Division of Student Affairs

Assessment Coffee Hours

Assessment Coffee Hours

Spring 2019

  • Carla Jackson, health educator, shared her evaluation methods for the Peer Health Educators program in the Bronco Wellness Center.
  • A discussion of methodology was established. (Which factors are most important to consider, for instance, when evaluating peer programs)?
  • Data was shared on how effective the program has been for students, both in the development of their skill set and their career path. (PS: over 80% of program alumni say they use the skills they learned).  
  • Concluded with open table discussion of how these methods might help other departments develop their own peer assessment practices.

  • Dr. Heather Wizikowski shared how students in her Education Specialist credential program are required to interact with their data and engage with one another to provide a true learning community.
  • Through assessment evaluation and modification, the symposium has become a valuable experience. For example, many students now attach their data collection to their resume when entering the job market.
  • The symposium teaches students valuable life skills relevant to their future special education careers: collaboration and interaction with data.

  • Kevin Malone, Analyst and Chair of Quality Management Improvement at Student Health, shared the assessment process they use to evaluate their Flu Shot program.
  • Using data from this assessment, which included student feedback, the program was (and is continually) modified to increase student outreach, make all shots free, and offer more options for students to come and receive  shots. 
  • As a result, in 2018, Student Health successfully administered shots to the targeted number of students for the first time ever.  A manufacturer change from single-dose to multi-dose vials provided useful data that will now be considered in future Flu Shot Clinics.

  • Dr. Lorena Márquez, coordinator of the PolyTransfer program on campus, shared an in-depth exploration into her research methodology and Community Cultural Wealth Theory. 
  • Using her findings, we see the need for higher ed institutions to extend the college experience to families of all cultural backgrounds.
  • As Dr. Márquez's research reveals, students recognize and appreciate the sacrifices of their parents -- a fact that most institutions do not take advantage of.

  • Dr. Tashiana Bryant Myrick, coordinator of the Diversity Ambassadors Program, shared the numerous ways the program touches and impacts students.
  • The program is a year-round academic program that centers around issues of social injustice in American history, and culminates in a Spring Break trip to the East Coast.
  • Through the assessment, we learned that all students met key targeted learning outcomes, including an ability to discuss historical events from diverse perspectives, and developing a capstone project that reveals everything they've learned. 

  • There are several steps to take when applying for IRB certification for your research study, including submitting a protocol packet for approval, completing CITI training, and more.
  • IRB certification is required when conducting a research study that may obtain data through intervention or interaction with a human subject, or identifiable private information about a human subject, especially if the finalized data is expected to be published or shared.
  • The IRB committee on campus is here to help you. Access more info on this topic and connect with the committee by clicking here.

  • Jami Grosser shared her research into how the cultural centers on campus have an impact on student success. Specifically, are the amounts of visits to the Cultural Centers associated with student GPA? Are the amount of visits associated with under-represented minority (URM) students' GPA?
  • A 2017 impact assessment revealed promising benefits of Cultural Center attendance for URM students and first-year students. Additionally, it was discovered 11.5% of the total student population visited the Cultural Centers in one academic year.
  • Building upon this initial assessment, further assessment wants to delve even deeper - asking questions that explore retention rates and their correlation with Cultural Center attendance and further questions related to tracking attendance.

  • Dennis Ramos, graduate student intern, and Marisol Cardenas, Educational Learning and Assessment Specialist, explained the NSSE process and how best to review NSSE results.
  • NSSE data collected at Cal Poly Pomona revealed notable results, including perceived skill development gains by race/ethnicity from first-year students through senior year.
  • The data also revealed positive gains in the perception of a supportive campus environment and overall educational experience.
  • This type of data collection offers the opportunity to learn about specific targets at once, including responses broken down by race and year, offering impactful results.
  • Visit the NSSE website by clicking here to learn more.

  • Ann Lara, Career Services Coordinator and lead of the Collins College Mentor Program, shared the impact of The Pineapple Club, a community for first-year Collins students to further engage in their program.
  • The program offers students an ability to learn and engage with relevant job searching, professional attire, presentation skills, resume building, a summer plan, and advising meetings. Students earn points throughout the program that can be redeemed for a scholarship and an industry immersion trip during Spring Break.
  • The program is assessed using NACE career competencies, including leadership, critical thinking, and career management, all of which had positive gains year over year.

