated using Nanofiltration (NF). The resulting permeate and retentate were analyzed for changes in composition and other characteristics. Reverse Phase HPLC (RP-HPLC), spectrophotometric methods and colorimeter were used to evaluate this parameters. The concentrated ACNs product had some positive and negative changes in quality parameters. There was a decrease of total phenolics from raw sample to concentrated sample, while the antioxidant capacity remained the same throughout the whole process. For each sample, the RP-HPLC chromatogram yielded six peaks, which signifies the ACNs remained intact throughout the membrane filtration process. The NF membrane (Hydracore50) proved to have a good anthocyanin retention since no anthocyanin content was found in the permeate. In addition the undesirable aroma from red cabbage was less intense in the concentrated sample as compare to the raw sample.

Keywords: membrane technology, anthocyanin, purification, HPLC, natural colors

Hibiscus Stained Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells
Oral Presentation
2:30pm - 2:45pm
Location:
University Library - 2913

Cinthia Ayala-Heredia. Coauthors: Jose Garcia, Eric Gruenberg, Gerson Trejo, Leoncio Marquez, Kuamail Ali. Faculty Mentor: Jonathan Puthoff.

Abstract: Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) are solar-energy harvesting devices that absorb visible light to produce electricity. DSSCs are produced with inexpensive organic based materials. The cells are typically composed of four layers, including an anode, a dye-coated titanium dioxide (TiO2) film, an electrolyte, and a cathode. We fabricated DSSCs using a transparent conductive flexible polymer: polyethylene terephthalate coated with indium-tin oxide (PET-ITO) as the base for the film and the anode material. These flexible DSSCs are more versatile than rigid glass based DSSCs. A binder-free TiO2 paste was deposited onto the conductive side of the anode and sintered at 120 °C without deforming the PET-ITO. We dyed the TiO2 with plant-derived hibiscus anthocyanins, which donate photogenerated electrons to the film, much like the process of photosynthesis. The cells require visible light to produce usable energy; outdoor as well as artificial light produced indoors can be utilized to power the cells. We used a multimeter to determine the voltage output of the charged cell as well as circuit characteristics..

Keywords: DSSCs, PET-ITO, anthocyanins

The Relevance of the Congressional Black Caucus
Oral Presentation
2:45pm - 3:00pm
Location:
University Library - 1808

Gabriel Smith. Faculty Mentor: Mario Guerrero, Nelian Chaterverdi.

Abstract: The congressional black caucus is seen as the leading legislative advocate for African Americans in government. Before the Civil Rights Act of 1964, African Americans were excluded from the political process and consequently treated as a sub-group disassociated from the general populace of America. Later in 1971, during the high point of Black Power movements, when African Americans desired political influence and demanded the government advocate for the needs of the black community the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC) formally emerged, numerous civil and economic, legislative causes are supported. The existence of the CBC and the proliferation of racially based caucuses raises issues seldom examined in literature in the legal process. My topic contributes to American politics by evaluating if the congressional black makes a contribution to the black community or is merely a symbolic organization with limited influence. This paper if black legislators make a distinctive impact in Congress as the engine prescribed as the voice for blacks, ensuring that that African Americans have an equal opportunity to achieve the American Dream. The methodology for this thesis is a simple quantitative and qualitative study. In order to test the research question, it is essential to evaluate if there is significant correlation to the frequency of legislation addressing salient issue of black America and the Congressional Black Caucus during the Obama Administration. To test this relationship, I will use bill introduction to test the number of times members of the 111th - 114th congress propose legislation themed around the CBC agenda: Voter Rights Restoration, Criminal justice reform, social safety net programs, investment in black colleges, and workforce diversity. Many scholars argue black legislator should be more effective during the Administration of the first African American President. However, I disagree and my goal is the prove the CBC is a symbolic organization and does not successfully implement their agenda. In order to express this, I will use the library of congress database to look through the congressional record and target legislation prescribed within the CBC agenda. My original data will use descriptive statistics by evaluating the behaviors of CBC members and non- members in the United States Congress is essential to identifying distinction of African American representatives. Specifically, the spreadsheet will be organized into five categories, 1 voter right, 2 criminal justice reform, 3 social wellness programs, 4. Investment into HBCU's, 5 workforce diversity. Then this spreadsheet, will be inputted into SPSS. To measure my data, I will look at the variables to determine if CBC members propose a larger quantity social justice legislation. I will collect the total number of legislators who support similar policies and create a ratio showing the similarity of CBC members.

Keywords: Congress, ethnic politics, caucuses

Veteran Students: Insiders vs. Outsiders
Oral Presentation
2:45pm - 3:00pm
Location:
University Library - Special Events (4th floor)

Haley Dunaj. Coauthors: Chantel Ylaya. Faculty Mentor: Anjana Narayan, Erica Morales.

Abstract: Part of a larger project that looks at Cal Poly Pomona Veteran Students' college experiences, this presentation specifically focuses on the methodological challenges of conducting qualitative interviews. Using the insider-outsider framework of qualitative research, this presentation will highlight the advantages and disadvantages of being an outsider to the group that is being studied. Overall, this research foregrounds the need for new researchers to be cognizant of the implications of their positionality during the data collection process..

Keywords: Veteran, insider, outsider, social work, sociology

The Underrepresentation of Women In Politics
Oral Presentation
2:45pm - 3:00pm
Location:
University Library - Special Collections (4th floor)

Brittany Banner. Faculty Mentor: Mario Guerrero.

Abstract: Women in the present day society lack ambition in political affairs, due to the fact that political parties do not recruit women. Secondly, society still holds passively biased traditional views of gender, believing that women are inferior to male opponent. Moreover, these stereotypes have prevented women from participating in the political system due to societal norms that detract from the development of ambition. Representation in political affairs serves as a stepping -stone for political freedom and political injustice. Due to societal norms women are not fully embraced in the world of politics. The importance of women being in politics lies in their representation, if only a certain amount of women are elected to public office; they are not represented in the government, but thus lack political power. If women are more active any form of government, which is essential to building and sustaining democracy, the government can exceed expectations..

Keywords: Underrepresentation, women, women in politics,

All-Solid-State Ion Selective Electrode
Oral Presentation
2:30pm - 2:45pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - 2132 (England Evans)

Rikesh Patel. Coauthors: Jorge Sandoval. Faculty Mentor: Peng Sun.

Abstract: Compared to a liquid membrane ion selective electrode, a solid-state ion selective electrode has many benefits, such as, it is cheap, durable and can be miniaturized. We have developed a method to fabricate an all-solid-state potassium and calcium ion sensor. To fabricate and study the sensors, a film, made from a mixture of chemicals, is placed on a glassy carbon electrode and then dried and placed in different concentrations of KCl and CaCl2 solutions (dissolved in DI water) respectively. By plotting the concentration of the solution by the voltage recorded, a positive linear line would be produced. Theoretically from the Nernst equation, the linear line should produce a slope of around 58 mV for a 10-fold concentration difference. In this research, we have been able to acquire the conditions needed to produce a linear line, however, the calibration curve slope value measured for the developed electrode is much lower than the theoretical value. Further testing has shown outstanding properties such as the potential stability, potential repeatability, and reproducibility of the fabricated electrodes..

Keywords: selective, electrode, potassium, calcium

Destabilizing Fictions: Defamiliarization and Biopolitics in Rankine's Citizen
Oral Presentation
12:30pm - 12:45pm
Location:
University Library - 1814

Mark Dietzel. Faculty Mentor: Aaron DeRosa.

Abstract: In the 21st century, biopolitics is the primary means of control as statistics are used to define and control human populations and individuals-optimizing human existence for the best possible outcomes. Norms are established to enact and perpetuate these optimizations. However, as populations are defined and managed by statistics, race becomes a category to which quantifiable outcomes can then be assigned. Thus, race is a key trait which defines who benefits from probabilities that separate "the good life" from a life of poverty, illness, crime, etc. Norms operate invisibly and are perpetuated under the guise of empirical data, so to expose these norms requires a disruptive approach detached from statistics. Viktor Shklovsky's theory of defamiliarization is usually applied to writing, separating literature from other texts by defining literature as material which makes the common uncommon by expressing it in a startling new way. This theory is useful in analyzing the norms of biopower because we can see how defamiliarization is essential for biopolitical apparatuses to exert their normative power on populations. Applying the theory of defamiliarization to Claudia Rankine's Citizen: An American Lyric assists in the deconstruction of biopolitical racial norms because it functions both as a work of literature and as an artifact illustrating the racial norms of "whiteness" and "blackness" in the United States. This interpretation of Rankine's work elucidates how biopolitical norms work on a racial level, illustrating how such norms link the "unfavorable probabilities" of biopolitics to black individuals and the black population collectively..

