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Presenter Directory

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Examining college students' perceptions of their readiness for academic organizational change and their related self-efficacy based on content, contextual, and process components

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:15 - 12:30
Location: 15-2907

Authors: Colin Adamik.
Faculty Mentor: Preeti Wadhwa.

Abstract: The success of organizational change arguably hinges on resistance to the change. The change recipients' perception of the change and their readiness for it may contribute to their posed resistance. In the context of a collegiate academic institution, this study examines students' perception of their readiness for change and related self-efficacy. Specifically, the study investigates how the content of change, the context in which it is being carried out, and the employed processes used to implement the initiative, are related to student perceptions of the change. This research utilizes field surveys to collect data from a representative sample of undergraduate students. Most of the sample includes freshmen and sophomores because they are the most affected participants in the change. Specific hypotheses are tested, and the results and their implications for students and the university are examined. An essential contribution of this work is considering organizational change using a deconstructed method by concurrently exploring components related to the content, context, and process of the change.

Biofilm Formation on Novel Human Prosthetics Metal Alloys

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Jeyashree Alagarsamy, Cindy Toscano, Kevin Robles.
Faculty Mentor: Steve Alas.

Abstract: Solid biomaterials with characteristics, such as high biocompatibility or corrosion resistance, are now being implanted in the human body more frequently for a wide range of purposes. However, implant-related infection is generally the most common serious complication. When bacteria adhere to and proliferate on the biomaterial surface, the bacteria produce extracellular polymeric substances, primarily polysaccharides, which mediate cell-to-cell adhesion and form a biofilm. In our lab, the long-term goal is to extend the life of a prosthetic implant by identifying new metal alloys that are less susceptible to bacterial colonization. Using two major biofilm producing bacteria commonly found to colonize implants after surgery, Staphylococcus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we investigated the biocompatibility of novel metal alloys with regard to their susceptibility to biofilm propagation. The Experimental biometal alloys examined were stainless steel (SS), commercially pure titanium (CPTi), titanium alloy (Ti64) and dental grade titanium (Ty). Biofilm formation was analyzed using crystal violet staining and fluorescent microscopy. Ideal experimental conditions were obtained using flasks with 50mL TSB media for 48 hours at 37oC or using a biofilm reactor with 350mL TSB media, and allowing incubation for 72 hours at 37oC. Biofilm reactor experiments were performed with or without a constant infusion of growth media during biofilm formation. Results indicate that the Ty alloy permits less biofilm formation than SS, CPTi and the Ti64, by Staphylococcus epidermidis. Thus, the Ty alloy may be a better alternative to traditional metals, stainless steel and pure titanium, as a modern prosthetic biometal.

Inflight Power Generation and Storage in Airplanes

Oral Presentation
Time: 11:45 - 12:00
Location: 9-325

Authors: Jonathan Franco, Ian Pollard, Jake Alder, Steve Betts.
Faculty Mentor: Steven Dobbs.

Abstract: Emerging unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) and other aircraft use electrical propulsion systems. To extend battery charge and aircraft range, power can be generated from multiple sources during flight including aeroelastic vibrations from gusts and flutter, bending movements, and sunlight. These sources of "free" energy can be summed and used during flight operation. This research will employ the aeroelastic vibrations of the wing that will be captured using a created device that uses vibrations to generate electricity. Stress flexing piezoelectric devices will be attached at the root of the wing, where the most bending strain occurs. Flexible solar panels will be attached to the top of wing. These three sources will be summed together to power the propeller of an aircraft. A Maximum Power Point Tracker (MPPT) board is utilized to adjust the input voltage to harvest power from the wing vibration phenomenon and transform this power to supply the voltage requirements of the battery or graphene supercapacitors under load.

Seismic Base Isolation: An Energy Formulation

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:45 - 3:00
Location: 9-269

Authors: Shatha Altawarah.
Faculty Mentor: Giuseppe Lomiento.

Abstract: One of the biggest concerns of structural engineers is the dynamic lateral load caused by ground shaking events such as earthquakes. Traditional buildings are designed to provide life safety conditions in case of severe earthquake events, by dissipating most of the shaking energy through controlled damages distributed throughout the structure. Damages are located in specifically designed lateral force resisting systems such as shear walls, moment-resistant frames, or cross-bracing. More effective solutions have been proposed in the past thirty years to resist seismic forces without structural damages. These solutions include seismic base isolation and energy dissipation systems. Despite being recognized as more effective in terms of seismic performance, the complex behavior of seismic isolation and dissipation devices requires advanced design calculations, which limit the use of this technology. In this research project, I developed a simple analytical formulation to study seismic isolation systems in terms of energy absorption. With this aim, I extended a simplified vibration modal analysis to determine the portion of the total vibration energy that is absorbed by the isolation system. The larger the energy trapped in the seismic isolators, the smaller the energy that affects the overlaying structure which decreases the amount of damage to the structure. By implementing the formulation to a variety of seismic isolation systems, I finally developed performance charts that can be used for a simplified design of seismic isolators.

Design, and testing of a solar-driven wastewater treatment unit for off-grid applications.

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:45 - 1:00
Location: 9-325

Authors: Justine Nguyen, Daniel Andrade, Thuan Nguyen, Kyle Miller, Masoud Modabernia, John Kest, Johnny Baradii, Laura Lopez, Binh Phun, David Jacobo.
Faculty Mentor: Reza Lakeh.

Abstract: In California the drought has become an important issue due to declines in surface water sources. In order to keep up with the continuously increasing demand for water, the state is heavily relying on imported water from the Colorado River. To account for this problem, the use of recycled water became necessary. The research team at Cal Poly Pomona, with the support of Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, is developing an off-grid solar-powered greywater treatment system for non-potable use in single households. Greywater, by definition, is the drained water from bathroom sinks, showers, tubs, and washing machines; this does not include wastewater from toilets or kitchen sinks. Treating greywater on-site can provide significant water savings, and can reduce the carbon footprint of desalination using solar panels. The system is comprised of a three-stage treatment: three microfilters, three solar-driven reverse osmosis membranes, and an ultraviolet disinfection unit. The product of this project is capable of reclaiming 90 gallons of water per day while recovering approximately 60% of residential greywater. The design of the system will remove traces of organic and inorganic chemicals, and particles of dirt, food and others. The team has built and tested a preliminary design of the greywater treatment system to address the mechanical controls, and electrical aspects of the overall system for future use. Based on data collection and analysis of Version 1, an optimized and more consumer-friendly Version 2 has been built and tested.

Solar Updraft Tower with Compost Waste Heat and Transpired Roof

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Abbygail Ang, Randy Osorio, Erik Villanueva.
Faculty Mentor: Kevin Anderson.

Abstract: This project studies the effects of incorporating compost waste heat and a transpired roof to the design of a Solar Updraft Tower (SUT). Traditional SUTs consist of a transparent collector base, which utilizes the greenhouse effect to collect heat, a cylindrical tower that creates an updraft effect, and a wind turbine on the inlet of the tower which generates power due to natural convection with hot air. By adding compost in the collector base, temperatures are allowed to increase more through the transmissive component of radiation heat transfer. Additionally, the compost waste heat can reduce landfill space in other areas while also contributing to power generation. The transpired roof "agitates" the airflow and makes it turbulent, resulting in an improved transfer of heat. A 6' x 6' prototype of the SUT was built with the transparent collector and updraft tower. Data was taken for four configurations of the SUT: (1) without compost or transpired roof, (2) with compost, (3) with transpired roof, and (4) with both compost and transpired roof. By measuring wind speeds, temperatures, and heat flux, the power generated was calculated and compared to CFD values.

Effect of Nitrogen and Irrigation Levels on Lettuce Growth Using Agronomic and Remote Sensing Measurements

Oral Presentation
Time: 3:00 - 3:15
Location: 9-335

Authors: Mehdi Ansari.
Faculty Mentor: Reza Chaichi.

Abstract: Lettuce warranties especial research and attention because California dominates the U.S. lettuce production. Efficient water use by irrigation systems is becoming increasingly important especially in arid and semi-arid regions with limited water resources. The large quantity of nitrogen which accumulates in ecosystem through fertilizer use causes great concerns for health and environmental aspects. To the contrary, limited amount of nitrogen adversely affects crops yield, and yield components. Remote sensing plays key role in the precision agriculture, which aims to optimize the amount of water, fertilizers, and pesticides. Remote sensing data can be used for the detection of crop stresses resulting from water and nutrient deficiency as well as from diseases. The goal of this project is to compromise between water and nitrogen fertilizer applications to achieve the most efficient yield and yield components of lettuce through remote sensing technology.

Indigenous Foodways: Before & After Spanish Conquest

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Andria Antoniades.
Faculty Mentor: Sandra Kapoor.

Abstract: "Mexico has a history of uninterrupted cultural exchanges... always enriching from a culinary standpoint". Chef Enrique Olvera of Pujol writes in his cookbook Mexico from the Inside Out (2015). We think we know Mexican food, but more often than not we really don't. Mexican food as we know it is a tasting menu of indigenous and global foodways. But what was food like prior to Spanish colonialism? Changes in Mexican foodways had serious implications not only on the diet and health of indigenous people, but also on social hierarchy and the natural environment. To illustrate the changes, cookbooks, codices, field research, and culinary history literature, of both indigenous and post-colonial foodways will be compared. This work will increase the understanding of how Mexican food is more than just tacos, but also an expression of colonial political history.

Upregulation of Adipogenesis by SUV39H1 and CITED2 siRNA Double Knock-down

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Shayne Fabian, Julian Aragon, Lun Tan.
Faculty Mentor: Yuanxiang Zhao.

Abstract: Obesity is a modern epidemic in the United States and other developed countries across the world. It is characterized by excessive body fat accumulation due to increased number of adipocytes (fat cells) through adipogenesis and/or enlarged adipocytes through lipogenesis. Human adipogenesis is the process through which uncommitted human mesenchymal stem cells differentiate into adipocytes. Understanding the molecular and cellular regulation of adipogenesis may provide a way to mitigate obesity and obesity related diseases. Based on a high throughput screen using siRNAs targeting 5000 genes in the human genome, a list of genes, whose expression knock-down by their corresponding siRNAs led to enhanced adipogenic differentiation of hMSCs, were identified. Two of the uncovered genes, SUV39H1, a histone lysine methyltransferase and CITED2, a transcriptional co-regulator, have been confirmed to significantly promote adipogenesis when individually knocked down by their siRNAs, siSUV39H1 and siCITED2, respectively, indicating that both SUV39H1 and CITED2 normally act as adipogenic suppressors. Here we focus on examining the combinatorial effect of siSUV39H1 and siCITED2 on adipogenesis by comparing the effect of double knock-down of these two genes (siSUV39H1 + siCITED2) to each single knock-down (siSUV39H1 + siControl; siCITED2 + siControl). Our preliminary data demonstrated that double knock-down treatment significantly increased total adipocyte count (by 4.5 folds) and adipocyte percentage (by 6.5 folds) in comparison to each single knock-down treatment, both of which increased by 3 folds for adipocyte counts and by 3.5 - 4 folds for adipocyte percentage, suggesting that knock-down of these two genes exert accumulative effect on suppressing adipogenesis.

Analysis of in situ Creep Deformation in Thermal Barrier Coatings

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Javier Martinez, Jorge Camarillo, Cynthia Do, Evelyn Arce.
Faculty Mentor: Jonathan Puthoff.

Abstract: Aluminide thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are used to give metallic components high temperature oxidation resistance and mechanical protection, thereby extending component lifetimes. In order to produce better-engineered components incorporating aluminide TBCs, we wish to better understand high temperature creep deformation of the coatings themselves. However, measuring the creep properties of aluminized coatings in situ are difficult due to the small dimensions of the coatings (100 micron coating thickness). We developed a model that permits us to determine the stresses in aluminide TBCs, and created software for performing the required calculations using Matlab.The model is based on the real geometry of TBC-coated material and includes distinct TBC, base metal, and interdiffusion zone layers. Using the stresses in the TBCs we can predict the creep deformation in the TBC and possibly the predominant failure mechanism. Additionally, the model can assist in the design of creep specimens so that the associated experiments can be performed. This combination of a detailed model of an aluminide TBC-coated material and experiments that can reveal the actual performance of the system would help in the design of components for high temperature applications such as turbines, engines, and reactors.

Cloud Plush

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Bryan Arciniega, Yuna Jung, Kathleen Wong, Joshua Montanez, Jakub Kupsik.
Faculty Mentor: Yu Sun.

Abstract: Our product will allow people to connect through a pair of stuffed toys. The stuffed toys will allow the users to send each other hugs through our stuffed toy. When hugging the stuffed animal, they will feel a heartbeat and warmth (by seeing a visible glowing heart). The heartbeat and warmth would essentially recreate the feeling of hugging their partner, which would bring the two physically together. All of this is done in real time. It is just as fast as sending and receiving a text message. When brought together again, the stuffed animals would "celebrate." Our product is a stuffed toy that incorporates technology with intimacy. It creates a second pathway for relationships to connect in a way that is physical and healthier than through digital communication. The technology we are building into our toy will improve the experience of having a stuffed toy. We want to utilize Raspberry Pi, WLAN, bluetooth, sensor, motor and LEDs in each product. This will allow the stuffed toy to communicate via wifi and vibrate. We also want to incorporate an ergonomic design so that our stuffed toy can be comfortable. Bluetooth will be incorporated into the main circuit board so that it can connect to your phone. The connection to your phone will allow for you to send and receive hugs when there is no wifi network present. All of this technology will allow users to hug their loved one whether they are in the same room or halfway across the globe.

UAS Based Mapping for Earthwork Quantity Estimation

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:00 - 1:15
Location: 9-271

Authors: Paul Stoiber, Brandon Arden.
Faculty Mentor: Omar Mora.

Abstract: Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) are emerging as an alternative tool for mapping and computing earthwork quantities in small to medium projects. The dense point clouds and surface models created from imagery acquired by these systems have not been extensively tested in terms of accuracy performance. For this reason, an evaluation was performed to test and evaluate the capabilities of UAS based mapping for earthwork quantity estimation. The UAS image based results were compared to a high-resolution surface model that was acquired by Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS). Aerial Targets (ATs) were distributed throughout the test area, and were subsequently surveyed using Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Real-Time Kinematic (RTK) surveying practices to achieve high-accuracy positioning. The laser scan point cloud was co-registered and the scanning stations were geo-referenced through a GNSS RTK survey. Initial results indicate that UAS based volumetric computations for earthwork quantity estimation can compete with scanning techniques, where the TLS volume were computed to be 564 yd3 and the UAS based results were 566 yd3, resulting in a percent error of 0.4%. These outcomes demonstrate that in some cases, the UAS based mapping may be a more cost effective alternative for surveying earthwork projects. A stockpile was surveyed and mapped by a UAS to generate a high-resolution surface model. The surface model were generated through three programs which were then used to determine volumes. The three programs used were Context Capture, AgiSoft Photoscan and PixElement. The dense point clouds were then brought into AUTOCAD Civil 3D where volumes were calculated by the difference between two surfaces method. The first surface for the volume calculation was a surface to represent the flat ground below the stockpile. The limits of the stockpile were established from data gathered in a general survey. The second surface was created to represent the outline of the stockpile created from the dense point cloud. The volumes from the dense point clouds that were created using the aerial imagery were then compared to volumes created through Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS).

3D printing Graphene-Enhanced Li-ion battery and Graphene supercapacitors

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:15 - 1:30
Location: 9-307

Authors: Matthew Tisbe, Nicholas Ferguson, Amanda Ramos, Jeffrey Lee, Calvin Nguyen, Ben Cheng, Alfredo Collazo, Alexander Lau, Jose Lopez, Alexander Botello, Albert Armienta.
Faculty Mentor: Zhen Yu.

Abstract: Batteries are power storage devices that provide their stored power to connected electronics. Li-ion batteries are a widely used battery type due to their high energy density and ability to recharge. These properties make them well suited for portable electronic devices at the expense of taking the majority weight and volume of the device. The use of a liquid electrolyte also limits the recharging speed and operating temperature. Switching to a solid electrolyte yields enhanced environmental safety and higher energy density, thus a smaller volume needed for portable applications. Our research focuses on the ease of production of such batteries through the development of a superior solid electrolyte, and the robustness of 3D printing and robotic assembly.

Interplanetary CubeSat Solar Sail Mission

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:30 - 1:45
Location: 9-333

Authors: Holly Everson, Guadalupe Romero Bravo, Steven Jaworski, Sofiya Pascual, Riza Dayapera, Aerbwong Chitamitara, Suleman Jalal, Erica Arroyo, Justin Toney.
Faculty Mentor: Navid Nakhjiri.

Abstract: Studying CubeSats for space science missions has increased significantly in recent years. The use of a CubeSat will provide a spacecraft which is lighter, mechanically simpler, and with a fraction of the cost of a traditional space mission. Cal Poly Pomona Interplanetary CubeSat Solar Sail Mission (IPCS3M) is a multi-year research project studying the use of solar radiation pressure on a sail as an alternative method of propulsion for interplanetary CubeSat missions. With a 90 meters squared Mylar sail, the 6U CubeSat will travel to Saturn with the intended goal of dropping a 1U science payload into Saturn's northern hexagonal storm. The payload will enter the inner wall of the eye to gather data regarding storm patterns, chemical composition, and other factors. Additionally, the solar sail will provide the spacecraft with a free continuous thrust, increasing velocity throughout the mission timeline provided by the solar radiation pressure. Finite Element Analysis and Computer Aided Design (CAD) modeling were used to construct the spacecraft and allow for structural studies. In addition to computer model tests, physical tests have also been performed to research material properties, light reflectance, and boom creation. Successful solar sail implementation will give CubeSats a form of propulsion that will open up possibilities for more complex missions, most notably orbital maneuvering and interplanetary travel.

The Power in Individual Consent: A Critical Examination of How Gatekeeping and Stereotypes Affect Access to Student-Veterans in the Qualitative Interview Process

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:00 - 1:15
Location: 15-1828

Authors: William Atienza.
Faculty Mentor: Erica Morales.

Abstract: Based on in-depth interviews conducted with more than 30 student-veterans enrolled in higher education institutions, this paper examines the methodological challenges of collecting qualitative interview data from this population. Situated within the larger interdisciplinary literature of doing qualitative research with vulnerable groups, this paper questions whether student-veterans should be considered a vulnerable group. Based on our research experience, we argue that framing student-veterans as vulnerable can lead to further stereotyping of this group and lead to difficulties in accessing an already under-researched population. In addition, our inability to hear the voices and experiences of student veterans can impact the kind of services and support that higher educational institutions can provide them.

Laser Micromachining for Fiber Optic Bundle Spectroscopy

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Jennifer Gavin, Nasim Azadi.
Faculty Mentor: Timothy Corcoran.

Abstract: Confocal laser microscopy is a powerful imaging tool in biology and related disciplines. Dividing a laser into multiple foci on the sample can make this process more efficient. This can be done using a micro lens array e.g. a 6 x 6 grid of micro lens. The light emitted from the sample is carried to the spectrometer via optical fibers, through reformation of the fibers from a 6 x 6 grid to a 1 x 36 line, to match the spectrometer input slit. We describe how this optical fiber bundle is being built.

Electrochemical Evaluation of Titanium Alloys for Biomedical Hip Implants

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:30 - 1:45
Location: 9-307

Authors: Michael Svidensky, Neelam Patel, Jaewan Bae, Carlos Pacheco, Vanessa Gomez.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: The need for longevity of hip implants is increasing as the life expectancy of the world's population increases. Titanium and titanium alloys are commonly used for biomedical implants due to their favorable strength-to-weight ratio, biocompatibility and corrosion resistance. In particular, Ti-6Al-4V (wt%) (Ti64) is widely used as a hip implant material. There are several issues with the long-term use of this alloy. One of these is the phenomenon of stress shielding in which the elastic modulus mismatch between the implant and bone leads to bone loss and subsequent loosening of the implant. Another is the release of aluminum cations into the body with potential deleterious effects, i.e., the link to Alzheimer's disease and other neurological disorders. In addition, inflammatory responses can be triggered through the phenomenon of aseptic loosening in which an imbalance between the osteoclasts (bone-eroding cells) and osteoblasts (bone-building cells) leads to bone resorption. A new class of β-phase titanium alloys (TNZ alloys), offers promising characteristics as potential candidates for orthopedic applications due to their lower elastic modulii and non-toxic characteristics. In this study, two TNZ alloys, i.e., Ti-39Nb-6Zr (wt%) and Ti-28Nb-20Zr (wt%), were cast into rods in a pure argon environment at atmospheric pressure. A witness coupon was cut from each of the as-cast rods which were then subsequently hot isostatically pressed (HIP) to remove any internal discontinuities. Witness coupons were also cut from the HIPped rods which were subsequently precision machined into a regular cylinder. The as-cast rods were subjected to non-destructive X-ray radiography pre- and post-HIPping to confirm the removal of residual porosity. The corrosion behavior of the TNZ alloys and Ti64 control coupons, was investigated through open circuit potential (OCP) tests, potentiodynamic polarization measurements (Tafel and cyclic potentiodynamic polarization), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in phosphate buffered saline solution (PBS) at normal body conditions (temperature at 37℃ +/- 1℃ and pH of 7.4 +/- 0.1). Tests were also conducted at lower pH conditions to simulate the body conditions of patients suffering from metabolic acidosis (pH of 6.9 +/- 0.1). EIS measurements were conducted before and after anodic polarization tests.

The inscription of La Lozana within the framework of the picaresque genre

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:15 - 1:30
Location: 15-1802

Authors: Maricela Baltazar.
Faculty Mentor: Marta Albalá Pelegrín.

Abstract: Spanish literary history usually concedes that the picaresque is a genre that emerged around the middle of the sixteenth century. La Lozana Andaluza, whose publication dates approximately from 1528 to 1530, already contains a set of characteristics similar to that of later picaresque canonical works such as El Lazarillo, El Guzmán de Alfarache or El Buscón. Several critics have argued for the inscription of La Lozana within the framework of the picaresque genre. Similarly, other scholars have systematically denied any systematic relationship. My paper goes beyond this dichotomy by tracing the picaresque features in the La Lozana andaluza and building on the arguments of critics such as Perugini, Parker, and Ronquillo. In this framework I will also analyze the book's relevance in connection with the geopolitical space in which it was written, that of the Spanish Rome, using Dandelet's coinage. My research has employed a methodological procedure, which incorporates the analysis of literary articles related to the city of Rome and its inhabitants, which serve to scrutinize the historical dimension of the work.

The Underrepresentation of Women in Politics

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:00 - 2:15
Location: 15-1828

Authors: Brittany Banner.
Faculty Mentor: Mario Guerrero.

Abstract: Representation in political affairs serves as a stepping-stone for political freedom and political injustice. If women are allowed to be more active any form of government, which is essential to building and sustaining democracy, the government can exceed its normal capacity. Women serve as over fifty percent of the world's population, yet women are still being under- represented as voters, leaders, and elected officials. The political aspect of life within our democracy cannot be exceeded their capacity if half of the population remains underrepresented. Women are not openly embraced in the political world, in reference to conservative political views that deter women's participation in political affairs. However, without the presence of women in political offices, gender preferences cannot be exemplified or measured. In order to assess gender biases, I will utilize case studies to analyze liberal and conservative candidates by exemplifying how media outlets portray men and women in the political atmosphere. Due the lack of ambition and political support women are unaware of the importance of their political support, which has allowed them to become underrepresented in politics. Women in the present day society lack ambition in political affairs, due to the fact that political parties do not recruit women. Once traditional or societal norms are violated such as a female running for a high-powered office, media outlets respond by covering female candidates less or in a negative light than their male counterparts. Therefore, female political ambition is constantly being undercut by how the media represent female candidates.

Upland Unified School District Garden Program

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:45 - 1:00
Location: 15-2907

Authors: Daniel Legat, David Bañuelas.
Faculty Mentor: Gwen Urey.

Abstract: The Upland Unified School District's (UUSD) Garden Project is a bold initiative to increase student access to fresh-organic fruits and vegetables while building a local food system. The programs primary purpose is to break down barriers that inhibit access to organic produce and space for gardening in the City of Upland. One in two students in the UUSD either receives free or reduced lunch programs, which is 4,980 students out of 6,414 (2017 Eligibility Report). At certain school sites, over 80% of students receive free or reduced lunch. The Garden Program uses sustainable farming techniques that protect the environment, public health, human communities, and animal welfare by growing produce in urban environments. The program turns underutilized spaces into full production gardens, minimizing our carbon footprint by eliminating emissions from transporting produce. UUSD is one of only three Community Food Producers (CFP) registered in San Bernardino County (SBC). Our objective as the only school district registered is to transition demonstration gardens into larger production farms to supply cafeterias. The program aims to develop production gardens in all 14 school locations within the district, amassing 2.5 acres of agricultural landscaping. The success of the program relies on support from our community partners. Such partners include Cal Poly Pomona student interns sponsored by the Randal Lewis Group, the YMCA of Upland, UUSD student groups and teachers who maintain gardens and local sponsors who have donated land, seeds, soil, and building materials.

Design, and testing of a solar-driven wastewater treatment unit for off-grid applications.

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:45 - 1:00
Location: 9-325

Authors: Justine Nguyen, Daniel Andrade, Thuan Nguyen, Kyle Miller, Masoud Modabernia, John Kest, Johnny Baradii, Laura Lopez, Binh Phun, David Jacobo.
Faculty Mentor: Reza Lakeh.

Abstract: In California the drought has become an important issue due to declines in surface water sources. In order to keep up with the continuously increasing demand for water, the state is heavily relying on imported water from the Colorado River. To account for this problem, the use of recycled water became necessary. The research team at Cal Poly Pomona, with the support of Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, is developing an off-grid solar-powered greywater treatment system for non-potable use in single households. Greywater, by definition, is the drained water from bathroom sinks, showers, tubs, and washing machines; this does not include wastewater from toilets or kitchen sinks. Treating greywater on-site can provide significant water savings, and can reduce the carbon footprint of desalination using solar panels. The system is comprised of a three-stage treatment: three microfilters, three solar-driven reverse osmosis membranes, and an ultraviolet disinfection unit. The product of this project is capable of reclaiming 90 gallons of water per day while recovering approximately 60% of residential greywater. The design of the system will remove traces of organic and inorganic chemicals, and particles of dirt, food and others. The team has built and tested a preliminary design of the greywater treatment system to address the mechanical controls, and electrical aspects of the overall system for future use. Based on data collection and analysis of Version 1, an optimized and more consumer-friendly Version 2 has been built and tested.

Thermal Nitridation of Stainless Steel Bipolar Plates in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:30 - 12:45
Location: 9-307

Authors: Kevin Duong, Adrian Barcimo.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: Increasing concerns regarding climate change due to rising CO2 emissions have prompted the development of alternative power generation systems. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are one example of power sources that have gained steady interest in transportation and stationary applications due to their environmentally-friendly, near-zero emissions and high efficiency. These devices utilize the chemical reaction between hydrogen and oxygen to produce electricity, with the emission of water. Bipolar plates are a key component of fuel cells and function as electrical conduits between cells and as distributors of reactant gases. These components account for 80% of the total weight and 40% of the cell stack cost. Currently, the material of choice used for bipolar plates is graphite because of its high corrosion resistance and electrical conductivity. However, the high cost of machining and poor mechanical properties of graphite limit its widespread use. In order to make these devices more commercially available, a new material that has better machinability and mechanical properties, while still being corrosion resistant and electrically conductive, is required for PEMFC bipolar plates. Metallic bipolar plates have been considered as an alternative candidate due to their good mechanical properties, high electrical conductivity and low costs of machining. However, naturally forming passive layers on the metallic plates can reduce electrical conductivity. In addition, metal cations from the corrosion reaction can reduce the effectiveness of the cell. To circumvent these problems, the metallic plates can be surface modified with a corrosion resistant and conductive coating. Thermal nitridation was chosen as the surface modification technique for several reasons including the ease with which the gas-solid reactions can occur, the relatively low cost of the process, the ability to modify it for high throughput and non line-of-sight coat the complex geometries of flow channels in the bipolar plates. The nitridation process leads to the formation of CrN/Cr2N precipitates, which can significantly improve electrical conductivity. This project examines the corrosion behavior of uncoated and coated UNS 43000 and 44600 stainless steels nitrided at various temperatures and times. A thermal nitridation process was implemented using pure N2 gas. The test coupons were placed in a 0.01M H2SO4 electrolyte solution at 70℃ to simulate a PEMFC environment and characterized using DC electrochemical testing. The surfaces of the coated product were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and optical microscopy. Electrical conductivity was measured before and after testing using a 4-point probe testing apparatus.

Evaluation of Surface Modified Stainless Steels and Titanium for Fuel Cells

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:45 - 1:00
Location: 9-307

Authors: Shehab Bassiouni, Sean Vinik, Fiona Follett, Brooke Singleton.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: The concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has steadily increased since the industrial revolution. The past few years have seen an alarming rise in the rate of carbon dioxide emissions with deleterious consequences on a global scale. Efforts to achieve a cleaner, more sustainable environment need to be accelerated. Replacing fossil-fuel burning vehicles with electrochemically powered vehicles can greatly mitigate the emissions of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. The proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell is an excellent solution due to its low operating temperatures and high efficiency. Despite technological improvements, proton exchange membrane fuel cell-powered vehicles are not commercially competitive with internal combustion engine vehicles. In this study, we aim to reduce fuel cell costs and improve their durability by substrate selection and surface modification of a crucial component - separator plates. Currently, graphite is used as the endplates of the fuel cell stack. Graphite offers excellent corrosion resistance; however, its porous nature makes it difficult to shape into thin sheets and its brittleness makes it unsuitable for transportation applications. In addition, the cost in manufacturing graphite causes the separator plates to account for 60% of the fuel cell cost. In order to allow PEM fuel cells to be more commercially available, a cost effective material should be selected to use as a bipolar plate. Current targets goals for a bipolar plate require materials to have desirable mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, high electrical conductivity, and low density. In this study, UNS S41000 stainless steels and UNS R50400 titanium were selected as possible candidate materials due to their high electrical conductivity, ductility and low cost. The surfaces of the selected materials were surface modified using two approaches: (a) coating with graphene and (b) gas phase nitridation. As-received and surface modified test coupons were subjected to electrochemical tests that were conducted under simulated PEMFC environments, i.e., 70℃ in 0.01 M sulfuric acid solution in a three-electrode flat cell. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and optical microscopy were used to characterize the test coupons. The effectiveness of the surface modification will be discussed and an optimal path forward will be outlined.

Vernalization induces flowering in Aquilegia coerulea

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:15 - 1:30
Location: 9-243

Authors: Timothy Batz.
Faculty Mentor: Bharti Sharma.

Abstract: Environmental and endogenous factors interact to initiate the flowering in plants. These signals in the shoot apical meristem (SAM) initiates its transition to inflorescence meristem and finally to a floral meristem. The reproductive timing of Aquilegia coerulea, an alpine perennial, is synchronized with seasonal temperatures to delay flowering until spring, thus avoiding harsh winter conditions. Studies by Ballerini and Kramer have shown that Aquilegia formosa requires 6 weeks of vernalization to begin the flowering transition. To compare vernalization requirements across the Aquilegia genus, mature A. coerulea plants were vernalized at 6°C followed by additional time in warmer greenhouse conditions. Meristems were dissected at weekly time points and prepared for anatomical and morphological analyses. Histological observations show the development of floral organ primordia happens during the 3-4 week of vernalization. Full maturation of these organs occur by 6 weeks of greenhouse treatment followed by subsequent floral senescence. Our observations show that A. coerulea requires 3-4 weeks of vernalization to begin reproductive development in the SAM, which is 3 weeks shorter compared to A. formosa. Since the reproductive transition is mediated in part by key flowering-time genes, the epigenetic role of vernalization on their expression is under investigation. Ongoing transcriptomic studies of the meristem during and post vernalization will offer insight into the varied cold requirements for flowering in A. coerulea and other species of the genus.

Co-Ni-Ga: Shape Memory Alloys

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:30 - 2:45
Location: 9-307

Authors: Matthew Tom, Joliette Li, Christopher Bautista.
Faculty Mentor: Jonathan Puthoff.

Abstract: Shape-memory alloys (SMAs) are metal alloys that can return to their original shape upon the addition of heat. Magnetic SMAs are alloys that possess magnetic properties in addition and can therefore be reconfigured through the application of external magnetic fields and heat. These materials have application in motors, actuators, implants, and prosthetics, providing a consolidated mechanical system that lacks separate components. Despite these advantageous properties, magnetic SMAs' low efficiency and high production costs prevent them from being used in many applications. In order to identify the optimal alloy structure and composition, and thereby improve the performance of the SMAs, we created phase diagrams for the Co-Ni-Ga SMA system. We employed published Gibbs energy functions to construct a database of the properties of phases found in this system and constructed the diagrams using the ThermoCalc software package. These diagrams are useful for calculating the relative amounts of magnetic and shape-memory phases in alloys with given Co, Ni, and Ga compositions. Optimizing this phase mixture can lead to potentially more effective magnetic SMAs.

Purchase Intentions of Millenials in Regards to Sustainable Apparel

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Lauren Jacoby, Jessica D'ambra, Natalie Newman, Cody Beaty.
Faculty Mentor: Angella Kim.

Abstract: Fast fashion is a term coined by the global apparel industry to describe retailers with an apparel supply chain model that knocks off garments at a rapid pace and by doing so frequently update their stores with cheap products (Zamani, Sandin, & Peters, 2017). Fast fashion is unsustainable and has created irreversible damage to the environment through waste and byproducts associated with apparel products. Unfortunately, millennials; the generation born between 1982-2002, have adopted fast fashion brands as a primary source of apparel, even though researchers define millennials as a generation with "increased awareness of environmental, and social issues within society" (Hill, Lee, 2012). This is made more unpleasant by the fact that millennials make up approximately $2.45 trillion in potential spending (Mak, 2016). Millennials are a financially powerful generation and have a strong understanding of contemporary environmental issues, yet they are major supporters of the fast fashion system which is very toxic for the environment. Therefore, this paper sets out to understand millennials purchase intentions in regards to sustainable fashion. In this paper, we use quantitative data gathered from surveys completed by college age millennials to understand millennial's apparel purchase intentions and their relationship to sustainable apparel. We found that millennials accessibility to sustainable products influences purchase intentions was weak and did not support our research. We conclude that if there is concern and knowledge of sustainability and our environment, millennials will be more willing to purchase sustainable products.

AugmentedRealms: The Next Generation of Tabletop Gaming

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Pasha Beglar, Jeffrey Schmitendorf, Flor Tonie Nguyen, Cindy Lin, Angelo Rodriguez, Jeremy Kleve, Liang Dong, Xinyuan Wang.
Faculty Mentor: Olukemi Sawyerr.

Abstract: Tabletop games such a Dungeons & Dragons allow players the ability to create a make belief world in which other players can be a part of. Tabletop games mainly depend on the players imagination, which is both its greatest feature and flaw. The frustration comes with not having shared vision for the word, so players typically buy figurines and maps. Our solution is an app that uses augmented reality to bring tabletop gaming to life. Players will be able to view the characters and maps of their story in a more interactive and immersive way. As players view the game from their phone camera, they will be able to see 3D trees, dragons, and their own personalized characters standing on the table, swaying and breathing as if they were in the room with them. Parties can be built to allow friends who are also playing the game to be able to see the same objects from their own distinct perspective. Not only do they have the option to choose through a selection of provided 3D models, but also be able to upload their own 3D models to view in the real world through their phone cameras.

Apparatus for the Characterizing of Gecko-Like Adhesive Specimens

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Arden Le, Natasha Beltran, Casandra Rivera-Fernandez, Nathan Doi, Jonathan Carranza.
Faculty Mentor: Jonathan Puthoff.

Abstract: Geckos adhere to surfaces across an array of microscopic hairs on their toes, and the adhesion forces between those hairs and the surface are based on Van der Waals' interactions. Scientists and engineers wish to produce materials that have gecko-like fibers that mimic the adhesive and non-contaminating properties of the natural material. In order to qualify how well these gecko-like adhesives perform, we need ways of measuring the tribological forces, such as adhesion and friction force. Measuring these forces will assist in identifying the relevant structural and materials variables that influence their performance. We developed a custom-built test platform that allows us to measure frictional forces produced by gecko-like materials. Our experimental setup includes a linear actuator, a force sensor, and is instrumented using LabView software. The sliding motion of an adhesive specimen against a glass substrate is initiated by the actuator to produce a frictional force. During an experiment, we can vary the sliding speed and normal forces applied to the specimen to influence the amount of adhesion generated by the specimen. We characterized the performance of the instrument using materials with known frictional properties; these results provide a baseline for the analysis of future experiments.

Localized Corrosion Behavior of Titanium Alloys

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:45 - 2:00
Location: 9-209

Authors: Kevin Robles , Jacob Benoun.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: Titanium and its alloys have been used in numerous applications, ranging from aerospace to biomedical. The mechanical properties as well as excellent corrosion behavior of these alloys have made it an ideal choice for a broad range of applications including aerospace, naval, sports and implants. Previous research conducted by this group has indicated that the addition of small amounts of boron may have helped improve corrosion behavior and biocompatibility of different titanium alloys using bulk dc and ac methods. To further elucidate the effect of boron on the corrosion behavior of titanium systems, this study is focused on the deployment of localized techniques, e.g., using a scanning droplet cell, to analysis corrosion behavior in small areas across different regions of a corrosion test coupon. The materials to be studied in this manner would include boron-containing alloys of Ti-6Al-4V (Ti64; UNS R56400) and commercial purity titanium (CP Ti; UNS R50400). The test solutions will include simulated seawater, saline, etc. Localized open circuit, linear polarization and cyclic potentiodynamic polarization measurements will be used to determine the local corrosion potential, resistance to polarization and the onset of pitting corrosion. This will allow for the analysis of the formation of the passive film in these unique alloys. Surface profiling will be conducted using both contact and non-contact techniques to provide further insights into the material behavior in these solutions

Body Temperature Regulation and Breathability of Synthetic Knit Structures in Sports Bras

Oral Presentation
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Ashley Garcia, Ellen Bessemans, Brandi Noble, Brianna Garrett.
Faculty Mentor: Jiangning Che.

Abstract: Sports bras were invented out of a need to remedy the physical damage and pain women felt from the excessive movement and shifting of their breasts while running or engaging in other physical activities. Desired qualities are the ability to wick moisture, breathability, fit and comfort. Issues with the current styles are discomfort from restrictive straps and lack of breathability. It is essential to identify and improve fabrications that are comfortable to wear and give breast support, while still allowing for excellent breathability. The purpose of this research is to better understand the influence knit structures and synthetic fibers in sports bras have on comfort factors of the wearer. This study's focus was on two aspects of comfort: (a) breathability, the moisture vapor permeability and transmission of a fabric's structure, and (b) thermal comfort, the insulating effect of clothing on the wearer. Our research group will perform tests comparing a sample product to four different synthetic fabrics with various knit structures to evaluate which fabric is most suitable for the desired comfort factors. To achieve this study's purpose, a multi-criteria decision-making method, TOPSIS (The Technique for Order of Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution), and AHP (Analytic Hierarchy Process) methods were utilized to select the knit structure and fiber type that performed best.

Fabrication of Gecko-like Adhesive

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Rohan Galotra, William Bestian, Wendy Ching, Kevin Lam, Hieu Nguyen, Muhammad Ikram.
Faculty Mentor: Jonathan Puthoff.