  • The Polytransfer program provides transfer students with a number of important services geared for their success, including peer to peer mentoring, transfer study hall, 1-1 student coaching, and more.
  • Did You Know? 50% of Fall 2018 enrollment were transfer students, and 90% of them transferred from a California Community College!
  • The data shows the important role CPP and all institutions must play in adapting to the needs of transfer students, which are often non-traditional.
  • Polytransfer helps provide a sense of belonging for these students, while also serving as a tool to further drive institutional change to support them into the future. Learn more at the Polytransfer website by clicking here.

Fall 2019

  • Christy Orgeta, senior coordinator for University Housing Services, shared what a sense of belonging means on a college campus through theory and practice.
  • A sense of belonging is key for students who are marginalized, for those students who feel they can't or don't fit in.
  • To counter this, staff and faculty can reach these students by targeting these areas:
    • Attention: the feeling that one is noticed
    • Importance: the belief that one is cared about
    • Ego Extension: the feeling that someone else will be proud of what one does or will sympathize with one's failure
    • Dependence: the feeling of being needed
  • To assess the feeling of belonging, you can use the folllowing tools:
    • Surveys
    • 1-1 interviews
    • Class oberservation
    • Rubrics that measure for mattering
  • Be personal! Use names, pronouns, and be hospitible.

  • Dr. Lorena Marquez shared the current problem facing higher education relating to Chicanx/Latinx students - institutions are not valuing familial and cultural assets.
  • Using the framework of Critical Race Theory and Latino Critical Race Theory, Dr. Marquez's work uncovered six themes through a sample of first generation, transfer Chicanx/Latinx students at both CPP and Cal State LA.
    • Gratitude and Appreciation - These students are deeply aware of their parents' sacrifice and efforts towards their educational success.
    • Power of Consejos - Networks of close advisors within these student's family circles both encouraged them to continue their educational jouney and inspire them that their success was attainable.
    • First Generation Moments - A unique first gen identity and experience exists 
    • Parental Support by Any Means Necessary - These students recognize the level of support their parents offer for their success, even in untraditional ways.
    • Desire to Belong - In addition to a desire to belong at school, these students felt a sense of responsibility for creating a sense of belonging and understanding for their parents as well.
    • Emotions and Unspoken Words - Not all stories were told by words, but rather in the expression and non-verbal language givenb by the students.
  • Recommendations for higher education institutions is to consider the familial and cultural experience of these students, and incorporate them more fully.

  • Dr. Preeti Wadhwa shared her findings following the creation of a peer mentoring program within the College of Business Administration on campus in 2017.
  • These findings proved the impact a peer mentorship has on the college experience:
    • Mentees, and especially first gen students, feel they have someone to go to for help.
    • Interntational students show improvements with language skills and adjustment to American culture.
    • Many are now encouraged to join campus involvement efforts they otherwise would not have been aware of.
    • From the flip side, senior mentors increased leadership and coaching skills, as well as developed how to be a role model.
  • Moving forward, the program wants to analyze quantitative data and incorporate student feedback to further grow and change the program to be more effective, including integrating it into FYE courses at CBA.

  • Primary goal is to eliminate the equity gap within the GEMS (Ethics and Women's Studies Department) program in the College of Education.
  • Creation of an assessment model, through three main tools to determine where the equity gap might exist:
    • End of Year Capstone Assessment
    • End of Year Survey
    • GEMS Alumni Survey
  • Several key findings emerged:
    • A large majority of students decide on a GEMS major during their Junior year.
    • Many of these students are attracted to the social justice component of the program.
    • Pieces of the assessment model can be further altered to capture a broader range of students by building surveys into course material.
  • Discussion points:
    • The role of transfer students versus first year incoming students in relation to the equity gap.
    • The considerations of professor implicit bias along with bias introduced by a student's world view or ubringing.
    • The possibility of surveying GEMS alumni several years following their graduation to capture better data on the impact of the program on their career and overall skill set. 

 

  • Career Counselor DeVoneia Jordan shared her assessment work using a 7-point Likert scale survey to assess the experience of student attendees to the Spring Career Fair in 2019.
    • 96% of students who prepared for the career fair, 81.7% of which felt confident in speaking with employers.
    • 71.8% of students seeking a full-time job felt confident, the least amount. This could indicate that students with 'most on the line' for career fair outcomes are displaying a confidence gap.
    • This data will prove valuable for how the Career Center will modify their programming and workshops to increase preparedness to address these gaps.
  • Students attending the Spring Career Fair showed hope and optimism for career opportunities.
    • Students seeking full-time positions felt they were most prepared for the Career Fair. How can this help seek opportunities to help other students gain confidence, build their network, and understand event mechanics.