Keywords: Biopolitics, race, black americans, norms, defamiliarization, viktor shklovsky

The Life of Jane Austen: Influences of Pride and Prejudice
Poster and Creative Works Showcase
2:30pm - 3:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - Ursa Major

Rebecca Ojeda. Faculty Mentor: Linda Bisesti.

Abstract: Jane Austen was a writer ever since she was a child, and through her family's unwavering support, grew into the astounding author who the world knows today. She has written over 38 literary works including novels, short stories, epistolary novels, poems, plays, and parodies throughout her short life. The most famously known novel of hers is Pride and Prejudice, a novel about a woman named Elizabeth who refuses to marry someone out of financial security alone, despite her family's wishes. Through an education that was exclusive to her father's vast library, Jane Austen became one of the world's most distinguished authors known to the twentieth century. Growing up in the Regency period, she was surrounded by many historical events that influenced her writing career. In addition she also wrote in a society that had expectation for women that were difficult to change. In order to help current and future actors who wish to play a role in Pride and Prejudice; social and historical context of the influences Jane Austen was exposed to when writing the novels is crucial to character development. It is purely fascinating that so many events such as her childhood, adolescence, adulthood, as well as the historical events during her lifetime influenced the writing of such a world renowned novel such as Pride and Prejudice. One crucial finding is the idea that the Napoleonic wars could have very likely influenced Jane Austen's decision to keep her identity as a writer a secret to the public..

Keywords: Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice, Femininity, Regency, Feminism, Literature, English, Britain

Effect of Aluminum on Co2NiGa Heusler Type Ferromagnetic Shape Memory Alloys
Oral Presentation
1:15pm - 1:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - 2337 (Perseus)

Sang Bum Kim. Coauthors: Paul Y. Lee, Henry T. Wang. Faculty Mentor: Haamun Kalaantari.

Abstract: Martensitic microstructure and the mechanical properties of inserting small amounts of 99.9% pure aluminum into cast Heusler alloy, Co50Ni25Ga25, were investigated in this study. The aluminum replaced the at. % of gallium from 0 to 3%, in 0.5% increments to form the Co50Ni25Ga25-xAlx alloy. As previously discovered, Co2NiGa alloys are found to exhibit ferromagnetic shape memory behavior much like Ni2MnGa alloys, but also retains a high transformation temperatures. The Cobalt within this alloy is known to enhance the ductility due to the high presence of the gamma phase. Although this alloy seems promising in FSM alloys; much of the problems with the alloy is found with its brittle nature. This present study depicts the gamma phase behavior and the changes with ductility of Co2NiGa when aluminum is introduced. Martensitic microstructure has been investigated using optical microscopic analysis and the hardness was determined using a Rockwell B 100kg ball indenter. By reducing the gamma phase with the addition of aluminum, the hardness was increased significantly and displayed a large change within the gamma phase due to the aluminum introducing more martensite. The 0.5% increments of aluminum that were added into Co50Ni25Ga25-xAlx resulted in minimal changes within the alloy in every analysis aspect. The future study will continue to investigate the effect of heat treatment and different cooling methods in Co50Ni25Ga25-xAlx Alloy.

Keywords: Ferromagnetic Shape Memory Alloys, Co-Ni-Ga-Al, Martensitic Mirostructuer,

Policy, Gender, and Experience on the Use of Force by Police Officers
Oral Presentation
1:00pm - 1:15pm
Location:
University Library - Special Collections (4th floor)

Daisy Campuzano. Faculty Mentor: Mario Guerrero.

Abstract: The criminal justice system in the United States is composed of law enforcement personnel, prosecutors, the judiciary, and the corrections department (Reese, 2006). Police officers have important duties that they conduct in the criminal justice system because they respond to complaints, file reports, investigate crimes, gather and submit evidence, and arrest people who violate the laws. Police officers have the capacity of using force on someone. Sometimes they are required to use force in order to protect the public, their partners, and themselves. The realm of law enforcement has gained attention due to the use of force videos that have circulated the news. Studies have shown that several factors such as a suspect's behavior, a department's use of force policy, and the use of body-worn cameras can determine whether or not an officer will use force. This project will determine whether policy, gender, and experience has an influence on the use of force by police officers in the Baldwin Park Police Department..

Keywords: police; use of force; gender; use of force policy; law enforcement; criminal justice; police brutality; education; policy; blue lives matter; black lives matter

Analyzing honey bees (Apis mellifera) foraging differently on Watermelon Flowers (Citrullus lanatus)
Oral Presentation
1:00pm - 1:15pm
Location:
University Library - 1822

Marisol Torres. Faculty Mentor: Joan Leong.

Abstract: Adult honeybees spend their last few weeks of their life span foraging on flowers for pollen or nectar. A typical bee's foraging behavior is usually a single visit per individual flower; however, there have been field observations of honey bees visiting an individual flower repeatedly during a brief period of time (revisitation). My study asks if there are morphological differences between these two different behavioral patterns that honeybees perform on watermelon flowers. I will compare the morphological feature of wing wear between the two groups of honey bee foragers: the "normal" foragers and the "revisit" foragers. As wing wear is an important predictor of age in adult insects, I will be able to determine if revisitation behavior is related to the age of the foraging bee. I will score the amount of wing wear the honeybees forewings have and take measurements of the head width. The purpose of this experiment is to distinguish if there are wing wear differences between the two groups of honeybees. I predict there will be more wing wear in the revisitation group, which would allow me to distinguish the bees by morphological differences, not just behavioral differences..

Keywords: honeybees, foraging behavior, morphological differences

Use of PCR for Detection of Mastitis-Causing Pathogens Isolated from Bovine Quarter Milk Samples
Oral Presentation
2:45pm - 3:00pm
Location:
University Library - 1822

Patricia Galvan. Faculty Mentor: Shelton Murinda.

Abstract: Milk and milk products have a tremendous impact on the US diet in regards achieving recommended intakes of nutrients. The dairy industry makes ~$125 billion per year and spends ~$1.8 billion in controlling mastitis, an inflammation of the mammary gland that results in a decrease in milk production and other losses. In this study, the potential role of pulsed electromagnetic field therapy (PEMFT) in controlling mastitis in dairy cows was investigated. A Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) protocol was developed in order to confirm the identity of mastitis causing pathogens isolated from 184 quarter milk (QM) samples that were collected from the udders of mastitic dairy cows treated with PEMFT. It is hypothesized PEMFT has the potential of becoming an effective, non-invasive and antibiotic-free treatment capable of reducing mastitis pathogens. The PCR protocol utilizes Staph. aureus, E. coli, and 3 Streptococcus sp. pathogen-specific primer sets that amplify a specific segment of DNA in these bacterial strains. A total of 66 of the QM samples were evaluated, and 52 (79%) tested positive for E. coli and 2 (3%) for Staphylococcus. The effect of PEMFT on mastitis will be assessed after all the samples have been tested.

Keywords: mastitis, microorganism, dairy cattle, milk, energy, pulsed electromagnetic field therapy

Vernalization is key to flowering in Aquilegia coerulea
Oral Presentation
12:00pm - 12:15pm
Location:
University Library - 1828

Timothy Batz. Faculty Mentor: Bharti Sharma.

Abstract: Transition to flowering is an important step in a plant's lifecycle. Environmental signals elicit genetic responses, which initiate the transition to flowering. Aquilegia coerulea, a temperate perennial native to the Rocky Mountains, requires several weeks of cold treatment (vernalization) in order to initiate flowering. In the current study we use histological techniques to investigate changes in the shoot apical meristem (SAM), a region of actively dividing cells and its differentiation into inflorescence meristem. To induce flowering, A. coerulea plants were subjected to 4 weeks of vernalization at 6°C and post-vernalization plants were moved to greenhouse conditions. Histology of Shoot apical meristem (SAM) was done at 9 weekly time points. Non-vernalized plants served as the control. Results indicate that A. coerulea begins inflorescence development around the third week of vernalization. Post-vernalization treatment shows dynamic changes in meristem differentiation resulting in increasing inflorescence complexity and form. Initiation and development of a floral meristem continues with the terminal bud enlarging in size and initiating floral organs. This is paralleled by subsequent development in the axillary meristems which mimic the development of the terminal bud. Future studies will examine gene expression in the SAM during and post-vernalization to better understand the genetic changes underlying the transition from vegetative to reproductive growth..