Abstract: Microsphere lithography is a process that involves the use of microparticles to create regular patterns with feature sizes at the microscale. This technique is applicable to the fabrication of Gecko adhesives because of the nature of the adhesive itself which operates on a microscopic scale. In order to replicate such minuscule fibers, microsphere lithography is used to create a template for the fibers that are then filled in with a liquid polymer. We developed techniques for suspending the microspheres on the surface of water and then extracting a submerged silicon wafer to produce a uniform coating of microspheres across the silicon wafer surface. The suspension of the particles was carried out using 2 methods: The first consisted of a suspension across the full area of the petri dish. This maximized the amount of usable area across which samples could be coated. The second method consisted of suspension over a limited region of the petri dish. This left space for the insertion of a syringe to extract water under the microsphere layer. The coating of the microspheres on the silicon wafer was conducted using 2 distinct methods. The float-transfer method is the more traditional technique that involves pulling silicon slides up through a layer of suspended microspheres. The second method involves withdrawing the water around the slides in order to bring the layer of microspheres to the surface of the silicon wafers. We determined that the combination of the limited-area microsphere suspension with the withdrawal method resulted in better microsphere coatings.

Inflight Power Generation and Storage in Airplanes

Oral Presentation
Time: 11:45 - 12:00
Location: 9-325

Authors: Jonathan Franco, Ian Pollard, Jake Alder, Steve Betts.
Faculty Mentor: Steven Dobbs.

Abstract: Emerging unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) and other aircraft use electrical propulsion systems. To extend battery charge and aircraft range, power can be generated from multiple sources during flight including aeroelastic vibrations from gusts and flutter, bending movements, and sunlight. These sources of "free" energy can be summed and used during flight operation. This research will employ the aeroelastic vibrations of the wing that will be captured using a created device that uses vibrations to generate electricity. Stress flexing piezoelectric devices will be attached at the root of the wing, where the most bending strain occurs. Flexible solar panels will be attached to the top of wing. These three sources will be summed together to power the propeller of an aircraft. A Maximum Power Point Tracker (MPPT) board is utilized to adjust the input voltage to harvest power from the wing vibration phenomenon and transform this power to supply the voltage requirements of the battery or graphene supercapacitors under load.

Is your best friend too old for laser treatment?

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Divya Biligiri, Andrea Watson.
Faculty Mentor: Cord Brundage.

Abstract: Cold Laser therapy is a treatment used for a large variety of physical ailments in many species. In this study I will be looking at canines and the influence of age and breed dependent maturation on the efficacy of the treatment after dental prophylaxis. Age and breed dependent maturation can greatly affect the animal's immune system and tissue healing rate, which are both factors that are influence by cold laser therapy. The canines will be between the ages of four months and eight years of varying breed and size (none larger than 60 pounds). Each patient will be placed in one of three groups: one treatment group where patients receive treatment on the gums of the upper and lower left side, a second treatment group for the upper and lower right side, and a control group where patients receive no treatment (treatment is 650nm wavelength, 10J/cm2). Photographs will be taken of the patient's gums one day after treatment and will be rated on a scale of one to seven by a blind evaluator. Once the data has been collected I will be analyzing it for the impact of age and breed, as two separate factors and with both combined, on the efficacy of the treatment on the patients. The data for this study is currently being collected, current results will be presented.

Comparative histological study to understand abscission zone formation in floral organs of Delphinium, a horticulturally important plant

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:45 - 3:00
Location: 9-335

Authors: Summer Blanco.
Faculty Mentor: Bharti Sharma.

Abstract: Floriculture is a multibillion-dollar branch of agriculture that is integral to the economy in numerous developed and developing countries. The Ranunculaceae family contains several plant species including delphinium, columbine, buttercup, and poppy, which are very important horticultural plants. The cut flower industry experiences heavy losses of 25-30% in crop shrinkage due to organ shedding, which makes flowers unattractive to buyers. Organ shedding is initiated due to a highly regulated process, which originates with the formation of a detachment or abscission zone (AZ). Delphinium sales particularly are negatively impacted by floral organ shedding that occurs approximately four days after harvest. AZ formation in floral organs induces enzymes and proteins to accumulate in predetermined positions. Molecules in these regions degrade the middle lamella, which joins adjacent cells. AZ formation is observed throughout development during events like germination, root formation, pollen release, floral organ shedding, and fruit softening. To increase the shelf life of these floral crops, chemicals are ectopically applied to inhibit the effects of ethylene, though the use of these products remains controversial because of concerns regarding their environmental impact. This project seeks to investigate abscission zone development in floral organs of delphinium flowers using histological techniques. This will be followed by understanding genetic basis of AZ formation. Results from our study can serve as a foundation for producing crops that have a longer shelf life.

Using high resolution Lidar data from SnowEx to characterize the sensitivity of snow depth retrievals to point-cloud density and vegetation

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Victoria Patterson, Kat Bormann, Jeff Deems, Tom Painter.
Faculty Mentor: Alex Small.

Abstract: The NASA SnowEx campaign conducted in 2016 and 2017 provides a rich source of high-resolution Lidar data from JPL's Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO - http://aso.jpl.nasa.gov) combined with extensive in-situ measurements in two key areas in Colorado: Grand Mesa and Senator Beck. While the uncertainty in the 50m snow depth retrievals from NASA's ASO been estimated at 1-2cm in non-vegetated exposed areas (Painter et al., 2016), the impact of forest cover and point-cloud density on ASO snow lidar depth retrievals is relatively unknown. Dense forest canopies are known to reduce lidar penetration and ground strikes thus affecting the elevation surface retrieved from in the forest. Using high-resolution lidar point cloud data from the ASO SnowEx campaigns (26pt/m2) we applied a series of data decimations (up to 90% point reduction) to the point cloud data to quantify the relationship between vegetation, ground point density, resulting snow-off and snow-on surface elevations and finally snow depth. We observed non-linear reductions in lidar ground point density in forested areas that were strongly correlated to structural forest cover metrics. Previously, the impacts of these data decimations on a small study area in Grand Mesa showed a sharp increase in under-canopy surface elevation errors of -0.18m when ground point densities were reduced to ~1.5pt/m2. In this study, we expanded the evaluation to the more topographically challenging Senator Beck basin, have conducted analysis along a vegetation gradient and are considering snow the impacts of snow depth rather than snow-off surface elevation. Preliminary analysis suggest that snow depth retrievals inferred from airborne lidar elevation differentials may systematically underestimate snow depth in forests when canopy densities exceed 1.75 and where tree heights exceed 5m. These results provide a basis from which to identify areas that may suffer from vegetation-induced biases in surface elevation models and snow depths derived from airborne lidar data, and help quantify expected spatial distributions of errors in the snow depth that can be used to improve the accuracy of ASO basin-scale depth and water equivalent products.

3D printing Graphene-Enhanced Li-ion battery and Graphene supercapacitors

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:15 - 1:30
Location: 9-307

Authors: Matthew Tisbe, Nicholas Ferguson, Amanda Ramos, Jeffrey Lee, Calvin Nguyen, Ben Cheng, Alfredo Collazo, Alexander Lau, Jose Lopez, Alexander Botello, Albert Armienta.
Faculty Mentor: Zhen Yu.

Abstract: Batteries are power storage devices that provide their stored power to connected electronics. Li-ion batteries are a widely used battery type due to their high energy density and ability to recharge. These properties make them well suited for portable electronic devices at the expense of taking the majority weight and volume of the device. The use of a liquid electrolyte also limits the recharging speed and operating temperature. Switching to a solid electrolyte yields enhanced environmental safety and higher energy density, thus a smaller volume needed for portable applications. Our research focuses on the ease of production of such batteries through the development of a superior solid electrolyte, and the robustness of 3D printing and robotic assembly.

Corrosion Resistance of Metal-Ceramic Composites Produced by Directed Metal Oxidation

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:30 - 1:45
Location: 9-209

Authors: Salar Tabesh, Christopher Kha, Joshua Diaz, Ian Limon, Jason Brayshaw, Kentaro Fujimoto Lunn.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) couple the wear resistance of ceramics and the ductility of metals. They also can provide an alternative to the difficult issue of shape formation confronting all-ceramic components if they can be formed to near net shape. Directed Metal Oxidation is a method of fabricating CMCs to near net shape. The process can be engineered to produce a wide range of geometries of alumina matrix/aluminum composites with minimum machining and also allows for further reinforcement of the composite through the addition of constituents such as silicon carbide. In applications, e.g., pump impellers and housing, where a combination of erosion, wear and corrosion resistance are required, the CMCs could be an ideal choice. Plates of ceramic-metal composites were fabricated from an aluminum-silicon-magnesium alloy using the Directed Metal Oxidation process. Coupons were prepared for a series of tests to characterize the corrosion behavior, hardness and erosion/wear resistance of this ceramic matrix composite material. Microstructural characterization of the composite was accomplished through scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) and optical microscopy. Hardness tests - both macro and micro - were conducted in different regions of the composites. The erosion resistance of these composites were determined using slurry abrasion and rotating pin tests.

Genetic and Bioinformatic Characterization of a New Sulfolobus Turreted Icosahedral Virus (STIV) Variant

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Michael Overton, Veneese Brown.
Faculty Mentor: Jamie Snyder.

Abstract: Due to their integral role in ecosystems and ideal qualities for studying evolutionary dynamics, the study of prokaryotic viruses has exploded in recent years. The archaeal virus STIV has repeatedly been confirmed to employ a lytic-only strategy in its host, Sulfolobus solfataricus (Sso), utilizing a unique lysis mechanism. Yet, several environmental strains of related S. acidocaldarius (Saci) have now been shown to contain a prophage with high sequence similarity to STIV, dubbed STIV3. This prophage was since induced and produced viable virions. The isolation of two variants of a virus with highly conserved genomes but divergent infection cycles presents an exciting system in which to study evolutionary and genetic dynamics. I have performed multiple sequence alignments for STIV, STIV3, and other archaeal viruses. Genome wide comparisons place STIV and STIV3 as sister variants, though some genomic regions also show high identity between STIV3 and a third variant, STIV2. Included in the latter is a gene, A510, which has particular similarities to known integrases. In order to deduce the actual function of A510, I am currently constructing a genetic system to generate A510 chimeras between STIV and STIV3. Sso and Saci will be infected with these chimeras, and lysogenic activity will be assessed with qPCR. As well, A510 expression will be measured with western blotting of cell lysates. My hope is to produce a genetic system for the further study of STIV3, to elucidate the role of A510 in its lysogenic cycle, and to determine potential mechanisms for STIV variant divergence.

The Effect of a Partisan Media Diet on Political Participation

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:45 - 2:00
Location: 15-1828

Authors: Renae Bruce.
Faculty Mentor: Mario Guerrero.

Abstract: Partisan Media Sites have become increasingly known for their sensationalizing of the news. Due to being run for profit rather than funded publicly, news sites must sensationalize the news to gain a viewing and audience to allow for a profit to be made. If the news stories told are dull, viewers will not continue to tune in. Because news stories are selectively chosen by these media sources and sensationalized to garner an audience, the audience's emotions are used to encourage them to participate politically and further reinforce their already solidified views. This project looks to identify the effect that a partisan media diet has on political participation in Cal Poly Pomona students. Using a survey given to students with various media diets and political ideologies, this thesis will examine if a biased media diet actually affects political participation in students though participation activities such as voting in elections, attending political rallies, and donating and/or showcasing support for a candidate or party. This paper will particularly look to see if having a biased media diet will increase political participation in individuals, as well as examine reasons to explain a correlation between the two.

Practice Tests and Workshops: Do They Help Students Pass Standardized Essay Tests?

Oral Presentation
Time: 3:00 - 3:15
Location: 15-2913

Authors: Alexis Letner, Christopher Buglino.
Faculty Mentor: Karen Russikoff.

Abstract: This study looked at the correlation between a student taking a practice test and/or going to workshops on grammar and writing strategies and the probability of that student passing a high-stakes essay test. Because 90% or more of students who do not pass this type of test are English language learners, this study is of particular interest to TESOL research. Most students who take these tests are advised to participate in the pre-test study activities mentioned above, but little research has been conducted to ascertain if said activities are actually helping the students pass. This study tracked the students who have participated in one or more of these study activities through the past year, and compared their pass rate to a general pass rate. The study found that only the students who had participated in multiple study activities during multiple school terms-thus failing the test at least once-had a significantly higher chance of passing compared to the general pass rate. It was therefore likely that only long-term writing intervention and dedication on the part of the student had any impact on the likelihood of a student to pass this type of test.

"John Lennon and His Lyrical Journey from Misogynist to Feminist"

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:45 - 3:00
Location: 15-1802

Authors: Christy Bui.
Faculty Mentor: David Kopplin.

Abstract: While John Winston Lennon was assassinated in 1980, his legacy lives on through his music. He is immortalized as iconic musician and an anti-war activist. There is no doubt that the Beatles have penned some of the most romantic love songs of our time with John at the helm. The band won the hearts of audiences across the world with their sweet lyricism and charm. On the other end of the spectrum, they've also released some rather alarming songs entailing infidelity, suicide, stalking and even murder all in the name of love. The perpetuation of toxic masculinity and unhealthy relationships in the Beatles' music is especially indicative of the discourse in John's personal life. By evaluating John's relationships with the various women in his life from Julia, Mimi, Cynthia and Yoko I have identified a clear correlation between their influence to his songwriting. To do so, I have evaluated the context of his songs, historical evidence and first and secondhand accounts to analyze the underlying source of the problematic lyrics as well as his efforts towards self improvement.

Los Horcones, Offering 1: Archaeology of the Senses

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:00 - 12:15
Location: 15-1828

Authors: Luke Burnor, Marlen Hinojosa.
Faculty Mentor: Claudia Garcia-Des Lauriers.

Abstract: Los Horcones, Offering 1: Archaeology of the Senses By: Marlen Hinojosa, Luke Burnor, and Dr. Claudia Garcia-Des Lauriers During the summer 2017 field season Offering 1, from the Los Horcones site on the Southern Pacific Coast of Chiapas Mexico, was examined using a variety of approaches and techniques to extract a unique understanding of the artifacts contained within. The assemblage contained a number of surprisingly intact figurines, masks, and whistles, as well as two broken vessels. Recordings and transcriptions were made of the whistles to explore the variety, range, and implications of the sounds produced by these artifacts. It was discovered that the range of sounds was dependent on the method of playing the instrument, lung capacity, and body size and often embodied various avian sounds. Previously unexcavated dirt collected between the vessels revealed an undiscovered figurine whistle, becoming potentially the most important artifact contained within the offering. Reconstruction and examination of the vessels was undertaken and various illustrations were created from a number of the artifacts. All objects were subsequently three-dimensionally scanned into digital format in an easily manipulable program to facilitate the examination of the artifacts without exacerbating degradation. This also allows the potential to replicate the objects via 3D printing hardware as well as maintain the safety of the original objects.

Apparatus for Measuring Efficiency of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Timothy Butch, Bassim Fakhro, Hannah Le, Kevin Sin, Carlos Rosete, Austin Hudson.
Faculty Mentor: Jonathan Puthoff.

Abstract: With the move toward renewable energy sources comes the necessity to validate the performance of next generation devices such as dye-sensitized solar cells. The issue with existing dye-sensitized solar cells is that it is difficult to measure their efficiency because of the relatively complicated nature of the devices. These complications include the presence of an electrolyte and dye based photoelectron generation. To address this problem we created an instrumented test platform for characterizing dye-sensitized solar cells in a simple circuit. Our platform includes a power supply/data acquisition module that can be controlled using custom software written in Laboratory Virtual Instrument Engineering Workbench (LabVIEW). With this instrumentation, numerous test variables can be controlled such as voltage step size and dwell time during a voltage sweep. The current versus voltage curves produced during an experiment can be analyzed to calculate cell efficiency. This efficiency data can be used to guide efforts to improve the manufacturing of dye-sensitized solar cells. This configuration will serve as a stepping stone for making solar power a more reliable energy resource by making its research more so uninhibited.

Optical Characterization of Thin Film Oxides Grown on Ferrous and Non-Ferrous Metals

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:45 - 1:00
Location: 9-209

Authors: Hernan Lopez, Samuel Navarrete, Yen Pung Chu, Gordon Butler.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: Metallic alloys used in various industrial applications can encounter high operating temperatures for varying periods of time. Under these conditions, metals are susceptible to oxidation, ultimately leading to the failure of that component or even complete system failure. Traditional methods of evaluating the extent of oxide growth, such as cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy, are destructive in nature and cannot be used to monitor the health of the structure while in service. Therefore, it is beneficial to have a method to determine the extent of oxidative attack on a component while in service. Optical analytical methods, which include spectral analysis and illuminance, offer an exciting non-destructive pathway to evaluate structures especially in hard to access or unsafe areas. In this study, the early onset of oxide films on UNS C11000, UNS G30400 and UNS R50400, at temperatures in the 125-900॰C range was determined. The color cycle was studied using a spectrophotometer to observe minute differences in the range of colors observed as the oxide film continues to grow. As the oxide film grows, it cycles between three colors: straw, brown and blue. The wavelength and intensity of the reflected incident light off the oxide film can indicate the state of oxidation. Results from the optical experiments were related to those obtained from scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) and optical microscopy. The oxide films were further characterized by non-contact profilometry and X-Ray diffraction (XRD).

Explorer I: From Rocket Science to Space Exploration

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:30 - 2:45
Location: 15-1802

Authors: Sarah Caballero.
Faculty Mentor: Zuoyue Wang.

Abstract: In the midst of the Cold War, the International Council of Scientific Unions declared an International Geophysical Year (IGY) for world-wide cooperation in geophysics in 1957-1958. The United States and the Soviet Union each announced plans to contribute an artificial satellite to the project. Urged on by the launch of the Soviet Union's Sputnik I and II in late 1957, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, which had experimented with rockets and missiles up to this point, and the U.S. Army worked together to launch the Explorer I satellite into Earth's orbit on January 31, 1958. The successful launch of Explorer I was the turning point from aeronautics dominated by military rocketry to an era of civilian space exploration. This new civilian focus was eventuated in NASA, which has taken the forefront in the frontier of outer space.

Quantification of trace fermentation products by 2D NMR

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:15 - 2:30
Location: 9-333

Authors: Liliana Cahuas, Michael Tran, Erica Hummel, Ana Cortes, Jacqueline Scott.
Faculty Mentor: Gregory Barding and Dr. Wei-Jen Lin.

Abstract: Biofuel development is a topic of high interest. Butanol, a promising alternative and direct substitute for gasoline powered engines, is naturally produced in relatively large quantities by bacteria that undergo ABE fermentation. To maximize butanol production, understanding the basic biochemistry of the underlying pathways is important and quantifying the biochemically related products can lead to the development of alternative biofuel sources. Quantification is complicated by the similarities of the targeted compounds, with several resonances overlapping. Using 2D NMR, which decreases convolution by spreading chemical information out in two dimensions, we can overcome the signal overlap. While 2D NMR is commonly used qualitatively for spectral assignments, our goal is to develop a 2D NMR method for the trace detection of butanol and related metabolites. To explore the quantitative nature of 2D NMR and quantify butanol and butyric acid, 1H-NMR and 2D TOCSY NMR methods were carried out on a buffered standard solution with three different pH values; 4.75, 7.00, and 8.5. As expected, the 1D analysis found the actual and expected concentrations to be similar. However, the results from the 2D experiments were not consistent with the actual concentrations. The analytes were also measured using an external calibration curve, with concentrations of 1, 4, 8, and 10 mM. The results indicate that while the 2D methods are not amenable to the traditional quantitation approaches by NMR, quantitation can be carried out if a calibration curve is applied.

Title IX: Evaluating Best Practices in Sexual Misconduct Policies, Procedures, and Resources

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:15 - 2:30
Location: 15-2907

Authors: Gustavo Callejas.
Faculty Mentor: Mario Guerrero.

Abstract: Title IX is a federal law that protects students from being discriminated against on the basis of sex, in any federally funded educational program. The Department of Education provides guidance to over 7,000 postsecondary institutions on how to implement Title IX policies and procedures. As a result of the broad guidance provided by the Department of Education, sexual misconduct policies and procedures vary substantially throughout postsecondary institutions across the nation. Current research suggests that many postsecondary institutions are not enforcing their own policies, nor those mandated by the federal government. In contrast, preliminary findings suggest that postsecondary institutions who have dedicated more resources to implement Title IX support services, experience an increase in the number of sexual misconduct complaints filed. Based on these findings, this thesis will investigate three postsecondary institutions who have implemented different policies, procedures, and resources to determine what the best practices are in implementing Title IX sexual misconduct policies, procedures, and resources.

Analysis of in situ Creep Deformation in Thermal Barrier Coatings

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Javier Martinez, Jorge Camarillo, Cynthia Do, Evelyn Arce.
Faculty Mentor: Jonathan Puthoff.

Abstract: Aluminide thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are used to give metallic components high temperature oxidation resistance and mechanical protection, thereby extending component lifetimes. In order to produce better-engineered components incorporating aluminide TBCs, we wish to better understand high temperature creep deformation of the coatings themselves. However, measuring the creep properties of aluminized coatings in situ are difficult due to the small dimensions of the coatings (100 micron coating thickness). We developed a model that permits us to determine the stresses in aluminide TBCs, and created software for performing the required calculations using Matlab.The model is based on the real geometry of TBC-coated material and includes distinct TBC, base metal, and interdiffusion zone layers. Using the stresses in the TBCs we can predict the creep deformation in the TBC and possibly the predominant failure mechanism. Additionally, the model can assist in the design of creep specimens so that the associated experiments can be performed. This combination of a detailed model of an aluminide TBC-coated material and experiments that can reveal the actual performance of the system would help in the design of components for high temperature applications such as turbines, engines, and reactors.

Overexpression and Purification of BaiH, a Bacterial Oxidoreductase Involved in Bile Acid Metabolism

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Amanda Cao.
Faculty Mentor: Kathryn McCulloch.

Abstract: Colorectal cancer is more prevalent in developed countries due to higher fat content diets. Fattier diets have been shown to increase secondary bile acids, which when accumulated, are possibly related with an increase in cancer rates. Secondary bile acids are a product of anaerobic gut bacteria metabolizing primary bile acids synthesized by the liver. As cholesterol derivatives, primary bile acids have detergent qualities that aid in nutrient uptake of fats and fat-soluble vitamins during digestion. Interfering with steps in the pathway is a possible approach to reducing the accumulation of secondary bile acids. One pathway gut bacteria use to convert primary bile acids to secondary bile acids is through the removal of the C7 hydroxyl group with enzymes encoded in the bile acid induced (bai) operon. Several oxidations are necessary to remove the C7 hydroxyl, including BaiH, an oxidoreductase that inserts a double bond between C4 and C5. Initial studies into BaiH necessitate identifying optimal conditions for overexpression in E. coli cell lines. Analysis of overexpression, performed by SDS-PAGE analysis of small scale trials, will identify conditions that are most ideal for large scale overexpression. Large scale overexpression will then lead into optimizing purification of active protein. Further work will include verifying that purified BaiH is active through an NADH:flavin oxidoreductase activity assay.

Dye Sensitized Solar Cells

Oral Presentation
Time: 3:00 - 3:15
Location: 9-307

Authors: Victoria Nguyen, Mitchell Mathes, Michael Ku, Sandie To, Hang Cao, Brian Case.
Faculty Mentor: Jonathan Puthoff.

Abstract: Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) are an example of a partially organic alternative to the semiconductor-based solar cells. They employ photosensitive dye molecules associated with a conducting substrate to harvest solar photons and accumulate electrons. We fabricate DSSCs that incorporate hibiscus dye and an organic hydrocarbon gel as the electrolyte. Previous generations of DSSCs relied on liquid electrolytes to replenish electrons in the dyes. To overcome the technical challenges associated with a liquid electrolyte we investigate the performance of solid electrolytes. Lambda carrageenan, known as Irish moss, is a thickening agent, stabilizer, and gel formula when mixed with water. Because of these qualities, Irish moss can be used to create a more mechanically stable electrolyte. For example, liquid electrolytes are prone to spillage which causes inconsistent readings. We investigated strategies for making lambda carrageenan electrolytes and tested the performance of those cells. We contrast the performance of the solid electrolyte based cells with that of the liquid electrolyte based cells.

Apparatus for the Characterizing of Gecko-Like Adhesive Specimens

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Arden Le, Natasha Beltran, Casandra Rivera-Fernandez, Nathan Doi, Jonathan Carranza.
Faculty Mentor: Jonathan Puthoff.

Abstract: Geckos adhere to surfaces across an array of microscopic hairs on their toes, and the adhesion forces between those hairs and the surface are based on Van der Waals' interactions. Scientists and engineers wish to produce materials that have gecko-like fibers that mimic the adhesive and non-contaminating properties of the natural material. In order to qualify how well these gecko-like adhesives perform, we need ways of measuring the tribological forces, such as adhesion and friction force. Measuring these forces will assist in identifying the relevant structural and materials variables that influence their performance. We developed a custom-built test platform that allows us to measure frictional forces produced by gecko-like materials. Our experimental setup includes a linear actuator, a force sensor, and is instrumented using LabView software. The sliding motion of an adhesive specimen against a glass substrate is initiated by the actuator to produce a frictional force. During an experiment, we can vary the sliding speed and normal forces applied to the specimen to influence the amount of adhesion generated by the specimen. We characterized the performance of the instrument using materials with known frictional properties; these results provide a baseline for the analysis of future experiments.

An Analysis of Human Sex Trafficking in Los Angeles County

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Success Carter.
Faculty Mentor: Renford Reese.

Abstract: This is an analytical review of current causes and effects of domestic human sex trafficking in the United States. Highlighting current federal and state anti-human sex trafficking policy, this study also aims to address the local initiatives and Legislation within Los Angeles County addressing sex trafficking.Further more, this analysis will decipher the effectiveness of current anti-human sex trafficking on a local level.

Dye Sensitized Solar Cells

Oral Presentation
Time: 3:00 - 3:15
Location: 9-307

Authors: Victoria Nguyen, Mitchell Mathes, Michael Ku, Sandie To, Hang Cao, Brian Case.
Faculty Mentor: Jonathan Puthoff.

Abstract: Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) are an example of a partially organic alternative to the semiconductor-based solar cells. They employ photosensitive dye molecules associated with a conducting substrate to harvest solar photons and accumulate electrons. We fabricate DSSCs that incorporate hibiscus dye and an organic hydrocarbon gel as the electrolyte. Previous generations of DSSCs relied on liquid electrolytes to replenish electrons in the dyes. To overcome the technical challenges associated with a liquid electrolyte we investigate the performance of solid electrolytes. Lambda carrageenan, known as Irish moss, is a thickening agent, stabilizer, and gel formula when mixed with water. Because of these qualities, Irish moss can be used to create a more mechanically stable electrolyte. For example, liquid electrolytes are prone to spillage which causes inconsistent readings. We investigated strategies for making lambda carrageenan electrolytes and tested the performance of those cells. We contrast the performance of the solid electrolyte based cells with that of the liquid electrolyte based cells.

Monitoring for anthelmintics resistance in horses using the modified McMaster egg-count technique

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Juan Castellanos, Cristina Olvera, James Ramirez, Roberto Ramirez.
Faculty Mentor: Cord Brundage.

Abstract: The modified McMaster egg count technique is a floatation technique used as a tool to keep quantitative record of Trichostrongyles-type eggs in horses. The modified McMaster allowed us to estimate the number of eggs per gram (epg) per fecal sample, giving us an idea of the scale of internal parasites within the horse. By incorporating the fecal egg reduction test, we were able to compare the numbers before application of anthelmintics and two weeks after to determine the effectiveness of the treatment. These records also allowed us to detect if any anthelmintic-resistance has built within the populations. Although after the application of anthelmintics the epg is largely decreased, the numbers began to increase after some time. By repeating this twice over the span of two quarters, we saw a drastic decrease in epg after application, followed by a gradual increase each week since the administration of the drugs. Although we were not able to determine if resistance has been built within the populations, we determined that these populations have the potential to become fully resistant. By further using the modified McMaster egg-counting technique, we will be able to keep record of these populations, and observe if resistance has formed.

Improving Thermal Comfort of the Base Layer for Snowboarding Gear

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Sabrina Huynh, Lindsay McClain, Vanessa Castro, Kiara Franco.
Faculty Mentor: Jiangning Che.

Abstract: Gear for winter sports, like snowboarding and skiing, have been around for over 50 years, and includes equipment and apparel. This type of apparel consists of three layers: the top layer is insulated, waterproof, and breathable, the mid-layer is meant to add warmth and comfort, and the base layer's main purpose is to keep the wearer dry by wicking moisture, which will keep them warm for a long period of time. The base layer is key to the balance between heat production and heat loss, known as thermal comfort and is crucial in cold-weather sports apparel because it is so close to the skin. However, the fabrication of most base layers do not prevent moisture from entering the garment, which means the base layer's main function cannot be completed and thermal comfort is ultimately reduced. The purpose of this research is to improve thermal comfort of the base layer for snowboarding. We will conduct tests with four different fabrics: Gore-Tex, neoprene, fleece, and swimwear tricot. The evaluation of these fabrics are critical in quantifying thermal comfort, abrasion resistance, thickness, and absorbency. Our goal is to refine thermal comfort for long-term wear of snowboarding attire by thoroughly collecting quantitative and qualitative data. In this study, we will make a decision based on multiple criteria, including the Technique for Order of Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS) and Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) methods. This will aid in the final selection of the base layer fabric, according to the desired performance properties.

Autonomous Collision Avoidance of UAVs With ADS-B Transponders

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:45 - 3:00
Location: 9-325

Authors: Tristan Sherman, Mitchell Caudle, Hana Haideri, Jimmy Lopez.
Faculty Mentor: Subodh Bhandari.

Abstract: If UAVs are to be successfully integrated into U.S. national airspace, the ability to perform autonomous collision avoidance between both manned and unmanned aircraft is a necessity. This poster presents a method for collision avoidance utilizing Automatic Dependent Surveillance - Broadcast (ADS-B) transponders which will be required in all manned aircraft by 2020. These devices broadcast and receive global position of all similarly equipped aircraft in a 100-nautical mile vicinity. A Sig Kadet Senior and a Hangar 9 Valiant fixed wing aircraft are used as flight platforms to test autonomous collision avoidance. These aircraft will include ADS-B transponders, a Pixhawk autopilot and an Intel NUC as the primary components of the avionics system. The uniquely developed algorithm is compiled in a Linux environment and uses MAVLink protocols to send off-board commands to the autopilot. The collision avoidance algorithm uses kinematic and circular motion equations to predict the future positions of both aircraft and employ an avoidance maneuver at a constant altitude. This system is demonstrated through simple ground tests, and subsequently moving on to full-system flight tests.

Electrochemical Evaluation of Aluminum Foams for Proton Exchange Membrane Electrolyzer Cells

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:15 - 2:30
Location: 9-307

Authors: Ho Lun Chan, Kevin Guo, Milena Mccarthy.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: Hydrogen gas is a renewable resource with three times the energy storage capability of gasoline. There is an increasing demand for its use in power generation, chemical synthesis and metallurgical processing. Current practices for hydrogen production, such as steam-reforming, are undesirable because of the resulting large carbon footprint. Proton exchange membrane electrolyzer cells (PEMECs) provide an efficient and pollution-free pathway to generate hydrogen gas. However, PEMECs suffer from short lifespan due to corrosion of materials used for the liquid/gas diffusion layer (LGDL). In PEMECs, the LGDL has the crucial role of managing the mass transportation of water to the catalyst layer and the distribution of heat and current throughout the cell. Titanium mesh and carbon paper are the most commonly used materials for the LGDL in electrolyzer cells. However, titanium mesh has low surface area and is not cost-effective. Carbon paper is not a suitable material for the LGDL due its inability to withstand the highly oxidizing environment at the anodic side of the cell. In addition, carbon paper is brittle, has a low liquid permeability and the corrosion byproducts will poison the catalyst. Due to the ineffectiveness of titanium mesh and carbon paper, aluminum foam is a potential alternative material for the LGDL because of its high surface area, mechanical strength, thermal conductivity, commercial availability, electrical conductivity and low density. UNS A96101 foams with porous microstructures of 4-6%, 6-8%, and 8-10% relative densities were studied with varying pore distributions of 10, 20, and 40 pores per inch. The corrosion behavior of test specimens was evaluated through linear polarization resistance and Tafel tests in aerated 0.01 M sulfuric acid solution at 50⁰C. Microstructural analysis was performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to observe localized changes on the surface of the UNS A96101 foam. Electrochemical surface area for each sample will be determined by cyclic voltammetry in the same environment.

Design and Experimental Testing of Air Gap Membrane Distillation Test Cell

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:15 - 1:30
Location: 9-325

Authors: Benny Ly, Aaron Chan, Keaton Cornell.
Faculty Mentor: Reza Lakeh.

Abstract: As the population grows, one issue that needs to be addressed is the lack of clean water resources. New technology has helped develop, and improve methods to treat non-potable water. One subcategory of water filtration is Membrane Distillation (MD). MD is a filtration process that utilizes thermal energy to desalinate and decontaminate water. By having a temperature difference across the membrane, the pressure gradient created drives vapor through. One method of MD known as Air Gap Membrane Distillation (AGMD) has shown significant ability to desalinate water effectively in small scales. The air gap minimizes heat loss through conduction making AGMD is an attractive option for upscaling. Exploration of the independent operating parameters is required to further understand and model relationships to the permeate flux, the measure of fresh water produced by the system. In order to test such parameters, a unique design was manufactured. The independent parameters that will be tested are feed and coolant temperatures, flow rates, and membrane porosity. Temperatures in the hot feed will be varied from 25oC to 80oC and cold feed temperatures will vary from 5oC to 25oC. Flow rates will range from 1 to 3 L/Min. The expected behavior of the permeate flux is an increase as feed temperature increase. A change in coolant temperature will affect the permeate flux but not as significantly as the feed temperature. The results acquired from the testing cell is expected to follow similar experiment trends of previously studied AGMD testing cells, thus validating the design.

Surface Modification of Stainless Steel using Cold Plasma

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Sara Margala, Josue Monterrosa, Anthony Oceguera, Lauren Wong, Wing Jong Chan.
Faculty Mentor: Nina Abramzon.

Abstract: Surface energy of stainless steel coupons were increased through the exposure of helium and oxygen atmospheric radio-frequency generated plasma. The increase in surface energy is observed through the contact angle of a water droplet placed on the sample and quantified by Young's equation. A 5 second exposure test reveals that an oxygen flow rate of 0.20L/min results in the lowest contact angle. Our experiments on the longevity of the treatment shows that at 6 hours after a one-minute treatment, our sample still retains a 35% higher surface energy compared to the control. An analysis of the spectra of the plasma showed that more reactive species are present at lower oxygen flow rates. Additionally, to enhance precision of exposure intervals, a electromechanical rotating stage system with a microcontroller was developed.

Design of a small-scale inflatable Martian entry vehicle for Prandtl-M

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:45 - 2:00
Location: 9-333

Authors: Nguyen Pham, Adam Charron, Jessica Ortiz, Alexander Rey, Andrew Tibbels.
Faculty Mentor: Navid Nakhjiri.

Abstract: With the prospect of a manned mission to Mars within the next decade, NASA has developed missions and projects to pave the way. The Prandtl-M, developed by NASA Armstrong, is a fully autonomous UAV that is meant to aerially survey the Martian surface. Blue Ares' mission is to safely take the Prandtl-M, packed in a 3U CubeSat, through the hypersonic atmospheric entry and deploy the aircraft at its operational altitude. Additionally, the challenge is to fit this delivery system into the confined space of a 12U CubeSat-which requires Blue Ares to be flexible and compact in addition to providing adequate thermal protection. Inspired by NASA Langley's Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) Project, Blue Ares uses an inflatable aeroshell to protect the payload through the violent conditions of atmospheric entry. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) was implemented to numerically analyze the vehicle's aerodynamic characteristics. Along with referenced data from the Phoenix Lander mission, CFD data was used in MATLAB to design a landing trajectory for the vehicle. ANSYS Workbench was used exclusively to analyze and simulate the aero-thermal behavior of the vehicle through the different stages of flight. The inflatable mechanism design, which includes material selection, folding configuration, and inflating method, was performed separately and later incorporated into the system. The outcome of this research is a vehicle that is capable of protecting the payload from atmospheric heating and aerodynamically slow down the vehicle to its desired altitude and velocity.

Diversity in Advertising Marketing Campaigns

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Dewen Chen, Kelsey Noriega, Denise Lopez, Shamia Hussain.
Faculty Mentor: Chitra Dabas.

Abstract: This research examined consumers attitude toward marketing campaigns that consist of diverse model ethnicity and, homogenous, white model ethnicities. Five constructs were used in this research, Self-Identification, Attitudes Toward Advertisement, Perceived Uniqueness, Word of Mouth, and Purchase Intention. We developed two stimulus that represents diversity and homogeneousness. Through convenience sampling with the use of SurveyMonkey and Social Medias, participants were asked to take a survey and to answer on a slider which stimulus they prefer given the question. The collected data are then recoded into two different scales with respect to each stimulus, diversity and homogeneousness. Then, Linear Regressions were employed to determine the significant value P, B and adjusted R square. All the hypotheses were supported. In general, consumers have a positive attitude toward diversity in marketing campaign with more engagement in word of mouth, purchase intention, and have a more positive attitude toward said advertisements. As additional analysis, we conducted t-tests to determine the frequency of participants answer on each scale. Interestingly, we found that participants are more willing to answer on the diversity spectrum instead of the homogeneous spectrum. For questions that involved the constructs of Attitude Toward Advertisement and Purchase Intentions, participants are more likely to have a strong positive impression on diversity stimulus.

NEUROIMAGING META-ANALYSIS OF LONG-TERM MEMORY ENCODING

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Karli Cheng, Shea Duarte.
Faculty Mentor: Robert Blumenfeld.

Abstract: The ability to successfully encode information into long-term memory (LTM) is fundamentally important for our daily functioning. Results from neuroimaging studies consistently implicate a network of brain regions, including the lateral prefrontal cortex, inferotemporal cortex, and medial temporal regions in LTM encoding and retrieval. We were interested in investigating the interactions amongst these regions during encoding and how they differ from retrieval. We hypothesized that during encoding, lateral prefrontal regions would act as hubs playing an essential role in mediating communication amongst other regions, and that prefrontal regions, along with inferior and medial temporal regions form a functional subnetwork that lay at the core of the communication throughout the larger encoding network. To test these hypotheses, we constructed a network model representing patterns of co-activation amongst brain regions across 89 studies in the LTM encoding neuroimaging literature. Interrogating this network using graph-theoretical metrics, we found evidence that left inferior frontal gyrus regions have the highest betweeness centrality in the network, thus they serve as global hubs during encoding. Moreover, using community detection analysis, we found that these left inferior frontal gyrus regions, along with right parahippocampal, inferior temporal, and inferior parietal cortices form a discrete subnetwork during encoding. In further analyses, we will compare the networks supporting item vs. associative LTM encoding, based on the notion that these forms of encoding are supported by different yet overlapping prefrontal-medial temporal networks.

3D printing Graphene-Enhanced Li-ion battery and Graphene supercapacitors

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:15 - 1:30
Location: 9-307

Authors: Matthew Tisbe, Nicholas Ferguson, Amanda Ramos, Jeffrey Lee, Calvin Nguyen, Ben Cheng, Alfredo Collazo, Alexander Lau, Jose Lopez, Alexander Botello, Albert Armienta.
Faculty Mentor: Zhen Yu.

Abstract: Batteries are power storage devices that provide their stored power to connected electronics. Li-ion batteries are a widely used battery type due to their high energy density and ability to recharge. These properties make them well suited for portable electronic devices at the expense of taking the majority weight and volume of the device. The use of a liquid electrolyte also limits the recharging speed and operating temperature. Switching to a solid electrolyte yields enhanced environmental safety and higher energy density, thus a smaller volume needed for portable applications. Our research focuses on the ease of production of such batteries through the development of a superior solid electrolyte, and the robustness of 3D printing and robotic assembly.

