Panel Discussion

IoT and the Opportunities for Mobile Operators

Abstract
When evaluating new revenue generators, almost all mobile operators have the Internet of Things (IoT) on the top of their list. CEOs have made bold statements about how much revenue they are going to generate from the IoT. But how real is this? Indeed, the IoT will be huge, billions of objects and devices will be connected. No question about that. The question is how mobile operators will make money in this environment. How much will be connected using licensed spectrum and how much using WiFi, LPWA networks or other alternatives? With competitive technologies in unlicensed spectrum the economics will change dramatically for mobile operators. And will mobile operators be satisfied with just only a kind of SIM-only business or are there other places in which they will like to play a key role?When evaluating new revenue generators, almost all mobile operators have the Internet of Things (IoT) on the top of their list. CEOs have made bold statements about how much revenue they are going to generate from the IoT. But how real is this? Indeed, the IoT will be huge, billions of objects and devices will be connected. No question about that. The question is how mobile operators will make money in this environment. How much will be connected using licensed spectrum and how much using WiFi, LPWA networks or other alternatives? With competitive technologies in unlicensed spectrum the economics will change dramatically for mobile operators. And will mobile operators be satisfied with just only a kind of SIM-only business or are there other places in which they will like to play a key role?

The panel will explore the different opportunities that the IoT offers mobile operators, ranging from connectivity through big data and cognitive analytics to IoT platforms and end-to-end solutions. The panel will focus on five questions:
  • How much revenue can mobile operators generate from the IoT and from which parts of the value chain?
  • Who are the competitors and who are potential partners in the evolving IoT ecosystem?
  • What will be the business model for operators who want to surpass the role of ‘dumb pipe’?
  • What is the importance of big data and cognitive analytics in the IoT?
  • How can several issues surrounding the IoT - such as scalability, reliability and privacy concerns – be addressed?
Moderator
Dr. J.P. Shim, Georgia State University
Panelists
  • Cameron Coursey, AT&T
  • Dr. J. P. Shim, Professor, Georgia State University
  • Dr. Rob van den Dam, IBM
  • Daniel Barnes, Synapse Wireless
Panelists’ Biography

J. P. Shim

J. P. Shim is a faculty of Computer Information Systems and Executive Director of KABC at Robinson College of Business at Georgia State University. Before joining at GSU in 2011 as a faculty, he was professor of BIS, Larry and Tonya Favreau Notable Scholar, John Grisham Professor, and IBSP Director at Mississippi State University. During the past twenty-seven years at MSU, he was a seventeen-time recipient of outstanding faculty awards. He received his Ph.D from University of Nebraska-Lincoln and completed Harvard Business School's Executive Education Program. He has published several books and over 100 papers, such as Journal of AIS, Communications of the ACM, Journal of Strategic Information Systems, European Journal of Information Systems, Decision Support Systems, Information & Management, Interfaces, Journal of Information Technology, Sloan Management Review, Journal of Operational Research Society, Computers & Operations Research, Omega, Academy of Management Proceedings, and ICIS Proceedings. He served on 2013 AMCIS Program Co-chair and was the principal investigator on several National Science Foundation grants and has received numerous funding from organizations He has been interviewed by the media (CBS TV, AP, The Clarion-Ledger, AJC, Global Atlanta) and worked as a consultant for Booz Allen, U.S. EPA, and Kia Motors Manufacturing Georgia.

Cameron Coursey

Cameron Coursey is Vice President of Product Development for AT&T’s Internet of Things Solution, charged with driving the system solutions and launch for connected devices on AT&T’s network.

From April 2009 to June 2012, Coursey was AVP of Product Realization within the Emerging Devices Organization, where he led device and network realization. From December 2004 to April 2009, Coursey was Executive Director of Subscriber Product Engineering within the Chief Technology Officer's organization of AT&T and Cingular Wireless. In that capacity, he oversaw the technical requirements development, certification, and post-launch technical support for wireless devices and smart cards used on AT&T's domestic wireless network. From July 2003 to December 2004, Coursey was Executive Director of Network Initiatives for Cingular, charged with overseeing technology aspects of Cingular's merger with AT&T Wireless Services and with responsibility for Cingular's labs and infrastructure planning. From July 2000 to July 2003, Coursey was Director of Technology & Product Realization for Cingular, where he led the development and deployment of GSM/TDMA interoperable technology.

Coursey was instrumental in the industry efforts to specify GSM/TDMA interoperability from 1999 through 2001, chairing the joint GSM Association-Universal Wireless Communications Consortium team that developed GSM/TDMA interoperability specifications. He was also vice chair of the GSM Global Roaming Forum of the GSM Association. During this time, Coursey was also granted multiple U.S. patents covering intelligent roaming for handsets and methods to implement private in-building systems that use wireless spectrum and technology.

In 1999, Coursey authored the textbook "Understanding Digital PCS: The TDMA Standard," which described the technology behind TDMA (IS-136) from a handset, air interface, and network perspective. Coursey was a key contributor to the IS-136 standard from 1996 through 1999, and helped to introduce IS-136 into Cingular's networks during that time.

Coursey began his commercial wireless career at SBC Technology Resources, Inc., in 1991, where he worked on technology for sharing spectrum between PCS and fixed wireless, early wireless packet data field trials for Southwestern Bell Mobile Systems, and network planning for new wireless opportunities for SBC in Southeast Asia. Prior to joining SBC Technology Resource, he worked for McDonnell Douglas on advanced communications systems for military aircraft.

Coursey received his Master of Science degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Missouri-Rolla in 1988. He received his Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Missouri-Rolla in 1987, graduating Magna Cum Laud.

Rob van den Dam

Rob van den Dam is the Global Telecommunications Industry Leader at the IBM Institute for Business Value. He is responsible for developing and deploying strategic thought leadership in telecommunications and as such contributor to IBM's global telecom strategy. In this role he develops future agendas, industry outlooks and business value realization studies. He has 20 years’ experience in the telecom industry and has worked in a range of advisory and implementation roles for major telecommunications, media and government organizations.

Prior to joining IBM he worked for Data Sciences where he was Senior Principal and one of the founders of Data Sciences' telecommunications practice. He started his career 30 years ago at the National Aerospace Industry where he worked in both national and international projects. Rob graduated at the Delft University in Aerospace Engineering (with honours), where he received a PhD.

Recent work includes future scenario planning, big data, Cloud, social business, and Internet of Things. Rob periodically presents or participates in panel sessions at major industry conferences, such as World Future Trends Summit, ITU World, GSMA Mobile Asia Conference, Total Telecom World, World Telecom Council, CommunicAsia, Broadband World Forum, and Asian Carriers’ Conference. He has published multiple articles in, amongst others, Total Telecom Magazine, Telecom Asia magazine, European Communications, Mobile Europe, Annual Review of Communications and Journal of Telecommunications Management.

Daniel Barnes

Daniel Barnes, Director of Product Management at Synapse Wireless, is responsible for SNAP: the Things Platform. Before transitioning into the IoT market, he performed various product development roles at ADTRAN, a telecom equipment manufacture, over the past 14 years. Daniel is a Lean thinker who is passionate about delighting the customer. He holds a MSEE from Georgia Tech and a BSEE from Auburn.