Keywords: Plant science, Flower, Vernalization, Inflorescence, Meristem

Individual-level variation in honey bee (Apis mellifera) revisitation behavior on watermelon flowers
Poster and Creative Works Showcase
2:30pm - 3:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - Ursa Major

Jon Sacro. Faculty Mentor: Joan Leong.

Abstract: My study seeks to examine the prevalence and importance of a little known foraging behavior of honey bees. This particular behavior, called revisitation,, occurs when a bee visits the same flower repeatedly during a short interval of time. Typically, most honey bee foragers visit a flower once and do not revisit. My study compares bees that perform single visit vs. revisitation behavior in watermelon fields, and examines whether floral nectar level or farm location influences the prevalence and duration of revisitation behavior. I predict that flowers with less nectar will have less revisitation compared to unmanipulated flowers. I also predict that unmanipulated flowers with higher nectar levels will receive greater number of visits by bees that exhibit either single visit or revisitation behavior. At several Southern California farm sites, I videomonitored a floral array of watermelon flowers, some of which had nectar extracted. The information I recorded from the videos included each bee visit along with the corresponding type of flower it had visited in the array and number of single visits or revisits to each array flower. The results of this study on individual-level variation in honey bee foraging behavior will add to emerging knowledge of individual behavioral differences among honey bee foragers..

Keywords: honey bee, watermelon, agriculture, pollination

Virus-induced gene silencing-A reverse genetics approach to study gene function in columbines
Oral Presentation
12:15pm - 12:30pm
Location:
University Library - 2907

Jesus Preciado. Faculty Mentor: Bharti Sharma.

Abstract: Virus-induced gene silencing is a reverse genetics technique to transiently knock down gene function. This technique involves the introduction of a virus based construct that contains a fragment of candidate gene of interest, which is endogenously expressed in the plant. The construct is introduced into the plant through Agrobacterium mediated transformation. In the current study we are using this technique to study functions of genes responsible in flower and inflorescence development in Columbines. Aquilegia commonly referred to as columbines, has proven to be a great model system for evolutionary studies. Aquilegia has a very interesting flower morphology, it has 5 whorl of floral organs namely: sepals, petals, stamens, staminodium- a novel organ and carpels. Understanding the genetics of flowering starts with the ABCE genes. Genes responsible for flower development have experienced duplications. From previous studies we know that B gene duplicate AqAP3-1 have evolved new function, mainly conferring staminodium identity. We will expand this study to understand E gene function and involvement of AqUFO homologs in columbines..

Keywords: virus induced, gene silencing, aquilegia, columbines, reverse genetics, b class, UFO, agrobacterium, floral development

What's a First Lady to Do?: A comparative study on traditional First Lady Nancy Reagan and modern First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton
Oral Presentation
12:45pm - 1:00pm
Location:
University Library - Special Collections (4th floor)

Raquel Ortega. Faculty Mentor: Mario Guerrero.

Abstract: The First Lady is one of the most well-known political figures. She is known to have more influence and media attention than the Vice President. Although she has no implied powers, she contributes to the presidency in many ways. Over the years the role of the First Lady has evolved from traditional to modern. The role of the presidential spouse is often unclear and open to interpretation by the first lady, herself. Many first ladies may approach the political role more openly, like Hillary Clinton, or behind-the-scenes, like Nancy Reagan. The traditional role of presidential wives has transformed throughout time and this study further examines this shift. This thesis examines two aspects on the study of First Ladies: how has the role of the first lady evolved from Nancy Reagan's traditional title to Hillary Clinton's modern one and what criticism did they receive? In addition, this research hopes to further define what it means to be the spouse of the President of the United States..

Keywords: Political Science, First Ladies, Hillary Clinton, Nancy Reagn

The Role of Epigenetic Regulator SUV39H1 in Human Adipogenesis
Oral Presentation
2:15pm - 2:30pm
Location:
University Library - 1802

Lun Tan. Coauthors: Derek Dinson, Esra Ibili. Faculty Mentor: Yuanxiang Zhao.

Abstract: The Role of Epigenetic Regulator SUV39H1 in Human Adipogenesis Lun Tan, Derek Dinson, Esra Ibili and Yuanxiang Zhao Lun Tan: Lead author, 011164504 Derek Dinson: 009087910 Esra Ibili: 010830352 Yuanxiang Zhao: Faculty mentor, zhao@cpp.edu Human adipogenesis is the process through which uncommitted human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) differentiate into adipocytes (fat cells). Understanding the molecular and cellular regulation of human adipogenesis may provide a way to prevent and/or treat obesity and obesity related diseases. HMSCs normally reside in the bone marrow and adipose tissue. They can be easily isolated, expanded in vitro and upon receiving the appropriate external stimuli, differentiate into specific lineage mature cell types including adipocytes. Based on a high throughput screen using siRNAs targeting 5000 genes in the human genome, a list of genes whose expression knock-down by its siRNAs led to enhanced adipogenic differentiation of hMSCs were uncovered. Our study has focused on one of the uncovered genes, SUV39H1, which encodes a histone lysine methyltransferase. The role of SUV39H1 during human stem cell fate commitment has never been studied. Here we report that knocking down the expression of SUV39H1 by around 80% using siSUV39H1 dramatically promoted adipogenesis, resulting in near two-fold of oil droplets compared to siControl, even though total cell number was reduced by 30%. Our preliminary data also demonstrated that the expression of CEBPα, which is a master regulator of adipogenesis, was markedly increased by around five-fold in siSUV39H1 cells compared to siControl cells. To further help understand how SUV39H1 regulates human adipogenesis, future studies will aim to reveal additional downstream targets of siSUV39H1 using microarray analysis..

Keywords: SUV39H1, Adipogenesis, hMSCs

Sex Differences in Food Anticipatory Activity
Poster and Creative Works Showcase
2:30pm - 3:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - Ursa Major

Camille Martin. Coauthors: Maya Ogawa-Okada. Faculty Mentor: Andrew Steele.

Abstract: Mammalian physiology and behavior is heavily influenced by circadian rhythms that are generated by an internal clock that is synchronized to light-dark cycles and environmental cues. Recent studies in mice have demonstrated a sexual dimorphism in circadian entrainment to feeding, with female mice showing less attunement with scheduled feeding as compared to males (Hsu, et al., 2010; Li, et al., 2015; Michalik et al., 2015). On a time restricted diet, males tend to develop food anticipatory activity sooner, along with higher amplitude, than females. The underlying cause of this sex difference remains unknown. Studies performed in our laboratory suggest that the sex difference in food anticipatory activity is unrelated to gonadal sex hormones. Currently, we are testing whether the difference in food anticipatory activity between male and female mice is due to sex chromosome copy number. We have obtained male mice with mutated Y chromosomes (Sry gene), rendering them gonadal females (XY-). Comparatively, wild-type females contain two copies of the X chromosomes (XX). We can rescue the Sry mutation by transgenic expression of Sry from an autosome (non-sex chromosome) to generate and compare XY-, SryTg and XX SryTg mice. From these comparisons we should be able to determine whether sex differences are due to sex chromosome copy numbers as opposed to sex hormones, for example. This research may provide insights into why eating disorders preferentially affect females and also obesity related issues.

Keywords: Behavioral, Neuroscience, Food Anticipatory Activity

Late Responses, Careless Actions: Non-transparency in Environmental Catastrophes
Oral Presentation
1:45pm - 2:00pm
Location:
University Library - 1808

Samantha Zometa. Faculty Mentor: Mario Guerrero.

Abstract: This thesis will take a qualitative approach by analyzing one case study to prove the argument that the demographics of a geographical area in the United States affects how efficient the government responds to a natural disaster. The ultimate goal will be to demonstrate that there indeed is a relationship between the demographics of an area and the efficiency of the governmental response by analyzing one case: 1) Hurricane Katrina in Louisiana, New Orleans in 2005. The argument focuses on the response of the United States governmental response after a natural disaster. Several past natural disasters can also assist in proving the case, and because of this, other environmental catastrophes will be directed. The results collected by the case study and other minor analyzed cases validate the argument at hand. The U.S. government is prone to provide necessary and quick assistance to areas with favored demographics. Information gathered from experts in politics, and environmental issues seem to have various ideas but result in similar conclusions. The preliminary results show that there is a clear relationship between certain environmental catastrophes and allocation of resources the government provides.