Fabrication of Gecko-like Adhesive

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Rohan Galotra, William Bestian, Wendy Ching, Kevin Lam, Hieu Nguyen, Muhammad Ikram.
Faculty Mentor: Jonathan Puthoff.

Abstract: Microsphere lithography is a process that involves the use of microparticles to create regular patterns with feature sizes at the microscale. This technique is applicable to the fabrication of Gecko adhesives because of the nature of the adhesive itself which operates on a microscopic scale. In order to replicate such minuscule fibers, microsphere lithography is used to create a template for the fibers that are then filled in with a liquid polymer. We developed techniques for suspending the microspheres on the surface of water and then extracting a submerged silicon wafer to produce a uniform coating of microspheres across the silicon wafer surface. The suspension of the particles was carried out using 2 methods: The first consisted of a suspension across the full area of the petri dish. This maximized the amount of usable area across which samples could be coated. The second method consisted of suspension over a limited region of the petri dish. This left space for the insertion of a syringe to extract water under the microsphere layer. The coating of the microspheres on the silicon wafer was conducted using 2 distinct methods. The float-transfer method is the more traditional technique that involves pulling silicon slides up through a layer of suspended microspheres. The second method involves withdrawing the water around the slides in order to bring the layer of microspheres to the surface of the silicon wafers. We determined that the combination of the limited-area microsphere suspension with the withdrawal method resulted in better microsphere coatings.

Interplanetary CubeSat Solar Sail Mission

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:30 - 1:45
Location: 9-333

Authors: Holly Everson, Guadalupe Romero Bravo, Steven Jaworski, Sofiya Pascual, Riza Dayapera, Aerbwong Chitamitara, Suleman Jalal, Erica Arroyo, Justin Toney.
Faculty Mentor: Navid Nakhjiri.

Abstract: Studying CubeSats for space science missions has increased significantly in recent years. The use of a CubeSat will provide a spacecraft which is lighter, mechanically simpler, and with a fraction of the cost of a traditional space mission. Cal Poly Pomona Interplanetary CubeSat Solar Sail Mission (IPCS3M) is a multi-year research project studying the use of solar radiation pressure on a sail as an alternative method of propulsion for interplanetary CubeSat missions. With a 90 meters squared Mylar sail, the 6U CubeSat will travel to Saturn with the intended goal of dropping a 1U science payload into Saturn's northern hexagonal storm. The payload will enter the inner wall of the eye to gather data regarding storm patterns, chemical composition, and other factors. Additionally, the solar sail will provide the spacecraft with a free continuous thrust, increasing velocity throughout the mission timeline provided by the solar radiation pressure. Finite Element Analysis and Computer Aided Design (CAD) modeling were used to construct the spacecraft and allow for structural studies. In addition to computer model tests, physical tests have also been performed to research material properties, light reflectance, and boom creation. Successful solar sail implementation will give CubeSats a form of propulsion that will open up possibilities for more complex missions, most notably orbital maneuvering and interplanetary travel.

Wastewater Sanitation and Reclamation: Onsite Solutions for Sustainable Living

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:45 - 2:00
Location: 9-325

Authors: Christopher Chiu.
Faculty Mentor: Monica Palomo.

Abstract: As the state of California experiences one of the worst drought on record, the demand of an alternate source of water continuous increasing. Onsite or decentralized water reclamation systems have become important infrastructure elements that can provide an alternate source of water in small geographic areas. An onsite or decentralized wastewater treatment system (DEWATS) is a low-maintenance, sustainable, and economical method for treating wastewater. Like conventional wastewater treatment, DEWATS uses both physical and biological treatment to improve water quality and it can be designed to meet state and federal discharge requirements. However, the decentralized design relies on the innovative use of traditional processes to create a system that provides an eco-friendly, and an ideally financially affordable solution that will allow the recovery of the water for use at the local level. The DEWATS is gravity-fed process that has been implemented in developing countries to improve health conditions in communities that lack sanitation services. Pilot testing is needed to evaluate the capacity of meeting NPDES discharge requirements. In addition to water recovery, DEWATS is also a potential source for methane recovery as an alternative local energy source. The project proposes storage for the reclaimed water at the end of the treatment train. The proposed project was developed to improve the quality of life for residents in low-income communities in Coachella Valley, California by replacing existing septic systems which do not meet Riverside County standards for onsite wastewater treatment systems. The proposed solution will provide a new source of water that could be used for crop irrigation, landscaping, or dust control.

Flight Testing, Data Collection, and System Identification of a Multicopter UAV

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:30 - 2:45
Location: 9-325

Authors: Sung Hyeok Cho.
Faculty Mentor: Subodh Bhandari.

Abstract: This presentation includes the flight dynamics model development of a multicopter using a system identification technique. The multicopter being identified is a 3DR X8 octocopter, equipped with a PixHawk flight computer. The result of this research can help development of an optimized flight control system, as well as a robust simulation of its flight dynamics. Frequency sweep and doublet flight maneuvers are conducted in the longitudinal, lateral, directional, and vertical axis. The pilot input, high level motor commands, as well as attitude angels, translational velocity, and angular velocities are logged during flight. The collected flight data is processed through MATLAB, and converted to a frequency response using CIFER software's FRESPID, MISOSA, and COMPOSITE modules. The frequency response is then used to derive a state-space model of the multicopter through CIFER's DERIVID module. The derived dynamic flight model is verified against the doublet maneuver using the VERIFY module of CIFER. For the multicopter, it was assumed that each flight axes' dynamics were not linked, and each axis was identified separately. Later, the obtained models were then put together to yield the final model.

Skeletal Anatomic Reconstructionists

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Marina Duveneck, Logan Malinchak, Roberto Ramirez, Rachel Christensen.
Faculty Mentor: Cord Brundage.

Abstract: SkAR, Skeletal Anatomic Reconstructionists, is a project that began in 2017, and has manifested into a collaborative effort of prospective veterinary students who are fascinated with anatomy and enjoy hands-on learning. The goal of SkAR was to debride animal tissue with the aid of flesh-eating beetles, in order to clean and articulate the bones back together in a physical model. The bone models are used for teaching purposes within our Animal Science department, as well as momento's for the students who built the model to keep. Highlights of SkAR so far has been tackling the challenge of debriding animal tissue in a way that is effective, sanitary, and reasonably fast. The beginning phase of the project involved the aid of a maceration tank with heated water to self decompose the tissue. These efforts were successful, but were deemed messy and time consuming. As a proposed alternative to the maceration tank, the program invested in flesh-eating beetles to feed off the tissue, which serve as a self sufficient population of decomposers. Other important highlights of this project are students conspiring as a group to articulate the bones correctly, while using appropriate support such as drills, wires, and glue. SkAR serves as a valuable opportunity for prospective veterinary students to learn animal anatomy in a way that is challenging, physical, and creative. It is anticipated that SkAR members will have a solid foundation and understanding of animal anatomy when they begin their journey as a graduate student.

Optical Characterization of Thin Film Oxides Grown on Ferrous and Non-Ferrous Metals

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:45 - 1:00
Location: 9-209

Authors: Hernan Lopez, Samuel Navarrete, Yen Pung Chu, Gordon Butler.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: Metallic alloys used in various industrial applications can encounter high operating temperatures for varying periods of time. Under these conditions, metals are susceptible to oxidation, ultimately leading to the failure of that component or even complete system failure. Traditional methods of evaluating the extent of oxide growth, such as cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy, are destructive in nature and cannot be used to monitor the health of the structure while in service. Therefore, it is beneficial to have a method to determine the extent of oxidative attack on a component while in service. Optical analytical methods, which include spectral analysis and illuminance, offer an exciting non-destructive pathway to evaluate structures especially in hard to access or unsafe areas. In this study, the early onset of oxide films on UNS C11000, UNS G30400 and UNS R50400, at temperatures in the 125-900॰C range was determined. The color cycle was studied using a spectrophotometer to observe minute differences in the range of colors observed as the oxide film continues to grow. As the oxide film grows, it cycles between three colors: straw, brown and blue. The wavelength and intensity of the reflected incident light off the oxide film can indicate the state of oxidation. Results from the optical experiments were related to those obtained from scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) and optical microscopy. The oxide films were further characterized by non-contact profilometry and X-Ray diffraction (XRD).

Deoxydehydration Reaction Catalyzed by Dioxomolybdenum Complexes of Salan Ligands

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:30 - 2:45
Location: 9-333

Authors: Garrit Clabaugh.
Faculty Mentor: Alex John.

Abstract: Currently, our material and energy needs are met primarily using fossil resources. Petro chemical, for example, obtained from the refining of crude oil are used as fuel and used for making chemicals/materials. Since fossil resources are present only in finite amounts, a transition from fossil fuels to other renewable resources is a necessity. In the project, we explore the possibility of using biomass as a renewable resource somewhat similar to petroleum. However, biomass such as lignocellulose is highly functionalized (oxygenated) while fossil resources are mostly hydro carbons in nature. One of the ways to reduce biomass is by the deoxydehydration (DODH) reaction, which converts diols into olefins. The most efficient catalyst discovered so far turns out to include the rare transition metal, rhenium. This metal has outstanding yields of converting substrates -which mimic the complexity of biomass- into alkenes, but with a downside of being absurdly expensive. Molybdenum on the other hand is far from scarce and is significantly cheaper than rhenium, with the downside of decreased yields. We are exploring the potential of molybdenum complexes supported over salan ligands in catalyzing the DODH reaction. More specifically, we want to see how changing the ligand backbone from (N,N'-H2)LMoO2 to (N,N'-Me2)LMoO2 in these complexes affects catalytic efficiency.

Laser Photomodulation Decreases the Likelihood of Wound Dehiscence in Laboratory Mice

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Benjamin Clock, Andrea Watson.
Faculty Mentor: Cord Brundage.

Abstract: Photomodulation (PM) using low-level-lasers is used therapeutically in human and veterinary medicine to minimize inflammation and expedite wound healing. To test the efficacy of this therapy we preformed PM on the surgical wound healing of live adult mice (Mus musculus) in a controlled laboratory environment. A class II, maximum 100 megaWatt, 650 nanometer wavelength type BF laser was used. Age controlled female mice (n = 12) were anesthetized and receive an initial surgical wound of approximately 2 centimeters located on their lower abdomen, mimicking a spay/neuter wound. After this surgery, all mice had their wounds surgically closed (3-stitches) and received a single dose of analgesic. The treatment group (n = 8) received an initial laser treatment 10 J/cm2 at the incision site after the surgical closure; A control group (n = 4) did not receive any laser treatment. The following morning each animal was evaluated and their incision site was photographed for scoring. PM decreases the likelihood of wound dehiscence (opening) in mice, as the mice that did not receive treatment displayed more wound dehiscence than the mice that that did receive PM. Additional experimentation is needed to further evaluate the effects of PM on wound healing in mice.

3D printing Graphene-Enhanced Li-ion battery and Graphene supercapacitors

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:15 - 1:30
Location: 9-307

Authors: Matthew Tisbe, Nicholas Ferguson, Amanda Ramos, Jeffrey Lee, Calvin Nguyen, Ben Cheng, Alfredo Collazo, Alexander Lau, Jose Lopez, Alexander Botello, Albert Armienta.
Faculty Mentor: Zhen Yu.

Abstract: Batteries are power storage devices that provide their stored power to connected electronics. Li-ion batteries are a widely used battery type due to their high energy density and ability to recharge. These properties make them well suited for portable electronic devices at the expense of taking the majority weight and volume of the device. The use of a liquid electrolyte also limits the recharging speed and operating temperature. Switching to a solid electrolyte yields enhanced environmental safety and higher energy density, thus a smaller volume needed for portable applications. Our research focuses on the ease of production of such batteries through the development of a superior solid electrolyte, and the robustness of 3D printing and robotic assembly.

Design and Experimental Testing of Air Gap Membrane Distillation Test Cell

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:15 - 1:30
Location: 9-325

Authors: Benny Ly, Aaron Chan, Keaton Cornell.
Faculty Mentor: Reza Lakeh.

Abstract: As the population grows, one issue that needs to be addressed is the lack of clean water resources. New technology has helped develop, and improve methods to treat non-potable water. One subcategory of water filtration is Membrane Distillation (MD). MD is a filtration process that utilizes thermal energy to desalinate and decontaminate water. By having a temperature difference across the membrane, the pressure gradient created drives vapor through. One method of MD known as Air Gap Membrane Distillation (AGMD) has shown significant ability to desalinate water effectively in small scales. The air gap minimizes heat loss through conduction making AGMD is an attractive option for upscaling. Exploration of the independent operating parameters is required to further understand and model relationships to the permeate flux, the measure of fresh water produced by the system. In order to test such parameters, a unique design was manufactured. The independent parameters that will be tested are feed and coolant temperatures, flow rates, and membrane porosity. Temperatures in the hot feed will be varied from 25oC to 80oC and cold feed temperatures will vary from 5oC to 25oC. Flow rates will range from 1 to 3 L/Min. The expected behavior of the permeate flux is an increase as feed temperature increase. A change in coolant temperature will affect the permeate flux but not as significantly as the feed temperature. The results acquired from the testing cell is expected to follow similar experiment trends of previously studied AGMD testing cells, thus validating the design.

It's a New Yorker Thing: How the Big Apple Shaped the Ideology of four Supreme Court Justices.

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:45 - 3:00
Location: 15-2913

Authors: Danielle Correa.
Faculty Mentor: Mario Guerrero.

Abstract: New York has always had a momentous voice in politics, understandably peaking the interest of many scholars. Most of these scholars have sought to determine how a large city shapes resident's ideology, often citing: diversity, affluence, and education as central factors. This thesis goes even further, and determines how the interactions in New York shaped four of our most influential figures in political history. These influential figures are Supreme Court Justices: Ginsberg, Kagan, Scalia, and Sotomayor. Aside from being raised in New York at different time periods, they each lived in different boroughs. Through the use of qualitative analysis, this thesis will use a combination of autobiographies and memoirs to determine which interactions they considered to be the most influential in shaping their ideology. This analysis will then cross reference U.S Census Data to determine the makeup of the borough at the time they lived there. In combination together, the thesis will successfully determine which of the interactions were the most influential for each individual justice.

Quantification of trace fermentation products by 2D NMR

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:15 - 2:30
Location: 9-333

Authors: Liliana Cahuas, Michael Tran, Erica Hummel, Ana Cortes, Jacqueline Scott.
Faculty Mentor: Gregory Barding and Dr. Wei-Jen Lin.

Abstract: Biofuel development is a topic of high interest. Butanol, a promising alternative and direct substitute for gasoline powered engines, is naturally produced in relatively large quantities by bacteria that undergo ABE fermentation. To maximize butanol production, understanding the basic biochemistry of the underlying pathways is important and quantifying the biochemically related products can lead to the development of alternative biofuel sources. Quantification is complicated by the similarities of the targeted compounds, with several resonances overlapping. Using 2D NMR, which decreases convolution by spreading chemical information out in two dimensions, we can overcome the signal overlap. While 2D NMR is commonly used qualitatively for spectral assignments, our goal is to develop a 2D NMR method for the trace detection of butanol and related metabolites. To explore the quantitative nature of 2D NMR and quantify butanol and butyric acid, 1H-NMR and 2D TOCSY NMR methods were carried out on a buffered standard solution with three different pH values; 4.75, 7.00, and 8.5. As expected, the 1D analysis found the actual and expected concentrations to be similar. However, the results from the 2D experiments were not consistent with the actual concentrations. The analytes were also measured using an external calibration curve, with concentrations of 1, 4, 8, and 10 mM. The results indicate that while the 2D methods are not amenable to the traditional quantitation approaches by NMR, quantitation can be carried out if a calibration curve is applied.

Decarbonylation of Ketones with Bidentate N-Heterocyclic Carbene Nickel Complexes

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:30 - 1:45
Location: 9-335

Authors: Justin Cortez.
Faculty Mentor: Chantal Stieber.

Abstract: Decarbonylation of ketones is of interest as a route towards synthesizing carbon-carbon bonds through removal of carbon monoxide. However, decarbonylation requires the cleavage of two carbon-carbon bonds which are kinetically and thermodynamically more stable than the carbon-hydrogen bond of an aldehyde. A recent study first reported decarbonylation of ketones by nickel bound to phosphine or carbene ligands. This project aims to establish feasibility of using bidentate N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) nickel complexes as catalysts for decarbonylation reactions. Three nickel complexes with varying ligand structures were implemented as catalysts in an initial reaction with benzophenone to establish feasibility. The observation of biphenyl by GC-MS indicated that decarbonylation had occurred. Therefore, the project was expanded to a range of para-substituted ketones. Future goals include tailoring the catalyst and reaction conditions to improve yields. Improving nickel mediated decarbonylation of ketones will be significant in the development of new reactions for synthesis of pharmaceuticals and fine chemicals.

Surface adhesion effects of PMMA (Poly(methyl methacrylate)) of Medical grade UHMWPE (Ultra-High Molecular Weight Polyethylene) after cold plasma treatment

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:45 - 3:00
Location: 9-307

Authors: Panik Moradian, Bianca Cruz.
Faculty Mentor: Keith Forward.

Abstract: Acrylic bone cements, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) play a key role in the anchorage of prostheses to the surrounding bone in cemented arthroplasties. Through surface modification, by means of oxygen and helium atmospheric plasma treatment, increasing the surface energy of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) could improve adherence of PMMA to biomaterials and reduce the risk of a factor of bone cement failure. In this study we propose an approach for testing the effects of plasma surface treatment of UHMWPE on biomaterial adhesion using bone cement. UHMWPE surfaces will be treated with plasma generated in the showerhead attachment of a reactor which uses a center electrode, connected to a radio-frequency power source resulting in ionization of a gas mixture flowing around the electrode. This produces species such as NO, OH, and ionized O2 that interact with the surface of materials and modify them. UHMWPE samples will be adhered together with a standardized method of PMMA application. The adhesion is expected to be performed by a tensile tester instrument. A perpendicular tensile force will be applied and gradually increased until the coating is detached. This raw data is then assessed for the maximum stress applied. Through these results with a large sample size and statistical analysis, we will be able to quantify how well PMMA adheres to UHMWP, and how cold plasma treatment effects adhesion. Additionally, based on this work it may be possible to replicate the experiment in the future to investigate other biomaterial bonding applications such as adhesion to nickel-titanium alloys.

Purchase Intentions of Millenials in Regards to Sustainable Apparel

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Lauren Jacoby, Jessica D'ambra, Natalie Newman, Cody Beaty.
Faculty Mentor: Angella Kim.

Abstract: Fast fashion is a term coined by the global apparel industry to describe retailers with an apparel supply chain model that knocks off garments at a rapid pace and by doing so frequently update their stores with cheap products (Zamani, Sandin, & Peters, 2017). Fast fashion is unsustainable and has created irreversible damage to the environment through waste and byproducts associated with apparel products. Unfortunately, millennials; the generation born between 1982-2002, have adopted fast fashion brands as a primary source of apparel, even though researchers define millennials as a generation with "increased awareness of environmental, and social issues within society" (Hill, Lee, 2012). This is made more unpleasant by the fact that millennials make up approximately $2.45 trillion in potential spending (Mak, 2016). Millennials are a financially powerful generation and have a strong understanding of contemporary environmental issues, yet they are major supporters of the fast fashion system which is very toxic for the environment. Therefore, this paper sets out to understand millennials purchase intentions in regards to sustainable fashion. In this paper, we use quantitative data gathered from surveys completed by college age millennials to understand millennial's apparel purchase intentions and their relationship to sustainable apparel. We found that millennials accessibility to sustainable products influences purchase intentions was weak and did not support our research. We conclude that if there is concern and knowledge of sustainability and our environment, millennials will be more willing to purchase sustainable products.

Environmental Justice: Measuring Various Air Pollutants in Low-Income Areas

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:45 - 2:00
Location: 9-271

Authors: Jessica Damon.
Faculty Mentor: Steve Boddeker.

Abstract: Air pollution and its effects on population health are one of the most important environmental and public health issues today. Socio-economics, population growth, and transportation are major factors in a city’s air quality. Though air pollution levels have been decreasing dramatically over the last few decades, some areas have higher levels than others. These areas are usually low social economic status (SES), surrounded by industry. Exposure to Particulate Matter (PM) of various sizes can have adverse health effects, including debilitating headaches, development of respiratory problems such as asthma, and an increased risk of cancer, especially for highly receptive populations such as elementary school children. Through analyzing data collected with PurpleAir nephelometers loaned by the Air Quality Sensor Performance Evaluation Center (AQ-SPEC) by South Coast AQMD with funding by EPA, and comparing these values to the EPA’s recommended Air Quality Guidelines, correlations between higher levels of air pollution and low-income areas are evident.

Innovative Classroom Assessment

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:30 - 12:45
Location: 15-2907

Authors: Michael Ramirez, Laura Dasilva, Nguyen Nguyen, Cheyenne Romero.
Faculty Mentor: Faye Wachs.

Abstract: Mechanical Engineering is a rigorous yet popular major chosen by over 1000 students that attend Cal Poly Pomona. Fluid Mechanics (ME 311) is a core lecture within the Mechanical curriculum and is considered to be a bottleneck course within the department due to the high failure rate that the course produces. A study conducted by Taotao Long (2016) demonstrated that students had positive attitudes towards utilizing course videos before lecture in a flipped classroom environment (Long, 2016). After several quarters of designing a course model tailored to Fluid Mechanics at Cal Poly Pomona, an ideal classroom structure was created. In the academic quarters of Winter and Spring of 2017, the flipped classroom structure was implemented ideally to produce outcomes similar to other research-backed data that proved academic success for students using a web-based learning model. Grade point averages, socio-emotional variables, and focus group data were collected at the beginning and end of each quarter to assess any development from the participants. Results from both quarters demonstrated the effectiveness of a flipped classroom structure in the ME 311 course. In the experimental group (n=63) 11.1% of students earned a failing grade while 41.3% of students received an A. In contrast, 34.3% of students in the control group (n=64) earned a failing grade, while only 14.1% earned an A. t-tests also revealed that the socio-emotional variables and cognitive belief scale data suggested that students in the experimental group perceived the classroom as significantly more stimulating when compared to the control group.

Utilization of Orange-processing By-products in Food Applications

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:45 - 2:00
Location: 15-2907

Authors: Erik Dassoff.
Faculty Mentor: Yao Olive Li.

Abstract: In orange juice processing, the vast majority of the fruit is not utilized in the final product, yielding large quantities of waste which currently have limited applications. Therefore, the valorization of these by-products, including the peel (pomace), is an important field of study. The peel is of particular interest due to its potential to satisfy a wide range of functional food benefits due to its antioxidant and fiber content. To test the feasibility of adding orange pomace as a food ingredient, the pomace was first dehydrated, ground, and sieved to create uniform powders of various particle sizes. Then, several formulations of pasta, meatballs, gummy candies, and thin cookies were prepared. The results indicate that higher concentrations may complement the sweetness of various products although concentrations above 5% start to become bitter. Also, increased concentrations darkened the color in meatballs. Interestingly, if applied strategically, orange pomace could positively affect the textural characteristics of some food products. In the meatballs, the pomace helped retain moisture in the cooked meat. While mostly insoluble, it did exhibit slight natural gelling in the gummy under acidic conditions which may indicate the presence of high methoxylated pectin. Lastly, the force required to cut the cooked meatball decreased with increased concentrations of pomace while the reverse correlation was found for the uncooked meatball indicating some complex textural interactions due to the addition of the pomace. Future studies will continue to address these interactions while attempting to mitigate bitterness for the development of a new functional food.

Aerosolized Liposomal Amphotericin B (AmBisome) Maintains Antifungal Drug Concentrations in Lungs for up to Five Days Post-Treatment

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:15 - 1:30
Location: 9-251

Authors: Janam Dave.
Faculty Mentor: Jill Adler-Moore.

Abstract: Background: In immunocompromised patients, Aspergillus pneumonia causes 50-90% mortality with 50% mortality even with treatment, indicating the need for improved therapy. Although AmBisome (AmBi) an antifungal amphotericin B drug, is used intravenously (IV) to treat this infection, aerosol AmBi could deliver high drug concentrations to the lungs. We developed an aerosol delivery system for AmBi and evaluated its pharmacokinetics in mice. Methods: AmBi was aerosolized with a Schuco S5000 nebulizer and delivered to Swiss Webster mice in a compartmentalized, chamber. Mice were immunosuppressed with 16 mg/kg triamcinolone acetonide d-3, d-1, d+1 relative to aerosol AmBi exposure which was 20-minutes, every 24hrs for 3 days. Tissues were collected 24h, 72h or 120h after the last drug treatment (n=4 mice/timepoint). Amphotericin B was extracted from homogenized tissues and analyzed via bioassay for drug concentration using Candida albicans as the indicator organism. Results: The aerosol successfully delivered at least the MIC drug level (2-4 ug/g) for Aspergillus spp. in lungs of all mice at all time points. Mean lung drug concentration after 24h was 15.3 g/g, 4.88 g/g at 72h, and 4.50 g/g at 120h. None of the kidneys and livers contained detectable amphotericin B although the spleens had detectable drug levels at 120h (2.88 ug/g). Conclusions: Aerosol delivery could be used to treat murine pulmonary aspergillosis since lung drug concentrations above the MIC for many Aspergillus spp. was achieved out to 120h. Undetectable levels of amphotericin B in kidneys and livers.

Interplanetary CubeSat Solar Sail Mission

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:30 - 1:45
Location: 9-333

Authors: Holly Everson, Guadalupe Romero Bravo, Steven Jaworski, Sofiya Pascual, Riza Dayapera, Aerbwong Chitamitara, Suleman Jalal, Erica Arroyo, Justin Toney.
Faculty Mentor: Navid Nakhjiri.

Abstract: Studying CubeSats for space science missions has increased significantly in recent years. The use of a CubeSat will provide a spacecraft which is lighter, mechanically simpler, and with a fraction of the cost of a traditional space mission. Cal Poly Pomona Interplanetary CubeSat Solar Sail Mission (IPCS3M) is a multi-year research project studying the use of solar radiation pressure on a sail as an alternative method of propulsion for interplanetary CubeSat missions. With a 90 meters squared Mylar sail, the 6U CubeSat will travel to Saturn with the intended goal of dropping a 1U science payload into Saturn's northern hexagonal storm. The payload will enter the inner wall of the eye to gather data regarding storm patterns, chemical composition, and other factors. Additionally, the solar sail will provide the spacecraft with a free continuous thrust, increasing velocity throughout the mission timeline provided by the solar radiation pressure. Finite Element Analysis and Computer Aided Design (CAD) modeling were used to construct the spacecraft and allow for structural studies. In addition to computer model tests, physical tests have also been performed to research material properties, light reflectance, and boom creation. Successful solar sail implementation will give CubeSats a form of propulsion that will open up possibilities for more complex missions, most notably orbital maneuvering and interplanetary travel.

UAS SURVEYING AND MAPPING FOR TRANSPORTATION PLANNING

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:00 - 1:15
Location: 9-269

Authors: Manuel De Leon, Gerardo Quintana.
Faculty Mentor: Omar Mora.

Abstract: Geospatial technologies and Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) have made significant strides in the past decade in terms of quality and cost efficiency. In regards to engineering practices, the combination of the two have the potential to deliver significant amounts of data in much less time and effort than traditional surveying and mapping practices. Remote Sensing technologies and their related software are usually associated with surveying and mapping, but how can transportation engineers utilize these tools in corroboration? Through the integration of photogrammetry and computer vision software such as ContextCapture, 3D surface models may be created from a collection of overlapping photos. By adding Ground Control Points (GCPs), the 3D surface model is georeferenced into any desired coordinate system. There are various amounts of information that can be obtained and analyzed for many applications, in particular, transportation planning. Geometric information, scaled distances, changes in slope and elevation, and the like, can be taken into account for projecting cost efficiency when road development plans are in consideration. With this collaboration of modern innovations, transportation engineering can have a new tool that bypasses past limitations in traditional surveying and mapping techniques.

Using high resolution Lidar data from SnowEx to characterize the sensitivity of snow depth retrievals to point-cloud density and vegetation

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Victoria Patterson, Kat Bormann, Jeff Deems, Tom Painter.
Faculty Mentor: Alex Small.

Abstract: The NASA SnowEx campaign conducted in 2016 and 2017 provides a rich source of high-resolution Lidar data from JPL's Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO - http://aso.jpl.nasa.gov) combined with extensive in-situ measurements in two key areas in Colorado: Grand Mesa and Senator Beck. While the uncertainty in the 50m snow depth retrievals from NASA's ASO been estimated at 1-2cm in non-vegetated exposed areas (Painter et al., 2016), the impact of forest cover and point-cloud density on ASO snow lidar depth retrievals is relatively unknown. Dense forest canopies are known to reduce lidar penetration and ground strikes thus affecting the elevation surface retrieved from in the forest. Using high-resolution lidar point cloud data from the ASO SnowEx campaigns (26pt/m2) we applied a series of data decimations (up to 90% point reduction) to the point cloud data to quantify the relationship between vegetation, ground point density, resulting snow-off and snow-on surface elevations and finally snow depth. We observed non-linear reductions in lidar ground point density in forested areas that were strongly correlated to structural forest cover metrics. Previously, the impacts of these data decimations on a small study area in Grand Mesa showed a sharp increase in under-canopy surface elevation errors of -0.18m when ground point densities were reduced to ~1.5pt/m2. In this study, we expanded the evaluation to the more topographically challenging Senator Beck basin, have conducted analysis along a vegetation gradient and are considering snow the impacts of snow depth rather than snow-off surface elevation. Preliminary analysis suggest that snow depth retrievals inferred from airborne lidar elevation differentials may systematically underestimate snow depth in forests when canopy densities exceed 1.75 and where tree heights exceed 5m. These results provide a basis from which to identify areas that may suffer from vegetation-induced biases in surface elevation models and snow depths derived from airborne lidar data, and help quantify expected spatial distributions of errors in the snow depth that can be used to improve the accuracy of ASO basin-scale depth and water equivalent products.

Use of pig-ear-notching to evaluate the wound treatment effects of Hypochlorous acid

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Hailey Pontes, Nicholas Denny.
Faculty Mentor: Cord Brundage.

Abstract: Hypochlorous acid (HA) is an electrically neutral oxidant available commercially in solutions as an antimicrobial wound treatment. We wanted to test the effects of HA on wound healing, incidence of infection and wound bacterial colonization in swine (Sus scrofa domesticus). The act of pig-ear-notching is an individual tagging system, used to distinguish animal numbers and litters. When notching, a small wedge of skin is removed at specific locations on one or both ears in piglets within 3 days of birth. These wounds usually resolve within 7-10 days. In this double-blind study, piglets receiving bilateral notching have one randomized ear treated with HA and the other treated with a control solution. Treatment commences following the notching and continues once daily for 10 days. Wound swabbing, photographs for wound scoring and inflammation grading is performed daily throughout the 10 day treatment period. Results provide evidence not only on the potency of HA as an antimicrobial, but also its activity expediting wound healing.

Implications of the Intersectionality of Drugs and Poverty: A Critique on the Philosophical Defense for Drug Decriminalization

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:15 - 2:30
Location: 15-2913

Authors: Jasmine Diaz.
Faculty Mentor: Katherine Gasdaglis.

Abstract: American legal efforts to combat the use and trade of illicit drugs have contributed to an unprecedent spike in rates of incarceration that have disproportionately impacted minority groups. This has caused huge backlash against the efforts of current criminalization of illicit drugs. In response, many are tempted by the arguments in defense of drug decriminalization. Prominent philosophers have contributed to the discussion by concluding that the decriminalization of drugs is the most justified response to the drug dilemma. However, research on the correlation between addiction and poverty has suggested, social positioning plays a fundamental role in determining how an individual interacts with illicit drugs. The impoverished are the most vulnerable and susceptible group to the havoc resulting from the use and trade of illicit drugs. In this essay, I will argue that the current philosophical defense for drug decriminalization has failed to account for the implications of the intersectionality of drugs and poverty. Current methodology has not only failed to notice this predicament but has misrepresented the issues at hand by casting the experience of a few well positioned individuals as a generalized account for how humans interact with illicit drugs. As a result, the hardships and experiences of those caught in the intersection of drugs and poverty go unacknowledged. Moreover, when we refuse to recognize the complications of illicit drugs we further perpetuate misinformation on a national level.

Corrosion Resistance of Metal-Ceramic Composites Produced by Directed Metal Oxidation

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:30 - 1:45
Location: 9-209

Authors: Salar Tabesh, Christopher Kha, Joshua Diaz, Ian Limon, Jason Brayshaw, Kentaro Fujimoto Lunn.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) couple the wear resistance of ceramics and the ductility of metals. They also can provide an alternative to the difficult issue of shape formation confronting all-ceramic components if they can be formed to near net shape. Directed Metal Oxidation is a method of fabricating CMCs to near net shape. The process can be engineered to produce a wide range of geometries of alumina matrix/aluminum composites with minimum machining and also allows for further reinforcement of the composite through the addition of constituents such as silicon carbide. In applications, e.g., pump impellers and housing, where a combination of erosion, wear and corrosion resistance are required, the CMCs could be an ideal choice. Plates of ceramic-metal composites were fabricated from an aluminum-silicon-magnesium alloy using the Directed Metal Oxidation process. Coupons were prepared for a series of tests to characterize the corrosion behavior, hardness and erosion/wear resistance of this ceramic matrix composite material. Microstructural characterization of the composite was accomplished through scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) and optical microscopy. Hardness tests - both macro and micro - were conducted in different regions of the composites. The erosion resistance of these composites were determined using slurry abrasion and rotating pin tests.

E-STEM Laptop Liquid Cooling System

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Roberto Mendez, Bryan Lee, Zhixuan(Victor) Ding, Mostafa Vahidi, Arik Naylous, Amanali Rodriguez, Alec Valladares, Yang Lo.
Faculty Mentor: Olukemi Sawyerr.

Abstract: Our group will present a revolutionary laptop cooling pad which utilizes an all-new liquid-convection cooling technique as opposed to other similar products in the market which use inefficient fans to dispense the heat. Our product uses a conductive plate to transfer the heat from the bottom of a laptop through a plate which is exposed to channels of water on the other side. Heat is then carried from the conductive plate to the water by convection and then ultimately transferred to the fins of a radiator to be radiated into the atmosphere. The water used for cooling is circulated using a small pump which runs continuously. As a result, our new cooling technology is able to perform up to five times better than the traditional cooling pads available today.

Corrosion Behavior of Metallic Alloys in a Molten Chloride Eutectic Salt for Nuclear Reactor Coolant

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:30 - 12:45
Location: 9-209

Authors: Dominic Dinh, Touba Shah, Peter Kang, Savannah Rodriguez.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: The rising demand for energy is creating an urgent need to develop an alternative method of energy production that is sustainable, cost-efficient and a clean alternative to traditional fossil fuel processes. Nuclear power is one option that has the potential to resolve these issues. Other alternative energy concepts such as solar energy and wind energy may seem promising, but the costs of operation and maintenance can cause these processes to be more expensive than nuclear in the long term. The coolant fluid in a nuclear reactor must possess certain qualities such as high volumetric heat capacity, high boiling point, low vapor pressure, resistance to radiation and thermodynamic stability. In recent years, there has been an increased shift from water to molten salts as the coolant for nuclear reactors. Despite the potential for increased corrosion rates in the containment vessel, molten salts minimize the risk of explosions because they do not to be pressurized. Fluoride salts are the preferred candidates for a coolant material but the associated expenses and safety hazards make them unattractive for prolonged utilization. A safer and more cost-effective alternative must be considered. Chloride salts fit this criteria but can be highly corrosive Therefore, careful consideration is required in the material selection process of the containment vessel. In this project, two stainless steels and one nickel-base alloy were tested at 700℃ using a DC electrochemical setup in a ternary molten salt eutectic salt. Linear polarization resistance and cyclic potentiodynamic polarization tests were performed to measure the corrosion behavior of the alloys. The post-test coupons were categorized with optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The viability of the chloride salt as a replacement for the coolant material will be discussed.

Analysis of in situ Creep Deformation in Thermal Barrier Coatings

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Javier Martinez, Jorge Camarillo, Cynthia Do, Evelyn Arce.
Faculty Mentor: Jonathan Puthoff.

Abstract: Aluminide thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are used to give metallic components high temperature oxidation resistance and mechanical protection, thereby extending component lifetimes. In order to produce better-engineered components incorporating aluminide TBCs, we wish to better understand high temperature creep deformation of the coatings themselves. However, measuring the creep properties of aluminized coatings in situ are difficult due to the small dimensions of the coatings (100 micron coating thickness). We developed a model that permits us to determine the stresses in aluminide TBCs, and created software for performing the required calculations using Matlab.The model is based on the real geometry of TBC-coated material and includes distinct TBC, base metal, and interdiffusion zone layers. Using the stresses in the TBCs we can predict the creep deformation in the TBC and possibly the predominant failure mechanism. Additionally, the model can assist in the design of creep specimens so that the associated experiments can be performed. This combination of a detailed model of an aluminide TBC-coated material and experiments that can reveal the actual performance of the system would help in the design of components for high temperature applications such as turbines, engines, and reactors.

Apparatus for the Characterizing of Gecko-Like Adhesive Specimens

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Arden Le, Natasha Beltran, Casandra Rivera-Fernandez, Nathan Doi, Jonathan Carranza.
Faculty Mentor: Jonathan Puthoff.

Abstract: Geckos adhere to surfaces across an array of microscopic hairs on their toes, and the adhesion forces between those hairs and the surface are based on Van der Waals' interactions. Scientists and engineers wish to produce materials that have gecko-like fibers that mimic the adhesive and non-contaminating properties of the natural material. In order to qualify how well these gecko-like adhesives perform, we need ways of measuring the tribological forces, such as adhesion and friction force. Measuring these forces will assist in identifying the relevant structural and materials variables that influence their performance. We developed a custom-built test platform that allows us to measure frictional forces produced by gecko-like materials. Our experimental setup includes a linear actuator, a force sensor, and is instrumented using LabView software. The sliding motion of an adhesive specimen against a glass substrate is initiated by the actuator to produce a frictional force. During an experiment, we can vary the sliding speed and normal forces applied to the specimen to influence the amount of adhesion generated by the specimen. We characterized the performance of the instrument using materials with known frictional properties; these results provide a baseline for the analysis of future experiments.

AugmentedRealms: The Next Generation of Tabletop Gaming

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Pasha Beglar, Jeffrey Schmitendorf, Flor Tonie Nguyen, Cindy Lin, Angelo Rodriguez, Jeremy Kleve, Liang Dong, Xinyuan Wang.
Faculty Mentor: Olukemi Sawyerr.

Abstract: Tabletop games such a Dungeons & Dragons allow players the ability to create a make belief world in which other players can be a part of. Tabletop games mainly depend on the players imagination, which is both its greatest feature and flaw. The frustration comes with not having shared vision for the word, so players typically buy figurines and maps. Our solution is an app that uses augmented reality to bring tabletop gaming to life. Players will be able to view the characters and maps of their story in a more interactive and immersive way. As players view the game from their phone camera, they will be able to see 3D trees, dragons, and their own personalized characters standing on the table, swaying and breathing as if they were in the room with them. Parties can be built to allow friends who are also playing the game to be able to see the same objects from their own distinct perspective. Not only do they have the option to choose through a selection of provided 3D models, but also be able to upload their own 3D models to view in the real world through their phone cameras.

NEUROIMAGING META-ANALYSIS OF LONG-TERM MEMORY ENCODING

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Karli Cheng, Shea Duarte.
Faculty Mentor: Robert Blumenfeld.

