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Update on 2017-18 Tuition Proposal

We’ve been hearing about a possible tuition increase for several months. Has it already been decided?

The CSU Board of Trustees voted to increase tuition for 2017-18 at its March 22, 2017 board meeting. Details about the increase can be found on the CSU website.

How much would tuition go up?

The increase would be aboutg 5% or $270 annually. 

Won’t a tuition increase make it harder for lower-income and first-generation students to stay in school?

We know that tuition increases are a difficult challenge, especially for students who work to make ends meet for themselves or their families. In the CSU, about 62 percent of undergraduates had their tuition fully covered by financial aid grants and will not be affected by the proposed increase. At Cal Poly Pomona, about 64 percent of undergraduates had their tuition fully covered through financial aid. The Cal Poly Pomona financial aid office is a good resource to learn what additional support might be available.

Why is a tuition increase even being considered?

Years ago, the state of California provided most of the CSU’s budget. That’s no longer the case. Today, about half of the funding comes from tuition and the other half comes from the state. While the governor’s proposed budget for 2017-18 provides increased funding to the CSU, it falls significantly short of what is needed. The proposed tuition increase would cover only part of the shortfall.

Can’t the CSU get by without a tuition increase, even with a shortfall?

Most of the additional funding that the governor has included in his budget would cover increases in necessary and required fixed expenses. The additional funding would be used for hiring more faculty members, adding more high-demand course sections, and expanding student success initiatives, which could help students graduate in a timely manner.

Couldn’t we avoid a tuition increase simply by reducing enrollment?

It isn’t that simple. In the end, it would hurt California’s businesses, industries and economy. In less than a decade, California is projected to be short 1 million bachelor’s degree graduates to meeting the growing economic needs of the state. If the CSU were fully funded, it could graduate an additional 500,000 students by 2025.

What is the CSU’s stance on fee increases?

The CSU makes every effort to keep student costs to a minimum. Fees listed in published schedules or student accounts may need to be increased when public funding is inadequate. Therefore, CSU must reserve the right, even after fees are initially charged or initial fee payments are made, to increase or modify any listed fees. All listed fees, other than mandatory systemwide fees, are subject to change without notice, until the date when instruction for a particular semester or quarter has begun. All CSU listed fees should be regarded as estimates that are subject to change upon approval by the Board of Trustees, the Chancellor, or the Presidents, as appropriate. Changes in mandatory systemwide fees will be made in accordance with the requirements of the Working Families Student Fee Transparency and Accountability Act (Sections 66028 – 66028.6 of the Education Code.)

More information is available on the "Proposed 2017-18 Tuition Increase" website