Keywords: Political Science, Natural Disasters, Environmental Politics, Hurricane Katrina, Non-transparency in Government

Efficiency of Prandtl's Bell Span Load Wing
Oral Presentation
2:00pm - 2:15pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - 1611D (Lyra)

Anthony Klaib. Coauthors: Tomoyuki Imai, Loris Mousessian, Nigam Dudhat, Talah Qasim, Martha Njuguna, Jorge Rivera. Faculty Mentor: Ali Ahmadi.

Abstract: This project is investigating the aerodynamic characteristics of Prandtl's bell span-load wing and comparing it to his elliptic span load wing. It is widely accepted that the elliptic lift distribution-developed by Prandtl in 1922-is the most efficient lift distribution possible. However, in 1933, Prandtl released a research paper in which he claims that his newer, bell span-load wing is actually more efficient than his "optimal" elliptically loaded wing. Despite this paper's significance, it was largely forgotten and, as a result, there have been no wind tunnel comparisons between these two wings. Dr. Al Bowers, from the NASA Ames Research Center, has conducted an experiment in which he applied the bell loading to a flying wing. However, Dr. Bowers work does not provide any wind tunnel comparisons, and his results are not very general. In order to determine which distribution is actually the most efficient, the team has developed a Numerical Lifting Line program to calculate the induced drag of both wings. If the bell wing is shown to be more efficient, in that it generates less induced drag than an equivalent elliptic wing, then both wings will be 3-D printed and tested in the wind tunnel. From the collected lift, drag, and moment measurements, it will be possible to determine which wing is in fact more efficient..

Keywords: Bell Span Load, Elliptic Span Load, Induced Drag, Aerodynamic Efficiency

The Demeanor of Police officers leading to Policy Change/ Creation
Oral Presentation
2:30pm - 2:45pm
Location:
University Library - 1808

Arturo Serrano. Faculty Mentor: Mario Guerrero.

Abstract: The purpose of this research is to identify whether Police Officers misconduct behavior involved in the Rodney King case and Tennessee v. Garner lead to policy change or creation. Policy is a course or principle action adopted or proposed by a government, party, business, or individual. The first phase of the project involves reviewing a case study, Rodney King. The Rodney King case took place in the city of Los Angeles, California, March 3, 1991. The final phase involves a second case study, Tennessee v. Garner that took place in Memphis Tennessee on October 3, 1974. By identifying both case studies we bring to light how the demeanor of police officers in both cases help push the creation of policy during that particular era. This research will help create a new way of looking at policy within our political system and how and why that policy was created in the first place..

Keywords: Misconduct, Police Officers, Policy, Policy Creation, Policy Change, Demeanor, Rodney King, Tennesse v. Garner, Los Angeles, Tennessee

Does social media have a positive or negative influence on public society and their political participation?
Oral Presentation
1:15pm - 1:30pm
Location:
University Library - 1808

Audria Barrios. Faculty Mentor: Mario Guerrero.

Abstract: Social media is a growing trend that positively and negatively influences the study of politics, specifically political campaigns. Social media offers the convenience and accessibility for citizens to be politically engaged. It also allows online opportunities for people to politically express themselves, relate and connect with like-minded citizens (Carlisle 2013). This thesis contributes to an active discussion of whether the use of social media is a positive or negative influence to the public society and their political participation..

Keywords: Social media, positive influence, negative influence, public society, political participation

Mechanistic Study of Ring Opening Metathesis of Cyclooctene
Poster and Creative Works Showcase
2:30pm - 3:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - Ursa Major

Matthew Galazzo. Faculty Mentor: Floyd Klavetter.

Abstract: Mechanistic Study of Ring Opening Metathesis Polymerization of Cyclooctene Ring Opening Metathesis Polymerization (ROMP) is used to produce industrially significant products, particularly for the fragrance and petrochemical industry. ROMP involves the reaction between a metal-carbene and a cyclic diene to produce either large macrocyclic rings or linear polymers, depending on solution parameters. Typical metathesis catalysts include tin, tungsten and aluminum complexes, however, few studies have been performed with Grubb's catalysts. Using Grubb's first generation catalyst, mechanistic studies of Ring Opening Metathesis Polymerization of cyclooctene monomer in toluene were conducted. The effects of temperature, catalyst loading, and monomer concentration on product selectivity were investigated. Dimer, trimer, and oligomer distribution was analyzed through Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy. Degree of polymerization and polymer distribution index were also investigated. Further understanding of the mechanism of this reaction may open avenues for more use at industrially relevant scales.

Keywords: Grubb's Catalyst, Ring Opening Metathesis Polymerization, Cyclooctene

Investigating activation mechanism of a mechanosensitive Piezo channel small molecule agonist
Oral Presentation
2:15pm - 2:30pm
Location:
University Library - 2907

David Kent. Coauthors: Brennan Kidder, John Fly. Faculty Mentor: Jerome Lacroix.

Abstract: Piezo1 and 2 are homologous mechanosensitive cation channels that play important roles in mechanobiology such as proprioception, mechanical touch and pain, and blood pressure regulation. Despite their implication in many human diseases, there are currently no available Piezo channels drugs, precluding potential therapeutic opportunities. Here we sought to identify the binding site and activation mechanism of Yoda1, a recently identified small molecule Piezo1 agonist. To this aim, we developed an experimental approach to locate which residues are essential for the agonist effect of Yoda1. Possible Yoda1 binding poses in the candidate binding sites are being determined using computational tools. Our preliminary data shows that Yoda1 binds to a C-terminal region encompassing mouse Piezo1 residues 2456-2547 where several potential Yoda1 binding poses have been identified.

Keywords: mechanosensitive, Piezo, computational

Development and Validation of Maglev Halbach Array Design
Oral Presentation
12:30pm - 12:45pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - 1611D (Lyra)

Anthony Perez. Coauthors: Wayne Page, Benjamin Younes. Faculty Mentor: Nolan Tsuchiya.

Abstract: An investigation is performed on the configuration of Halbach arrays to yield certain characteristics nominal to particular applications. Amidst growing implications for large scale public Maglev transportation systems such as the Hyperloop, more research must be performed into improving relevant components such as levitation casters, stability bearings, and brake calipers. Previous studies regarding Halbach arrays do not account for high-speed, large air gap, low pressure, environments specific to modern concepts. These include studies into higher-order Halbach array's where most studies make assumptions that don't apply in these scenarios. Also, there has been limited research into validating the use of simulation software like ANSYS Maxwell for the use in the design of Halbach array's for these applications. A test rig will be developed to validate results from ANSYS Maxwell simulations in order to determine halbach arrangements with ideal lift to drag ratios. The test rig will be comprised of an AC motor-driven aluminum rotor positioned relative to configurable magnet hubs fastened to load cells to extrapolate data on forces with respect to the velocity and height of the rotor. The results of this study are intended to serve as a model that can be scaled to real-world applications.

Keywords: Hyperloop, Maglev, Halbach, Array

The Dynamics of Sexuality and Slut-Shaming Discourse Among Latina College Students
Oral Presentation
2:30pm - 2:45pm
Location:
University Library - Special Events (4th floor)

Marysol Gonzalez. Faculty Mentor: Alejandro Morales.

Abstract: Author: Marysol Gonzalez, California State Polytechnic University Pomona Mentor: Alejandro Morales, PhD., California State Polytechnic University Pomona This research stems from constructs relating to gender-based double standards that pertain to sexuality. An analysis of the interactional relationships among women and the concept of self-esteem will be focal points in this study. Furthermore, the concept of "slut-shaming" will also be examined within this analysis, in particular, its potential in fortifying negativity to the foundation of "the self" and on how women perceive other women. Previous research presented by Shavelson, Hubner and Stanton defines self-concept as a person's perception of themselves influenced by experiences with their environment and other individuals. Additionally, the researchers' definition of "the self" includes observations of self-notions such as self-esteem and self-image which are impacted by outside interactions to formulate an individual's identity. I define "slut-shaming" as degrading language to depict a female's morality and character by utilizing choices in attire, behaviors, attitudes, and sexual expression/autonomy. There exists limited research around the phenomena of "slut-shaming" and its prevalence among young women. My goal is to specifically analyze how this lack of discourse manifests itself in multicultural communities. Therefore, this research focuses on the examination of college-educated women aged 18-24 who describe themselves as ethnically Latina; as I would like to contribute insight from a multicultural perspective..