Abstract: The ability to successfully encode information into long-term memory (LTM) is fundamentally important for our daily functioning. Results from neuroimaging studies consistently implicate a network of brain regions, including the lateral prefrontal cortex, inferotemporal cortex, and medial temporal regions in LTM encoding and retrieval. We were interested in investigating the interactions amongst these regions during encoding and how they differ from retrieval. We hypothesized that during encoding, lateral prefrontal regions would act as hubs playing an essential role in mediating communication amongst other regions, and that prefrontal regions, along with inferior and medial temporal regions form a functional subnetwork that lay at the core of the communication throughout the larger encoding network. To test these hypotheses, we constructed a network model representing patterns of co-activation amongst brain regions across 89 studies in the LTM encoding neuroimaging literature. Interrogating this network using graph-theoretical metrics, we found evidence that left inferior frontal gyrus regions have the highest betweeness centrality in the network, thus they serve as global hubs during encoding. Moreover, using community detection analysis, we found that these left inferior frontal gyrus regions, along with right parahippocampal, inferior temporal, and inferior parietal cortices form a discrete subnetwork during encoding. In further analyses, we will compare the networks supporting item vs. associative LTM encoding, based on the notion that these forms of encoding are supported by different yet overlapping prefrontal-medial temporal networks.

Thermal Nitridation of Stainless Steel Bipolar Plates in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:30 - 12:45
Location: 9-307

Authors: Kevin Duong, Adrian Barcimo.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: Increasing concerns regarding climate change due to rising CO2 emissions have prompted the development of alternative power generation systems. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are one example of power sources that have gained steady interest in transportation and stationary applications due to their environmentally-friendly, near-zero emissions and high efficiency. These devices utilize the chemical reaction between hydrogen and oxygen to produce electricity, with the emission of water. Bipolar plates are a key component of fuel cells and function as electrical conduits between cells and as distributors of reactant gases. These components account for 80% of the total weight and 40% of the cell stack cost. Currently, the material of choice used for bipolar plates is graphite because of its high corrosion resistance and electrical conductivity. However, the high cost of machining and poor mechanical properties of graphite limit its widespread use. In order to make these devices more commercially available, a new material that has better machinability and mechanical properties, while still being corrosion resistant and electrically conductive, is required for PEMFC bipolar plates. Metallic bipolar plates have been considered as an alternative candidate due to their good mechanical properties, high electrical conductivity and low costs of machining. However, naturally forming passive layers on the metallic plates can reduce electrical conductivity. In addition, metal cations from the corrosion reaction can reduce the effectiveness of the cell. To circumvent these problems, the metallic plates can be surface modified with a corrosion resistant and conductive coating. Thermal nitridation was chosen as the surface modification technique for several reasons including the ease with which the gas-solid reactions can occur, the relatively low cost of the process, the ability to modify it for high throughput and non line-of-sight coat the complex geometries of flow channels in the bipolar plates. The nitridation process leads to the formation of CrN/Cr2N precipitates, which can significantly improve electrical conductivity. This project examines the corrosion behavior of uncoated and coated UNS 43000 and 44600 stainless steels nitrided at various temperatures and times. A thermal nitridation process was implemented using pure N2 gas. The test coupons were placed in a 0.01M H2SO4 electrolyte solution at 70℃ to simulate a PEMFC environment and characterized using DC electrochemical testing. The surfaces of the coated product were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and optical microscopy. Electrical conductivity was measured before and after testing using a 4-point probe testing apparatus.

Skeletal Anatomic Reconstructionists

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Marina Duveneck, Logan Malinchak, Roberto Ramirez, Rachel Christensen.
Faculty Mentor: Cord Brundage.

Abstract: SkAR, Skeletal Anatomic Reconstructionists, is a project that began in 2017, and has manifested into a collaborative effort of prospective veterinary students who are fascinated with anatomy and enjoy hands-on learning. The goal of SkAR was to debride animal tissue with the aid of flesh-eating beetles, in order to clean and articulate the bones back together in a physical model. The bone models are used for teaching purposes within our Animal Science department, as well as momento's for the students who built the model to keep. Highlights of SkAR so far has been tackling the challenge of debriding animal tissue in a way that is effective, sanitary, and reasonably fast. The beginning phase of the project involved the aid of a maceration tank with heated water to self decompose the tissue. These efforts were successful, but were deemed messy and time consuming. As a proposed alternative to the maceration tank, the program invested in flesh-eating beetles to feed off the tissue, which serve as a self sufficient population of decomposers. Other important highlights of this project are students conspiring as a group to articulate the bones correctly, while using appropriate support such as drills, wires, and glue. SkAR serves as a valuable opportunity for prospective veterinary students to learn animal anatomy in a way that is challenging, physical, and creative. It is anticipated that SkAR members will have a solid foundation and understanding of animal anatomy when they begin their journey as a graduate student.

Fruits of My Leisure: A Conceptual Analysis

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:15 - 1:30
Location: 15-2913

Authors: Blake Eaton.
Faculty Mentor: Katherine Gasdaglis.

Abstract: In this presentation, I provide a conceptual analysis of leisure that draws upon the works of Aristotle, Pieper, Delphy, Ferguson, and Barrett. I argue that leisure is a relation between a.) a tripartite cognitive disposition which an individual possesses and b.) certain external conditions. The disposition of the individual must meet the following three necessary conditions: 1.) person P does activity A primarily for the sake of enjoying A, 2.) P is not obligated to do A, and 3.) P does A without intentions of trying to "change the state of affairs of the world." The external conditions include 1.) the necessary external conditions that allow P to do A and 2.) the necessary external conditions for P to do A that respect the cognitive conditions.

Global Justice: Practical Approaches to Discharge Responsibility

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:00 - 1:15
Location: 15-2913

Authors: Joshua Ebiner.
Faculty Mentor: Alex Madva.

Abstract: What moral obligations do agents have towards others in the global community? What conceptual framework and ethical grounding best capture the complex nature of global injustice? Towards answering these questions, this paper accomplishes two things. First, it identifies and taxonomizes three philosophical conceptions of global injustice and how to redress it. I term these categories the "top-down structuralist approach", the "bottom-up structuralist approach", and the "individualist approach". Next, I identify the central shortcomings of these types of theories. Specifically, I argue that in attempting to redress global injustice we cannot practically separate so-called structural and individual levels of reform. Moreover, I argue that redressing global injustice is a challenge separately distinct from theorizing the nature of the injustice itself. That is, it is not a matter of either logical or real necessity that a problem of a (so-called) structural nature will require a solution that is itself fully structural in nature. Diagnosing the structural nature of injustice is relevant but not sufficient for the development of a solution. The nature of injustice is complex, containing both structural and individual level components that must be addressed in conjunction with each other. The framework offered attempts to provide sufficient guidance to both evaluate the nature of injustice and suitability of intervention.

Efficacy Against HSV-2 Vaginal Infection in Mice Following Vaccination with Liposomes Containing the Immunogenic Herpes simplex (HSV-2) gD Tripeptide and the Immunostimulating Adjuvant Tucaresol

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:00 - 2:15
Location: 9-243

Authors: Yasmin Elhajmoussa.
Faculty Mentor: Jill Adler-Moore.

Abstract: HSV-2 is the cause of a sexually transmitted genital disease which spreads to sensory neurons following infection. Although anti-viral drugs can control the symptoms, there is no vaccine to prevent it. We investigated the protective effects of a liposomal vaccine containing HSV-2 gD tripeptide (gD3pep-Cys) with lipidated tucaresol adjuvant (LT1) or its analogues derived from minor modifications in its structure: Amido-LT1, LT2, LT3, LT4, des-C5-OH-LT1, C5-OMe-LT1, and des-C6-CHO-LT1 (Molecular Express, Inc. VesiVax® CMI liposomes). Mice (n=12/gp) were vaccinated subcutaneously d0, d14, d28 with liposomes containing 15 µg/dose gD3pep-Cys and 6 µg/ dose LT1 or its analogues or buffer. Serum and spleens (n=5/gp) were collected d31/d32 for anti-gD3pep IgG isotypes, HSV-2 neutralizing antibody titers and cytokine production by spleenocytes. Mice (n=7/gp) were challenged intravaginally d35 with HSV-2, and monitored for morbidity for 28 days. Vaginal swabs were collected d37 for viral burden by a Plaque Forming Unit assay. The best survival was 83% for mice given LT1 or LT2. LT3 and C5-OMe-LT1 produced the lowest survival (0%). Disease signs and weight loss paralleled survival. All vaccinated groups had less viral burden and higher neutralizing antibody titers versus buffer. All vaccinated groups stimulated a Th2 response based on anti-gD3pep IgG isotyping and increased numbers of splenocytes producing IL-4. Splenocytes from the best survival groups secreted elevated levels of IL-6, IL-10 and IL-4. In conclusion, minor changes in the lipidated tucaresol molecule have a pronounced effect on the immunoprotection generated by the liposomal gD3pep vaccine.

Latinos en el cine clásico de Hollywood (Latinos in Hollywood's classical cinema)

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:00 - 1:15
Location: 15-1802

Authors: Carolina Espinoza.
Faculty Mentor: Marta Albalá Pelegrín.

Abstract: Latinos have been an important asset in the Hollywood movie industry since its beginning in early 1900s. Hollywood's classical cinema was the starting point for the Latino actor and one of the most visible platforms, given its international reach, for a string of unfair representation of Latin American individuals, and Latino cultures, as William Anthony Nericcio and Clara E. Rodríguez have studied. While the treatment of the actors echoed a wider racial and cultural segregation undergoing the United States at that time, the continuous performance of images of stereotypical Latino characters came to have a negative impact in the perception of Mexican-Americans. The image of Latinos in Hollywood's classical movies was, in certain cases, appropriated by American cinema, and the Latinos portraying such roles were forced into extensive de-Latinization and subjection, to bring life to these characters, fitting a larger trend of projection of the American ideal that touched upon almost every community on the country. From the barbaric greaser to the sensual Latin lover to the picante Latina, Latinos portrayed these roles on the screen, yet the repercussions extended off the screen. Through the analysis of pre-recorded interviews with key figures in the industry like actress Lupe Ontiveros and the director, Alfonso Arau, and the review of Nericcio's and Rodríguez's book, this essay will discuss the multiple challenges that Latinos faced in Hollywood's classical cinema and the elements to which they were frequently objected.

Pseudocryptic speciation of two Eastern Pacific sea slug species

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:30 - 12:45
Location: 9-243

Authors: Austin Estores-Pacheco.
Faculty Mentor: Angel Valdes.

Abstract: A recent study characterized Hermissenda crassicornis as a species complex of three distinct species. Hermissenda crassicornis and H. opalescens are two pseudocryptic sister species that occur in the eastern Pacific with overlapping ranges in Northern California and possibly as north as British Columbia. We will conduct comprehensive surveys along the California coast to investigate the extent of the range overlap. We will also examine molecular and ecological differences between these species to explore the mechanism of speciation and the processes maintaining reproductive isolation. Specifically, we will investigate whether the range overlap is the result of ecological speciation or secondary contact after allopatric speciation. This will be done by conducting a survey of nuclear gene fragments and intronic regions to identify markers with polymorphisms using restriction site-associated DNA sequencing (RADseq). Specimens from the overlapping region will be sequenced to investigate the presence of hybridization. Field surveys, mating preference experiments and feeding behavior studies will be conducted to characterize the niche of each species. So far, fragments of the mitochondrial gene COI were sequenced to confirm species and compared with previous sequences. Using phylogenetic and barcode gap analyses of the COI gene fragment, we found that at least two distinct species were present in the samples studied thus far. Mating experiments showed that the two species mate within species but not between species. Species of Hermissenda are important model organisms in neuroscience and other fields. Therefore, understanding the recent evolution of this group has broader impacts in other areas of science.

Interplanetary CubeSat Solar Sail Mission

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:30 - 1:45
Location: 9-333

Authors: Holly Everson, Guadalupe Romero Bravo, Steven Jaworski, Sofiya Pascual, Riza Dayapera, Aerbwong Chitamitara, Suleman Jalal, Erica Arroyo, Justin Toney.
Faculty Mentor: Navid Nakhjiri.

Abstract: Studying CubeSats for space science missions has increased significantly in recent years. The use of a CubeSat will provide a spacecraft which is lighter, mechanically simpler, and with a fraction of the cost of a traditional space mission. Cal Poly Pomona Interplanetary CubeSat Solar Sail Mission (IPCS3M) is a multi-year research project studying the use of solar radiation pressure on a sail as an alternative method of propulsion for interplanetary CubeSat missions. With a 90 meters squared Mylar sail, the 6U CubeSat will travel to Saturn with the intended goal of dropping a 1U science payload into Saturn's northern hexagonal storm. The payload will enter the inner wall of the eye to gather data regarding storm patterns, chemical composition, and other factors. Additionally, the solar sail will provide the spacecraft with a free continuous thrust, increasing velocity throughout the mission timeline provided by the solar radiation pressure. Finite Element Analysis and Computer Aided Design (CAD) modeling were used to construct the spacecraft and allow for structural studies. In addition to computer model tests, physical tests have also been performed to research material properties, light reflectance, and boom creation. Successful solar sail implementation will give CubeSats a form of propulsion that will open up possibilities for more complex missions, most notably orbital maneuvering and interplanetary travel.

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Upregulation of Adipogenesis by SUV39H1 and CITED2 siRNA Double Knock-down

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Shayne Fabian, Julian Aragon, Lun Tan.
Faculty Mentor: Yuanxiang Zhao.

Abstract: Obesity is a modern epidemic in the United States and other developed countries across the world. It is characterized by excessive body fat accumulation due to increased number of adipocytes (fat cells) through adipogenesis and/or enlarged adipocytes through lipogenesis. Human adipogenesis is the process through which uncommitted human mesenchymal stem cells differentiate into adipocytes. Understanding the molecular and cellular regulation of adipogenesis may provide a way to mitigate obesity and obesity related diseases. Based on a high throughput screen using siRNAs targeting 5000 genes in the human genome, a list of genes, whose expression knock-down by their corresponding siRNAs led to enhanced adipogenic differentiation of hMSCs, were identified. Two of the uncovered genes, SUV39H1, a histone lysine methyltransferase and CITED2, a transcriptional co-regulator, have been confirmed to significantly promote adipogenesis when individually knocked down by their siRNAs, siSUV39H1 and siCITED2, respectively, indicating that both SUV39H1 and CITED2 normally act as adipogenic suppressors. Here we focus on examining the combinatorial effect of siSUV39H1 and siCITED2 on adipogenesis by comparing the effect of double knock-down of these two genes (siSUV39H1 + siCITED2) to each single knock-down (siSUV39H1 + siControl; siCITED2 + siControl). Our preliminary data demonstrated that double knock-down treatment significantly increased total adipocyte count (by 4.5 folds) and adipocyte percentage (by 6.5 folds) in comparison to each single knock-down treatment, both of which increased by 3 folds for adipocyte counts and by 3.5 - 4 folds for adipocyte percentage, suggesting that knock-down of these two genes exert accumulative effect on suppressing adipogenesis.

Apparatus for Measuring Efficiency of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Timothy Butch, Bassim Fakhro, Hannah Le, Kevin Sin, Carlos Rosete, Austin Hudson.
Faculty Mentor: Jonathan Puthoff.

Abstract: With the move toward renewable energy sources comes the necessity to validate the performance of next generation devices such as dye-sensitized solar cells. The issue with existing dye-sensitized solar cells is that it is difficult to measure their efficiency because of the relatively complicated nature of the devices. These complications include the presence of an electrolyte and dye based photoelectron generation. To address this problem we created an instrumented test platform for characterizing dye-sensitized solar cells in a simple circuit. Our platform includes a power supply/data acquisition module that can be controlled using custom software written in Laboratory Virtual Instrument Engineering Workbench (LabVIEW). With this instrumentation, numerous test variables can be controlled such as voltage step size and dwell time during a voltage sweep. The current versus voltage curves produced during an experiment can be analyzed to calculate cell efficiency. This efficiency data can be used to guide efforts to improve the manufacturing of dye-sensitized solar cells. This configuration will serve as a stepping stone for making solar power a more reliable energy resource by making its research more so uninhibited.

Protective Immune Response Against H1N1 Influenza Challenge in BALB/c Mice Vaccinated with Liposomes Containing Adjuvants and No Influenza Protein

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:30 - 1:45
Location: 9-243

Authors: Eden Faneuff.
Faculty Mentor: Jill Adler-Moore.

Abstract: Introduction: Commercial influenza vaccines depend upon stimulation of the adaptive immune response to viral proteins that mutate year to year. We have been investigating a liposomal vaccine containing only adjuvants to stimulate an innate immune response against influenza which does not require activation of the adaptive immune response directed against influenza proteins. Methods: Previously, we found that a protective innate immune response in BALB/c mice against H1N1 influenza was generated by a comaleimide (CMI) liposomal vaccine (VesiVax®,Molecular Express Inc.) containing the TLR2 agonist, Pam3CAG (25ug/day) (L-Pam3CAG) administered intranasally (IN) d-4 and d-2 before viral challenge. In this study, we altered the vaccine regimen to determine the effects of timing and adjuvant dose on protection, administering liposomes IN (25ug Pam3CAG/day) d-4/-2, d-2, d-4 or d-4(PBS) to BALB/c mice [10 mice/group (gp)]. D0 mice were challenged IN with 10XLD50 H1N1 and monitored for morbidity 2X/day to d28. Results: Survival was significantly better for mice given L-Pam3CAG d-4/-2 (50%, p=0.01) or d-4 (40%, (p≤0.05).) versus PBS mice (0%); d-2 dosing produced only 10% survival. Disease signs paralleled survival with L-Pam3CAG on d-4/-2 or d-4 producing significantly lower disease scores compared to the d-2 and PBS groups (p≤0.04). Conclusions: Given that the d-4/-2 and d-4 regimens yielded the best survival while d-2 dosing gave poor survival, the timing of administration of the L-Pam3CAG appeared to be more important than the dose of Pam3CAG for stimulating an effective innate immune response to influenza challenge.

3D printing Graphene-Enhanced Li-ion battery and Graphene supercapacitors

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:15 - 1:30
Location: 9-307

Authors: Matthew Tisbe, Nicholas Ferguson, Amanda Ramos, Jeffrey Lee, Calvin Nguyen, Ben Cheng, Alfredo Collazo, Alexander Lau, Jose Lopez, Alexander Botello, Albert Armienta.
Faculty Mentor: Zhen Yu.

Abstract: Batteries are power storage devices that provide their stored power to connected electronics. Li-ion batteries are a widely used battery type due to their high energy density and ability to recharge. These properties make them well suited for portable electronic devices at the expense of taking the majority weight and volume of the device. The use of a liquid electrolyte also limits the recharging speed and operating temperature. Switching to a solid electrolyte yields enhanced environmental safety and higher energy density, thus a smaller volume needed for portable applications. Our research focuses on the ease of production of such batteries through the development of a superior solid electrolyte, and the robustness of 3D printing and robotic assembly.

Discretized Enthalpy Method with Variable Heat Transfer Coefficient Capability Analysis for Shell and Tube Heat Exchangers

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Anthony Flores.
Faculty Mentor: Kevin Anderson.

Abstract: Shell and tube heat exchangers are the most common type of heat exchangers used in industry. They are used to exchange thermal energy between two fluids of different temperatures without the use of mixing. They offer large flexibility in their design and a common method in analyzing their performance is through the widely accepted Number of Transfer Units (NTU) and the Log Mean Temperature Difference (LMTD) methods. These methods use the inlet and outlet properties of the fluids to predict the overall performance of the device. A severe limitation to these methods occurs from the neglect of the variability of thermal physical properties with respect to temperature of the fluids. Because the temperature of the fluids are constantly changing throughout the device due to heat transfer, their properties also change. A method for analyzing shell and tube heat exchangers with account for the variability in thermal physical properties of fluids is being developed. This method will also have the capacity to model phase changes in the fluids throughout the device, another limitation of the NTU and LMTD methods. A discretized approach is taken by splitting the shell and tube into a fixed number of elements where thermodynamic and fluid mechanic equations are applied locally. Local temperatures allow for the correct temperature dependent thermal physical properties to be used. Moving from one element to the next, all elements are analyzed and an overall performance of the shell and tube heat exchanger can be determined.

Onsite Wastewater Treatment System as a Living Laboratory

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:30 - 1:45
Location: 9-325

Authors: Paola Grano, Warjay Naigan, Martin Flores, Stephanie Osorio, Renz Soriano, Angela Truong, Gustavo Perez, Christopher Thomas, Carolyn Soy, Rima Sabih, Yasmin Proa.
Faculty Mentor: Monica Palomo.

Abstract: This project proposes the establishment of a living laboratory that will provide an on campus space that can be used for learning, innovation, and leisure of the campus community. This project proposes an expansion of the current Cal Poly Pomona water and energy infrastructure with an onsite (decentralized) wastewater treatment system. The system will increase the resiliency of the existing campus infrastructure by providing the opportunity to disconnect from the central wastewater and energy networks while maintaining the connection to the centralized utilities. The proposed project provides a unique opportunity for the Cal Poly Pomona campus to become a regional and national demonstration site where students, faculty, public agencies, private companies, and community members could have the opportunity to learn and conduct research on wastewater treatment processes, water treatment, and sustainable water reclamation practices. The key treatment process centers on a membrane bioreactor (MBR), which combines microfiltration with a biologically activated sludge process. The onsite system will treat sewage to groundwater recharge standards with potential uses for flushing, irrigation, decorative fountains and other non-potable water applications. The living laboratory will be located centrally on campus for user accessibility. The criteria for site selection further included: available square footage, site geology, elevation and grading, wastewater influent, hydrologic conditions, existing developments, and potential hazards, such as seismic activity, slope stability, liquefaction, and subsurface conditions. In conclusion, the living laboratory and its location will yield a high-quality and sustainable wastewater treatment facility where Cal Poly Pomona can showcase frontline wastewater reclamation practices.

Evaluation of Surface Modified Stainless Steels and Titanium for Fuel Cells

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:45 - 1:00
Location: 9-307

Authors: Shehab Bassiouni, Sean Vinik, Fiona Follett, Brooke Singleton.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: The concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has steadily increased since the industrial revolution. The past few years have seen an alarming rise in the rate of carbon dioxide emissions with deleterious consequences on a global scale. Efforts to achieve a cleaner, more sustainable environment need to be accelerated. Replacing fossil-fuel burning vehicles with electrochemically powered vehicles can greatly mitigate the emissions of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. The proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell is an excellent solution due to its low operating temperatures and high efficiency. Despite technological improvements, proton exchange membrane fuel cell-powered vehicles are not commercially competitive with internal combustion engine vehicles. In this study, we aim to reduce fuel cell costs and improve their durability by substrate selection and surface modification of a crucial component - separator plates. Currently, graphite is used as the endplates of the fuel cell stack. Graphite offers excellent corrosion resistance; however, its porous nature makes it difficult to shape into thin sheets and its brittleness makes it unsuitable for transportation applications. In addition, the cost in manufacturing graphite causes the separator plates to account for 60% of the fuel cell cost. In order to allow PEM fuel cells to be more commercially available, a cost effective material should be selected to use as a bipolar plate. Current targets goals for a bipolar plate require materials to have desirable mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, high electrical conductivity, and low density. In this study, UNS S41000 stainless steels and UNS R50400 titanium were selected as possible candidate materials due to their high electrical conductivity, ductility and low cost. The surfaces of the selected materials were surface modified using two approaches: (a) coating with graphene and (b) gas phase nitridation. As-received and surface modified test coupons were subjected to electrochemical tests that were conducted under simulated PEMFC environments, i.e., 70℃ in 0.01 M sulfuric acid solution in a three-electrode flat cell. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and optical microscopy were used to characterize the test coupons. The effectiveness of the surface modification will be discussed and an optimal path forward will be outlined.

Inflight Power Generation and Storage in Airplanes

Oral Presentation
Time: 11:45 - 12:00
Location: 9-325

Authors: Jonathan Franco, Ian Pollard, Jake Alder, Steve Betts.
Faculty Mentor: Steven Dobbs.

Abstract: Emerging unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) and other aircraft use electrical propulsion systems. To extend battery charge and aircraft range, power can be generated from multiple sources during flight including aeroelastic vibrations from gusts and flutter, bending movements, and sunlight. These sources of "free" energy can be summed and used during flight operation. This research will employ the aeroelastic vibrations of the wing that will be captured using a created device that uses vibrations to generate electricity. Stress flexing piezoelectric devices will be attached at the root of the wing, where the most bending strain occurs. Flexible solar panels will be attached to the top of wing. These three sources will be summed together to power the propeller of an aircraft. A Maximum Power Point Tracker (MPPT) board is utilized to adjust the input voltage to harvest power from the wing vibration phenomenon and transform this power to supply the voltage requirements of the battery or graphene supercapacitors under load.

Improving Thermal Comfort of the Base Layer for Snowboarding Gear

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Sabrina Huynh, Lindsay McClain, Vanessa Castro, Kiara Franco.
Faculty Mentor: Jiangning Che.

Abstract: Gear for winter sports, like snowboarding and skiing, have been around for over 50 years, and includes equipment and apparel. This type of apparel consists of three layers: the top layer is insulated, waterproof, and breathable, the mid-layer is meant to add warmth and comfort, and the base layer's main purpose is to keep the wearer dry by wicking moisture, which will keep them warm for a long period of time. The base layer is key to the balance between heat production and heat loss, known as thermal comfort and is crucial in cold-weather sports apparel because it is so close to the skin. However, the fabrication of most base layers do not prevent moisture from entering the garment, which means the base layer's main function cannot be completed and thermal comfort is ultimately reduced. The purpose of this research is to improve thermal comfort of the base layer for snowboarding. We will conduct tests with four different fabrics: Gore-Tex, neoprene, fleece, and swimwear tricot. The evaluation of these fabrics are critical in quantifying thermal comfort, abrasion resistance, thickness, and absorbency. Our goal is to refine thermal comfort for long-term wear of snowboarding attire by thoroughly collecting quantitative and qualitative data. In this study, we will make a decision based on multiple criteria, including the Technique for Order of Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS) and Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) methods. This will aid in the final selection of the base layer fabric, according to the desired performance properties.

Pre-clinical assessment of treatment side effects from Trazodone HCL in Rabbits

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Yumiko Jin, Courtney Fukushima.
Faculty Mentor: Cord Brundage.

Abstract: We have previously demonstrated that Trazodone Hydrochloride (TZN) improves animal handling/tractability in laboratory rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus). To complete pre-clinical trials on the use of TZN therapeutically for rabbits, we must demonstrate safety in addition to efficacy. In humans TZN has been associated with serotonin syndrome, heart arrhythmias and tachycardia. We compared the heart rate and body temperature of rabbits before and 3 hrs after 20, 40, 80 mg/kg TZN (by mouth), treated as part of our blinded randomized placebo controlled study. Trazodone increased heart rate, but did not induce tachycardia. No significant change in temperature were noted. The next phase of this study involves repeated administration of TZN (every 12 hours) with blood work and full physical examinations. These diagnostics are done prior to onset of treatment, after two and four weeks of continued treatment and a two-week following the cessation period. This data will be use to evaluate the safety of TZN and may lead to its use in clinical trials used in client owned rabbits.

Metamaterials for Seismic Isolation of Server Racks

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:30 - 12:45
Location: 9-325

Authors: Lucas Gabaldo Borghese.
Faculty Mentor: Giuseppe Lomiento.

Abstract: Seismic isolation is recognized as an effective technology to achieve high levels of protection against seismic forces. Despite their effectiveness, currently used seismic isolators have practical, technical and economical limitations, which result in their application to critical structures only. Metamaterial pads have been recently proposed as a solution to overcome these limitations and expand the application of this technology to residential homes, retail stores, and equipment. Metamaterials are artificial materials with distinct properties dictated by a specifically constructed pattern of voids within the material itself. In this research, isolation pads containing a specially designed metamaterial are investigated for the seismic isolation of server racks. The method I followed to conduct this research includes physical laboratory testing and numerical analysis. The isolation pads were first subjected to dynamic testing, with a concrete block representing the mass of the server rack. Acceleration data for the ground motion and block was gathered in two horizontal directions. Examination of this test data showed all block accelerations were within acceptable values, and so the isolation pads were considered successful for these levels of seismic activity. Once the physical test data was analyzed, a model of the lab test was created in a structural analysis software and subjected to the same seismic forces. The model was calibrated to match the physical test data. The experimentally calibrated model was then used to assess the performance of typological server racks for different levels of ground shaking. An additional analysis was finally conducted to determine the effect on performance if the number of isolations pads were doubled.

Morphology Development of Aluminide Coatings on Mo-Si-B-Ti Alloys

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:30 - 2:45
Location: 9-209

Authors: Zachery Walsh, Shahan Kasnakjian, Logan Gallegos, Deepali Patil.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: As the need for higher efficiencies in gas turbines that are marine-based or airborne increases, alternatives to nickel-base superalloys need to be investigated. Molybdenum-silicon-boron (Mo-Si-B) alloys are refractory materials that are expected to have high temperature stabilities; however, they are denser than nickel base superalloys. More recently, the addition of titanium to Mo-Si-B to form Mo-Si-B-Ti has been considered as a possible improvement by improving the creep resistance of the base alloy while lowering the density to values lower than those of Ni-base superalloys. However, Mo-Si-B-Ti alloys are vulnerable to high temperature oxidation, and to compensate for this, a protective coating would be required. The surfaces of the Mo-12.5Si- 8.5B-27.5Ti (at.%) alloy was modified using the halide activated pack cementation (HAPC) method. This is a coating method in which a halide vapor is generated within a pack and deposits the master alloy onto the surface of the substrate. Subsequently, the coating element diffuses into the substrate. Coatings were produced at 700-750C, in times ranging from 1 to 25 hours in an inert argon environment. The aluminized specimens were characterized using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/ EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis to investigate coating thickness, structure, composition, and microhardness testing was used to obtain hardness profiles of the coatings. Coatings had similar morphologies for different coating times in the 1 - 25 h range, consisting of a single layer with multiple phases and columnar/elongated grains. Some coatings contained fine precipitates near the coating-substrate interface. The coating morphology appeared to be dependent on substrate microstructure, with regions high in Mo in the coating aligning with structures in the substrate which were also high in Mo.

Fabrication of Gecko-like Adhesive

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Rohan Galotra, William Bestian, Wendy Ching, Kevin Lam, Hieu Nguyen, Muhammad Ikram.
Faculty Mentor: Jonathan Puthoff.

Abstract: Microsphere lithography is a process that involves the use of microparticles to create regular patterns with feature sizes at the microscale. This technique is applicable to the fabrication of Gecko adhesives because of the nature of the adhesive itself which operates on a microscopic scale. In order to replicate such minuscule fibers, microsphere lithography is used to create a template for the fibers that are then filled in with a liquid polymer. We developed techniques for suspending the microspheres on the surface of water and then extracting a submerged silicon wafer to produce a uniform coating of microspheres across the silicon wafer surface. The suspension of the particles was carried out using 2 methods: The first consisted of a suspension across the full area of the petri dish. This maximized the amount of usable area across which samples could be coated. The second method consisted of suspension over a limited region of the petri dish. This left space for the insertion of a syringe to extract water under the microsphere layer. The coating of the microspheres on the silicon wafer was conducted using 2 distinct methods. The float-transfer method is the more traditional technique that involves pulling silicon slides up through a layer of suspended microspheres. The second method involves withdrawing the water around the slides in order to bring the layer of microspheres to the surface of the silicon wafers. We determined that the combination of the limited-area microsphere suspension with the withdrawal method resulted in better microsphere coatings.

Determination of the Prevalence of Major Mastitis-Causing Pathogens in California Dairy Farms Using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR)

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:30 - 2:45
Location: 9-335

Authors: Patricia Galvan.
Faculty Mentor: Shelton Murinda.

Abstract: The U.S. dairy industry in 2012 garnered $35.5 billion and California had $6.9 billion in milk sales. This industry is in constant jeopardy as a result of mastitis, a disease characterized by inflammation of the mammary gland. Bovine mastitis accounts for $1.8 billion per year and the cost per cow per year is $80. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of major mastitis-causing pathogens (i.e., Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus species) isolated from bovine quarter milk (QM) samples in California dairy farms (San Bernardino Co.) and compare it with current prevalence trends. The data will determine if control methods or antibiotics utilized before can still be applied today. The study uses multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction (mPCR) to identify the major mastitis pathogens present in QM samples (n = 293). The mPCR protocol combines S. aureus, E. coli, and three Streptococcus sp. pathogen-specific primers. Hypothesis The predominant causative agent of bovine mastitis in dairy operations is Staphylococcus aureus, with a prevalence of ~43%. In this study, it was expected S. aureus would be the predominant mastitis causative agent present in QM samples. Preliminary Results A total of 197 quarter milk samples have been tested with the mPCR assay. A total of 116 (59 %) were positive for E. coli, 33 (17%) for S. aureus, 8 (4%) for more than one species, and 40 (20%) had no bacterial contamination. Our findings indicate that the environmental pathogen E. coli, has a higher prevalence in QM samples isolated from mastitic bovine milk.

Body Temperature Regulation and Breathability of Synthetic Knit Structures in Sports Bras

Oral Presentation
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Ashley Garcia, Ellen Bessemans, Brandi Noble, Brianna Garrett.
Faculty Mentor: Jiangning Che.

Abstract: Sports bras were invented out of a need to remedy the physical damage and pain women felt from the excessive movement and shifting of their breasts while running or engaging in other physical activities. Desired qualities are the ability to wick moisture, breathability, fit and comfort. Issues with the current styles are discomfort from restrictive straps and lack of breathability. It is essential to identify and improve fabrications that are comfortable to wear and give breast support, while still allowing for excellent breathability. The purpose of this research is to better understand the influence knit structures and synthetic fibers in sports bras have on comfort factors of the wearer. This study's focus was on two aspects of comfort: (a) breathability, the moisture vapor permeability and transmission of a fabric's structure, and (b) thermal comfort, the insulating effect of clothing on the wearer. Our research group will perform tests comparing a sample product to four different synthetic fabrics with various knit structures to evaluate which fabric is most suitable for the desired comfort factors. To achieve this study's purpose, a multi-criteria decision-making method, TOPSIS (The Technique for Order of Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution), and AHP (Analytic Hierarchy Process) methods were utilized to select the knit structure and fiber type that performed best.

Analyzing The Dear Colleague Letter of 2011

Oral Presentation
Time: 3:00 - 3:15
Location: 15-2907

Authors: Athenamarie Garcia-Gunn.
Faculty Mentor: Mario Guerrero.

Abstract: In April of 2011, the Office of Civil Rights (OCR) released a “Dear Colleague” letter to over 7,000 colleges that receive federal funding across the United States. This policy guidance instructed new legal obligations on the practices colleges must employ to adjudicate cases of sexual violence and sexual misconduct. It has given way to ethical debates on evidence standards, appropriate disciplinary actions in the capacity of the educational system and concerns regarding due process. Further, colleges struggle to comply due to inadequate funding that would otherwise be used to develop practices that investigate and adjudicate cases and appoint personnel. A lack in funding has the potential to impact accountability, compliance, due process, privacy and transparency. With these concerns in mind, this thesis aims to study The Dear Colleague Letter of 2011 through three campuses to understand the different practices that are adapted in order to comply with OCR’s policy guidance of 2011. This study analyzes the campuses with the highest, lowest and median reported sexual misconduct cases between the years 2014-2017 as a sounding board for analyzing federal, state and university policies and internal practices. Ultimately, this study aims to prove if The Dear Colleague Letter of 2011 is efficient in its directive and guidance.

Autonomous Collision Avoidance System for Unmanned Aerial Systems using Stereoscopic Vision

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:15 - 2:30
Location: 9-325

Authors: Erwin Perez, Alexander Winger, Alex Tran, Nick Keti, Carlos Garcia-Paredes.
Faculty Mentor: Subodh Bhandari.

Abstract: This project discusses the use of stereoscopic vision as a means of sensing and detecting obstacles and other aircraft as a collision avoidance system for small unmanned aerial systems (UASs). The importance of this research has become increasingly significant as the presence of UASs in commercial and private sectors has led to stricter FAA regulations. Implementing collision avoidance systems can help integrate UASs more seamlessly into the National Airspace System (NAS) with fewer safety concerns and fewer financial burdens. Stereoscopic vision provides a cheaper and more lightweight solution for collision detection. The project uses a Zed stereo camera that is mounted on a DJI S900 Hexacopter unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) to generate depth maps. An NVIDIA Jetson TX1 board is used for onboard processing of the depth maps and obstacle avoidance. The board communicates with the PixHawk 3DR autopilot module which transmits data to the ground control station via XBee radios. By using the Zed software development kit (SDK), it is possible to obtain depth maps directly from the camera and use them in the implementation of obstacle avoidance. The algorithm that is used will partition the depth map into multiple sections, allowing it to find the section of the image that has pixels which represent objects furthest away, hence this section should be obstacle free. From here, the UAV can maneuver in the direction of the selected section of the depth map, allowing it to avoid obstacles in its path.

Body Temperature Regulation and Breathability of Synthetic Knit Structures in Sports Bras

Oral Presentation
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Ashley Garcia, Ellen Bessemans, Brandi Noble, Brianna Garrett.
Faculty Mentor: Jiangning Che.

Abstract: Sports bras were invented out of a need to remedy the physical damage and pain women felt from the excessive movement and shifting of their breasts while running or engaging in other physical activities. Desired qualities are the ability to wick moisture, breathability, fit and comfort. Issues with the current styles are discomfort from restrictive straps and lack of breathability. It is essential to identify and improve fabrications that are comfortable to wear and give breast support, while still allowing for excellent breathability. The purpose of this research is to better understand the influence knit structures and synthetic fibers in sports bras have on comfort factors of the wearer. This study's focus was on two aspects of comfort: (a) breathability, the moisture vapor permeability and transmission of a fabric's structure, and (b) thermal comfort, the insulating effect of clothing on the wearer. Our research group will perform tests comparing a sample product to four different synthetic fabrics with various knit structures to evaluate which fabric is most suitable for the desired comfort factors. To achieve this study's purpose, a multi-criteria decision-making method, TOPSIS (The Technique for Order of Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution), and AHP (Analytic Hierarchy Process) methods were utilized to select the knit structure and fiber type that performed best.

Free Surface Electrospun Polyvinylidene Fluoride Membranes for Direct Contact Membrane Distillation

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:00 - 12:15
Location: 9-307

Authors: Carson Gattenby, Sebastian Olarte, Dajohn Murray.
Faculty Mentor: Keith Forward.

Abstract: An estimated 1.1 billion people worldwide lack access to portable water and 2.7 billion people will face water scarce for at least a month of the year. About two-thirds of the world's population are expected to experience water shortages by the year 2025. The driving forces behind water scarcity are the growing uses of fresh water and the depletion of natural freshwater sources. Addressing this problem, several methods of water purification including reverse osmosis, multistage flash distillation, and direct contact membrane distillation are being explored. Direct Contact Membrane Distillation (DCMD) may provide a solution to populations facing water scarcity which is driven by a difference temperature (or waste heat) over a small distance. This temperature gradient can be easily be achieved by renewable energy sources such as solar, geothermal, and nuclear systems. However, current DCMD membranes are expensive and inefficient due to the lack of optimization of the membrane's desirable properties. To address this limitation, the fabrication method of free surface electrospinning was used to the control of membrane properties such as fiber diameter, pore size, and membrane thickness. Membranes were electrospun from a 22 wt% polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) solution with 78 wt% dimethylacetamide (DMAC). The produced membranes were then characterized by membrane thickness and scanning electron micrographs (SEM). Finally, a DCMD apparatus evaluated the productivity of the membranes by distilling simulated seawater (3.5 wt% NaCl). These productivities were compared to a commercially produced membrane.

Laser Micromachining for Fiber Optic Bundle Spectroscopy

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Jennifer Gavin, Nasim Azadi.
Faculty Mentor: Timothy Corcoran.

Abstract: Confocal laser microscopy is a powerful imaging tool in biology and related disciplines. Dividing a laser into multiple foci on the sample can make this process more efficient. This can be done using a micro lens array e.g. a 6 x 6 grid of micro lens. The light emitted from the sample is carried to the spectrometer via optical fibers, through reformation of the fibers from a 6 x 6 grid to a 1 x 36 line, to match the spectrometer input slit. We describe how this optical fiber bundle is being built.

Grief-Related Consumer Vulnerability: The Case of Funeral Planning

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Tania Gaxiola.
Faculty Mentor: L. Lin Ong.

Abstract: The death of a loved one is a vulnerability that virtually every person will encounter, and yet the funeral planning process is relatively unknown before experiencing it directly. In the US, discussion of death is generally seen as a taboo topic. This often forces survivors to experience the stress that comes with planning a funeral while in a grief state that renders them least capable of managing the process. Consumers are often unnecessarily upsold on funerals due to a lack of information, not having many choices, or lacking motivation to comparison shop. To empower grieving consumers, and counteract funeral homes taking advantage of the situation, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) enacted the Funeral Rule, which requires all funeral providers to give customers an itemized price list of their goods and services. During their annual compliance checks, the FTC found that many funeral homes failed to comply with the regulations set by the Funeral Rule. This exploratory research seeks to better understand the decision-making process of a grieving consumer while they make one of the largest expenditures of their lifetime, during a time of increased vulnerability. Through personal interviews, the authors qualitatively explore awareness of the Funeral Rule, and whether they were exposed to violations of the Funeral Rule guidelines. Finally, we explore consumers' psychological states during the experience of planning a funeral, and connect it to self-determination theory in order to create a framework to better understand consumer vulnerability in this specific situation. Expanding access to the information consumers need before experiencing a loss will provide every family with the opportunity to say farewell to their loved one in the way that they feel comfortable with, and that brings peace instead of increased stress.

The transpacific species Berthella californica is a species complex

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:45 - 1:00
Location: 9-243

Authors: Hessam Ghanimi.
Faculty Mentor: Angel Valdes.

Abstract: Berthella californica (Dall, 1900) is a species of side-gilled sea slug known from the Pacific Ocean which was originally described from San Pedro, southern California. Berthella chacei (Burch, 1944) was described from Crescent City, northern California. MacFarland (1966) synonymized Berthella chacei with Berthella californica. There are currently 2 known morphs of Berthella californica that differ in aspects of external and internal morphology. One morph (northern) ranges from the Sea of Japan to Monterey County in northern Califronia. This morph has a cream to white mantle with variably-sized and unevenly-distributed dorsal white spots and lays a white egg mass. The other morph (southern) ranges from southern California to the Galapagos Island. It has a tan to brown mantle with evenl- sized and distributed dorsal white spots and lays a brown egg mass. We hypothesized that the northern and southern morphs of Berthella californica are 2 distinct species. To test this hypothesis, we implemented the Automatic Barcode Gap Discovery (ABGD) analysis on the mitochondrial CO1 gene to determine the number of species present in the data set. Bayseian and maximum likelihood analyses were employed using 2 mitochondrial genes (16S & CO1) and a nuclear gene (H3) to determine the phylogenetic relationships. Our results indicate that the northern and the southern morphs of Berthella californica are 2 distinct species, each forming a fully-supported clade in the Bayesian and maximum likelihood phylogenies. Thus, we keep the name Berthella californica for the southern species and resurrect the name Berthella chacei for the northern species.

Bisphenol A mediated effects on offspring glucocorticoid homeostasis and obesity

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Ira Glassman.
Faculty Mentor: Juanita Jellyman.

Abstract: Background: Bisphenol A (BPA) is ubiquitous environmental chemical with significant levels in pregnant women, fetal plasma and amniotic fluid (1). In rats, perinatal exposure to BPA increases offspring body weights and adiposity (2), however, the mechanisms by which BPA exerts its effects on adiposity are unknown. The objective of this study was to determine whether BPA-mediated effects on glucocorticoid pathways contribute to offspring obesity. We hypothesized that perinatal exposure to BPA increases circulating corticosterone levels and the abundance of adrenal steroidogenic enzymes. Methods: Rat dams were provided with filtered drinking water (Control) or drinking water treated with BPA (5mg/L; BPA) starting two weeks prior to mating and lasting throughout pregnancy and lactation. Plasma and adrenal tissue was collected from 13 month-old male and female offspring to determine the plasma corticosterone (ELISA) and protein abundance (Western Blot) of 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3βHSD), steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), and melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2-R), respectively. Data were compared by ANOVA and Student's T-test, as appropriate. Results: There were no differences in plasma concentrations of corticosterone, or the abundance of 3βHSD, StAR or MC2-R protein in the adrenal glands of BPA-treated male or female offspring compared with controls. Conclusions: These data suggest that maternal exposure to BPA does not alter corticosterone levels or the protein abundance of key receptors and enzymes involved in the synthesis of corticosterone. (1) Ikezuki Y, Tsutsumi O, Takai Y, Kamei Y, Taketani Y. Determination of BPA concentrations in human biological fluids reveals significant early prenatal exposure. Hum Reprod 2002; 17(11):2839-2841. (2) Galyon KD, Farshidi F, Han G, Ross MG, Desai M, Jellyman JK. Maternal bisphenol A exposure alters rat offspring hepatic and skeletal muscle insulin signaling protein abundance. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2017 Mar;216(3):290.e1-290.

Development and Execution of a Veterinary Medical Massage Training Workshop

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Susanna Glore, Brianna Kelley, Emily Sanchez.
Faculty Mentor: Cord Brundage.

Abstract: Medical massage, therapeutic touch and acupressure are techniques used to help relieve tension, support circulation and treat soreness. These use can be as beneficial in veterinary medicine as they are in human medicine. There is however, less awareness of medical massage applications and techniques in veterinary medicine. Our goal was to develop a workshop where we could introduce people to medical massage and instruct them on the proper methods that can be used in pets. We reviewed literature and created an instruction guide and presentation. We piloted the workshop with a group of Cal Poly Pomona students and conducted surveys to help us refine the demonstrations/presentations. This information was used to create a program for us to outreach to community members and teach them how to strengthen the human-animal bond and support their own pet's wellness through medical massage.

Electrochemical Evaluation of Titanium Alloys for Biomedical Hip Implants

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:30 - 1:45
Location: 9-307

Authors: Michael Svidensky, Neelam Patel, Jaewan Bae, Carlos Pacheco, Vanessa Gomez.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: The need for longevity of hip implants is increasing as the life expectancy of the world's population increases. Titanium and titanium alloys are commonly used for biomedical implants due to their favorable strength-to-weight ratio, biocompatibility and corrosion resistance. In particular, Ti-6Al-4V (wt%) (Ti64) is widely used as a hip implant material. There are several issues with the long-term use of this alloy. One of these is the phenomenon of stress shielding in which the elastic modulus mismatch between the implant and bone leads to bone loss and subsequent loosening of the implant. Another is the release of aluminum cations into the body with potential deleterious effects, i.e., the link to Alzheimer's disease and other neurological disorders. In addition, inflammatory responses can be triggered through the phenomenon of aseptic loosening in which an imbalance between the osteoclasts (bone-eroding cells) and osteoblasts (bone-building cells) leads to bone resorption. A new class of β-phase titanium alloys (TNZ alloys), offers promising characteristics as potential candidates for orthopedic applications due to their lower elastic modulii and non-toxic characteristics. In this study, two TNZ alloys, i.e., Ti-39Nb-6Zr (wt%) and Ti-28Nb-20Zr (wt%), were cast into rods in a pure argon environment at atmospheric pressure. A witness coupon was cut from each of the as-cast rods which were then subsequently hot isostatically pressed (HIP) to remove any internal discontinuities. Witness coupons were also cut from the HIPped rods which were subsequently precision machined into a regular cylinder. The as-cast rods were subjected to non-destructive X-ray radiography pre- and post-HIPping to confirm the removal of residual porosity. The corrosion behavior of the TNZ alloys and Ti64 control coupons, was investigated through open circuit potential (OCP) tests, potentiodynamic polarization measurements (Tafel and cyclic potentiodynamic polarization), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in phosphate buffered saline solution (PBS) at normal body conditions (temperature at 37℃ +/- 1℃ and pH of 7.4 +/- 0.1). Tests were also conducted at lower pH conditions to simulate the body conditions of patients suffering from metabolic acidosis (pH of 6.9 +/- 0.1). EIS measurements were conducted before and after anodic polarization tests.

Investigating the effect of deformation on mechanical properties of a 2-D pantographic metamaterial

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:15 - 1:30
Location: 9-271

Authors: Raymundo Gonzalez.
Faculty Mentor: Mehrdad Haghi.

Abstract: The growth of additive manufacturing continues to be driven in part by the ability to produce complex geometrical parts at reduced costs. Mechanical metamaterials are materials that possess properties obtained from the structure of the material in addition to those provided by its composition. This research investigates the properties of a 2D pantographic sheet, a material composed of two bidirectional layers of parallel beams joined by cylindrical pivots. Previous testing of the structure demonstrates large amounts of resilience and toughness. Our research seeks to explore changes in the mechanical properties of the 2D pantographic structure when it is subjected to increasing strain.

Conditional Cash Transfer Programs in Latin America: A New Type of Social Program

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:15 - 1:30
Location: 15-1808

Authors: Sonia Gonzalez.
Faculty Mentor: Robert Nyenhuis.

Abstract: Latin America is often associated with poverty and governments that are unwilling or unable to provide for the mass of people who need help. Social programs are enacted to take a step towards decreasing the amount of people living in poverty while hopefully breaking the cycle of poverty within the families. Conditional cash transfer (CCT) programs have gained popularity as a new social program of combating poverty throughout the world, but particularly more so in Latin America. It is a different approach to the problem because families are given cash in exchange of meeting certain requirements that are aimed at improving education and health. Eligibility for these programs and their requirements vary country by country but are all similar in their intended goals. This paper examines the following case studies: Brazil, Colombia, and Nicaragua. Mainly through qualitative research methods, I have examined what contributes to a country successfully implementing this type of program. The information collected is centered on what issue(s) the program intended to combat and whether or not the actions carried out by the program have had any impact on their intended demographics. I will also examine to what extent these programs are successfully reducing poverty rates and if so, what variables vary in comparison to other countries that have seen failure in implementing conditional cash transfer programs.

Gough-Stewart Platform Controller

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: David Gordon.
Faculty Mentor: Kevin Anderson.

Abstract: The Gough-Stewart platform is a device that allows control of the six degrees-of-freedom, or states, of a rigid body in space with the use of 6 actuators working in parallel. These states are composed of the three translations along the x, y, and z coordinates, and the three rotations, referred to as yaw, pitch, and roll. Such devices are often used in motion and flight simulators and are thus an important part of the amusement park and aerospace industry. To control this device, I am employing six separate PID controllers, one for each state. Since the easiest measurement of the device outputs the actuators lengths instead of the states of the body, I used the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm as an iterative solver to find the state that has the minimum residual actuator lengths when compared to the values recorded. Once the states are known each controller then outputs a single force or moment that will cause that state to move towards the desired value. To physically create these forces and moments a system of equations using unit vectors to represent the direction of each actuator in its current state is used to solve for the required force on each actuator. To simplify the rotational states, Euler's equations are used to modify the required moments and the unit vectors are rotated to the body's local coordinate system. Once the actuator forces are known they are applied causing the desired translation or rotation to the body.

Onsite Wastewater Treatment System as a Living Laboratory

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:30 - 1:45
Location: 9-325

Authors: Paola Grano, Warjay Naigan, Martin Flores, Stephanie Osorio, Renz Soriano, Angela Truong, Gustavo Perez, Christopher Thomas, Carolyn Soy, Rima Sabih, Yasmin Proa.
Faculty Mentor: Monica Palomo.

Abstract: This project proposes the establishment of a living laboratory that will provide an on campus space that can be used for learning, innovation, and leisure of the campus community. This project proposes an expansion of the current Cal Poly Pomona water and energy infrastructure with an onsite (decentralized) wastewater treatment system. The system will increase the resiliency of the existing campus infrastructure by providing the opportunity to disconnect from the central wastewater and energy networks while maintaining the connection to the centralized utilities. The proposed project provides a unique opportunity for the Cal Poly Pomona campus to become a regional and national demonstration site where students, faculty, public agencies, private companies, and community members could have the opportunity to learn and conduct research on wastewater treatment processes, water treatment, and sustainable water reclamation practices. The key treatment process centers on a membrane bioreactor (MBR), which combines microfiltration with a biologically activated sludge process. The onsite system will treat sewage to groundwater recharge standards with potential uses for flushing, irrigation, decorative fountains and other non-potable water applications. The living laboratory will be located centrally on campus for user accessibility. The criteria for site selection further included: available square footage, site geology, elevation and grading, wastewater influent, hydrologic conditions, existing developments, and potential hazards, such as seismic activity, slope stability, liquefaction, and subsurface conditions. In conclusion, the living laboratory and its location will yield a high-quality and sustainable wastewater treatment facility where Cal Poly Pomona can showcase frontline wastewater reclamation practices.

Determining the Effectiveness of Orange Pomace Extract as a Natural Antimicrobial

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:15 - 12:30
Location: 9-251

Authors: Jonathan Guo.
Faculty Mentor: Yao Olive Li.

Abstract: Fruits that are expressed to make juice, such as orange juice, often result in a by-product containing the peel, pulp, and seeds; this by-product is known as pomace. Utilizing orange pomace as cattle feed or extracting essential oils are the efforts currently taken to reutilize this by-product; however, much of orange pomace is still discarded into landfills, negatively impacting our environment through carbon emissions. Orange pomace contains valuable components, such as dietary fiber, essential oils, and polyphenolic compounds. Rather than being wasted, this study focuses on repurposing orange pomace by utilizing orange pomace extract as a natural antimicrobial against foodborne pathogens. Orange pomace was obtained from the Cal Poly Pomona Farm Store and underwent dehydration for 6 hours at 165°F and size reduction using a Spice Grinder to obtain a fine powder. Ultrasound assisted solvent extraction with 95% ethanol was used to extract polyphenols from the orange pomace powder. Through HPLC analysis, the concentration of naringin in a crude extract was determined to be 2600 ppm (µg/mL). The concentration of naringin in orange pomace powder is 1071.32 µg/g. Preliminary antimicrobial screening through addition of 5% (w/v) orange pomace powder in TSA with a concentration gradient showed minimal inhibition with gram positive bacteria. When 20 μL of crude flavonoid extract and crude essential oil were placed on a disc against 105 of L. monocytogenes, the result showed a zone of 0.9 cm and 1.5 cm from the flavonoid extract and the essential oil extract, respectively.

Electrochemical Evaluation of Aluminum Foams for Proton Exchange Membrane Electrolyzer Cells

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:15 - 2:30
Location: 9-307

Authors: Ho Lun Chan, Kevin Guo, Milena Mccarthy.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: Hydrogen gas is a renewable resource with three times the energy storage capability of gasoline. There is an increasing demand for its use in power generation, chemical synthesis and metallurgical processing. Current practices for hydrogen production, such as steam-reforming, are undesirable because of the resulting large carbon footprint. Proton exchange membrane electrolyzer cells (PEMECs) provide an efficient and pollution-free pathway to generate hydrogen gas. However, PEMECs suffer from short lifespan due to corrosion of materials used for the liquid/gas diffusion layer (LGDL). In PEMECs, the LGDL has the crucial role of managing the mass transportation of water to the catalyst layer and the distribution of heat and current throughout the cell. Titanium mesh and carbon paper are the most commonly used materials for the LGDL in electrolyzer cells. However, titanium mesh has low surface area and is not cost-effective. Carbon paper is not a suitable material for the LGDL due its inability to withstand the highly oxidizing environment at the anodic side of the cell. In addition, carbon paper is brittle, has a low liquid permeability and the corrosion byproducts will poison the catalyst. Due to the ineffectiveness of titanium mesh and carbon paper, aluminum foam is a potential alternative material for the LGDL because of its high surface area, mechanical strength, thermal conductivity, commercial availability, electrical conductivity and low density. UNS A96101 foams with porous microstructures of 4-6%, 6-8%, and 8-10% relative densities were studied with varying pore distributions of 10, 20, and 40 pores per inch. The corrosion behavior of test specimens was evaluated through linear polarization resistance and Tafel tests in aerated 0.01 M sulfuric acid solution at 50⁰C. Microstructural analysis was performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to observe localized changes on the surface of the UNS A96101 foam. Electrochemical surface area for each sample will be determined by cyclic voltammetry in the same environment.

Analyzing the effects of site-directed mutagenesis within the B345 C-terminal tail on ESCRT III protein recruitment.

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:45 - 3:00
Location: 9-283

Authors: Jacqueline Gutierrez.
Faculty Mentor: Jamie Snyder.

Abstract: The Sulfolobus turreted icosahedral virus (STIV) has emerged as a model system for examining archaeal viruses. STIV was originally isolated from an acidic (pH 2) hot (82°C) spring within Yellowstone National Park (YNP). STIV has a double-stranded DNA genome and replicates in the hyperthermophile host Sulfolobus solfataricus. Currently, we have only a rudimentary understanding of the cellular components required for assembly of STIV. Interestingly, transcriptomic analysis of STIV-infected S. solfataricus revealed that one of the most up-regulated gene clusters during a STIV infection was an ESCRT (Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport) gene cluster. In eukaryotes, ESCRT proteins are part of a conserved pathway important for the budding of viruses. During STIV infection, an ESCRT-III protein, the STIV MCP (B345), as well as other viral proteins were found in the membrane subcellular fraction. These observations led us to examine the functional relevance of this apparent interplay between STIV and the host ESCRT machinery. We have previously shown that B345 interacts with an ESCRT-III homolog in the Sulfolobus genome. Our hypothesis is that B345 interacts with ESCRT-III (SSO0619), such that it recruits the ESCRT-III protein to vesicles that will eventually become the internal membrane of the assembled virion. My project focuses on the creation of mutations within the C-terminal tail of B345. These constructs will be tested in context of virus replication, B345 alone in S. solfataricus cultures, and in co-immunoprecipitation assays. If STIV assembly utilizes ESCRT proteins, we should alter assembly when this interaction is disrupted.

The Reactive Element Effect on the Oxidation Behavior of Nickel Aluminide Coatings

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:00 - 1:15
Location: 9-209

Authors: Nicholas Ury, Annette Wagner, Eric Quach, Ananda Gutierrez.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: The efficiency of turbines in power generation plants can be increased by raising the operating temperatures. Currently, nickel-base alloys that form a protective layer of chromium oxide are used in the hot section components of land-based turbines. However, chromium oxide is known to volatilize at higher temperatures, a problem that is worsened in the presence of water vapor in the exhaust. One approach to resolve this issue is to apply a protective aluminide coating to the surface of the alloys. Under the oxidizing conditions in the turbine environment, the aluminide surface layers will form a protective alumina scale. The adherence of the alumina oxide scale can be improved by the presence of reactive elements, such as yttrium, in small amounts. Three different nickel-base alloys were aluminized via a slurry coating process with various reactive element additions. The coupons were then subjected to high temperature oxidation at 1000⁰C in both dry and steam-containing environments, and their short-term oxidation behavior was measured via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The coupons were analyzed post-oxidation via optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The effects of humid air on the kinetics of oxidation of the as-received and slurry aluminized alloys will be discussed.

Public Opinion of Mental Health Post Deinstitutionalization

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:15 - 2:30
Location: 15-1802

Authors: Marilyn Guzman.
Faculty Mentor: Neil Chaturvedi.

Abstract: One in five Americans have a mental health condition (U.S. Department of Mental Health), yet despite the increase of mental health insurance provided by the Affordable Care Act, the utilization of these services do not parallel the current demand. Although factors such as insurance cost and mental health clinic proximity play an influential role in the accessibility of these services, existing literature suggests that social influences like stigmatization amongst cultures, media depiction, and misinformation refrain individuals from seeking help. During the 1950's, Americans were inundated with images of asylums depicting abuse and poor sanitation which would then funnel the deinstitutionalization of the mentally ill, shifting state responsibility to community support systems. This paper aims to utilize current public opinion surrounding mental illness to demonstrate that increased prevalence of mental health facilities raises awareness and approval of mental health treatment. By utilizing public opinion, healthcare administrators can increase the rate of utilization of mental health services.

Autonomous Collision Avoidance of UAVs With ADS-B Transponders

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:45 - 3:00
Location: 9-325

Authors: Tristan Sherman, Mitchell Caudle, Hana Haideri, Jimmy Lopez.
Faculty Mentor: Subodh Bhandari.

Abstract: If UAVs are to be successfully integrated into U.S. national airspace, the ability to perform autonomous collision avoidance between both manned and unmanned aircraft is a necessity. This poster presents a method for collision avoidance utilizing Automatic Dependent Surveillance - Broadcast (ADS-B) transponders which will be required in all manned aircraft by 2020. These devices broadcast and receive global position of all similarly equipped aircraft in a 100-nautical mile vicinity. A Sig Kadet Senior and a Hangar 9 Valiant fixed wing aircraft are used as flight platforms to test autonomous collision avoidance. These aircraft will include ADS-B transponders, a Pixhawk autopilot and an Intel NUC as the primary components of the avionics system. The uniquely developed algorithm is compiled in a Linux environment and uses MAVLink protocols to send off-board commands to the autopilot. The collision avoidance algorithm uses kinematic and circular motion equations to predict the future positions of both aircraft and employ an avoidance maneuver at a constant altitude. This system is demonstrated through simple ground tests, and subsequently moving on to full-system flight tests.

Public Private Partnerships in California: A Case Study

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Thierry Hal.
Faculty Mentor: Ghada Gad.

Abstract: California's Public-Private-Partnership (P3) project portfolio has expanded within the last decade, due to a series of factors that has increased their attractiveness to public entities, contractors, and financial entities. This increase of P3 being used as a construction contract type and delivery method has not come without a certain amount of criticism. These concerns and criticisms are likely to grow with P3's rise in popularity. The objective of the study presented in this paper is to investigate critical factors that may aid or abet the use of P3 as a project delivery method in California which will help determine their future use within the states, and possible issues that may be encountered as time progresses. To achieve this objective of forecasting the future landscape of P3 in California, the paper followed a two-step process starting with a literature review on the existing state of practice of P3 in California and internationally, as pertinent to the objectives of key factors which are claimed to aid or abet a P3 project. This was followed by a case study analysis of the City of Long Beach Civic Center Master Project by means of interviews, contract document reading, and of news release articles which were pertinent to the project. Information collected was analyzed and it was determined the key factors which were instrumental to the Long Beach Civic Center in both preconstruction and construction included: sound financial payment methods, picking effective builders, and undertaking a large investment in public involvement.

Examining the Characteristics of Student Leaders

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:00 - 1:15
Location: 15-1808

Authors: Meice Hamad.
Faculty Mentor: Renford Reese.

Abstract: The college years of a student is a critical period for individual growth personally, socially, and professionally. Several studies have supported that student leadership positively influence collegiate experiences. This exploratory research aims to understand the dynamics of student leaders. It examines who these student leaders are, what motivates individuals to become student leaders, and to what extent does student leadership influence the individual, by analyzing the profiles of student leaders among twenty undergraduate-lead organizations at a university in Southern California. An online survey examines students' motivation for becoming a student leader, the aspirations these students have for their future, as well as their demographics. From these participants, twenty random students will be selected to participate in a one-on-one interview to analyze the diverse cases of leaders. Potential findings from this study will not ascribe to any single type of student rather many characteristics of student dynamics. Expected outcomes may include students experiencing intrinsic motivation, following into the footsteps of those who guided them, and to further gain leadership experience. The outcomes of this study are potentially beneficial for programs that aim to nurture future leaders and increase the professional development of undergraduate students.

Aluminization of Nickel-Base Superalloys by Slurry and Pack Cementation Processes

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:00 - 2:15
Location: 9-209

Authors: Kailey Hanan, Kenneth C. Hirscht, Keith Inouye, Steven Ochoa.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: Aluminide coatings on nickel-base superalloys are quite effective in affording protection against high temperature corrosion in gas turbine environments. The addition of small amounts (0.5 - 1 wt%) of reactive elements like yttrium has been known to improve oxide scale adhesion, thereby promoting the longevity of the material. Pack and slurry cementation are two processes for the application of aluminide coatings. Both of these are processes activated by halide salts and result in chemical reactions that produce diffusion coatings and can be utilized to deposit aluminum, silicon, or chromium on the surface of metallic alloys. Under oxidizing conditions, the coated surfaces form a passivating oxide layer to protect the base metal from high temperature corrosion. In this study, reactive elements were incorporated into aluminizing packs and slurries and used to coat Ni-base superalloys. The characteristics of coatings applied by the pack and slurry processes, e.g., thickness, microhardness, microstructure and elemental distribution, were studied using a broad range of techniques, i.e., X-ray diffraction (XRD), surface profilometry, macrophotography, optical and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS), etc.

Motion of a Charged Particle Within a Rotating Black Hole

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:00 - 12:15
Location: 9-333

Authors: Davian Harry, Jennifer Oum.
Faculty Mentor: Shohreh Abdolrahimi.

Abstract: Black holes can gain a weak magnetic field from the matter accreting around it. In order to characterize the properties of a black hole with a magnetic field, we are required to study the motion of a test charged particle around a rotating black hole with a weak magnetic field. We will focus particularly on the behavior of the particle in the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) and other possible stable circular orbits (SCO) that the particle can have. For this research, we will pay attention to the spin parameters of alpha = 0.5 and B = 0.24 which denote rotation and charge respectively. Using numerical computations, we can observe the trajectory of the particle after it gets kicked out of its orbit which can be plotted using the numerical computing environment Maple. Other important plots that we generated pays attention to the radius, energy, and angular momentum of the particle. The plots that we have generated behave as we expected and we hope to use the results to compare the ISCO and SCO orbits to any unstable orbits that the particle might traverse.

Campus mental health: A study and evaluation on Cal Poly's counseling and psychological services

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:30 - 2:45
Location: 15-1828

Authors: Ericka Hernandez.
Faculty Mentor: Mario Guerrero.

Abstract: College mental health is vital to maintaining a healthy student body. Many scholars have studied and advocated early education on mental health as a prevention and management mechanism in maintaining good mental health. Some scholars have studied the cause of mental health problems in colleges, while other scholars have gone as far to make suggestions on possible solutions to this rising epidemic. This paper will examine college mental health, but specifically will highlight the causes and contemporary trends pertaining to mental health at universities. This paper focuses on the California State Polytechnic University, Pomona student body to observe the services offered on campus dedicated to mental health. This research utilizes both observations and student surveys to provide insight on attitudes and opinions regarding college mental health and the counseling and psychological services rendered on campus. These surveys and observations will then help determine factors that are potentially hindering students in Cal Poly Pomona from using the Counseling and Psychological services on campus.

Indoor Search and Rescue Using Unmanned Aerial Systems

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:15 - 12:30
Location: 9-325

Authors: Antonio Herrera, Thinh Nguyen.
Faculty Mentor: Subodh Bhandari.

Abstract: Unmanned Aerial Systems (UASs) can be cost effectively and efficiently used for indoor search and rescue missions. These environments pose dangerous and risky scenarios for rescue personnel. UASs can locate and assist victims that are in need during the event of natural disaster with increased safety and low response time, without posing any danger to the rescuers. However, the lack of GPS signal in the indoor environments poses many difficulties for the use and navigation of these systems. Using two small unmanned aerial systems, one for search and another for rescue, can help mitigate this problem. The search UAS, a quadcopter, uses a front-facing camera for the detection of victim, and ultrasonic sensors for collision detection. Using computer vision and machine learning, the search quadcopter navigates the indoor environments and identifies survivors of disaster, and then relays this information to the rescue UAS, also a quadcopter, via a ground control station (GCS). The rescue quadcopter then navigates to the location of the victim and releases the payload. The use of multiple vehicles allows the use of smaller and more agile vehicles. This presentation will discuss how the UASs will be able to fly autonomously within GPS-denied environments while detecting victims using artificial neural networks.

Los Horcones, Offering 1: Archaeology of the Senses

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:00 - 12:15
Location: 15-1828

Authors: Luke Burnor, Marlen Hinojosa.
Faculty Mentor: Claudia Garcia-Des Lauriers.

Abstract: Los Horcones, Offering 1: Archaeology of the Senses By: Marlen Hinojosa, Luke Burnor, and Dr. Claudia Garcia-Des Lauriers During the summer 2017 field season Offering 1, from the Los Horcones site on the Southern Pacific Coast of Chiapas Mexico, was examined using a variety of approaches and techniques to extract a unique understanding of the artifacts contained within. The assemblage contained a number of surprisingly intact figurines, masks, and whistles, as well as two broken vessels. Recordings and transcriptions were made of the whistles to explore the variety, range, and implications of the sounds produced by these artifacts. It was discovered that the range of sounds was dependent on the method of playing the instrument, lung capacity, and body size and often embodied various avian sounds. Previously unexcavated dirt collected between the vessels revealed an undiscovered figurine whistle, becoming potentially the most important artifact contained within the offering. Reconstruction and examination of the vessels was undertaken and various illustrations were created from a number of the artifacts. All objects were subsequently three-dimensionally scanned into digital format in an easily manipulable program to facilitate the examination of the artifacts without exacerbating degradation. This also allows the potential to replicate the objects via 3D printing hardware as well as maintain the safety of the original objects.

Aluminization of Nickel-Base Superalloys by Slurry and Pack Cementation Processes

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:00 - 2:15
Location: 9-209

Authors: Kailey Hanan, Kenneth C. Hirscht, Keith Inouye, Steven Ochoa.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: Aluminide coatings on nickel-base superalloys are quite effective in affording protection against high temperature corrosion in gas turbine environments. The addition of small amounts (0.5 - 1 wt%) of reactive elements like yttrium has been known to improve oxide scale adhesion, thereby promoting the longevity of the material. Pack and slurry cementation are two processes for the application of aluminide coatings. Both of these are processes activated by halide salts and result in chemical reactions that produce diffusion coatings and can be utilized to deposit aluminum, silicon, or chromium on the surface of metallic alloys. Under oxidizing conditions, the coated surfaces form a passivating oxide layer to protect the base metal from high temperature corrosion. In this study, reactive elements were incorporated into aluminizing packs and slurries and used to coat Ni-base superalloys. The characteristics of coatings applied by the pack and slurry processes, e.g., thickness, microhardness, microstructure and elemental distribution, were studied using a broad range of techniques, i.e., X-ray diffraction (XRD), surface profilometry, macrophotography, optical and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS), etc.

Doctorate Programs: A Comparison of Veterinary School with Optometry School from a Prospective Student's View

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Ashley Horgan.
Faculty Mentor: Cord Brundage.

Abstract: For those students seeking a career in medicine who do not want to take the traditional route of medical school, choosing a doctoral program can prove a daunting task. There is less information out there on all of the doctorate programs compared to medical school which forces students to choose certain paths only to find that that area of medicine is not for them. Two popular doctoral programs include those of veterinary medicine and optometry. Being a pre-veterinary student myself here at Cal Poly Pomona, it was a wake-up call when I decided not to pursue a career in veterinary medicine as of my sophomore year. I was left wondering which path to take next. Luckily after doing research I reached out to my optometrist who soon became my mentor. It is truly through doing that we as students are able to see which path is right for us. I am here to compare these two career paths and the steps necessary in order to be considered competitive for each program.

Microbial Safety Assessment of Orange Pomace Generated from Fresh-juicing Process

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:30 - 12:45
Location: 9-335

Authors: Huiying Hu, Carolina Maksudi.
Faculty Mentor: Yao Olive Li.

Abstract: Orange pomace is a by-product of juicing process, including the peels, seeds, and pulps. Usually, it is disposed in a landfill or used for animal feeds. However, phenolic compounds and dietary fiber along with other minor bioactive ingredients are abundant in orange pomace, hence its utilization for functional food application is very promising. The objective of this study is to assess the microbial safety of orange pomace collected from CPP Farm Store after a fresh-juicing process, which will be meaningful for further food product development. Following the Aerobic Plate Count (APC) method, the total microbial count was determined to be 505 CFU/g. The rapid tests indicated Salmonella, E.coli O157: H7 and Listeria were absent in the samples. The results were confirmed by SMAC and BioChrome plates for the absence of the above-mentioned three pathogens, however the presence of Staphylococcus aureus, which could be derived from the pomace collection and handling processes. API strip test was conducted to verify the presence of S. aureus. The results showed some variations of microbial counts and the presence of certain species batch by batch. In conclusion, all samples were free from Salmonella and E.coli O157: H7, but had Staphylococcus aureus and coliforms. Only one batch sample was found with Listeria monocytogenes. Coliforms varied from 505 CFU/g to 2000 CFU/g. The ongoing research will employ advanced genetic sequencing methods to verify the results.

Apparatus for Measuring Efficiency of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Timothy Butch, Bassim Fakhro, Hannah Le, Kevin Sin, Carlos Rosete, Austin Hudson.
Faculty Mentor: Jonathan Puthoff.

Abstract: With the move toward renewable energy sources comes the necessity to validate the performance of next generation devices such as dye-sensitized solar cells. The issue with existing dye-sensitized solar cells is that it is difficult to measure their efficiency because of the relatively complicated nature of the devices. These complications include the presence of an electrolyte and dye based photoelectron generation. To address this problem we created an instrumented test platform for characterizing dye-sensitized solar cells in a simple circuit. Our platform includes a power supply/data acquisition module that can be controlled using custom software written in Laboratory Virtual Instrument Engineering Workbench (LabVIEW). With this instrumentation, numerous test variables can be controlled such as voltage step size and dwell time during a voltage sweep. The current versus voltage curves produced during an experiment can be analyzed to calculate cell efficiency. This efficiency data can be used to guide efforts to improve the manufacturing of dye-sensitized solar cells. This configuration will serve as a stepping stone for making solar power a more reliable energy resource by making its research more so uninhibited.

Quantification of trace fermentation products by 2D NMR

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:15 - 2:30
Location: 9-333

Authors: Liliana Cahuas, Michael Tran, Erica Hummel, Ana Cortes, Jacqueline Scott.
Faculty Mentor: Gregory Barding and Dr. Wei-Jen Lin.

Abstract: Biofuel development is a topic of high interest. Butanol, a promising alternative and direct substitute for gasoline powered engines, is naturally produced in relatively large quantities by bacteria that undergo ABE fermentation. To maximize butanol production, understanding the basic biochemistry of the underlying pathways is important and quantifying the biochemically related products can lead to the development of alternative biofuel sources. Quantification is complicated by the similarities of the targeted compounds, with several resonances overlapping. Using 2D NMR, which decreases convolution by spreading chemical information out in two dimensions, we can overcome the signal overlap. While 2D NMR is commonly used qualitatively for spectral assignments, our goal is to develop a 2D NMR method for the trace detection of butanol and related metabolites. To explore the quantitative nature of 2D NMR and quantify butanol and butyric acid, 1H-NMR and 2D TOCSY NMR methods were carried out on a buffered standard solution with three different pH values; 4.75, 7.00, and 8.5. As expected, the 1D analysis found the actual and expected concentrations to be similar. However, the results from the 2D experiments were not consistent with the actual concentrations. The analytes were also measured using an external calibration curve, with concentrations of 1, 4, 8, and 10 mM. The results indicate that while the 2D methods are not amenable to the traditional quantitation approaches by NMR, quantitation can be carried out if a calibration curve is applied.

Diversity in Advertising Marketing Campaigns

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Dewen Chen, Kelsey Noriega, Denise Lopez, Shamia Hussain.
Faculty Mentor: Chitra Dabas.

Abstract: This research examined consumers attitude toward marketing campaigns that consist of diverse model ethnicity and, homogenous, white model ethnicities. Five constructs were used in this research, Self-Identification, Attitudes Toward Advertisement, Perceived Uniqueness, Word of Mouth, and Purchase Intention. We developed two stimulus that represents diversity and homogeneousness. Through convenience sampling with the use of SurveyMonkey and Social Medias, participants were asked to take a survey and to answer on a slider which stimulus they prefer given the question. The collected data are then recoded into two different scales with respect to each stimulus, diversity and homogeneousness. Then, Linear Regressions were employed to determine the significant value P, B and adjusted R square. All the hypotheses were supported. In general, consumers have a positive attitude toward diversity in marketing campaign with more engagement in word of mouth, purchase intention, and have a more positive attitude toward said advertisements. As additional analysis, we conducted t-tests to determine the frequency of participants answer on each scale. Interestingly, we found that participants are more willing to answer on the diversity spectrum instead of the homogeneous spectrum. For questions that involved the constructs of Attitude Toward Advertisement and Purchase Intentions, participants are more likely to have a strong positive impression on diversity stimulus.

Improving Thermal Comfort of the Base Layer for Snowboarding Gear

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Sabrina Huynh, Lindsay McClain, Vanessa Castro, Kiara Franco.
Faculty Mentor: Jiangning Che.

Abstract: Gear for winter sports, like snowboarding and skiing, have been around for over 50 years, and includes equipment and apparel. This type of apparel consists of three layers: the top layer is insulated, waterproof, and breathable, the mid-layer is meant to add warmth and comfort, and the base layer's main purpose is to keep the wearer dry by wicking moisture, which will keep them warm for a long period of time. The base layer is key to the balance between heat production and heat loss, known as thermal comfort and is crucial in cold-weather sports apparel because it is so close to the skin. However, the fabrication of most base layers do not prevent moisture from entering the garment, which means the base layer's main function cannot be completed and thermal comfort is ultimately reduced. The purpose of this research is to improve thermal comfort of the base layer for snowboarding. We will conduct tests with four different fabrics: Gore-Tex, neoprene, fleece, and swimwear tricot. The evaluation of these fabrics are critical in quantifying thermal comfort, abrasion resistance, thickness, and absorbency. Our goal is to refine thermal comfort for long-term wear of snowboarding attire by thoroughly collecting quantitative and qualitative data. In this study, we will make a decision based on multiple criteria, including the Technique for Order of Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS) and Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) methods. This will aid in the final selection of the base layer fabric, according to the desired performance properties.

CITED2 Is a Negative Regulator of Human Adipogenesis

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Esra Ibili, Lun Tan.
Faculty Mentor: Yuanxiang Zhao.

Abstract: Human adipogenesis is the process through which uncommitted human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) differentiate into adipocytes (fat cells). HMSCs normally reside in the bone marrow and adipose tissue. They can be easily isolated, expanded in vitro and upon exposure to a cocktail (AIM) of isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX), Dexamethasone (DEX) and Insulin, can differentiate into mature adipocytes (fat cells), making it an excellent in vitro cellular model for studying human adipogenesis. Based on a high throughput screen using siRNAs targeting 5000 genes in the human genome, a list of genes whose expression knock-down by its siRNAs led to enhanced adipogenic differentiation of hMSCs were uncovered. This study has focused on one of the uncovered genes, CITED2, whose role in human adipogenesis has never been studied. Here we report that expression of CITED2 is upregulated by about 2-4 fold during normal adipogenic commitment stage, between day 3 to day 6 post adipogenic induction by AIM. Expression knockdown by siCITED2 led to about 80% reduction of its normal expression level, but resulted in near 2-fold increase in total fat accumulation based on OilRedO staining and extraction. To find out whether the increased fat accumulation was due to increased total fat cell numbers or increased fat accumulation in individual fat cells, total cell numbers and mature fat cells were counted, and the resulting percentage of fat cells was found to be significantly higher in siCITED2 treated group (25%) vs. siCONTROL treated group (7%). In addition, the total number of cells in both treatment groups were insignificantly different, indicating that expression knockdown of CITED2 during adipogenesis significantly promoted adipogenic differentiation efficiency of hMSCs, hence increasing the total number of mature fat cells. Furthermore, real time RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that the expression of CEBPα and PPARγ, two master regulators of adipogensis, were both dramatically increased in siCITED2 cells compare to siControl cells, suggesting that CITED2 normally acts as negative regulator of human adipogenesis by suppressing the expression of CEBPα and PPARγ.