Keywords: Slut-Shaming Discourse, Latina Sexuality

Transitioning from Within: Internalized Power Dynamics and Social Constructs of the Transgender Identity
Oral Presentation
12:30pm - 12:45pm
Location:
University Library - Special Events (4th floor)

Megan Francisco. Faculty Mentor: Shayda Kafai.

Abstract: In this research study, we are concerned with the transgender crisis of self. A central component of the transgender experience is the desire for one to align their external representation with their internal representation. Consequently, a transgender person might go through a process where their gender preferences and behaviors clash with the social standards of their cisgender counterparts. As a direct complication of existing outside a strict male-to-female binary, one might question their levels of privilege gained and lost from switching to their unique depiction of self. There are varied judgments from conservative groups and religious institutions on the differences of sexual bodies and behaviors towards the transgender population. Thus, transgender people may be held to changed standards of conduct that can obscure their inclusion of societal understanding; their underrepresentation in the media or the workplace can promote the objectification and alienation of transgender people (Demos, Vasilikie, Segal Marcia Texler 27). In this oral presentation, I will explore the complexities and unprecedented psychological changes that transgender members of the LGBTQIA community go through before, during, and after a sex change operation by interviewing those who identify as transgender. In addition, I will discuss the possibility of internalized power dynamics that exists in people who wish to transition and how that affects - and ultimately creates - new ground for developed social constructs that support or defy the process of transitioning from the rest of society..

Keywords: transgender, cisgender, lgbtqia, transrights, gender equality, minority, underrepresenation, identity, self, binary, society, sex change, duality, inclusion, ethnic and women's studies, psychology, power dynamics, social constructs

The Shell Pavilion
Poster and Creative Works Showcase
2:30pm - 3:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - Ursa Major

Abigail Robles. Coauthors: Pedro Cuin, Gabriella Compolong, Alejandra Novelo, Luis Montoya, Henry Alcantra, Tiffany Dela Cruz, Sklyer Maroste, Paola Murillo, Mariana Uy. Faculty Mentor: Marc Schulitz.

Abstract: This paper describes the work of a team of architecture undergraduate students with architecture professor Marc Schulitz during the development and construction of a full-scale timber grid shell pavilion. The pavilion was supported by an RSCA award Assistant Professor Schulitz had applied for. The design approach involved using geodesic segments to create a double-curved form. Implementing the form in full-scale was preceded by iterative prototyping and pre-fabricating each unique wood segment. The full-scale prototype was constructed over a quarter and then exhibited in the College of Environmental Design in Cal Poly Pomona. A shell is a surface structure that uses double-curved geometry to generate strength and stiffness, like an egg's shell. A grid shell uses a grid of linear parts as its main construction elements, instead of a continuous surface. A grid shell's form aligns with the flow of forces, which makes it extremely material-efficient. For this project, the grid shell comprises of short, geodesic segments that connect one end to another to form the grid. This allowed for a simple construction process. The research and prototyping was done during the 2016 spring quarter. The final full-scale structure was assembled at the end of spring quarter and then carefully disassembled. It was reconstructed the following fall quarter and exhibited in the gallery space of the College of Environmental Design. The Shell pavilion successfully demonstrates the potential for constructability and transportability of such an approach to building double-curved forms, with a minimum amount of material.

Keywords: architecture, grid shell, pavilion, structure

Administrative Plights and Potentials in Universal Mental Health Screening for Public Schools
Oral Presentation
12:00pm - 12:15pm
Location:
University Library - Special Collections (4th floor)

Eli Dowens. Faculty Mentor: Mario Guerrero.

Abstract: The goal of education reform has always been to improve and innovate new ways to give all students the tools they need to succeed. In order to provide an equal opportunity for all students to learn, their needs must first be assessed in order for administrative and educational professionals to properly address said needs. Specifically, students with educational disabilities and mental health challenges require more care than the current systems in place are able to provide. Studies from multiple disciplines have suggested that School-Based Mental Health systems would be improved by greater collaboration between teachers, administrative staff, school psychologists, and the outside community. However, within current literature is a notable lack of focus on the administrative role in potential programs. This thesis aims to examine multiple public school systems and influential outside actors to determine if School-Based Mental Health Systems can be administered more effectively by adapting and mandating screening tools such as Early Periodic Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment systems for all students - and the potential impacts of this kind of system.

Keywords: public education, mental health, public health, school psychology, special education, student health,

Mutation of a highly conserved, intronic sequence prompts temperature-dependent aberrant splicing of precursor mRNA
Oral Presentation
2:30pm - 2:45pm
Location:
University Library - 2907

Thomas Sokolich. Coauthors: Gaurav Prajapati. Faculty Mentor: Craig LaMunyon.

Abstract: Easily toggled between states, temperature sensitive mutations offer great utility in gene function studies. The spe-6 gene in the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, is required for spermatid activation, major sperm protein assembly, and the proper execution of meiosis I. Two unique intronic mutations, spe-6(zq18) and spe-6(hc190), independently result in the temperature-dependent inactivation of this gene. At 25ºC, a majority of spe-6(zq18) precursor mRNA is aberrantly spliced, subsequently invoking sterility in affected worms. At 15ºC, a minority of spe-6(zq18) products are incorrectly spliced, and affected worms maintain fertility. spe-6(hc190) follows this same pattern of conditional fertility that allows the propagation of otherwise inviable, homozygous strains. However, aberrant splicing has not been detected in the hc190 allele, possibly due to nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD). The zq18 and hc190 alleles are characterized by guanine-to-adenine substitutions on the 5th and 1st base, respectively, immediately flanking the 3' end of the exon. Furthermore, the short loci encompassing these two mutations is highly conserved amongst Eukaryotic genes. To elucidate possible effects of a zq18-like and hc190-like guanine-to-adenine substitution on other gene products, our laboratory induced the point mutations in three alternative contexts without a native permissive temperature. Transposon-mediated mutagenesis and the CRISPR-Cas9 system were used to emulate the aforementioned point mutations in Cbr-unc-119 and spe-44. Here, we show resulting phenotype of these mutants..

Keywords: mRNA processing, temperature-senstivie phenotype, RNA splicing, C. elegans, sperm

The Role of Socioeconomic Factors in Community Engagement
Oral Presentation
12:15pm - 12:30pm
Location:
University Library - 1814

Joanne Loeza. Faculty Mentor: Mario Guerrero.

Abstract: My Senior Thesis explores the dynamic relationship and effects that socioeconomic factors have with the amount of engagement and participation residents have with their community. The cities of Inglewood and West Covina are compared because of their distinct difference in socioeconomic factors amongst their residents. The three important factors that were investigated in my research were race, income, and education level..

Keywords: community engagement, socioeconomic factors, race, education level, income, participation, community

Do Social Networks Mirror the Ideals of a Deliberative Democracy?
Oral Presentation
2:00pm - 2:15pm
Location:
University Library - 1814

Daniel Raad. Faculty Mentor: Mario Guerrero.

Abstract: 1.Facebook is the largest and most popular social network site where deliberation among the American public takes place. Facebook is also a great representation of democratic deliberation because its users consist of both adults and teenagers, so it gives a greater perspective on the American voter. Many scholars argue that online political group participation can lead to increased offline group participation. Existing research demonstrates that group membership encourages trust, democratic values, and the development of important political skills. Furthermore, membership in a group provides necessary motivation and incentive to be politically informed. However, although social media can inform its users on politics, it is not effective in increasing offline group participation. Technological development has spurred what is known as "networked individualism" where individuals are more likely to share information and work in collaborative networked groups. More specifically, the internet has created online political groups that resemble offline political groups. However, online political groups are not perfect examples for offline political groups because they are formed from heavy political biases and do not share the views of all online participants. As a result of this, I don't believe that they are a good representation of offline political groups. The bias material is detrimental to the values and ideals of a deliberative democracy because it results in the creation of online political groups with members that share the same political views. This is contradictory to the diverse conversations and exchanges of ideas that a deliberative democracy is supposed to represent..

Keywords: Deliberative, Democracy, Social Networks

Effects of Terrorism on Military Enlistment
Oral Presentation
2:00pm - 2:15pm
Location:
University Library - Special Collections (4th floor)

Paul Gonzales. Faculty Mentor: Mario Guerrero.

Abstract: I am studying whether living through the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center in New York City on September 11, 2001, impacted people's decision to join the military. This research is important because it will provide insight as to how people respond to a direct threat to their country. I hope to prove that when citizens see fellow (innocent) citizens dying, it invokes a sense of enhanced patriotism/nationalism and as a response to this emotion, people become more likely to join the military. My research will add substantive data to the literature that already exists and provide very personal views, experiences, and opinions of a very diverse group of Veterans. I will survey Veteran students of Cal Poly Pomona to acquire my results and analyze my data in SPSS. I feel it is important to study the effects of terrorism as the risk of attack has grown over the years. If we can better understand the effects of terrorism, we can be more proactive about educating society about terrorism and be more effective when treating victims of terrorism..

Keywords: terrorism, 9/11, military, patriotism, nationalism

Trading Away Power and Influence
Oral Presentation
3:00pm - 3:15pm
Location:
University Library - Special Collections (4th floor)

Thomas Gonzalez. Faculty Mentor: Mario Guerrero.

Abstract: Since its inception, America has been engaged in the business of trade for the promotion of economic gain and political power. Although the strategy has not changed much, the landscape of the economy has drastically changed, leaving the United States in a precarious predicament. One in which adaptability and sustainability have played a large part in the downfall of America's influence in the political spectrum, as well as its ability to exert policy. This topic will introduce the constraints of trade and outsourcing from an empirical perspective, and identify both potential pitfalls and and strategies to remedy the dilemma that we are poised to encounter..

Keywords: America, Trade, Outsourcing, Political Influence, Power

The effects of spatial mismatch on disadvantaged neighborhoods with poor public transportation in the Coachella Valley
Oral Presentation
3:00pm - 3:15pm
Location:
University Library - Special Events (4th floor)

Luis Rubalcava. Faculty Mentor: Alvaro Huerta, Abhishek Tiwari.

Abstract: The spatial mismatch hypothesis argues the separation of low-skilled, low-income workers and their appropriate place of work. The further the displacement of workers higher the lesser the chances of overcoming the spatial mismatch. As this distance increases, low-skill workers with low levels of personal mobility are not able to meet the travel requirements of the dispersed locations (Sanchez, 1998). Public transportation plays a significant role in this argument. According to researcher Kilian Heilmann, mass transit for commuting in most American cities is largely used by low-income people that are unable to afford a car. This study will use GIS to analyze the location of low income workers and suitable workplaces with varying levels of public transportation accessibility. With the help of the GIS software and census tract information, spatial and demographic variables will be used to estimate their relationship to work travel times in the Coachella Valley. There has been very little research on the topic of public transportation equity in the Coachella Valley region, and the purpose of this study is to explore the factors that affect travel times..

Keywords: Spatial Mismatch, Public Transportation, Equity

Response of Streamflow and Spring Discharge from Precipitation Recharge Events in Icehouse Canyon Watershed, Eastern San Gabriel Mountains, California
Poster and Creative Works Showcase
2:30pm - 3:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - Ursa Major

Danny Miranda. Faculty Mentor: Jonathan Nourse.

Abstract: Icehouse Canyon watershed lies in the eastern San Gabriel Mountains of Southern California within a natural region of Angeles National Forest. Icehouse Creek is an important tributary of the San Antonio watershed that provides drinking water supplies to residents of Mount Baldy Village and the city of Upland. Flow during dry periods is controlled by discharge from landslide and alluvial deposits in addition to deep-seated fractures and fault zones in crystalline bedrock. We utilized a velocity flow probe, V-notch weirs, and pressure transducers to determine streamflow in Icehouse Creek and discharge from associated perennial springs at approximately bi-weekly intervals between June 2014 and December 2016. Pressure transducers were installed at selected spring locations in order to obtain a continuous record of water level and temperature over a period of several months. Coincident with the discharge study, we have monitored precipitation at 8 rain gauges located between 4,600 and 6,300 ft in elevation beginning on December 2014. Hydrographs comparing precipitation data with discharge over the observation period yielded interesting preliminary results that provide an important baseline for documenting hydrology during an extended 5-year drought period in California. Precipitation totals for storm events occurring within Icehouse Canyon ranged from 0.05 to 5.84 inches, which appear to show significant variation due to various environmental factors including local climate. Hydrographs for selected gauging stations along Icehouse Creek reveal different responses to precipitation recharge events. The stations located in areas with bedrock exposure appear to be more responsive. Comparison of two springs discharging from Cedar landslide along Icehouse Trail suggest that Spring #1 is more responsive to rain events while Spring #2 discharge remains relatively constant during minor storm events. It's possible that Spring #1 is dominated by near-surface drainage from landslide material while Spring #2 may be fed by deeper bedrock fractures.

Keywords: Icehouse Canyon, watershed, streamflow, spring discharge

Legislative Failure: Climate change and campaign contributions in Congress
Oral Presentation
2:15pm - 2:30pm
Location:
University Library - 1808

Robert Martinez. Faculty Mentor: Mario Guerrero.

Abstract: The scientific community is in consensus that climate change exists and that human activity significantly contributes to it. While this fact is increasingly becoming common knowledge, there is little action taking place in the United States Congress because proponents of legislation to combat climate change do not have a majority. Legislation that would combat climate change often involves regulation which would lead to fewer profits for industries that would be affected by this legislation. Research suggests that these industries make investments to safeguard their profits in the form of contributions to the campaigns of members of Congress. The members of Congress who are the most active opponents of climate change legislation tend to be the recipients of the most generous donations of industries whose profits would be negatively affected by this legislation. While there cannot be definitive results, the findings do suggest that there is a link between monetary contributions to a Congressperson's campaign and whether they oppose legislation that would combat climate change..

Keywords: campaign finance, climate change, congress, special interests, campaign contributions

Pseudocryptic speciation of two Hermissenda sea slug species
Oral Presentation
12:30pm - 12:45pm
Location:
University Library - 1802

Austin Estores-Pacheco. Faculty Mentor: Ángel Valdés.

Abstract: A recent study characterized Hermissenda crassicornis as a species complex of three distinct species. Hermissenda crassicornis and H. opalescens are two pseudocryptic sister species that occur in the eastern Pacific with overlapping ranges in Northern California and possibly beyond. We will conduct comprehensive surveys along the California coast to investigate the extent of the range overlap. We will also examine molecular and ecological differences between these species to explore the mechanism of speciation and the processes maintaining reproductive isolation. Specifically, we will investigate whether the range overlap is the result of ecological speciation or secondary contact after allopatric speciation. This will be done by conducting a survey of nuclear gene fragments, intronic regions, and microsatellites to identify markers with polymorphisms. Specimens from the overlapping region will be sequenced to investigate the presence of hybridization. Field surveys, mating preference experiments and feeding behavior studies will be conducted to characterize the niche of each species and to determine the presence of assortative mating. So far, fragments of the mitochondrial gene COI were sequenced to confirm species and compared with previous sequences. Using phylogenetic and barcode gap analyses of the COI gene fragment, we found that at least two distinct species were present in the samples studied thus far. Species of Hermissenda are important model organisms in neuroscience and other fields. Therefore, understanding the recent evolution of this group has broader impacts in other areas of science..

Keywords: biology, molecular biology, ecology, sea slugs, hybridization, assortative mating

Together
Poster and Creative Works Showcase
2:30pm - 3:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - Ursa Major

Esmeralda Urias. Faculty Mentor: Angela Kim.

Abstract: Today, we see women having a voice in our anarchy society. We see black, brown, and white women and women identify individuals being united together. They are supporting each other on the tough times society has brought upon us. My collection will conduct the diversity in women and women identify individuals that show off who they are as individuals. The materials I used for my collection are recycled t-shirts and materials to support sustainability. Being a self-love advocate, I inspire women to love themselves and empower their curves and confidence. The models where selective to show the different ethnicities and body shapes of our melting pot. My t-shirts are tie dyed and put into a rainbow to represent what makes America great. Enjoy my presentation..

Keywords: Together, Feminist, Body,Positive, Self-Love, Fashion

Tunable Control of Ferrofluidic Jet Instability and Localized Fiber Deposition via Magneto-Electro-Assisted Spinning (MEAS)
Oral Presentation
3:00pm - 3:15pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - 2337 (Perseus)

Christopher Calle. Faculty Mentor: Yong Gan.