Fabrication of Gecko-like Adhesive

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Rohan Galotra, William Bestian, Wendy Ching, Kevin Lam, Hieu Nguyen, Muhammad Ikram.
Faculty Mentor: Jonathan Puthoff.

Abstract: Microsphere lithography is a process that involves the use of microparticles to create regular patterns with feature sizes at the microscale. This technique is applicable to the fabrication of Gecko adhesives because of the nature of the adhesive itself which operates on a microscopic scale. In order to replicate such minuscule fibers, microsphere lithography is used to create a template for the fibers that are then filled in with a liquid polymer. We developed techniques for suspending the microspheres on the surface of water and then extracting a submerged silicon wafer to produce a uniform coating of microspheres across the silicon wafer surface. The suspension of the particles was carried out using 2 methods: The first consisted of a suspension across the full area of the petri dish. This maximized the amount of usable area across which samples could be coated. The second method consisted of suspension over a limited region of the petri dish. This left space for the insertion of a syringe to extract water under the microsphere layer. The coating of the microspheres on the silicon wafer was conducted using 2 distinct methods. The float-transfer method is the more traditional technique that involves pulling silicon slides up through a layer of suspended microspheres. The second method involves withdrawing the water around the slides in order to bring the layer of microspheres to the surface of the silicon wafers. We determined that the combination of the limited-area microsphere suspension with the withdrawal method resulted in better microsphere coatings.

Aluminization of Nickel-Base Superalloys by Slurry and Pack Cementation Processes

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:00 - 2:15
Location: 9-209

Authors: Kailey Hanan, Kenneth C. Hirscht, Keith Inouye, Steven Ochoa.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: Aluminide coatings on nickel-base superalloys are quite effective in affording protection against high temperature corrosion in gas turbine environments. The addition of small amounts (0.5 - 1 wt%) of reactive elements like yttrium has been known to improve oxide scale adhesion, thereby promoting the longevity of the material. Pack and slurry cementation are two processes for the application of aluminide coatings. Both of these are processes activated by halide salts and result in chemical reactions that produce diffusion coatings and can be utilized to deposit aluminum, silicon, or chromium on the surface of metallic alloys. Under oxidizing conditions, the coated surfaces form a passivating oxide layer to protect the base metal from high temperature corrosion. In this study, reactive elements were incorporated into aluminizing packs and slurries and used to coat Ni-base superalloys. The characteristics of coatings applied by the pack and slurry processes, e.g., thickness, microhardness, microstructure and elemental distribution, were studied using a broad range of techniques, i.e., X-ray diffraction (XRD), surface profilometry, macrophotography, optical and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS), etc.

Effects of Readisorb L-GSH in altering granulomatous responses against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Hicret Islamoglu.
Faculty Mentor: John Chan.

Abstract: Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb), a rod-shaped, acid-fast bacteria, is the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB). TB remains one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Additionally, approximately one-third of the world's population is latently infected with M. tb (LTBI) as a result of the body's primary mechanism of defense against M. tb infection, the formation of a granuloma. A granuloma is the aggregation of immune cells that encapsulate the bacteria to keep them localized to prevent further infection and thus the bacteria become quiescent. However, if an individual becomes immunocompromised, they become more susceptible to M. tb, which may lead to bacterial reactivation and an active infection, because the host is no longer able to generate adequate immune responses. In this study, we examined liposomal glutathione's (L-GSH) effectiveness in promoting the formation of solid, stable granulomas. We assessed this ability by generating in vitro human granulomas constructed from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) which were derived from healthy subjects and tested their granulomatous effector responses against both M. bovis bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) and the highly virulent Erdman strain of M. tb. Additionally, we measured the survival and immune characteristics of the Erdman strain of M. tb in THP-1 originated macrophages as well as in vitro granulomas generated from individuals from type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Our results demonstrate that L-GSH treatment can decrease the intracellular survival of both BCG and virulent M. tb, as well as downregulate the levels of overexpressed proinflammatory cytokines delegated from the granulomas derived from not only healthy subjects but individuals with T2DM.

Design, and testing of a solar-driven wastewater treatment unit for off-grid applications.

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:45 - 1:00
Location: 9-325

Authors: Justine Nguyen, Daniel Andrade, Thuan Nguyen, Kyle Miller, Masoud Modabernia, John Kest, Johnny Baradii, Laura Lopez, Binh Phun, David Jacobo.
Faculty Mentor: Reza Lakeh.

Abstract: In California the drought has become an important issue due to declines in surface water sources. In order to keep up with the continuously increasing demand for water, the state is heavily relying on imported water from the Colorado River. To account for this problem, the use of recycled water became necessary. The research team at Cal Poly Pomona, with the support of Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, is developing an off-grid solar-powered greywater treatment system for non-potable use in single households. Greywater, by definition, is the drained water from bathroom sinks, showers, tubs, and washing machines; this does not include wastewater from toilets or kitchen sinks. Treating greywater on-site can provide significant water savings, and can reduce the carbon footprint of desalination using solar panels. The system is comprised of a three-stage treatment: three microfilters, three solar-driven reverse osmosis membranes, and an ultraviolet disinfection unit. The product of this project is capable of reclaiming 90 gallons of water per day while recovering approximately 60% of residential greywater. The design of the system will remove traces of organic and inorganic chemicals, and particles of dirt, food and others. The team has built and tested a preliminary design of the greywater treatment system to address the mechanical controls, and electrical aspects of the overall system for future use. Based on data collection and analysis of Version 1, an optimized and more consumer-friendly Version 2 has been built and tested.

Purchase Intentions of Millenials in Regards to Sustainable Apparel

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Lauren Jacoby, Jessica D'ambra, Natalie Newman, Cody Beaty.
Faculty Mentor: Angella Kim.

Abstract: Fast fashion is a term coined by the global apparel industry to describe retailers with an apparel supply chain model that knocks off garments at a rapid pace and by doing so frequently update their stores with cheap products (Zamani, Sandin, & Peters, 2017). Fast fashion is unsustainable and has created irreversible damage to the environment through waste and byproducts associated with apparel products. Unfortunately, millennials; the generation born between 1982-2002, have adopted fast fashion brands as a primary source of apparel, even though researchers define millennials as a generation with "increased awareness of environmental, and social issues within society" (Hill, Lee, 2012). This is made more unpleasant by the fact that millennials make up approximately $2.45 trillion in potential spending (Mak, 2016). Millennials are a financially powerful generation and have a strong understanding of contemporary environmental issues, yet they are major supporters of the fast fashion system which is very toxic for the environment. Therefore, this paper sets out to understand millennials purchase intentions in regards to sustainable fashion. In this paper, we use quantitative data gathered from surveys completed by college age millennials to understand millennial's apparel purchase intentions and their relationship to sustainable apparel. We found that millennials accessibility to sustainable products influences purchase intentions was weak and did not support our research. We conclude that if there is concern and knowledge of sustainability and our environment, millennials will be more willing to purchase sustainable products.

Interplanetary CubeSat Solar Sail Mission

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:30 - 1:45
Location: 9-333

Authors: Holly Everson, Guadalupe Romero Bravo, Steven Jaworski, Sofiya Pascual, Riza Dayapera, Aerbwong Chitamitara, Suleman Jalal, Erica Arroyo, Justin Toney.
Faculty Mentor: Navid Nakhjiri.

Abstract: Studying CubeSats for space science missions has increased significantly in recent years. The use of a CubeSat will provide a spacecraft which is lighter, mechanically simpler, and with a fraction of the cost of a traditional space mission. Cal Poly Pomona Interplanetary CubeSat Solar Sail Mission (IPCS3M) is a multi-year research project studying the use of solar radiation pressure on a sail as an alternative method of propulsion for interplanetary CubeSat missions. With a 90 meters squared Mylar sail, the 6U CubeSat will travel to Saturn with the intended goal of dropping a 1U science payload into Saturn's northern hexagonal storm. The payload will enter the inner wall of the eye to gather data regarding storm patterns, chemical composition, and other factors. Additionally, the solar sail will provide the spacecraft with a free continuous thrust, increasing velocity throughout the mission timeline provided by the solar radiation pressure. Finite Element Analysis and Computer Aided Design (CAD) modeling were used to construct the spacecraft and allow for structural studies. In addition to computer model tests, physical tests have also been performed to research material properties, light reflectance, and boom creation. Successful solar sail implementation will give CubeSats a form of propulsion that will open up possibilities for more complex missions, most notably orbital maneuvering and interplanetary travel.

Hot Corrosion of High Entropy Alloys in Molten Salts

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:00 - 12:15
Location: 9-209

Authors: Alexander Jalbuena, Steven Pierce, Carinne Lukiman.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: High Entropy Alloys (HEAs) are a new class of multicomponent alloys that contain five or more elements in equal or near-equal amounts in atomic percent, resulting in extraordinary mechanical properties. Turbine blades are one of many potential applications for HEAs. Gas turbine blades exposed to temperatures in the 650-900°C range in marine atmospheres, can be subject to accelerated corrosion beneath a thin molten eutectic salt film consisting of sodium chloride and sodium sulfate. This type of corrosion (Type II hot corrosion) can eventually lead to engineering failure. Understanding the corrosion behavior of HEAs in the presence of a thin fused film of these salts would therefore be relevant for this application. In this study, coupons of a multicomponent AlCoCrFeNi alloy and a selected nickel-based superalloy as a baseline were exposed to a molten NaCl-Na2SO4 eutectic salt mixture at 700, 750, and 800°C in the presence of a platinum-catalyzed SO2/air mixture. In situ electrochemical techniques were utilized to characterize the corrosion behavior of these alloys. The morphology of the attack was studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The results are discussed and comparisons between the different alloy systems are made.


Hot Corrosion Testing of Co-, Ni- and Fe-Based Alloys Using a Dean's Rig

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:15 - 12:30
Location: 9-209

Authors: Carinne Lukiman, Steven Pierce, Alexander Jalbuena.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: Hot corrosion is a form of accelerated degradation of metallic alloys underneath a thin, molten salt film in high temperature environments, such as marine and industrial gas turbines or jet engines. Sulfur impurities from the fuel react with the sodium chloride present in the marine environment, resulting in a sodium sulfate salt which subsequently forms a thin molten film on the turbine components. Simulating this phenomenon will be invaluable in materials selection for this application. The Dean's Rig has been designed to simulate this corrosive environment. It uses a two-zone furnace, with a container of salt located at the hot zone and the test coupon(s) located in the lower temperature zone. The high temperature zone (1000℃) is used to vaporize salts and introduce them into a flowing gas stream. The low temperature zone (700℃) allows for deposition of the salt vapor onto the alloy, simulating the conditions that the alloy would encounter during service. To best mimic service conditions, a O2 - 0.1% SO2 gas was used at a flow rate of 1 sccm. Coupons of cobalt, nickel and iron alloys were pre-deposited with salt prior to testing using a drip method in which a supersaturated salt solution was slowly deposited onto the surface and then heated to allow the water to completely evaporate, leaving behind a thin salt film. Corrosion rate was determined through mass loss measurements. Post test samples were analyzed using optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) as well as X-ray diffraction (XRD).

Interplanetary CubeSat Solar Sail Mission

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:30 - 1:45
Location: 9-333

Authors: Holly Everson, Guadalupe Romero Bravo, Steven Jaworski, Sofiya Pascual, Riza Dayapera, Aerbwong Chitamitara, Suleman Jalal, Erica Arroyo, Justin Toney.
Faculty Mentor: Navid Nakhjiri.

Abstract: Studying CubeSats for space science missions has increased significantly in recent years. The use of a CubeSat will provide a spacecraft which is lighter, mechanically simpler, and with a fraction of the cost of a traditional space mission. Cal Poly Pomona Interplanetary CubeSat Solar Sail Mission (IPCS3M) is a multi-year research project studying the use of solar radiation pressure on a sail as an alternative method of propulsion for interplanetary CubeSat missions. With a 90 meters squared Mylar sail, the 6U CubeSat will travel to Saturn with the intended goal of dropping a 1U science payload into Saturn's northern hexagonal storm. The payload will enter the inner wall of the eye to gather data regarding storm patterns, chemical composition, and other factors. Additionally, the solar sail will provide the spacecraft with a free continuous thrust, increasing velocity throughout the mission timeline provided by the solar radiation pressure. Finite Element Analysis and Computer Aided Design (CAD) modeling were used to construct the spacecraft and allow for structural studies. In addition to computer model tests, physical tests have also been performed to research material properties, light reflectance, and boom creation. Successful solar sail implementation will give CubeSats a form of propulsion that will open up possibilities for more complex missions, most notably orbital maneuvering and interplanetary travel.

Triboelectrification

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:15 - 12:30
Location: 9-307

Authors: Erik Jensen, Maria Rullan.
Faculty Mentor: Keith Forward.

Abstract: Triboelectrification is the natural phenomena of the transfer of an electrostatic charge between two materials upon contact. This concept is seemingly simple, yet has left many debating over the factors affecting it, and how this charge is transferred. The goal of this experiment was to determine how environmental factors, such as humidity affect different materials and their triboelectric charge. The experimental system is a sealed incubator chamber to control for humidity, and air pressure. Inside the incubator is a downward coiled copper tube (1.5 mm in-diameter), that either contains nylon or teflon tubing, and is connected to a tin-metal Faraday cup. A single 500-800 micron sized particle of soda-lime glass or polystyrene is dropped into the top end of the coiled tube and the particle is allowed to rolls downward through the tubing accumulating charge before being deposited into the tin metal Faraday cup. The charge was measured and recorded within a period of time as the particle discharges. Measurements taken at a constant low relative humidity are compared to those of higher humidity. This was done by soaking the particles in water and evaporating until a desired relative humidity was reached. It is necessary to determine the humidity affect triboelectrification in insulated materials to better understand the possible benefit and hazards of this process.

Pre-clinical assessment of treatment side effects from Trazodone HCL in Rabbits

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Yumiko Jin, Courtney Fukushima.
Faculty Mentor: Cord Brundage.

Abstract: We have previously demonstrated that Trazodone Hydrochloride (TZN) improves animal handling/tractability in laboratory rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus). To complete pre-clinical trials on the use of TZN therapeutically for rabbits, we must demonstrate safety in addition to efficacy. In humans TZN has been associated with serotonin syndrome, heart arrhythmias and tachycardia. We compared the heart rate and body temperature of rabbits before and 3 hrs after 20, 40, 80 mg/kg TZN (by mouth), treated as part of our blinded randomized placebo controlled study. Trazodone increased heart rate, but did not induce tachycardia. No significant change in temperature were noted. The next phase of this study involves repeated administration of TZN (every 12 hours) with blood work and full physical examinations. These diagnostics are done prior to onset of treatment, after two and four weeks of continued treatment and a two-week following the cessation period. This data will be use to evaluate the safety of TZN and may lead to its use in clinical trials used in client owned rabbits.

Multilayer Plasmonic Structures in Terahertz Frequencies

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Bo Shrewsbury, Nolan Johnston, Ildar Salakhutdinov.
Faculty Mentor: Ertan Salik.

Abstract: Layered structures of alternating conducting materials and dielectric materials are creating plasmonic strcutures. These multilayer plasmonic structures have plasmonic modes with high effective refractive index. A material or structure with a high effective refractive index has great use in sensing because any change in the effective refractive index is easily detectable. This phenomenon can have many applications in a variety of fields, but is specifically important for biomedical sensing applications. However, the optimal frequency range for some biomedical sensing applications would be in the terahertz range due to the human body's natural emissions and reflections in other ranges. Gold would typically be used as the conducting material for many other frequency ranges like visible light or IR, but gold will not function optimally in Thz range. Therefore, we had to find materials that could operate as a conducting material in the terahertz range. Indium antimonide (InSb) and Lead telluride (PbTe) are promising materials in for THz plasmonic applications but they properties are not studued properly yet. We chose to work with InSb since it has satisfactory values for its complex permittivity in the terahertz range. With a working material, the multilayer plasmonic waveguide was tested using FEM simulations. We analyzed the mode(s) found in these plasmonic structures and the effective refractive index of the mode(s) for use in biomedical sensing applications.

The Evaluation of the effect of Maillard Conjugates and Bile Salts in the Release of Free Fatty Acids during Simulated Digestions of Emulsions.

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:00 - 12:15
Location: 9-251

Authors: Dena Jones.
Faculty Mentor: Gabriel Davidov-Pardo.

Abstract: Maillard conjugates (MC) made of polysaccharides covalently bound to proteins have proven to be effective emulsifiers and stabilizers of nanoemulsions under extreme conditions (pH, heat). The objective of this research was to study the effect MC and bile salts (BS) on emulsions during In Vitro digestions. It was hypothesized that MC would maintain the stability of emulsions during the gastric phase, while BS would have a major role in the release free fatty acids (FFA). The emulsions were subjected to a simulated digestion which included a gastric phase with pepsin at pH 3 and an intestinal phase with lipase, pancreatin and BS at pH 7. pH-Stat titration was used to quantify the release of FFA. The MC emulsions maintained their physical stability after the gastric phase while some destabilization occurred with the non-conjugated emulsions. After the intestinal phase, the emulsions were destabilized in all cases. For the MC emulsions, the release of FFA reached 93.7% when all intestinal components were present, while it reached 63.6% when no BS were present. When BS were present but pancreatin was omitted, the release of FFA reached 85.7%. The non-conjugated emulsions released 82.0% FFA when all intestinal components were present, while it reached 59.8% and 82.0% when no BS or no pancreatin were present, respectively. These results show the importance of MC and BS in the release of FFA from emulsions in simulated digestions.

Cloud Plush

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Bryan Arciniega, Yuna Jung, Kathleen Wong, Joshua Montanez, Jakub Kupsik.
Faculty Mentor: Yu Sun.

Abstract: Our product will allow people to connect through a pair of stuffed toys. The stuffed toys will allow the users to send each other hugs through our stuffed toy. When hugging the stuffed animal, they will feel a heartbeat and warmth (by seeing a visible glowing heart). The heartbeat and warmth would essentially recreate the feeling of hugging their partner, which would bring the two physically together. All of this is done in real time. It is just as fast as sending and receiving a text message. When brought together again, the stuffed animals would "celebrate." Our product is a stuffed toy that incorporates technology with intimacy. It creates a second pathway for relationships to connect in a way that is physical and healthier than through digital communication. The technology we are building into our toy will improve the experience of having a stuffed toy. We want to utilize Raspberry Pi, WLAN, bluetooth, sensor, motor and LEDs in each product. This will allow the stuffed toy to communicate via wifi and vibrate. We also want to incorporate an ergonomic design so that our stuffed toy can be comfortable. Bluetooth will be incorporated into the main circuit board so that it can connect to your phone. The connection to your phone will allow for you to send and receive hugs when there is no wifi network present. All of this technology will allow users to hug their loved one whether they are in the same room or halfway across the globe.

Corrosion Behavior of Metallic Alloys in a Molten Chloride Eutectic Salt for Nuclear Reactor Coolant

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:30 - 12:45
Location: 9-209

Authors: Dominic Dinh, Touba Shah, Peter Kang, Savannah Rodriguez.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: The rising demand for energy is creating an urgent need to develop an alternative method of energy production that is sustainable, cost-efficient and a clean alternative to traditional fossil fuel processes. Nuclear power is one option that has the potential to resolve these issues. Other alternative energy concepts such as solar energy and wind energy may seem promising, but the costs of operation and maintenance can cause these processes to be more expensive than nuclear in the long term. The coolant fluid in a nuclear reactor must possess certain qualities such as high volumetric heat capacity, high boiling point, low vapor pressure, resistance to radiation and thermodynamic stability. In recent years, there has been an increased shift from water to molten salts as the coolant for nuclear reactors. Despite the potential for increased corrosion rates in the containment vessel, molten salts minimize the risk of explosions because they do not to be pressurized. Fluoride salts are the preferred candidates for a coolant material but the associated expenses and safety hazards make them unattractive for prolonged utilization. A safer and more cost-effective alternative must be considered. Chloride salts fit this criteria but can be highly corrosive Therefore, careful consideration is required in the material selection process of the containment vessel. In this project, two stainless steels and one nickel-base alloy were tested at 700℃ using a DC electrochemical setup in a ternary molten salt eutectic salt. Linear polarization resistance and cyclic potentiodynamic polarization tests were performed to measure the corrosion behavior of the alloys. The post-test coupons were categorized with optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The viability of the chloride salt as a replacement for the coolant material will be discussed.

Morphology Development of Aluminide Coatings on Mo-Si-B-Ti Alloys

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:30 - 2:45
Location: 9-209

Authors: Zachery Walsh, Shahan Kasnakjian, Logan Gallegos, Deepali Patil.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: As the need for higher efficiencies in gas turbines that are marine-based or airborne increases, alternatives to nickel-base superalloys need to be investigated. Molybdenum-silicon-boron (Mo-Si-B) alloys are refractory materials that are expected to have high temperature stabilities; however, they are denser than nickel base superalloys. More recently, the addition of titanium to Mo-Si-B to form Mo-Si-B-Ti has been considered as a possible improvement by improving the creep resistance of the base alloy while lowering the density to values lower than those of Ni-base superalloys. However, Mo-Si-B-Ti alloys are vulnerable to high temperature oxidation, and to compensate for this, a protective coating would be required. The surfaces of the Mo-12.5Si- 8.5B-27.5Ti (at.%) alloy was modified using the halide activated pack cementation (HAPC) method. This is a coating method in which a halide vapor is generated within a pack and deposits the master alloy onto the surface of the substrate. Subsequently, the coating element diffuses into the substrate. Coatings were produced at 700-750C, in times ranging from 1 to 25 hours in an inert argon environment. The aluminized specimens were characterized using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/ EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis to investigate coating thickness, structure, composition, and microhardness testing was used to obtain hardness profiles of the coatings. Coatings had similar morphologies for different coating times in the 1 - 25 h range, consisting of a single layer with multiple phases and columnar/elongated grains. Some coatings contained fine precipitates near the coating-substrate interface. The coating morphology appeared to be dependent on substrate microstructure, with regions high in Mo in the coating aligning with structures in the substrate which were also high in Mo.

Development and Execution of a Veterinary Medical Massage Training Workshop

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Susanna Glore, Brianna Kelley, Emily Sanchez.
Faculty Mentor: Cord Brundage.

Abstract: Medical massage, therapeutic touch and acupressure are techniques used to help relieve tension, support circulation and treat soreness. These use can be as beneficial in veterinary medicine as they are in human medicine. There is however, less awareness of medical massage applications and techniques in veterinary medicine. Our goal was to develop a workshop where we could introduce people to medical massage and instruct them on the proper methods that can be used in pets. We reviewed literature and created an instruction guide and presentation. We piloted the workshop with a group of Cal Poly Pomona students and conducted surveys to help us refine the demonstrations/presentations. This information was used to create a program for us to outreach to community members and teach them how to strengthen the human-animal bond and support their own pet's wellness through medical massage.

Design, and testing of a solar-driven wastewater treatment unit for off-grid applications.

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:45 - 1:00
Location: 9-325

Authors: Justine Nguyen, Daniel Andrade, Thuan Nguyen, Kyle Miller, Masoud Modabernia, John Kest, Johnny Baradii, Laura Lopez, Binh Phun, David Jacobo.
Faculty Mentor: Reza Lakeh.

Abstract: In California the drought has become an important issue due to declines in surface water sources. In order to keep up with the continuously increasing demand for water, the state is heavily relying on imported water from the Colorado River. To account for this problem, the use of recycled water became necessary. The research team at Cal Poly Pomona, with the support of Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, is developing an off-grid solar-powered greywater treatment system for non-potable use in single households. Greywater, by definition, is the drained water from bathroom sinks, showers, tubs, and washing machines; this does not include wastewater from toilets or kitchen sinks. Treating greywater on-site can provide significant water savings, and can reduce the carbon footprint of desalination using solar panels. The system is comprised of a three-stage treatment: three microfilters, three solar-driven reverse osmosis membranes, and an ultraviolet disinfection unit. The product of this project is capable of reclaiming 90 gallons of water per day while recovering approximately 60% of residential greywater. The design of the system will remove traces of organic and inorganic chemicals, and particles of dirt, food and others. The team has built and tested a preliminary design of the greywater treatment system to address the mechanical controls, and electrical aspects of the overall system for future use. Based on data collection and analysis of Version 1, an optimized and more consumer-friendly Version 2 has been built and tested.

Autonomous Collision Avoidance System for Unmanned Aerial Systems using Stereoscopic Vision

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:15 - 2:30
Location: 9-325

Authors: Erwin Perez, Alexander Winger, Alex Tran, Nick Keti, Carlos Garcia-Paredes.
Faculty Mentor: Subodh Bhandari.

Abstract: This project discusses the use of stereoscopic vision as a means of sensing and detecting obstacles and other aircraft as a collision avoidance system for small unmanned aerial systems (UASs). The importance of this research has become increasingly significant as the presence of UASs in commercial and private sectors has led to stricter FAA regulations. Implementing collision avoidance systems can help integrate UASs more seamlessly into the National Airspace System (NAS) with fewer safety concerns and fewer financial burdens. Stereoscopic vision provides a cheaper and more lightweight solution for collision detection. The project uses a Zed stereo camera that is mounted on a DJI S900 Hexacopter unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) to generate depth maps. An NVIDIA Jetson TX1 board is used for onboard processing of the depth maps and obstacle avoidance. The board communicates with the PixHawk 3DR autopilot module which transmits data to the ground control station via XBee radios. By using the Zed software development kit (SDK), it is possible to obtain depth maps directly from the camera and use them in the implementation of obstacle avoidance. The algorithm that is used will partition the depth map into multiple sections, allowing it to find the section of the image that has pixels which represent objects furthest away, hence this section should be obstacle free. From here, the UAV can maneuver in the direction of the selected section of the depth map, allowing it to avoid obstacles in its path.

BioScope: The Notebook Microscope

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Lauren Keyes.
Faculty Mentor: Ertan Salik.

Abstract: Many high schools and middle schools are unable to afford a microscope for each student in class. In addition, most parents can't afford a high quality microscope at home. To help engage young students and boost interest in STEM, I worked with a team of Cal Poly Pomona students to develop a hand-held cell phone microscope, called BioScope, that is affordable and interactive. Prototyping has included testing lenses for magnification, resolution, and field of view, as well as many product design considerations. This process has led to a unique "notebook" construction, in which the structure of a spiral-bound notebook allows for adjustable lenses and focal lengths. Bioscope has a resolution of 3.48 microns, which is fine enough to resolve human red blood cells. It is currently in the final stages of prototyping and we are preparing for user-testing.

Corrosion Resistance of Metal-Ceramic Composites Produced by Directed Metal Oxidation

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:30 - 1:45
Location: 9-209

Authors: Salar Tabesh, Christopher Kha, Joshua Diaz, Ian Limon, Jason Brayshaw, Kentaro Fujimoto Lunn.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) couple the wear resistance of ceramics and the ductility of metals. They also can provide an alternative to the difficult issue of shape formation confronting all-ceramic components if they can be formed to near net shape. Directed Metal Oxidation is a method of fabricating CMCs to near net shape. The process can be engineered to produce a wide range of geometries of alumina matrix/aluminum composites with minimum machining and also allows for further reinforcement of the composite through the addition of constituents such as silicon carbide. In applications, e.g., pump impellers and housing, where a combination of erosion, wear and corrosion resistance are required, the CMCs could be an ideal choice. Plates of ceramic-metal composites were fabricated from an aluminum-silicon-magnesium alloy using the Directed Metal Oxidation process. Coupons were prepared for a series of tests to characterize the corrosion behavior, hardness and erosion/wear resistance of this ceramic matrix composite material. Microstructural characterization of the composite was accomplished through scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) and optical microscopy. Hardness tests - both macro and micro - were conducted in different regions of the composites. The erosion resistance of these composites were determined using slurry abrasion and rotating pin tests.

Do Attorneys Even Matter? : A look at Supreme Court Decision-Making

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:15 - 1:30
Location: 15-1828

Authors: Kristen Khair.
Faculty Mentor: Mario Guerrero.

Abstract: The Supreme Court is the ultimate decision maker in determining what laws we follow in our everyday lives, but is the Court's opinion affected by the parties who present cases to the Court? This paper examines whether attorneys have been able to affect the outcome on cases that are partisanly divided in the Supreme Court. This paper will argue that when a politically polarized issue is heard before the Supreme Court, the justices are more likely to be influenced by their own previously held political beliefs as oppose to the argument made by the attorneys before the Court. This study uses quantitative analysis, specifically a content analysis, focusing on oral arguments that have been heard before the Supreme Court. Through this analysis, I was able to find that an attorney does have an effect, but in cases that are partisanly divided, the effect is limited. Justices in the Supreme Court are basing their decisions on issues they know to be true or on their own interpretation of the Constitution. Therefore an attorney's oral argument is not the primary reason for a Justice's decision making.

The Study of Metal Powder Particle Size Distribution For Direct Metal Laser Sintering. (Powder Metallurgy for 3D Metal Printing)

Oral Presentation
Time: 3:00 - 3:15
Location: 9-269

Authors: Don Kim.
Faculty Mentor: Shokoufeh Mirzaei.

Abstract: Additive Manufacturing(AM) such as Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS), has opened a new era of digital manufacturing, namely "3D Metal Printing". 3D metal printing now enables anyone with a 3D metal printer to "print" virtually any shape, form, or size (with certain limitations) of an object in metal (stainless steel, aluminum, titanium, Inconel, etc). This new emerging technology eliminates, or reduces conventional manufacturing time to a fraction of a time, and enables rapid prototyping of complex organic designs that were not physical possible in the past, such as 3D printing porous bone replica in stainless steel for orthopedic use at the same office where it was designed. One of the most important ingredients of 3D metal printing is, the quality of the metal powder particles. Better powder particle quality yields less part defects, such as heat affected zones, porosity, hairline cracks, etc. Powder metallurgy is a field that studies the characteristics of metal powder particles. One of the most important powder metal characteristics is the particle size distribution. Currently there exist no data available for which particle size distribution yields the best packing density for 3D metal printing powder suppliers. The goal of this study is to understand how varying size distributions affect the packing density of the metal powder particles, and how to optimize the particle size distribution on a given set of size constraints, if it is possible.

Observations Through the Interstellar Medium in near Infrared

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:15 - 12:30
Location: 9-333

Authors: Christopher Mendoza, Aaron Kim.
Faculty Mentor: Matthew Povich.

Abstract: Our project is about one of the closest and most active star forming regions in the entire Galaxy, W3 cluster in the direction of the constellation Sagittarius. Our research is primarily focused on being able to take pictures from telescopes and transform them into scientific data, which we would then use to improve on existing star catalogs. Our images came from the WHIRC camera, which captures images in infrared, allowing us to see deeper through the dust that obscures the light radiated by stars. This might help us understand how stars, like our sun, may have formed in the past. Our images present a wider field of view and much higher resolution than previous observations. Our results provide insight into the amount of dust we are looking through and allows us to identify newborn stars with dusty disks which could eventually form planets like our own: Earth.

Aural Vision for the Blind

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:15 - 1:30
Location: 9-269

Authors: Andy Klaib.
Faculty Mentor: Scott Boskovich.

Abstract: While blind people lack sight, they generally have an enhanced sense of hearing. The goal of this research project is to study the possibility of making an assistive device that can detect objects in a room using wearable sensors, and then relay that information to a visually impaired person using spatial audio. A suitable way of detecting the objects in a room will be studied, such as by using microphones worn on a belt and acoustic beamforming. Different methods of relaying this spatial information using aural cues to the user will also be researched in order to find the most effective and intuitive method. The variables that can be experimented with include the pitch, amplitude, tone, rhythm, and overtones of the generated sound. These generated sounds representing the different objects will be artificially placed in the position of the obstacles by using 360° spatial audio.

AugmentedRealms: The Next Generation of Tabletop Gaming

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Pasha Beglar, Jeffrey Schmitendorf, Flor Tonie Nguyen, Cindy Lin, Angelo Rodriguez, Jeremy Kleve, Liang Dong, Xinyuan Wang.
Faculty Mentor: Olukemi Sawyerr.

Abstract: Tabletop games such a Dungeons & Dragons allow players the ability to create a make belief world in which other players can be a part of. Tabletop games mainly depend on the players imagination, which is both its greatest feature and flaw. The frustration comes with not having shared vision for the word, so players typically buy figurines and maps. Our solution is an app that uses augmented reality to bring tabletop gaming to life. Players will be able to view the characters and maps of their story in a more interactive and immersive way. As players view the game from their phone camera, they will be able to see 3D trees, dragons, and their own personalized characters standing on the table, swaying and breathing as if they were in the room with them. Parties can be built to allow friends who are also playing the game to be able to see the same objects from their own distinct perspective. Not only do they have the option to choose through a selection of provided 3D models, but also be able to upload their own 3D models to view in the real world through their phone cameras.

Dye Sensitized Solar Cells

Oral Presentation
Time: 3:00 - 3:15
Location: 9-307

Authors: Victoria Nguyen, Mitchell Mathes, Michael Ku, Sandie To, Hang Cao, Brian Case.
Faculty Mentor: Jonathan Puthoff.

Abstract: Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) are an example of a partially organic alternative to the semiconductor-based solar cells. They employ photosensitive dye molecules associated with a conducting substrate to harvest solar photons and accumulate electrons. We fabricate DSSCs that incorporate hibiscus dye and an organic hydrocarbon gel as the electrolyte. Previous generations of DSSCs relied on liquid electrolytes to replenish electrons in the dyes. To overcome the technical challenges associated with a liquid electrolyte we investigate the performance of solid electrolytes. Lambda carrageenan, known as Irish moss, is a thickening agent, stabilizer, and gel formula when mixed with water. Because of these qualities, Irish moss can be used to create a more mechanically stable electrolyte. For example, liquid electrolytes are prone to spillage which causes inconsistent readings. We investigated strategies for making lambda carrageenan electrolytes and tested the performance of those cells. We contrast the performance of the solid electrolyte based cells with that of the liquid electrolyte based cells.

How Is Millennial Women's Interest in Female Fitness Products shaped?

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:00 - 12:15
Location: 15-2907

Authors: Mahta Mirzaeiramin, Cailin Kuchenbecker, Quynh Le.
Faculty Mentor: Jae Min Jung.

Abstract: Despite growing research interest in consumer health, well-being and beauty, little is known about factors influencing consumer purchase decisions for female fitness devices. This study focuses on Kegel exercises -- exercise routines developed by Dr. Kegel to strengthen pelvic floor muscles -- that are recommended by health professionals for patients experiencing health ailments such as urinary incontinence, sexual dysfunction and dissatisfaction (Kegel 1948). Despite the benefits, women are not well aware of the role of pelvic floor muscles (e.g., O'Neill, 2017). The diffusion and acceptance of Kegel exercise and devices among women is likely determined by how comfortable women are about obtaining such benefits. For this reason, feminism should play an important role in shaping women's desire to engage in Kegel exercises. Thus, this research is intended to shed light on the role of feminism in women's formation of attitudes towards Kegel exercises and intentions to purchase Kegel devices. In addition, this research is purported to identify additional factors that mediate the impact of feminism on the attitudes and intentions. To this end, we develop 13 hypotheses, and survey 793 Millennial women in 10 liberal and health conscious cities across the country, ascertain the quality of measures, and test the hypotheses using PLS SEM. The results show general support for the hypotheses. To our best knowledge, this is the first study investigating the role of feminism in shaping attitudes towards Kegel exercises. Findings of the research provide implications for theory development and businesses for their segmentation, positioning, and targeting decisions.


How Companies Can Expand Their Traditional Gender Markets: A Look at Reversed Gender Advertisements

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:15 - 1:30
Location: 15-2907

Authors: Cailin Kuchenbecker.
Faculty Mentor: Jae Min Jung.

Abstract: As female oriented companies like Dove and Mattel and male oriented companies like Coors Light and Ram Trucks start to branch out from their mainly one sided gender markets to start targeting opposite gender consumers, a new trend is starting to arise; cross gender advertisements. Cross or reversed gender advertisements are those in which a traditionally male product is promoted to women and a traditionally female product is promoted to men. The current research conducted on reversed gender advertising indicates that matching a spokesperson's gender to the gender of the product results in higher rates of purchase intention from the audience than if the spokesperson's gender does not match the gender of the product. However, researchers studying this topic have not yet looked at moderating factors that may account for why this is the case. The purpose of this study is to identify possible moderators that may affect an individual's purchase intentions of a product that was advertised in a reversed gendered way, such as an individual's culture, prior experience with the product or service, and whether or not they saw the advertisement in a public or private setting. An experiment will be conducted with college students. This study holds managerial implications by giving organizations greater insights on how to approach reversed gender advertisements in a way that minimizes the risk of consumer backlash and provides a way to keep up with competitors branching out of their main gender markets.

Cloud Plush

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Bryan Arciniega, Yuna Jung, Kathleen Wong, Joshua Montanez, Jakub Kupsik.
Faculty Mentor: Yu Sun.

Abstract: Our product will allow people to connect through a pair of stuffed toys. The stuffed toys will allow the users to send each other hugs through our stuffed toy. When hugging the stuffed animal, they will feel a heartbeat and warmth (by seeing a visible glowing heart). The heartbeat and warmth would essentially recreate the feeling of hugging their partner, which would bring the two physically together. All of this is done in real time. It is just as fast as sending and receiving a text message. When brought together again, the stuffed animals would "celebrate." Our product is a stuffed toy that incorporates technology with intimacy. It creates a second pathway for relationships to connect in a way that is physical and healthier than through digital communication. The technology we are building into our toy will improve the experience of having a stuffed toy. We want to utilize Raspberry Pi, WLAN, bluetooth, sensor, motor and LEDs in each product. This will allow the stuffed toy to communicate via wifi and vibrate. We also want to incorporate an ergonomic design so that our stuffed toy can be comfortable. Bluetooth will be incorporated into the main circuit board so that it can connect to your phone. The connection to your phone will allow for you to send and receive hugs when there is no wifi network present. All of this technology will allow users to hug their loved one whether they are in the same room or halfway across the globe.

Evaluating expected temperature interval ranges in healthy canines

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Claire Kwon.
Faculty Mentor: Cord Brundage.

Abstract: Infrared thermography (IRT) has been used in veterinary medicine as a non-invasive tool to detect changes in skin surface temperature. This is achieved through the observation of differences in thermal patterns visualized as a color map of heat distribution across the skin. Previous studies have used thermography for early detection of inflammation. Inflammation can be identified as a localized heat source compared to the surrounding area on the surface of the skin as well as generalized temperature. These studies identify inflammation through qualitative methods such as the change in color gradient. Limited IRT references exist for standard procedures, based in part on the wide range of variables that come with using IRT diagnostically. The purpose of this research is to develop anticipated IRT value intervals for healthy canines. This study used normal, healthy canines (n = est. 50) in controlled temperature rooms. Images were taken by a FLIR B400 camera at a minimum distance of 1.3 feet. Analysis of the images are established through regions of interests (ROIs) drawn relative to the size of the dogs of different anatomical parts of the body. The temperature interval found in the preliminary study of this research aligns with previous studies where the temperature ranges from 1-3 °C.