Abstract: In electrospinning, typical polymeric solutions undergo two distinct jet motion phases, a stable jet and a whipping instability phase. Due to the electrically-driven instabilities that manifest as a result of the high electric potential gradient applied, ejected jets characteristically exhibit uncontrollable lateral behavior. A proposed alternative to the electrospinning method will be explored, specifically to simplify and reduce the monetary cost of the conventional apparatus setup. In the magneto-electro-assisted spinning (MEAS) technique, typical electrospun polymeric solutions will be replaced with magnetic-nanoparticle-doped solutions or ferrofluids for the sole purpose of exploiting the superparamagnetic nature of the embedded magnetite (Fe3O4) particulates. In addition to exposing this unique class of magnetic fluids to an electrostatic field similar to that of the conventional electrospinning technique, an external magnetostatic field will be integrated to prevent ejected ferrofluidic jets from transitioning into physically unstable conditions by attenuating the undesirable effects caused by electrically-driven instabilities. A series of cylindrical NeFeB permanent magnets with absent core centers will generate the required magnetic field configuration to orient and elongate the jet along a vertically downwards trajectory. Control of jet motion in this manner suggests not only an improvement in fiber tuning capabilities, however, also the ability to generate a variety of specialized geometric configurations or templates by laterally moving the collector, a capability currently not possible by conventional electrospinning methods..

Keywords: ferrofluid, electrospinning, magneto-electro-assisted spinning, jet stability, fiber deposition

The effects of social media on Millennial's shopping behaviors
Oral Presentation
3:00pm - 3:15pm
Location:
University Library - 1814

Esmeralda Urias. Coauthors: Vanessa Hernandez. Faculty Mentor: Angella Kim.

Abstract: There is increased use of social media among consumers as the new media allow users to network with each other, exchange information, and shop via social media platforms. The aim of this research is to examine the influence of social media on Millennials shopping behavior. We were particularly interested in the shopping behaviors of Millennials (age 18 to 34) because this generation is heavy users of social media and it is important for retailers to know how to effectively use social media to target Millennials. In our study, we examined the influence of Millennials involvement with social media on shopping related outcomes such as impulse buying, peer-influenced shopping, and frequency of shopping. Data were collected via online survey and regression analysis was conducted to test hypotheses. The findings show that social media involvement significantly influence impulse buying and purchase influenced by the influencers on social media. However, social media involvement did not have significant relationship with shopping frequency..

Keywords: social media, social networks, vblog, hashtag, social media influencers, likert scale, cronbach's alpha


Together
Poster and Creative Works Showcase
2:30pm - 3:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - Ursa Major

Esmeralda Urias. Faculty Mentor: Angela Kim.

Abstract: Today, we see women having a voice in our anarchy society. We see black, brown, and white women and women identify individuals being united together. They are supporting each other on the tough times society has brought upon us. My collection will conduct the diversity in women and women identify individuals that show off who they are as individuals. The materials I used for my collection are recycled t-shirts and materials to support sustainability. Being a self-love advocate, I inspire women to love themselves and empower their curves and confidence. The models where selective to show the different ethnicities and body shapes of our melting pot. My t-shirts are tie dyed and put into a rainbow to represent what makes America great. Enjoy my presentation..

Keywords: Together, Feminist, Body,Positive, Self-Love, Fashion

Analysis of Particle Size and Metal Content of a Decentralized Wastewater Treatment System in South Africa
Oral Presentation
12:15pm - 12:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - 2337 (Perseus)

Jaclyn O'Hara. Coauthors: Rianne Okamoto. Faculty Mentor: Monica Palomo.

Abstract: Decentralized Wastewater Treatment Systems (DEWATS) are sustainable, economical, and low maintenance wastewater treatment systems that can provide sanitation in areas with low population density. Understanding the dynamics of metals and particulate organic matter in DEWATS biosolids provides important information to achieve safe application as soil amendment in agricultural activities. An evaluation of a DEWATS that treats domestic waste from 84 low-medium income households in the Newlands suburb in Durban, South Africa was conducted using an anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR) followed by anaerobic filter (AF) treatment. Particle sizes of suspended solids were observed using Fluorescence microscopy, SEM and elemental composition analysis. Additionally, raw samples and five particle fraction ranges (11 μm to 20 μm, 1.5 μm to 11 μm, 0.7 μm to 1.5 μm, and 0.45 μm to 0.7 μm) were separated using filtration and investigated by total suspended solids and volatile suspended solids. Chemical oxygen demand was studied using the filtrate from each successive filter. Sludge metal content was determined via inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The results suggest that this system has potential not only for water reuse but biosolids reuse purposes and promotes a low-maintenance, low-cost, sustainable alternative to centralized plants that may not be feasible in rural or sparsely populated areas..

Keywords: DEWATS, Reclaimed Water, Wastewater, South Africa, Particle Size Analysis, COD, Metal Conetent, ICP- OES


Reclaimed Water Quality Dynamics Throughout a Distribution System
Oral Presentation
1:30pm - 1:45pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - 2337 (Perseus)

Lonnie Chung. Coauthors: Jaclyn O'Hara. Faculty Mentor: Monica Palomo.

Abstract: As drought conditions in California continue to deplete fresh water reserves, the adoption of alternative water sources, such as reclaimed water, is expedient for non-potable uses. As studies have shown that microbial growth occurs in drinking water networks, a concern of reclaimed water service, such as irrigation and groundwater replenishment, is the remnant of certain compounds after treatment. It is hypothesized that the quality of flowing reclaimed water varies throughout the distribution system, encouraging an increase of activity from microorganisms. Reclaimed water was sampled at three locations on the campus of California Polytechnic University, Pomona (CPP), by tapping into the distribution pipeline network. The locations sampled were, Manor House (A), Rose Garden (B), and Music Building (C), located northwest, northeast, and southwest, from the center of CPP, respectively. Water quality tests were conducted for a number of parameters and constituents, including true and apparent color, temperature, pH, total organic carbon (TOC), alkalinity, nitrate, and nitrite. Results indicate that the presence of TOC, nitrate, and nitrite, display a continuous trend of succession from locations A, B, and C. On the contrary, alkalinity values results are similar at all three locations, but seem to vary day by day, from 139 - 177 mg/L CaCO3. Prospective experimental assessments include total chlorine, total coliforms, ATP, and heterotrophic plate count (HPC). Moreover, additional research must be conducted, in order to establish spatial statistical, seasonal trends, and to confirm the microbial changes in the pipeline distribution system..

Keywords: Reclaimed Water, Distribution System, CPP, Water Quality

Effects of food composition and sucrose levels on FAA in mice
Poster and Creative Works Showcase
2:30pm - 3:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - Ursa Major

Amanda Ng. Coauthors: Camille Martin. Faculty Mentor: Andrew Steele.

Abstract: Circadian rhythms are biological rhythms with a period length of about 24 hours. These rhythms affect almost all behavior and physiology and can be observed in plants, animals, fungi, and even bacteria. The synchronization of these diverse rhythms is accomplished by a network of proteins that constitute a biological clock. The best studied influence on circadian rhythms is sunlight. However, there is evidence that feeding is another profound influence on an animal's circadian rhythm. We study how feeding influences circadian rhythm by measuring the behavior of laboratory mice in their home cage. When fed a limited amount of food at the same time each day, mice will develop food anticipatory activity (FAA)--a characteristic increase in activity in anticipation of scheduled mealtime. We tested whether the type and composition of the food influences the amount of FAA. First, we mice fed either an unformulated or a formulated diet. We observed that the formulated diet moderately increased FAA. We observed that the mice on the formulated diet lost significantly more weight compared to the non-formulated diet, which could possibly explain why the latter mice showed a trend toward decreased FAA. In parallel we tested whether different sucrose levels in the formulated diet (hence a sweeter taste) would influence FAA. Although mice showed an overall preference for higher sucrose content food, sucrose levels did not play substantially affect the amount of FAA..

Keywords: Circadian rhythm, mice. FAA, feeding


Sex Differences in Food Anticipatory Activity
Poster and Creative Works Showcase
2:30pm - 3:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - Ursa Major

Camille Martin. Coauthors: Maya Ogawa-Okada. Faculty Mentor: Andrew Steele.