Apparatus for Measuring Efficiency of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Timothy Butch, Bassim Fakhro, Hannah Le, Kevin Sin, Carlos Rosete, Austin Hudson.
Faculty Mentor: Jonathan Puthoff.

Abstract: With the move toward renewable energy sources comes the necessity to validate the performance of next generation devices such as dye-sensitized solar cells. The issue with existing dye-sensitized solar cells is that it is difficult to measure their efficiency because of the relatively complicated nature of the devices. These complications include the presence of an electrolyte and dye based photoelectron generation. To address this problem we created an instrumented test platform for characterizing dye-sensitized solar cells in a simple circuit. Our platform includes a power supply/data acquisition module that can be controlled using custom software written in Laboratory Virtual Instrument Engineering Workbench (LabVIEW). With this instrumentation, numerous test variables can be controlled such as voltage step size and dwell time during a voltage sweep. The current versus voltage curves produced during an experiment can be analyzed to calculate cell efficiency. This efficiency data can be used to guide efforts to improve the manufacturing of dye-sensitized solar cells. This configuration will serve as a stepping stone for making solar power a more reliable energy resource by making its research more so uninhibited.

"Selection of DNA aptamers for rapid and specific detection of Listeria monocytogenes in food products"

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:30 - 2:45
Location: 9-283

Authors: Jacqueline Lara.
Faculty Mentor: Junjun Liu.

Abstract: Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes) is a facultative anaerobic bacterium, which causes the infection listeriosis and is one of the most virulent foodborne pathogens. Listeriosis predominately affects pregnant women, newborns, adults with weak immune system such as the elderly. It is estimated that 1,600 people get listeriosis and about 260 die each year. It is therefore very important to develop rapid and effective methods for L. monocytogenes test to protect human health and avoid costly food product recalls. L. monocytogenes in food and environmental samples are traditionally detected by cultural enrichment and selective/differential plating followed by biochemical, serological, and/or molecular identification. These methods are labor intensive and tedious, and usually take 2-3 days to confirm a negative and up to a week or more for a positive. Antibody-based immunoassays are fast, reproducible, and less sensitive to food interference therefore are widely used in L. monocytogenes detection. However, due to the nature of antibodies, their binding affinities and quality may vary. Recently, aptamers have emerged as a good alternative to antibodies in pathogen detection. Aptamers are stable short single-stranded oligonucleotides or peptides that bind to targets with high affinity and specificity. As they are produced by in vitro synthesis, their quality is more consistent. By using whole cell L. monocytogenes as target, single-stranded DNA aptamers can be selected. The ultimate goal of the project is to develop an aptamer-based rapid and specific L. monocytogenes detection method for food safety test.

Improving Plant Resistant to Powdery Mildew Disease

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:00 - 12:15
Location: 9-335

Authors: Stephanie Mora Garcia, Ryan Schiefelbein, Paul Larsen.
Faculty Mentor: Gregory Barding.

Abstract: Powdery mildew disease is a fungal infection which can have negative effects on crop growth. There is evidence that a bio-signaling molecule is present in our model plant, A. thaliana, that results in an increase of powdery mildew disease. By utilizing various separation techniques, a method for isolation and identification of the molecule is underway. Plant extracts containing the metabolite are prepared using C18 solid phase extraction (SPE) followed by weak anion exchange (WAX) SPE and tested with a bioassay. The initial results suggest that the molecule in question is highly polar and anionic. To further isolate the molecule, a high performance liquid chromatograph is being utilized for fractionation. Due to the nature of the metabolite, the method being used on the liquid chromatograph is hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC). The buffer system that elutes the metabolite from the column has been identified along with the parameters in which the separation of the metabolite from other constituents is successful. The effectiveness of our fractionation is determined by the same bioassay. As our method for isolation improves, high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is used to assist in the identification of the molecule. Isolating and identifying the metabolite will provide valuable information regarding the biological mechanism of the resistance to the fungal disease and possible applications to the broader agricultural community.

3D printing Graphene-Enhanced Li-ion battery and Graphene supercapacitors

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:15 - 1:30
Location: 9-307

Authors: Matthew Tisbe, Nicholas Ferguson, Amanda Ramos, Jeffrey Lee, Calvin Nguyen, Ben Cheng, Alfredo Collazo, Alexander Lau, Jose Lopez, Alexander Botello, Albert Armienta.
Faculty Mentor: Zhen Yu.

Abstract: Batteries are power storage devices that provide their stored power to connected electronics. Li-ion batteries are a widely used battery type due to their high energy density and ability to recharge. These properties make them well suited for portable electronic devices at the expense of taking the majority weight and volume of the device. The use of a liquid electrolyte also limits the recharging speed and operating temperature. Switching to a solid electrolyte yields enhanced environmental safety and higher energy density, thus a smaller volume needed for portable applications. Our research focuses on the ease of production of such batteries through the development of a superior solid electrolyte, and the robustness of 3D printing and robotic assembly.

Restoration of invaded walnut woodlands using a trait-based community assembly approach

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:15 - 1:30
Location: 9-283

Authors: Sierra Lauman.
Faculty Mentor: Erin Questad.

Abstract: Non-native plant invasions have been cited as a cause of decline of numerous plant communities, including Southern California walnut woodlands. These woodlands are dominated by Juglans californica, the California black walnut, which is a rare, endemic, allelopathic tree. Barriers to native community assembly in walnut woodlands include abiotic filters, such as light and water availability, biotic filters, including competition with invasive plant species, and allelopathy, due to the chemical juglone. Two experiments were conducted to assess how these abiotic and biotic environmental filters affect the establishment, growth, and reproduction of native and non-native annual plant species, with a focus on developing a trait-based restoration approach for this ecosystem. A laboratory experiment was used to assess species resistance to juglone at concentrations ranging from 0 to 0.5mM. A field experiment was conducted to examine native and non-native annual plant recruitment with respect to microclimate and competition. Communities containing native only, invasive only, or a mixture of both species types were assembled under J. californica canopies, and in exposed locations.

Apparatus for the Characterizing of Gecko-Like Adhesive Specimens

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Arden Le, Natasha Beltran, Casandra Rivera-Fernandez, Nathan Doi, Jonathan Carranza.
Faculty Mentor: Jonathan Puthoff.

Abstract: Geckos adhere to surfaces across an array of microscopic hairs on their toes, and the adhesion forces between those hairs and the surface are based on Van der Waals' interactions. Scientists and engineers wish to produce materials that have gecko-like fibers that mimic the adhesive and non-contaminating properties of the natural material. In order to qualify how well these gecko-like adhesives perform, we need ways of measuring the tribological forces, such as adhesion and friction force. Measuring these forces will assist in identifying the relevant structural and materials variables that influence their performance. We developed a custom-built test platform that allows us to measure frictional forces produced by gecko-like materials. Our experimental setup includes a linear actuator, a force sensor, and is instrumented using LabView software. The sliding motion of an adhesive specimen against a glass substrate is initiated by the actuator to produce a frictional force. During an experiment, we can vary the sliding speed and normal forces applied to the specimen to influence the amount of adhesion generated by the specimen. We characterized the performance of the instrument using materials with known frictional properties; these results provide a baseline for the analysis of future experiments.

Apparatus for Measuring Efficiency of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Timothy Butch, Bassim Fakhro, Hannah Le, Kevin Sin, Carlos Rosete, Austin Hudson.
Faculty Mentor: Jonathan Puthoff.

Abstract: With the move toward renewable energy sources comes the necessity to validate the performance of next generation devices such as dye-sensitized solar cells. The issue with existing dye-sensitized solar cells is that it is difficult to measure their efficiency because of the relatively complicated nature of the devices. These complications include the presence of an electrolyte and dye based photoelectron generation. To address this problem we created an instrumented test platform for characterizing dye-sensitized solar cells in a simple circuit. Our platform includes a power supply/data acquisition module that can be controlled using custom software written in Laboratory Virtual Instrument Engineering Workbench (LabVIEW). With this instrumentation, numerous test variables can be controlled such as voltage step size and dwell time during a voltage sweep. The current versus voltage curves produced during an experiment can be analyzed to calculate cell efficiency. This efficiency data can be used to guide efforts to improve the manufacturing of dye-sensitized solar cells. This configuration will serve as a stepping stone for making solar power a more reliable energy resource by making its research more so uninhibited.

How Is Millennial Women's Interest in Female Fitness Products shaped?

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:00 - 12:15
Location: 15-2907

Authors: Mahta Mirzaeiramin, Cailin Kuchenbecker, Quynh Le.
Faculty Mentor: Jae Min Jung.

Abstract: Despite growing research interest in consumer health, well-being and beauty, little is known about factors influencing consumer purchase decisions for female fitness devices. This study focuses on Kegel exercises -- exercise routines developed by Dr. Kegel to strengthen pelvic floor muscles -- that are recommended by health professionals for patients experiencing health ailments such as urinary incontinence, sexual dysfunction and dissatisfaction (Kegel 1948). Despite the benefits, women are not well aware of the role of pelvic floor muscles (e.g., O'Neill, 2017). The diffusion and acceptance of Kegel exercise and devices among women is likely determined by how comfortable women are about obtaining such benefits. For this reason, feminism should play an important role in shaping women's desire to engage in Kegel exercises. Thus, this research is intended to shed light on the role of feminism in women's formation of attitudes towards Kegel exercises and intentions to purchase Kegel devices. In addition, this research is purported to identify additional factors that mediate the impact of feminism on the attitudes and intentions. To this end, we develop 13 hypotheses, and survey 793 Millennial women in 10 liberal and health conscious cities across the country, ascertain the quality of measures, and test the hypotheses using PLS SEM. The results show general support for the hypotheses. To our best knowledge, this is the first study investigating the role of feminism in shaping attitudes towards Kegel exercises. Findings of the research provide implications for theory development and businesses for their segmentation, positioning, and targeting decisions.

REFINEMENT OF TECTONOSTRATIGRAPHY OF THE NORTHEAST BIG MARIA MOUNTAINS, RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA.

Oral Presentation
Time: 3:00 - 3:15
Location: 9-333

Authors: Anthony Lebeau.
Faculty Mentor: Nicholas Van Buer.

Abstract: The Big Maria mountains in the eastern Mojave, north of Blythe, California, contain the Paleozoic stratigraphy of the Grand Canyon, but it has been overturned and in some places attenuated to a tenth of its original thickness. The range has been the focus of several structural geology investigations over the past 30 years. Some workers have attempted to relate its geology to Cordilleran tectonics, but to adequately achieve this, more than structural analysis is needed. It will be imperative to understand the basic geology of the range. A significant obstacle to that has been the ambiguous age of three related metamorphic units; an augen gneiss, a quartz-epidote schist, and a fine grained quartzofeldspathic gneiss. The ages of these rocks are either Proterozoic or Mesozoic. This investigation was focused in the northeast of the range, where all three units are concentrated. A map based on field data and satellite imagery was created with GIS software. Samples were analyzed using X-ray fluorescence and optical petrography. U/Pb zircon geochronology was reserved for the metamorphic units without definite ages. Mapping confirms a nappe that has been cut by a detachment fault. Petrographic analysis reveals that the metamorphic units are similar in composition and exhibit epidote-amphibolite metamorphic textures and mineralogy. Discrimination diagrams, based upon XRF data, suggest the protolith of the metamorphic units to be igneous. Radiometric dating has clarified that the augen gneiss is Proterozoic and both the quartz-epidote schist, and fine grained quartzofeldspathic gneiss are Mesozoic in age.

Overexpression, purification, and preliminary characterization of BaiCD enzyme from intestinal bacteria, Clostridium scindens

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: SiYoung Lee.
Faculty Mentor: Kathryn McCulloch.

Abstract: Primary bile acid is synthesized in liver and converted into secondary bile acid by intestinal bacteria, and secondary bile acid levels have been related to GI tract related diseases. One species of gut bacteria, Clostridium scindens, uses a bile acid inducible (bai) operon containing many genes to accomplish this conversion. Recent research revealed BaiCD functions as an oxidoreductase in this process. BaiCD is also found to have substrate stereospecificity that other bai genes do not have except BaiH. There is a lack of biochemical and structural information about the baiCD gene product itself. This characterization will require significant quantities of purified protein. First, overexpression trials were conducted using different E. coli strains to determine which cell lines overexpress BaiCD robustly. Whole cell samples and soluble protein samples were taken at different increments of time during overexpression trials, and analyzed by SDS-PAGE. BaiCD protein will then be purified using metal affinity chromatography and size exclusion chromatography. In the future, the mechanism of purified BaiCD enzyme will be characterized by conducting enzymatic assays, site-directed mutagenesis, and X-ray crystallography.

E-STEM Laptop Liquid Cooling System

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Roberto Mendez, Bryan Lee, Zhixuan(Victor) Ding, Mostafa Vahidi, Arik Naylous, Amanali Rodriguez, Alec Valladares, Yang Lo.
Faculty Mentor: Olukemi Sawyerr.

Abstract: Our group will present a revolutionary laptop cooling pad which utilizes an all-new liquid-convection cooling technique as opposed to other similar products in the market which use inefficient fans to dispense the heat. Our product uses a conductive plate to transfer the heat from the bottom of a laptop through a plate which is exposed to channels of water on the other side. Heat is then carried from the conductive plate to the water by convection and then ultimately transferred to the fins of a radiator to be radiated into the atmosphere. The water used for cooling is circulated using a small pump which runs continuously. As a result, our new cooling technology is able to perform up to five times better than the traditional cooling pads available today.

3D printing Graphene-Enhanced Li-ion battery and Graphene supercapacitors

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:15 - 1:30
Location: 9-307

Authors: Matthew Tisbe, Nicholas Ferguson, Amanda Ramos, Jeffrey Lee, Calvin Nguyen, Ben Cheng, Alfredo Collazo, Alexander Lau, Jose Lopez, Alexander Botello, Albert Armienta.
Faculty Mentor: Zhen Yu.

Abstract: Batteries are power storage devices that provide their stored power to connected electronics. Li-ion batteries are a widely used battery type due to their high energy density and ability to recharge. These properties make them well suited for portable electronic devices at the expense of taking the majority weight and volume of the device. The use of a liquid electrolyte also limits the recharging speed and operating temperature. Switching to a solid electrolyte yields enhanced environmental safety and higher energy density, thus a smaller volume needed for portable applications. Our research focuses on the ease of production of such batteries through the development of a superior solid electrolyte, and the robustness of 3D printing and robotic assembly.

Upland Unified School District Garden Program

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:45 - 1:00
Location: 15-2907

Authors: Daniel Legat, David Bañuelas.
Faculty Mentor: Gwen Urey.

Abstract: The Upland Unified School District's (UUSD) Garden Project is a bold initiative to increase student access to fresh-organic fruits and vegetables while building a local food system. The programs primary purpose is to break down barriers that inhibit access to organic produce and space for gardening in the City of Upland. One in two students in the UUSD either receives free or reduced lunch programs, which is 4,980 students out of 6,414 (2017 Eligibility Report). At certain school sites, over 80% of students receive free or reduced lunch. The Garden Program uses sustainable farming techniques that protect the environment, public health, human communities, and animal welfare by growing produce in urban environments. The program turns underutilized spaces into full production gardens, minimizing our carbon footprint by eliminating emissions from transporting produce. UUSD is one of only three Community Food Producers (CFP) registered in San Bernardino County (SBC). Our objective as the only school district registered is to transition demonstration gardens into larger production farms to supply cafeterias. The program aims to develop production gardens in all 14 school locations within the district, amassing 2.5 acres of agricultural landscaping. The success of the program relies on support from our community partners. Such partners include Cal Poly Pomona student interns sponsored by the Randal Lewis Group, the YMCA of Upland, UUSD student groups and teachers who maintain gardens and local sponsors who have donated land, seeds, soil, and building materials.

Corrosion Resistance of Metal-Ceramic Composites Produced by Directed Metal Oxidation

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:30 - 1:45
Location: 9-209

Authors: Salar Tabesh, Christopher Kha, Joshua Diaz, Ian Limon, Jason Brayshaw, Kentaro Fujimoto Lunn.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) couple the wear resistance of ceramics and the ductility of metals. They also can provide an alternative to the difficult issue of shape formation confronting all-ceramic components if they can be formed to near net shape. Directed Metal Oxidation is a method of fabricating CMCs to near net shape. The process can be engineered to produce a wide range of geometries of alumina matrix/aluminum composites with minimum machining and also allows for further reinforcement of the composite through the addition of constituents such as silicon carbide. In applications, e.g., pump impellers and housing, where a combination of erosion, wear and corrosion resistance are required, the CMCs could be an ideal choice. Plates of ceramic-metal composites were fabricated from an aluminum-silicon-magnesium alloy using the Directed Metal Oxidation process. Coupons were prepared for a series of tests to characterize the corrosion behavior, hardness and erosion/wear resistance of this ceramic matrix composite material. Microstructural characterization of the composite was accomplished through scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) and optical microscopy. Hardness tests - both macro and micro - were conducted in different regions of the composites. The erosion resistance of these composites were determined using slurry abrasion and rotating pin tests.

Practice Tests and Workshops: Do They Help Students Pass Standardized Essay Tests?

Oral Presentation
Time: 3:00 - 3:15
Location: 15-2913

Authors: Alexis Letner, Christopher Buglino.
Faculty Mentor: Karen Russikoff.

Abstract: This study looked at the correlation between a student taking a practice test and/or going to workshops on grammar and writing strategies and the probability of that student passing a high-stakes essay test. Because 90% or more of students who do not pass this type of test are English language learners, this study is of particular interest to TESOL research. Most students who take these tests are advised to participate in the pre-test study activities mentioned above, but little research has been conducted to ascertain if said activities are actually helping the students pass. This study tracked the students who have participated in one or more of these study activities through the past year, and compared their pass rate to a general pass rate. The study found that only the students who had participated in multiple study activities during multiple school terms-thus failing the test at least once-had a significantly higher chance of passing compared to the general pass rate. It was therefore likely that only long-term writing intervention and dedication on the part of the student had any impact on the likelihood of a student to pass this type of test.

Co-Ni-Ga: Shape Memory Alloys

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:30 - 2:45
Location: 9-307

Authors: Matthew Tom, Joliette Li, Christopher Bautista.
Faculty Mentor: Jonathan Puthoff.

Abstract: Shape-memory alloys (SMAs) are metal alloys that can return to their original shape upon the addition of heat. Magnetic SMAs are alloys that possess magnetic properties in addition and can therefore be reconfigured through the application of external magnetic fields and heat. These materials have application in motors, actuators, implants, and prosthetics, providing a consolidated mechanical system that lacks separate components. Despite these advantageous properties, magnetic SMAs' low efficiency and high production costs prevent them from being used in many applications. In order to identify the optimal alloy structure and composition, and thereby improve the performance of the SMAs, we created phase diagrams for the Co-Ni-Ga SMA system. We employed published Gibbs energy functions to construct a database of the properties of phases found in this system and constructed the diagrams using the ThermoCalc software package. These diagrams are useful for calculating the relative amounts of magnetic and shape-memory phases in alloys with given Co, Ni, and Ga compositions. Optimizing this phase mixture can lead to potentially more effective magnetic SMAs.

Evaluation of the Stoichiometry Between [Pt(Cl)_6]^2-and TOA^+ Ions During the Liquid/liquid Extraction

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Kevin Liang, Shu Wu.
Faculty Mentor: Peng Sun.

Abstract: The monolayer protected Pt nanoparticles have been widely used in catalyst, energy conversion, chemical sensing etc. The Brust-Schiffrin (BS) is a two-phase synthesis method that is mostly used to synthesize the monolayer protected Pt nanoparticles. In the BS method, [Pt(Cl)_6]^2- ions in the aqueous phase needs to be transferred into an organic phase with the assistance of TOA^+. However, a problem quickly arises because the stoichiometry between TOA^+ and [Pt(Cl)_6]^2- during the facilitated transfer process is still unknown. In this project, a hemispherical micro-liquid/liquid interface formed between a layer of [Pt(Cl)_6]^2- aqueous filled micropipette and an organic phase has been employed to study the stoichiometry of TOA^+ facilitated transfer of [Pt(Cl)_6]^2-. Since at the hemispherical micro-liquid/liquid interface there is even diffusion field, the theoretical i-V curve for TOA^+ facilitated transfer of [Pt(Cl)_6]^2- can be derived much more easily. By simulating the theoretical i-V curve to the experimental voltammogram, the stoichiometry of TOA^+ facilitated transfer of [Pt(Cl)_6]^2- can be precisely obtained by fitting the experimental curve with the theoretical curve.

AugmentedRealms: The Next Generation of Tabletop Gaming

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Pasha Beglar, Jeffrey Schmitendorf, Flor Tonie Nguyen, Cindy Lin, Angelo Rodriguez, Jeremy Kleve, Liang Dong, Xinyuan Wang.
Faculty Mentor: Olukemi Sawyerr.

Abstract: Tabletop games such a Dungeons & Dragons allow players the ability to create a make belief world in which other players can be a part of. Tabletop games mainly depend on the players imagination, which is both its greatest feature and flaw. The frustration comes with not having shared vision for the word, so players typically buy figurines and maps. Our solution is an app that uses augmented reality to bring tabletop gaming to life. Players will be able to view the characters and maps of their story in a more interactive and immersive way. As players view the game from their phone camera, they will be able to see 3D trees, dragons, and their own personalized characters standing on the table, swaying and breathing as if they were in the room with them. Parties can be built to allow friends who are also playing the game to be able to see the same objects from their own distinct perspective. Not only do they have the option to choose through a selection of provided 3D models, but also be able to upload their own 3D models to view in the real world through their phone cameras.

Recombinase Polymerase Amplification for Rapid, Real-Time, Isothermal Detection of Shiga-Toxin Producing E.coli at Point-of-Care

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:15 - 2:30
Location: 9-335

Authors: Leanna Little Dog.
Faculty Mentor: Shelton Murinda.

Abstract: Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are a major family of foodborne pathogens of public health, veterinary, and economic significance in the United States and worldwide. Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) has been previously used to detect the presence of STEC in real time (5-10 min at 39°C) with high specificity, sensitivity, and predictive value similar to that of polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The limits of detection of STEC in laboratory media were ~5-50 colony forming units (CFU)/mL. The goal of this study is to lower the limit of detection for STEC in order to begin development of a protocol for use in the field at points-of-concern (field, animals, etc.).

Effect of Inclination Angle on the Performance of an Isochoric and Elemental Thermal Energy Storage Tube

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:30 - 2:45
Location: 9-269

Authors: Kevin Liu, Jego Santos.
Faculty Mentor: Reza Lakeh.

Abstract: Most renewable energy sources, e.g., Concentrated Solar Power (CSP), are intermittent in power generation, having supply periods that are not synchronous with power demand. Thermal energy storage (TES) can be integrated with CSP plants to improve system response and availability. This paper investigates the charging behavior of sulfur when used as a TES medium in various containment orientations. Sulfur was incorporated as the TES medium due to its stability, low cost, and high energy density. A commercially available computational fluid analysis (CFD) package (ANSYS/FLUENT) was used to analyze a three-dimensional tubular containment model in different orientations. The model was configured as a transient, sensible TES system operating from 200 to 400°C, corresponding to the initial sulfur temperature and to the heated storage wall temperature. The properties of sulfur were incorporated into the CFD software to simulate buoyancy-driven convective flow inside the storage tube under different inclinations. Analysis of the CFD results determined that sulfur is a valid TES candidate with good thermal performance.

Applicant Pool Characteristics of Pro-environmental Companies

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:45 - 2:00
Location: 15-1808

Authors: Anna Liu.
Faculty Mentor: Sara Langford.

Abstract: Businesses have been known to be greedy, self-serving, and harmful to the environment. However, it is a misconception that businesses and the environment must be at odds. Corporate social responsibility bridges the gap between both. Many studies have found that socially and environmentally responsible companies are more attractive employers to prospective job applicants. It may be possible that the applicant pool attracted to environmentally-friendly companies are of higher quality. This study examines the characteristics of the applicant pool attracted to pro-environmental companies. Participants in this study viewed either a green job ad or a nongreen job ad and answered questions relating to organization attractiveness and prestige as well as their intentions to pursue a job with the organization. They also answered questions relating to conscientiousness and their environmental attitudes. Data collection is currently in progress. Results and implications of findings will be discussed. Keywords: applicant pool, characteristics, environmentally-friendly, businesses, companies, corporate social responsibility, conscientiousness, environmental attitudes

E-STEM Laptop Liquid Cooling System

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Roberto Mendez, Bryan Lee, Zhixuan(Victor) Ding, Mostafa Vahidi, Arik Naylous, Amanali Rodriguez, Alec Valladares, Yang Lo.
Faculty Mentor: Olukemi Sawyerr.

Abstract: Our group will present a revolutionary laptop cooling pad which utilizes an all-new liquid-convection cooling technique as opposed to other similar products in the market which use inefficient fans to dispense the heat. Our product uses a conductive plate to transfer the heat from the bottom of a laptop through a plate which is exposed to channels of water on the other side. Heat is then carried from the conductive plate to the water by convection and then ultimately transferred to the fins of a radiator to be radiated into the atmosphere. The water used for cooling is circulated using a small pump which runs continuously. As a result, our new cooling technology is able to perform up to five times better than the traditional cooling pads available today.

Optical Characterization of Thin Film Oxides Grown on Ferrous and Non-Ferrous Metals

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:45 - 1:00
Location: 9-209

Authors: Hernan Lopez, Samuel Navarrete, Yen Pung Chu, Gordon Butler.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: Metallic alloys used in various industrial applications can encounter high operating temperatures for varying periods of time. Under these conditions, metals are susceptible to oxidation, ultimately leading to the failure of that component or even complete system failure. Traditional methods of evaluating the extent of oxide growth, such as cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy, are destructive in nature and cannot be used to monitor the health of the structure while in service. Therefore, it is beneficial to have a method to determine the extent of oxidative attack on a component while in service. Optical analytical methods, which include spectral analysis and illuminance, offer an exciting non-destructive pathway to evaluate structures especially in hard to access or unsafe areas. In this study, the early onset of oxide films on UNS C11000, UNS G30400 and UNS R50400, at temperatures in the 125-900॰C range was determined. The color cycle was studied using a spectrophotometer to observe minute differences in the range of colors observed as the oxide film continues to grow. As the oxide film grows, it cycles between three colors: straw, brown and blue. The wavelength and intensity of the reflected incident light off the oxide film can indicate the state of oxidation. Results from the optical experiments were related to those obtained from scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) and optical microscopy. The oxide films were further characterized by non-contact profilometry and X-Ray diffraction (XRD).

Diversity in Advertising Marketing Campaigns

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Dewen Chen, Kelsey Noriega, Denise Lopez, Shamia Hussain.
Faculty Mentor: Chitra Dabas.

Abstract: This research examined consumers attitude toward marketing campaigns that consist of diverse model ethnicity and, homogenous, white model ethnicities. Five constructs were used in this research, Self-Identification, Attitudes Toward Advertisement, Perceived Uniqueness, Word of Mouth, and Purchase Intention. We developed two stimulus that represents diversity and homogeneousness. Through convenience sampling with the use of SurveyMonkey and Social Medias, participants were asked to take a survey and to answer on a slider which stimulus they prefer given the question. The collected data are then recoded into two different scales with respect to each stimulus, diversity and homogeneousness. Then, Linear Regressions were employed to determine the significant value P, B and adjusted R square. All the hypotheses were supported. In general, consumers have a positive attitude toward diversity in marketing campaign with more engagement in word of mouth, purchase intention, and have a more positive attitude toward said advertisements. As additional analysis, we conducted t-tests to determine the frequency of participants answer on each scale. Interestingly, we found that participants are more willing to answer on the diversity spectrum instead of the homogeneous spectrum. For questions that involved the constructs of Attitude Toward Advertisement and Purchase Intentions, participants are more likely to have a strong positive impression on diversity stimulus.

Autonomous Collision Avoidance of UAVs With ADS-B Transponders

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:45 - 3:00
Location: 9-325

Authors: Tristan Sherman, Mitchell Caudle, Hana Haideri, Jimmy Lopez.
Faculty Mentor: Subodh Bhandari.

Abstract: If UAVs are to be successfully integrated into U.S. national airspace, the ability to perform autonomous collision avoidance between both manned and unmanned aircraft is a necessity. This poster presents a method for collision avoidance utilizing Automatic Dependent Surveillance - Broadcast (ADS-B) transponders which will be required in all manned aircraft by 2020. These devices broadcast and receive global position of all similarly equipped aircraft in a 100-nautical mile vicinity. A Sig Kadet Senior and a Hangar 9 Valiant fixed wing aircraft are used as flight platforms to test autonomous collision avoidance. These aircraft will include ADS-B transponders, a Pixhawk autopilot and an Intel NUC as the primary components of the avionics system. The uniquely developed algorithm is compiled in a Linux environment and uses MAVLink protocols to send off-board commands to the autopilot. The collision avoidance algorithm uses kinematic and circular motion equations to predict the future positions of both aircraft and employ an avoidance maneuver at a constant altitude. This system is demonstrated through simple ground tests, and subsequently moving on to full-system flight tests.

Design, and testing of a solar-driven wastewater treatment unit for off-grid applications.

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:45 - 1:00
Location: 9-325

Authors: Justine Nguyen, Daniel Andrade, Thuan Nguyen, Kyle Miller, Masoud Modabernia, John Kest, Johnny Baradii, Laura Lopez, Binh Phun, David Jacobo.
Faculty Mentor: Reza Lakeh.

Abstract: In California the drought has become an important issue due to declines in surface water sources. In order to keep up with the continuously increasing demand for water, the state is heavily relying on imported water from the Colorado River. To account for this problem, the use of recycled water became necessary. The research team at Cal Poly Pomona, with the support of Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, is developing an off-grid solar-powered greywater treatment system for non-potable use in single households. Greywater, by definition, is the drained water from bathroom sinks, showers, tubs, and washing machines; this does not include wastewater from toilets or kitchen sinks. Treating greywater on-site can provide significant water savings, and can reduce the carbon footprint of desalination using solar panels. The system is comprised of a three-stage treatment: three microfilters, three solar-driven reverse osmosis membranes, and an ultraviolet disinfection unit. The product of this project is capable of reclaiming 90 gallons of water per day while recovering approximately 60% of residential greywater. The design of the system will remove traces of organic and inorganic chemicals, and particles of dirt, food and others. The team has built and tested a preliminary design of the greywater treatment system to address the mechanical controls, and electrical aspects of the overall system for future use. Based on data collection and analysis of Version 1, an optimized and more consumer-friendly Version 2 has been built and tested.

3D printing Graphene-Enhanced Li-ion battery and Graphene supercapacitors

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:15 - 1:30
Location: 9-307

Authors: Matthew Tisbe, Nicholas Ferguson, Amanda Ramos, Jeffrey Lee, Calvin Nguyen, Ben Cheng, Alfredo Collazo, Alexander Lau, Jose Lopez, Alexander Botello, Albert Armienta.
Faculty Mentor: Zhen Yu.

Abstract: Batteries are power storage devices that provide their stored power to connected electronics. Li-ion batteries are a widely used battery type due to their high energy density and ability to recharge. These properties make them well suited for portable electronic devices at the expense of taking the majority weight and volume of the device. The use of a liquid electrolyte also limits the recharging speed and operating temperature. Switching to a solid electrolyte yields enhanced environmental safety and higher energy density, thus a smaller volume needed for portable applications. Our research focuses on the ease of production of such batteries through the development of a superior solid electrolyte, and the robustness of 3D printing and robotic assembly.

Spanish Heritage Language Processing

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:30 - 2:45
Location: 15-1808

Authors: Julissa Loza Mendez.
Faculty Mentor: Eleonora Rossi.

Abstract: Throughout America's history, millions of individuals migrated to North America, bringing along their native language. The definition of "Heritage speakers" describes individuals who are typically exposed to the minority family's language and the majority country's language. In the academic system of North America, minority languages are rarely embedded into the schooling system, resulting in heritage speakers not being able to acquire literacy in the heritage language and become more dominant in the majority language (English). The goal of this study is to start investigating if and to what extent engaging in relearning Spanish through a computerized program (i.e., Rosetta Stone) will affect proficiency levels for Heritage Spanish Speakers (HSS). We will first present data from a sister study in which we exposed English native speakers to study Dutch for ten days through Rosetta Stone, and we will demonstrate speakers' learning trajectory, and we will also discuss how learning of the new language is predicted by a number of cognitive functions, such as memory. We will then present the goals and methods we are developing for the new study, and discuss future implications of this research.

Hot Corrosion of High Entropy Alloys in Molten Salts

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:00 - 12:15
Location: 9-209

Authors: Alexander Jalbuena, Steven Pierce, Carinne Lukiman.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: High Entropy Alloys (HEAs) are a new class of multicomponent alloys that contain five or more elements in equal or near-equal amounts in atomic percent, resulting in extraordinary mechanical properties. Turbine blades are one of many potential applications for HEAs. Gas turbine blades exposed to temperatures in the 650-900°C range in marine atmospheres, can be subject to accelerated corrosion beneath a thin molten eutectic salt film consisting of sodium chloride and sodium sulfate. This type of corrosion (Type II hot corrosion) can eventually lead to engineering failure. Understanding the corrosion behavior of HEAs in the presence of a thin fused film of these salts would therefore be relevant for this application. In this study, coupons of a multicomponent AlCoCrFeNi alloy and a selected nickel-based superalloy as a baseline were exposed to a molten NaCl-Na2SO4 eutectic salt mixture at 700, 750, and 800°C in the presence of a platinum-catalyzed SO2/air mixture. In situ electrochemical techniques were utilized to characterize the corrosion behavior of these alloys. The morphology of the attack was studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The results are discussed and comparisons between the different alloy systems are made.


Hot Corrosion Testing of Co-, Ni- and Fe-Based Alloys Using a Dean's Rig

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:15 - 12:30
Location: 9-209

Authors: Carinne Lukiman, Steven Pierce, Alexander Jalbuena.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: Hot corrosion is a form of accelerated degradation of metallic alloys underneath a thin, molten salt film in high temperature environments, such as marine and industrial gas turbines or jet engines. Sulfur impurities from the fuel react with the sodium chloride present in the marine environment, resulting in a sodium sulfate salt which subsequently forms a thin molten film on the turbine components. Simulating this phenomenon will be invaluable in materials selection for this application. The Dean's Rig has been designed to simulate this corrosive environment. It uses a two-zone furnace, with a container of salt located at the hot zone and the test coupon(s) located in the lower temperature zone. The high temperature zone (1000℃) is used to vaporize salts and introduce them into a flowing gas stream. The low temperature zone (700℃) allows for deposition of the salt vapor onto the alloy, simulating the conditions that the alloy would encounter during service. To best mimic service conditions, a O2 - 0.1% SO2 gas was used at a flow rate of 1 sccm. Coupons of cobalt, nickel and iron alloys were pre-deposited with salt prior to testing using a drip method in which a supersaturated salt solution was slowly deposited onto the surface and then heated to allow the water to completely evaporate, leaving behind a thin salt film. Corrosion rate was determined through mass loss measurements. Post test samples were analyzed using optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) as well as X-ray diffraction (XRD).

Corrosion Resistance of Metal-Ceramic Composites Produced by Directed Metal Oxidation

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:30 - 1:45
Location: 9-209

Authors: Salar Tabesh, Christopher Kha, Joshua Diaz, Ian Limon, Jason Brayshaw, Kentaro Fujimoto Lunn.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) couple the wear resistance of ceramics and the ductility of metals. They also can provide an alternative to the difficult issue of shape formation confronting all-ceramic components if they can be formed to near net shape. Directed Metal Oxidation is a method of fabricating CMCs to near net shape. The process can be engineered to produce a wide range of geometries of alumina matrix/aluminum composites with minimum machining and also allows for further reinforcement of the composite through the addition of constituents such as silicon carbide. In applications, e.g., pump impellers and housing, where a combination of erosion, wear and corrosion resistance are required, the CMCs could be an ideal choice. Plates of ceramic-metal composites were fabricated from an aluminum-silicon-magnesium alloy using the Directed Metal Oxidation process. Coupons were prepared for a series of tests to characterize the corrosion behavior, hardness and erosion/wear resistance of this ceramic matrix composite material. Microstructural characterization of the composite was accomplished through scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) and optical microscopy. Hardness tests - both macro and micro - were conducted in different regions of the composites. The erosion resistance of these composites were determined using slurry abrasion and rotating pin tests.

Characterization of Welded Joint Stainless Steel PH 15-5 Produced by Additive Manufacturing

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:45 - 2:00
Location: 9-269

Authors: Kate Ly.
Faculty Mentor: Todd Coburn.

Abstract: Additive manufacturing (AM), commonly known as 3D printing, has been receiving a tremendous amount of attention for its potential to revolutionize the manufacturing industry. This type of processing has the ability to rapidly produce highly complex geometries while eliminating costly, part specific tooling. Despite the success of existing methods, AM's ability to become ubiquitous within industry remains less competitive compared to conventional manufacturing method. This is due to current technological limitations including printed material strength and the restriction by the size which the part can be produced. As the complexity of 3D printed parts increases, the ability of attaching these parts together requires investigation. The physical characteristics of welded, 3D printed material has yet to receive significant attention for the industry researchers. In order for these types of joints to become a common design feature, the mechanical behavior of the joint must be well understood. The objective of this study is to investigate the structural integrity and microstructures of welded joints subjected to tension and fatigue loading. For this study, the common aerospace material of PH 15-5 stainless steel alloy has been selected. A comparison is made between the mechanical behavior of welded joints using a substrate of hot rolled plate vs EOS's Direct Metal Laser Sintering AM machine. The method of attachment used on both is Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW).

Design and Experimental Testing of Air Gap Membrane Distillation Test Cell

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:15 - 1:30
Location: 9-325

Authors: Benny Ly, Aaron Chan, Keaton Cornell.
Faculty Mentor: Reza Lakeh.

Abstract: As the population grows, one issue that needs to be addressed is the lack of clean water resources. New technology has helped develop, and improve methods to treat non-potable water. One subcategory of water filtration is Membrane Distillation (MD). MD is a filtration process that utilizes thermal energy to desalinate and decontaminate water. By having a temperature difference across the membrane, the pressure gradient created drives vapor through. One method of MD known as Air Gap Membrane Distillation (AGMD) has shown significant ability to desalinate water effectively in small scales. The air gap minimizes heat loss through conduction making AGMD is an attractive option for upscaling. Exploration of the independent operating parameters is required to further understand and model relationships to the permeate flux, the measure of fresh water produced by the system. In order to test such parameters, a unique design was manufactured. The independent parameters that will be tested are feed and coolant temperatures, flow rates, and membrane porosity. Temperatures in the hot feed will be varied from 25oC to 80oC and cold feed temperatures will vary from 5oC to 25oC. Flow rates will range from 1 to 3 L/Min. The expected behavior of the permeate flux is an increase as feed temperature increase. A change in coolant temperature will affect the permeate flux but not as significantly as the feed temperature. The results acquired from the testing cell is expected to follow similar experiment trends of previously studied AGMD testing cells, thus validating the design.

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Improvement of Puffer Jacket Insulation that Retains Body Heat

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Hayli Mair, David Nguyen, Nicole Sanford, Araya Treadway.
Faculty Mentor: Jiangning Che.