Abstract: Mammalian physiology and behavior is heavily influenced by circadian rhythms that are generated by an internal clock that is synchronized to light-dark cycles and environmental cues. Recent studies in mice have demonstrated a sexual dimorphism in circadian entrainment to feeding, with female mice showing less attunement with scheduled feeding as compared to males (Hsu, et al., 2010; Li, et al., 2015; Michalik et al., 2015). On a time restricted diet, males tend to develop food anticipatory activity sooner, along with higher amplitude, than females. The underlying cause of this sex difference remains unknown. Studies performed in our laboratory suggest that the sex difference in food anticipatory activity is unrelated to gonadal sex hormones. Currently, we are testing whether the difference in food anticipatory activity between male and female mice is due to sex chromosome copy number. We have obtained male mice with mutated Y chromosomes (Sry gene), rendering them gonadal females (XY-). Comparatively, wild-type females contain two copies of the X chromosomes (XX). We can rescue the Sry mutation by transgenic expression of Sry from an autosome (non-sex chromosome) to generate and compare XY-, SryTg and XX SryTg mice. From these comparisons we should be able to determine whether sex differences are due to sex chromosome copy numbers as opposed to sex hormones, for example. This research may provide insights into why eating disorders preferentially affect females and also obesity related issues.

Keywords: Behavioral, Neuroscience, Food Anticipatory Activity

Mobile Phone-Based 3D Reconstruction of Building Facades
Poster and Creative Works Showcase
2:30pm - 3:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - Ursa Major

Eugene Nicko Canlas. Coauthors: Francisco Armando Ponce, Jose Zuniga, Caitlin Tran. Faculty Mentor: Omar Mora.

Abstract: 3D reconstruction of environments from imagery has become a norm in the modern era. There are a vast amount of applications from a wide range of fields. Mobile devices have revolutionized data collection making it accessible and affordable. In particular, the imagery acquired from mobile phones, this in specific has made 3D reconstruction possible. For these reasons, an evaluation of the potential contributions from the mobile phone is necessary. This feasibility study is focused on assessing the potential of using photogrammetric data through mobile phones to reconstruct 3D models aimed at mapping infrastructure. First, various cameras from mobile phones are analyzed to determine whether they can map and model building facades. Next, data are collected from various angles to evaluate if the building structure can be reconstructed in 3D. Finally, the data are analyzed to determine if 3D reconstruction is feasible from the methods tested. This study summarizes the initial findings of this investigation..

Keywords: Modeling, Infrastructure, Photogrammetry, 3D Reconstruction, DSM


Image-Based 3D Reconstruction of the Russian Thistle: Lessons Learned
Poster and Creative Works Showcase
2:30pm - 3:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - Ursa Major

Jose Zuniga. Coauthors: Caitlin Tran, Eugene Canlas, Francisco Ponce. Faculty Mentor: Omar Mora, Erin Questad.

Abstract: Russian thistle (Salsola spp.), also known as tumbleweed, is an invasive plant of Eurasian origin. This plant has become a troublesome nuisance, in particular during late fall and early winter when it breaks from the soil and travels across the surface when blown. Thus, making its control difficult. In addition, it reduces the yield and quality of various crops and creates a fire hazard. For these reasons identifying areas with high densities of Russian thistle is an important part of preventing the further spread of the species. This feasibility study is focused on assessing the potential of using photogrammetric data to reconstruct 3D models aimed at mapping Russian thistle and estimating its biomass. First, various RGB cameras are analyzed to determine whether they can map and model a single plant from an oblique angle. Next, data are collected from a nadir view using RGB cameras to evaluate if the Russian thistle can be differentiated from the natural ground surface. Finally, the data are analyzed to determine if 3D reconstruction is feasible from the methods tested. This study summarizes the initial findings of this investigation..

Keywords: Russian thistle, Tumbleweed, Photogrammetry, 3D Reconstruction, DSM

Trazodone Hydrochloride Improves Laboratory Rabbit Handling
Oral Presentation
12:00pm - 12:15pm
Location:
University Library - 2907

Courtney Fukushima. Coauthors: Kierra Kuhlman, Cindy Tessler, Yumiko Jin, Jim Alderson, Cord Brundage. Faculty Mentor: Cord Brundage.

Abstract: To decrease the risk of harm or stress in handling and housing laboratory rabbits, Oryctolagus cuniculus, a sedative may need to be considered. Trazodone hydrochloride (TZN), a selective serotonin and antagonist and serotonin reuptake inhibitor, has been useful in sedating anxious behavior in humans as well as anxiety and aggression in dogs and cats for clinical purposes, but has yet to be used in rabbits. Veterinary examinations were performed on 15 laboratory rabbits prior to receiving TZN or a placebo. Each rabbit was given a score based on their levels of tension, struggle, aggressive behavior, and overall tractability during the examination. In this double blind placebo controlled randomized cross-over study the rabbits were also recorded/monitored for a three hour period after treatment was administered, followed by a re-examination and scoring at the end of the three hours. Rabbits that received TZN showed a reduction in the levels of tension, struggling, aggression, and overall handling tractability compared to rabbits receiving the placebo. TZN decreased the level of tension (26%), struggling (38%), aggressiveness (81%), overall tractability (19%), and complete a composite handling composite score (34%). Rabbits that received placebo had minimal decreases in tension (4%), tractability (8%), complete handling composite score (3%), and increased struggling by 5%. These results suggest that TZN may be an appropriate sedative/anti-anxyolitic option for laboratory rabbits during handling or veterinary examinations..

Keywords: trazodone, rabbits, tractability, Oryctolagus cuniculus, sedative, aggressive


Perceptions of Rabbit Behavior During Handling Varies with Veterinary Experience
Poster and Creative Works Showcase
2:30pm - 3:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - Ursa Major

Amika Yamamoto. Coauthors: Kierra Kuhlman, Courtney Fukushima. Faculty Mentor: Cord Brundage, James Alderson, Cindy Tessler.

Abstract: Veterinarians in practice are asked to work with a number of species some of which they are less familiar. A lack of confidence and limited experience with restraint can have significant health consequences for both the animal and restrainer. this is especially true in rabbits who frequently suffer injuries from poor animal handling. We tested the hypothesis that the experience of the animal handler would have a significant impact on the behavior and demeanor of non-human-socialized rabbits. A set of physical examination procedures were performed by both a seasoned veterinarian (37 years of practice) with considerable rabbit experience and a recent graduate (1 year of practice) with minimal rabbit experience. During each procedure the animals (n=15) level of tension, amount of struggling and signs of aggression were recorded to determine overall handling difficulty. The general demeanor of the rabbit was also scored after the exam, by the veterinarian and an outside observer. All handling parameters were elevated in the recent graduate with significantly more struggling reported (P=<.05). Despite an increase in overall difficulty in reported handling animal demeanor was unaffected by the experience of the handler. Overall this suggests that recent graduates may over interpret the amount of handling in an examination..

Keywords: Confidence, experience, animal handling

Three-dimensional print of a seismic record
Poster and Creative Works Showcase
2:30pm - 3:30pm
Location:
Bronco Student Center - Ursa Major

Juan Onate. Coauthors: Bem Gi Kim, Chin man Lam. Faculty Mentor: Gary McGavin.

Abstract: In the event of an earthquake, the ground shakes in three dimension simultaneously: up and down, east to west, and north to south. The information obtained in seismographs is a representation of the ground shaking in each separate dimension. This project attempts to combine the information obtained in a seismograph and display it simultaneously in a three-dimensional manner. A procedure is followed in which each seismograph curve is placed on an axis and extruded three-dimensionally using CAD. The interception of each of the three dimensions is then isolated and a three-dimensional mass is created which represents the three dimensions of the earthquake..

Keywords: earthquake, seismograh, 3D Printing, 3D, graphs


Gelatin Modulus of Elasticity
Oral Presentation
2:15pm - 2:30pm
Location:
University Library - 2913

Juan Onate. Coauthors: Bem Gi Kim, Chin man Lam. Faculty Mentor: Gary McGavin.

Abstract: Young's Modulus (E) or Modulus of Elasticity describes the tendency of an object to deform when opposing forces are applied to said object. It is often defined as the ratio between tensile stress to tensile strain; in other words, the modulus of elasticity of a material is simply the slope of the curve generated comparing the tensile stress versus tensile strain of a given material. Modulus of Elasticity is often thought to deal solely to structural materials, such as steel, concrete, wood, glass and other metals. In reality, however, any solid material possesses this property. The purpose of this experiment is to determine the modulus of Elasticity of common gelatin through different tensile, compressive, and shear tests. By testing gelatin samples at different temperatures and different grenetine concentrations we will determine the effects of temperature and grenetine concentrations in the Modulus of Elasticity of gelatin. Our results may infer important analogies to other materials, such as the behavior of tectonic plates and oscillation dampers..

Keywords: gelatin, jello, strenght, materials, modulus, elasticity, tension, compression, shear, stress


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