Abstract: A jacket is comprised of three layers; shell, insulation, and lining. The shell is the outer layer and is the fabric the consumers see the most. While insulation is known as the fibers between the outer and inner layer that retains heat. The inner layer is the lining that conceals the insulation and provides a neat finish. Insulated jackets come in all weights, styles and are filled with different material in hopes of providing optimal warmth in cold environments. Some of the issues with thicker jackets is that it tends to have less mobility, and added bulkiness that makes it difficult to carry around or wear. There are opportunities for improvement with the ability of jackets to retain heat, comfort, weight, and mobility by changing types of insulation and design. By implementing these changes, a jacket can be thin and lightweight while still fulfilling its purpose. The purpose of this research is to improve puffer jackets by offering a thinner and lighter insulation option while still retaining thermal heat. By applying certified test methods by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), we will conduct tests on three different insulations in comparison to the insulation found in a manufactured jacket. By using The Technique for Order of Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS) and Analytic Hierarchy Process(AHP), we can make multi-criteria decisions. Our goal is to enhance thermal comfort, mobility and reduce weight with quantitative research.

Microbial Safety Assessment of Orange Pomace Generated from Fresh-juicing Process

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:30 - 12:45
Location: 9-335

Authors: Huiying Hu, Carolina Maksudi.
Faculty Mentor: Yao Olive Li.

Abstract: Orange pomace is a by-product of juicing process, including the peels, seeds, and pulps. Usually, it is disposed in a landfill or used for animal feeds. However, phenolic compounds and dietary fiber along with other minor bioactive ingredients are abundant in orange pomace, hence its utilization for functional food application is very promising. The objective of this study is to assess the microbial safety of orange pomace collected from CPP Farm Store after a fresh-juicing process, which will be meaningful for further food product development. Following the Aerobic Plate Count (APC) method, the total microbial count was determined to be 505 CFU/g. The rapid tests indicated Salmonella, E.coli O157: H7 and Listeria were absent in the samples. The results were confirmed by SMAC and BioChrome plates for the absence of the above-mentioned three pathogens, however the presence of Staphylococcus aureus, which could be derived from the pomace collection and handling processes. API strip test was conducted to verify the presence of S. aureus. The results showed some variations of microbial counts and the presence of certain species batch by batch. In conclusion, all samples were free from Salmonella and E.coli O157: H7, but had Staphylococcus aureus and coliforms. Only one batch sample was found with Listeria monocytogenes. Coliforms varied from 505 CFU/g to 2000 CFU/g. The ongoing research will employ advanced genetic sequencing methods to verify the results.

Skeletal Anatomic Reconstructionists

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Marina Duveneck, Logan Malinchak, Roberto Ramirez, Rachel Christensen.
Faculty Mentor: Cord Brundage.

Abstract: SkAR, Skeletal Anatomic Reconstructionists, is a project that began in 2017, and has manifested into a collaborative effort of prospective veterinary students who are fascinated with anatomy and enjoy hands-on learning. The goal of SkAR was to debride animal tissue with the aid of flesh-eating beetles, in order to clean and articulate the bones back together in a physical model. The bone models are used for teaching purposes within our Animal Science department, as well as momento's for the students who built the model to keep. Highlights of SkAR so far has been tackling the challenge of debriding animal tissue in a way that is effective, sanitary, and reasonably fast. The beginning phase of the project involved the aid of a maceration tank with heated water to self decompose the tissue. These efforts were successful, but were deemed messy and time consuming. As a proposed alternative to the maceration tank, the program invested in flesh-eating beetles to feed off the tissue, which serve as a self sufficient population of decomposers. Other important highlights of this project are students conspiring as a group to articulate the bones correctly, while using appropriate support such as drills, wires, and glue. SkAR serves as a valuable opportunity for prospective veterinary students to learn animal anatomy in a way that is challenging, physical, and creative. It is anticipated that SkAR members will have a solid foundation and understanding of animal anatomy when they begin their journey as a graduate student.

Exploring Similarities Between Archaeal Viruses Through Chimeric Gene Constructs

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:30 - 12:45
Location: 9-251

Authors: Robert Manuel.
Faculty Mentor: Jamie Snyder.

Abstract: When archaeal viruses Sulfolobus Turreted Icosahedral Virus (STIV) and Sulfolobus islandicus rod-shaped virus 2 (SIRV2) infect a host cell, they produce pyramidal structures on the cell surface prior to lysing. These unique structures are formed by the viral proteins c92 (STIV) and p98 (SIRV2). This is surprising as both viruses have a completely different morphology and genome. The similarities between these two genes were explored through chimeric gene formation. The N terminus of c92 and the C terminus of p98 were spliced together to form a chimeric gene. The same was done to the N terminus of p98 and C terminus of c92. These chimeras were then inserted into the STIV virus genome in place of c92 to test their viral replication abilities. In addition, they were overexpressed in the host cell, Sulfolobus solfataricus to determine if they could still form pyramids on the surface of the cell. Results of this experiment showed that though both chimeras were able to develop similar pyramidal structures to c92 and p98, they hindered viral replication. However, further studies revealed a promoter region directly in front of the c92 gene in the STIV genome. This was unfortunately destroyed in the formation of the chimeric genes. In this study, the chimeric genes were reformed with the c92 promoter still intact. As there was only pyramidal formation when overexpressed and no viral replication when inserted back into STIV, we propose that this promoter region may play an important role in viral replication of STIV.

Surface Modification of Stainless Steel using Cold Plasma

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Sara Margala, Josue Monterrosa, Anthony Oceguera, Lauren Wong, Wing Jong Chan.
Faculty Mentor: Nina Abramzon.

Abstract: Surface energy of stainless steel coupons were increased through the exposure of helium and oxygen atmospheric radio-frequency generated plasma. The increase in surface energy is observed through the contact angle of a water droplet placed on the sample and quantified by Young's equation. A 5 second exposure test reveals that an oxygen flow rate of 0.20L/min results in the lowest contact angle. Our experiments on the longevity of the treatment shows that at 6 hours after a one-minute treatment, our sample still retains a 35% higher surface energy compared to the control. An analysis of the spectra of the plasma showed that more reactive species are present at lower oxygen flow rates. Additionally, to enhance precision of exposure intervals, a electromechanical rotating stage system with a microcontroller was developed.

Frankenstein as a Tragedy of Limitations

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:00 - 2:15
Location: 15-2913

Authors: Casey Marler-Marshall.
Faculty Mentor: Aaron DeRosa.

Abstract: According to the typical interpretation of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, Dr. Victor Frankenstein is the true monster, rather than the socially maligned monster created from his experiment. While Dr. Frankenstein's complicity in the monster's suffering is inarguable, putting the focus on the doctor's moral failings distracts the reader from the web of social factors that doom the monster to be excluded by society. The monster's "monstrousness" doesn't exist in a vacuum - it is inextricably connected with a society that both defines the monster, and is unavoidably affected by his existence. Just the vision of the monster hurts anyone who he attempts to talk to; his very birth causes a fugue state in Dr. Frankenstein, and the DeLacy family sells their house after encountering him even once. The monster's dilemma shows us the power of visual affect, and how easily it overcomes rhetoric, as Brian Massumi describes in "The Autonomy of Affect". Every time the monster speaks to someone, the affect his appearance inspires is quicker and stronger - and anyone who sees him is unable to overcome it. The tragedy of Mary Shelley's novel is not simply that Dr. Frankenstein cannot accept the monster, but that the society he longs to be accepted by is in many ways not equipped to accept him. For the monster to live peacefully in any way, the society he was born into must find the capacity to change - but the tragedy of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein is that society is not equipped to rise to that challenge.

Analysis of in situ Creep Deformation in Thermal Barrier Coatings

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Javier Martinez, Jorge Camarillo, Cynthia Do, Evelyn Arce.
Faculty Mentor: Jonathan Puthoff.

Abstract: Aluminide thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are used to give metallic components high temperature oxidation resistance and mechanical protection, thereby extending component lifetimes. In order to produce better-engineered components incorporating aluminide TBCs, we wish to better understand high temperature creep deformation of the coatings themselves. However, measuring the creep properties of aluminized coatings in situ are difficult due to the small dimensions of the coatings (100 micron coating thickness). We developed a model that permits us to determine the stresses in aluminide TBCs, and created software for performing the required calculations using Matlab.The model is based on the real geometry of TBC-coated material and includes distinct TBC, base metal, and interdiffusion zone layers. Using the stresses in the TBCs we can predict the creep deformation in the TBC and possibly the predominant failure mechanism. Additionally, the model can assist in the design of creep specimens so that the associated experiments can be performed. This combination of a detailed model of an aluminide TBC-coated material and experiments that can reveal the actual performance of the system would help in the design of components for high temperature applications such as turbines, engines, and reactors.

Dye Sensitized Solar Cells

Oral Presentation
Time: 3:00 - 3:15
Location: 9-307

Authors: Victoria Nguyen, Mitchell Mathes, Michael Ku, Sandie To, Hang Cao, Brian Case.
Faculty Mentor: Jonathan Puthoff.

Abstract: Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) are an example of a partially organic alternative to the semiconductor-based solar cells. They employ photosensitive dye molecules associated with a conducting substrate to harvest solar photons and accumulate electrons. We fabricate DSSCs that incorporate hibiscus dye and an organic hydrocarbon gel as the electrolyte. Previous generations of DSSCs relied on liquid electrolytes to replenish electrons in the dyes. To overcome the technical challenges associated with a liquid electrolyte we investigate the performance of solid electrolytes. Lambda carrageenan, known as Irish moss, is a thickening agent, stabilizer, and gel formula when mixed with water. Because of these qualities, Irish moss can be used to create a more mechanically stable electrolyte. For example, liquid electrolytes are prone to spillage which causes inconsistent readings. We investigated strategies for making lambda carrageenan electrolytes and tested the performance of those cells. We contrast the performance of the solid electrolyte based cells with that of the liquid electrolyte based cells.

Electrochemical Evaluation of Aluminum Foams for Proton Exchange Membrane Electrolyzer Cells

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:15 - 2:30
Location: 9-307

Authors: Ho Lun Chan, Kevin Guo, Milena Mccarthy.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: Hydrogen gas is a renewable resource with three times the energy storage capability of gasoline. There is an increasing demand for its use in power generation, chemical synthesis and metallurgical processing. Current practices for hydrogen production, such as steam-reforming, are undesirable because of the resulting large carbon footprint. Proton exchange membrane electrolyzer cells (PEMECs) provide an efficient and pollution-free pathway to generate hydrogen gas. However, PEMECs suffer from short lifespan due to corrosion of materials used for the liquid/gas diffusion layer (LGDL). In PEMECs, the LGDL has the crucial role of managing the mass transportation of water to the catalyst layer and the distribution of heat and current throughout the cell. Titanium mesh and carbon paper are the most commonly used materials for the LGDL in electrolyzer cells. However, titanium mesh has low surface area and is not cost-effective. Carbon paper is not a suitable material for the LGDL due its inability to withstand the highly oxidizing environment at the anodic side of the cell. In addition, carbon paper is brittle, has a low liquid permeability and the corrosion byproducts will poison the catalyst. Due to the ineffectiveness of titanium mesh and carbon paper, aluminum foam is a potential alternative material for the LGDL because of its high surface area, mechanical strength, thermal conductivity, commercial availability, electrical conductivity and low density. UNS A96101 foams with porous microstructures of 4-6%, 6-8%, and 8-10% relative densities were studied with varying pore distributions of 10, 20, and 40 pores per inch. The corrosion behavior of test specimens was evaluated through linear polarization resistance and Tafel tests in aerated 0.01 M sulfuric acid solution at 50⁰C. Microstructural analysis was performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to observe localized changes on the surface of the UNS A96101 foam. Electrochemical surface area for each sample will be determined by cyclic voltammetry in the same environment.

Improving Thermal Comfort of the Base Layer for Snowboarding Gear

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Sabrina Huynh, Lindsay McClain, Vanessa Castro, Kiara Franco.
Faculty Mentor: Jiangning Che.

Abstract: Gear for winter sports, like snowboarding and skiing, have been around for over 50 years, and includes equipment and apparel. This type of apparel consists of three layers: the top layer is insulated, waterproof, and breathable, the mid-layer is meant to add warmth and comfort, and the base layer's main purpose is to keep the wearer dry by wicking moisture, which will keep them warm for a long period of time. The base layer is key to the balance between heat production and heat loss, known as thermal comfort and is crucial in cold-weather sports apparel because it is so close to the skin. However, the fabrication of most base layers do not prevent moisture from entering the garment, which means the base layer's main function cannot be completed and thermal comfort is ultimately reduced. The purpose of this research is to improve thermal comfort of the base layer for snowboarding. We will conduct tests with four different fabrics: Gore-Tex, neoprene, fleece, and swimwear tricot. The evaluation of these fabrics are critical in quantifying thermal comfort, abrasion resistance, thickness, and absorbency. Our goal is to refine thermal comfort for long-term wear of snowboarding attire by thoroughly collecting quantitative and qualitative data. In this study, we will make a decision based on multiple criteria, including the Technique for Order of Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS) and Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) methods. This will aid in the final selection of the base layer fabric, according to the desired performance properties.

Effects of phlorotannin and nutrition concentration of brown seaweeds (Phaeophyceae) on feeding rates of the black sea hare Aplysia vaccaria.

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:15 - 12:30
Location: 9-243

Authors: Danielle Mchaskell.
Faculty Mentor: Jayson R. Smith.

Abstract: In marine ecosystems, herbivory plays a vital role in ecosystem function and can drive community structure. Feeding selectivity by herbivores may be influenced by numerous factors, including seaweed nutritional value and palatability. For example, since most herbivores tend to be nitrogen limited, the consumption of nitrogen rich algae, with a low C:N, has been known to increase consumption. Furthermore, many seaweeds produce defensive chemical compounds which often result in reduced palatability and deterred consumption. However, the quantity of these deterrents varies among seaweed taxa and their effectiveness can differs among herbivores. The black sea hare, Aplysia vaccaria, is a voracious grazer in southern California shallow marine systems, reaching 14 kg within its 1-year life span. In controlled laboratory experiments, we preliminarily examined the relationship between consumption rates on various brown seaweeds by A. vaccaria and the concentration of phlorotannins, a defensive chemical, for each alga. In an herbivore with such high grazing rates, it was expected that the black sea hare would be an indiscriminant feeder and that phlorotannin concentrations would not play a role, despite affecting consumption in other herbivores. As expected, consumption of all seaweeds was high; however, a weak trend of reduced consumption of seaweeds with higher phlorotannin concentrations was observed. To further explore the role of phlorotannins on consumption rates of A. vaccaria, additional feeding experiments will be conducted. In addition, we will also examine whether the nutritional content of the seaweeds, using Carbon to Nitrogen ratios, will affect consumption rates.

Design and Optimization of a Low Frequency Near Infrared Raman Microscope for Liquid and Solid-State Sample Analysis

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:15 - 12:30
Location: 9-335

Authors: Sevan Menachekanian.
Faculty Mentor: Timothy Corcoran.

Abstract: Near Infrared Raman spectroscopy is a powerful technique that provides structural fingerprints to identify organic and inorganic materials with minimum fluorescence interference. This study presents the design and optimization of a near Infrared (NIR) Raman spectrometer for analysis of liquid and solid-state samples. This instrument is able to record low frequency Raman spectra with excellent S/N in as little as 1 second. The recorded Raman shift range is 40-3000 cm-1 with a resolution of 4.9 cm-1 in the Rayleigh line. The excitation source is a 785 nm diode laser. Highly reflective mirrors direct the laser beam to the liquid and solid samples and back to the spectrometer located all within the optical bench cage system. A microscope equipped with a camera was incorporated into the set-up to visualize the sample and to collect the Raman signals from the solid samples in a 180° backscattering geometry. Two longpass filters (LPF) provide excellent blockage of Rayleigh scatter. A fiber optic coupled Raman signal to the spectrometer. Raman spectra of two samples obtained from the designed instrument have been analyzed in this study.

E-STEM Laptop Liquid Cooling System

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Roberto Mendez, Bryan Lee, Zhixuan(Victor) Ding, Mostafa Vahidi, Arik Naylous, Amanali Rodriguez, Alec Valladares, Yang Lo.
Faculty Mentor: Olukemi Sawyerr.

Abstract: Our group will present a revolutionary laptop cooling pad which utilizes an all-new liquid-convection cooling technique as opposed to other similar products in the market which use inefficient fans to dispense the heat. Our product uses a conductive plate to transfer the heat from the bottom of a laptop through a plate which is exposed to channels of water on the other side. Heat is then carried from the conductive plate to the water by convection and then ultimately transferred to the fins of a radiator to be radiated into the atmosphere. The water used for cooling is circulated using a small pump which runs continuously. As a result, our new cooling technology is able to perform up to five times better than the traditional cooling pads available today.

Observations Through the Interstellar Medium in near Infrared

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:15 - 12:30
Location: 9-333

Authors: Christopher Mendoza, Aaron Kim.
Faculty Mentor: Matthew Povich.

Abstract: Our project is about one of the closest and most active star forming regions in the entire Galaxy, W3 cluster in the direction of the constellation Sagittarius. Our research is primarily focused on being able to take pictures from telescopes and transform them into scientific data, which we would then use to improve on existing star catalogs. Our images came from the WHIRC camera, which captures images in infrared, allowing us to see deeper through the dust that obscures the light radiated by stars. This might help us understand how stars, like our sun, may have formed in the past. Our images present a wider field of view and much higher resolution than previous observations. Our results provide insight into the amount of dust we are looking through and allows us to identify newborn stars with dusty disks which could eventually form planets like our own: Earth.

Economical Silicone Alternative for Veterinary Surgery Practice

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Alena Eliel Mercado Martinez.
Faculty Mentor: Cord Brundage.

Abstract: It is important for veterinary students to develop proper instrument handling and surgery suture techniques. Silicone pads are available commercially to allow students to practice on simulated animal tissue. The high cost of these pads can limit their availability for some students. My goal was to develop an equally effective, lower-cost, surgery practice alternative. I experimented with mixed, colored, and layered silicone with varying degrees of flexibility and opacity in order to replicate the layers of the skin. I developed two prototype silicone pads constructed and cut with a more flexible silicone and a less flexible silicone. I organized a suture clinic with 20 students and provided these two practice pad options. The students preferred the more flexible less opaque silicone pads as they reportedly, more closely resembled and simulated animal tissue. Taking the students' input into consideration, another set of silicone pads are being developed to further refine our product to more accurately recreate the skin layers. Our process will be available for students and educators so they too can produce these economical silicone alternatives for veterinary surgery practice.

STIV protein F93 is a transcription factor that regulates C92 expression playing role in the viral genome replication

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:00 - 1:15
Location: 9-283

Authors: Prudencio Merino.
Faculty Mentor: Jamie Snyder.

Abstract: Sulfolobus turreted icosahedral virus (STIV) was first isolated from an acidic hot spring in Yellowstone National Park and has since become a model system for investigating archaeal viruses. STIV contains a double-stranded DNA genome in which 37 open reading frames (ORFs) have been identified. Studies of STIV infecting the cell host Sulfolobus solfataricus have demonstrated that STIV is a lytic virus in which cell lysis is led by the involvement of the C92 protein forming pyramid-like structures on the surface of the cell essential for STIV replication. In crystallographic studies of the STIV proteome, one protein (F93) was found to be a 93-residue winged-helix-turn-helix (wHTH) protein. Because of its similarity to other proteins, it has been suggested that F93 is most likely a transcriptional regulator of several viral genes. Studies have identified nine potential binding sites for F93 within the STIV genome consisting of two boxes of nearly palindromic DNA sequence with the consensus sequence: 5' TCT-X5 -AGA - X1-2 - TCT- X5 -AGA 3', including a region of 46 bp upstream of C92. The tightest binding was demonstrated to be upstream of F93, so it appears the protein regulates its own activity. The objective of this research is to determine whether F93 regulates the expression of C92 by altering the F93 binding site upstream of C92 and mutating the F93 protein. These constructs will aid in analyzing C92 expression and determining the effect on cell growth/lysis as well as determining the relative transcript abundance of C92 during STIV infection to better understand the role of F93 in the viral genome replication.

"Where Do I Belong, Here or Where You Are?": A Postcolonial Feminist Reading of "Wide Sargasso Sea" and "Corpse Song"

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:30 - 1:45
Location: 15-2913

Authors: Parveena Singh, Devon Mier.
Faculty Mentor: Alison Baker.

Abstract: This paper discusses how opposing forces in power, race, and social status can displace the identity of an ethnic woman which is present in Jeans Rhys' Wide Sargasso Sea and Margaret Atwood's "Corpse Song." Through the application of a Postcolonial Feminist lens, the paper explores how both texts incorporate concepts multiple such as "double colonization" and "othering" in order to reinforce the economic, social, and psychological oppression of the two female protagonists. The paper also discusses the presence of multiple identities and how they can lead to either the displacement of a woman's identity or the reclaiming of it. The presence of identities is further explored through the negative effects of postcolonialism and the patriarchy. The two texts utilize a disruptive narrative style in order to represent the resistance against the Eurocentric and phallocentric ideas that traditional literature is usually defined by.

Design, and testing of a solar-driven wastewater treatment unit for off-grid applications.

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:45 - 1:00
Location: 9-325

Authors: Justine Nguyen, Daniel Andrade, Thuan Nguyen, Kyle Miller, Masoud Modabernia, John Kest, Johnny Baradii, Laura Lopez, Binh Phun, David Jacobo.
Faculty Mentor: Reza Lakeh.

Abstract: In California the drought has become an important issue due to declines in surface water sources. In order to keep up with the continuously increasing demand for water, the state is heavily relying on imported water from the Colorado River. To account for this problem, the use of recycled water became necessary. The research team at Cal Poly Pomona, with the support of Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, is developing an off-grid solar-powered greywater treatment system for non-potable use in single households. Greywater, by definition, is the drained water from bathroom sinks, showers, tubs, and washing machines; this does not include wastewater from toilets or kitchen sinks. Treating greywater on-site can provide significant water savings, and can reduce the carbon footprint of desalination using solar panels. The system is comprised of a three-stage treatment: three microfilters, three solar-driven reverse osmosis membranes, and an ultraviolet disinfection unit. The product of this project is capable of reclaiming 90 gallons of water per day while recovering approximately 60% of residential greywater. The design of the system will remove traces of organic and inorganic chemicals, and particles of dirt, food and others. The team has built and tested a preliminary design of the greywater treatment system to address the mechanical controls, and electrical aspects of the overall system for future use. Based on data collection and analysis of Version 1, an optimized and more consumer-friendly Version 2 has been built and tested.

How Is Millennial Women's Interest in Female Fitness Products shaped?

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:00 - 12:15
Location: 15-2907

Authors: Mahta Mirzaeiramin, Cailin Kuchenbecker, Quynh Le.
Faculty Mentor: Jae Min Jung.

Abstract: Despite growing research interest in consumer health, well-being and beauty, little is known about factors influencing consumer purchase decisions for female fitness devices. This study focuses on Kegel exercises -- exercise routines developed by Dr. Kegel to strengthen pelvic floor muscles -- that are recommended by health professionals for patients experiencing health ailments such as urinary incontinence, sexual dysfunction and dissatisfaction (Kegel 1948). Despite the benefits, women are not well aware of the role of pelvic floor muscles (e.g., O'Neill, 2017). The diffusion and acceptance of Kegel exercise and devices among women is likely determined by how comfortable women are about obtaining such benefits. For this reason, feminism should play an important role in shaping women's desire to engage in Kegel exercises. Thus, this research is intended to shed light on the role of feminism in women's formation of attitudes towards Kegel exercises and intentions to purchase Kegel devices. In addition, this research is purported to identify additional factors that mediate the impact of feminism on the attitudes and intentions. To this end, we develop 13 hypotheses, and survey 793 Millennial women in 10 liberal and health conscious cities across the country, ascertain the quality of measures, and test the hypotheses using PLS SEM. The results show general support for the hypotheses. To our best knowledge, this is the first study investigating the role of feminism in shaping attitudes towards Kegel exercises. Findings of the research provide implications for theory development and businesses for their segmentation, positioning, and targeting decisions.

Design, and testing of a solar-driven wastewater treatment unit for off-grid applications.

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:45 - 1:00
Location: 9-325

Authors: Justine Nguyen, Daniel Andrade, Thuan Nguyen, Kyle Miller, Masoud Modabernia, John Kest, Johnny Baradii, Laura Lopez, Binh Phun, David Jacobo.
Faculty Mentor: Reza Lakeh.

Abstract: In California the drought has become an important issue due to declines in surface water sources. In order to keep up with the continuously increasing demand for water, the state is heavily relying on imported water from the Colorado River. To account for this problem, the use of recycled water became necessary. The research team at Cal Poly Pomona, with the support of Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, is developing an off-grid solar-powered greywater treatment system for non-potable use in single households. Greywater, by definition, is the drained water from bathroom sinks, showers, tubs, and washing machines; this does not include wastewater from toilets or kitchen sinks. Treating greywater on-site can provide significant water savings, and can reduce the carbon footprint of desalination using solar panels. The system is comprised of a three-stage treatment: three microfilters, three solar-driven reverse osmosis membranes, and an ultraviolet disinfection unit. The product of this project is capable of reclaiming 90 gallons of water per day while recovering approximately 60% of residential greywater. The design of the system will remove traces of organic and inorganic chemicals, and particles of dirt, food and others. The team has built and tested a preliminary design of the greywater treatment system to address the mechanical controls, and electrical aspects of the overall system for future use. Based on data collection and analysis of Version 1, an optimized and more consumer-friendly Version 2 has been built and tested.

Cloud Plush

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Bryan Arciniega, Yuna Jung, Kathleen Wong, Joshua Montanez, Jakub Kupsik.
Faculty Mentor: Yu Sun.

Abstract: Our product will allow people to connect through a pair of stuffed toys. The stuffed toys will allow the users to send each other hugs through our stuffed toy. When hugging the stuffed animal, they will feel a heartbeat and warmth (by seeing a visible glowing heart). The heartbeat and warmth would essentially recreate the feeling of hugging their partner, which would bring the two physically together. All of this is done in real time. It is just as fast as sending and receiving a text message. When brought together again, the stuffed animals would "celebrate." Our product is a stuffed toy that incorporates technology with intimacy. It creates a second pathway for relationships to connect in a way that is physical and healthier than through digital communication. The technology we are building into our toy will improve the experience of having a stuffed toy. We want to utilize Raspberry Pi, WLAN, bluetooth, sensor, motor and LEDs in each product. This will allow the stuffed toy to communicate via wifi and vibrate. We also want to incorporate an ergonomic design so that our stuffed toy can be comfortable. Bluetooth will be incorporated into the main circuit board so that it can connect to your phone. The connection to your phone will allow for you to send and receive hugs when there is no wifi network present. All of this technology will allow users to hug their loved one whether they are in the same room or halfway across the globe.

Surface Modification of Stainless Steel using Cold Plasma

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Sara Margala, Josue Monterrosa, Anthony Oceguera, Lauren Wong, Wing Jong Chan.
Faculty Mentor: Nina Abramzon.

Abstract: Surface energy of stainless steel coupons were increased through the exposure of helium and oxygen atmospheric radio-frequency generated plasma. The increase in surface energy is observed through the contact angle of a water droplet placed on the sample and quantified by Young's equation. A 5 second exposure test reveals that an oxygen flow rate of 0.20L/min results in the lowest contact angle. Our experiments on the longevity of the treatment shows that at 6 hours after a one-minute treatment, our sample still retains a 35% higher surface energy compared to the control. An analysis of the spectra of the plasma showed that more reactive species are present at lower oxygen flow rates. Additionally, to enhance precision of exposure intervals, a electromechanical rotating stage system with a microcontroller was developed.

Unlocking the electronic genome of halogenobenzenes

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:45 - 3:00
Location: 9-271

Authors: Carlos Mora.
Faculty Mentor: Bohdan Schatschneider.

Abstract: Growing interest in organic materials for the use in optoelectronic devices has recently created a need to understand how functionalization effects the electronic properties of conjugated molecules. In this study, density functional theory (DFT) is employed to model the affect halogenation has on the HOMO-LUMO gap (EH-L) and the individual HOMO and LUMO orbitals of homo-halogen substituted benzenes with a mixed basis set which includes relativistic effects for the halogen atoms. It was observed that the frontier orbitals of benzene are substantially perturbed with each additional halogen substitution and that the substitution pattern could allow for tailoring of the EH-L. It is ultimately shown that the EH-L decreases upon subsequent substitution (regardless of the pattern) and that the smallest reduced population of halogen atomic orbital in the LUMO (%XLumo) also has the smallest HOMO-LUMO gaps.

Improving Plant Resistant to Powdery Mildew Disease

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:00 - 12:15
Location: 9-335

Authors: Stephanie Mora Garcia, Ryan Schiefelbein, Paul Larsen.
Faculty Mentor: Gregory Barding.

Abstract: Powdery mildew disease is a fungal infection which can have negative effects on crop growth. There is evidence that a bio-signaling molecule is present in our model plant, A. thaliana, that results in an increase of powdery mildew disease. By utilizing various separation techniques, a method for isolation and identification of the molecule is underway. Plant extracts containing the metabolite are prepared using C18 solid phase extraction (SPE) followed by weak anion exchange (WAX) SPE and tested with a bioassay. The initial results suggest that the molecule in question is highly polar and anionic. To further isolate the molecule, a high performance liquid chromatograph is being utilized for fractionation. Due to the nature of the metabolite, the method being used on the liquid chromatograph is hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC). The buffer system that elutes the metabolite from the column has been identified along with the parameters in which the separation of the metabolite from other constituents is successful. The effectiveness of our fractionation is determined by the same bioassay. As our method for isolation improves, high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is used to assist in the identification of the molecule. Isolating and identifying the metabolite will provide valuable information regarding the biological mechanism of the resistance to the fungal disease and possible applications to the broader agricultural community.

Surface adhesion effects of PMMA (Poly(methyl methacrylate)) of Medical grade UHMWPE (Ultra-High Molecular Weight Polyethylene) after cold plasma treatment

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:45 - 3:00
Location: 9-307

Authors: Panik Moradian, Bianca Cruz.
Faculty Mentor: Keith Forward.

Abstract: Acrylic bone cements, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) play a key role in the anchorage of prostheses to the surrounding bone in cemented arthroplasties. Through surface modification, by means of oxygen and helium atmospheric plasma treatment, increasing the surface energy of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) could improve adherence of PMMA to biomaterials and reduce the risk of a factor of bone cement failure. In this study we propose an approach for testing the effects of plasma surface treatment of UHMWPE on biomaterial adhesion using bone cement. UHMWPE surfaces will be treated with plasma generated in the showerhead attachment of a reactor which uses a center electrode, connected to a radio-frequency power source resulting in ionization of a gas mixture flowing around the electrode. This produces species such as NO, OH, and ionized O2 that interact with the surface of materials and modify them. UHMWPE samples will be adhered together with a standardized method of PMMA application. The adhesion is expected to be performed by a tensile tester instrument. A perpendicular tensile force will be applied and gradually increased until the coating is detached. This raw data is then assessed for the maximum stress applied. Through these results with a large sample size and statistical analysis, we will be able to quantify how well PMMA adheres to UHMWP, and how cold plasma treatment effects adhesion. Additionally, based on this work it may be possible to replicate the experiment in the future to investigate other biomaterial bonding applications such as adhesion to nickel-titanium alloys.

The invasion of the red slugs: Vayssierea felis (Collingwood 1881) in the Northeastern Pacific

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:30 - 1:45
Location: 9-283

Authors: Karina Moreno.
Faculty Mentor: Ángel Valdés.

Abstract: Vayssierea felis (Collingwood 1881) is a species of sea slug in the family Okadaiidae, native to the Indo-West Pacific. It is characterized by having a very small body (up to 5 mm long), bright red in color, with no external gill. A few years ago, specimens of this species were found in San Diego and Redondo Beach, California, and are becoming more frequently observed along the Northeast Pacific. The increasing number of these nudibranchs in California indicates that it could potentially be an invasive species. In order to determine the origin of the Northeast Pacific populations, we obtained specimens collected from Australia, Russia, Japan, Hawaii and California. We hypothesize that the specimens of Vayssierea felis found along California will have a similar genetic make-up to that of these other specimens. DNA was extracted from tissue samples of the specimens. The extracted DNA was sequenced for the two mitochondrial genes (CO1, 16S) and a nuclear gene (H3). Phylogenetic and species delimitation analyses were conducted using these genes to determine the relationship among the specimens. We found that the specimens from California are genetically distinct from those found in other regions, suggesting that this group could be a species complex.

Free Surface Electrospun Polyvinylidene Fluoride Membranes for Direct Contact Membrane Distillation

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:00 - 12:15
Location: 9-307

Authors: Carson Gattenby, Sebastian Olarte, Dajohn Murray.
Faculty Mentor: Keith Forward.

Abstract: An estimated 1.1 billion people worldwide lack access to portable water and 2.7 billion people will face water scarce for at least a month of the year. About two-thirds of the world's population are expected to experience water shortages by the year 2025. The driving forces behind water scarcity are the growing uses of fresh water and the depletion of natural freshwater sources. Addressing this problem, several methods of water purification including reverse osmosis, multistage flash distillation, and direct contact membrane distillation are being explored. Direct Contact Membrane Distillation (DCMD) may provide a solution to populations facing water scarcity which is driven by a difference temperature (or waste heat) over a small distance. This temperature gradient can be easily be achieved by renewable energy sources such as solar, geothermal, and nuclear systems. However, current DCMD membranes are expensive and inefficient due to the lack of optimization of the membrane's desirable properties. To address this limitation, the fabrication method of free surface electrospinning was used to the control of membrane properties such as fiber diameter, pore size, and membrane thickness. Membranes were electrospun from a 22 wt% polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) solution with 78 wt% dimethylacetamide (DMAC). The produced membranes were then characterized by membrane thickness and scanning electron micrographs (SEM). Finally, a DCMD apparatus evaluated the productivity of the membranes by distilling simulated seawater (3.5 wt% NaCl). These productivities were compared to a commercially produced membrane.

Onsite Wastewater Treatment System as a Living Laboratory

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:30 - 1:45
Location: 9-325

Authors: Paola Grano, Warjay Naigan, Martin Flores, Stephanie Osorio, Renz Soriano, Angela Truong, Gustavo Perez, Christopher Thomas, Carolyn Soy, Rima Sabih, Yasmin Proa.
Faculty Mentor: Monica Palomo.

Abstract: This project proposes the establishment of a living laboratory that will provide an on campus space that can be used for learning, innovation, and leisure of the campus community. This project proposes an expansion of the current Cal Poly Pomona water and energy infrastructure with an onsite (decentralized) wastewater treatment system. The system will increase the resiliency of the existing campus infrastructure by providing the opportunity to disconnect from the central wastewater and energy networks while maintaining the connection to the centralized utilities. The proposed project provides a unique opportunity for the Cal Poly Pomona campus to become a regional and national demonstration site where students, faculty, public agencies, private companies, and community members could have the opportunity to learn and conduct research on wastewater treatment processes, water treatment, and sustainable water reclamation practices. The key treatment process centers on a membrane bioreactor (MBR), which combines microfiltration with a biologically activated sludge process. The onsite system will treat sewage to groundwater recharge standards with potential uses for flushing, irrigation, decorative fountains and other non-potable water applications. The living laboratory will be located centrally on campus for user accessibility. The criteria for site selection further included: available square footage, site geology, elevation and grading, wastewater influent, hydrologic conditions, existing developments, and potential hazards, such as seismic activity, slope stability, liquefaction, and subsurface conditions. In conclusion, the living laboratory and its location will yield a high-quality and sustainable wastewater treatment facility where Cal Poly Pomona can showcase frontline wastewater reclamation practices.

Effects of Language Learning on Domain General Cognitive Functions

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:45 - 3:00
Location: 15-1808

Authors: Megan Nakamura.
Faculty Mentor: Eleonora Rossi.

Abstract: In the last decade a growing body of literature has demonstrated that learning a second language might induce behavioral and neural changes in domain general cognitive functions (e.g., Bak et al., 2016; Bialystok, 2017). However, very little of the current research has considered how these changes come into place. Further, even less is considered about the effects and influences of different language contexts (i.e. language environment) in which the second language is being acquired in. This project, developed collaboratively by students and faculty at Cal Poly Pomona and the University of California, Riverside, asks how a short-term intensive language learning experience might produce changes in domain-general executive functions (such as attention and executive control) for individuals who are immersed in a context in which the new language is the majority, and who either have explicit language learning goals or do not. We compared native English speaking students studying abroad in the Netherlands at the Radboud University of Nijmegen who were exposed to Dutch in the environment. Group I had the goal of learning Dutch via a ten-day online language learning course, while Group II did not have this goal. The results of this group were compared with the results of the same study conducted at UC Riverside. In total, 17 participants were tested from Radboud, and 17 from UC Riverside, total 34. Preliminary results suggest a correlation between an enriched language environment coupled with semi-intensive second language learning and a positive effect on certain domains of cognition such as working memory and executive control. The study remains ongoing, data collection continues to build a larger sample size representative of both sets of students in The Netherlands and Southern California. Data analysis also remains underway. Ultimately, the final results of this study could potentially support theories of a cognitive advantage for varying types multilinguals, including language learners.

Optical Characterization of Thin Film Oxides Grown on Ferrous and Non-Ferrous Metals

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:45 - 1:00
Location: 9-209

Authors: Hernan Lopez, Samuel Navarrete, Yen Pung Chu, Gordon Butler.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: Metallic alloys used in various industrial applications can encounter high operating temperatures for varying periods of time. Under these conditions, metals are susceptible to oxidation, ultimately leading to the failure of that component or even complete system failure. Traditional methods of evaluating the extent of oxide growth, such as cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy, are destructive in nature and cannot be used to monitor the health of the structure while in service. Therefore, it is beneficial to have a method to determine the extent of oxidative attack on a component while in service. Optical analytical methods, which include spectral analysis and illuminance, offer an exciting non-destructive pathway to evaluate structures especially in hard to access or unsafe areas. In this study, the early onset of oxide films on UNS C11000, UNS G30400 and UNS R50400, at temperatures in the 125-900॰C range was determined. The color cycle was studied using a spectrophotometer to observe minute differences in the range of colors observed as the oxide film continues to grow. As the oxide film grows, it cycles between three colors: straw, brown and blue. The wavelength and intensity of the reflected incident light off the oxide film can indicate the state of oxidation. Results from the optical experiments were related to those obtained from scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) and optical microscopy. The oxide films were further characterized by non-contact profilometry and X-Ray diffraction (XRD).

The Relationship Between Language Brokering and Pro-Social Behaviors Among Latina/o College Students

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:15 - 2:30
Location: 15-1808

Authors: Jesus Navarro.
Faculty Mentor: Alejandro Morales.

Abstract: The psychological literature has historically ignored the contributions immigrant children make to their families in the US. One example of such understudied contribution is language brokering (LB). That is when children of immigrants translate and interpret for their non-English speaking parents and other members of the family. Child brokers interpret in a variety of situations including doctor's office, government agencies, supermarkets, and department stores. They also translate documents such as, bank statements, letters from school, TV shows, etc. Research on LB is growing and illuminating the relevance it has on the child who plays this role and overall impact on the family. One question that remains unanswered is how LB may facilitate or impact the broker's pro-social behaviors. Hence, the purpose of this study was to test how the different components of LB (i.e., translating, interpreting, and feelings) may predict to pro-social behaviors among Latino college students who are active brokers. A sample of 678 participants answered a demographic questionnaire, the Language Brokering Scales, and the Prosocial Tendencies Measure. To answer our research question, we will run a series of correlations and hierarchical regression analyses. Ideas for theory, practice, and future research will be addressed.

Why Rape During Wartime Should be Punishable as a Crime Against Humanity

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:30 - 12:45
Location: 15-2913

Authors: Zardana Nawabi.
Faculty Mentor: Mario Guerrero.

Abstract: Many people around the world would agree that rape is a heinous crime that should be punishable as a crime against humanity. Despite that, rape during wartime is often seen as an act between two people and the international community has yet to recognize rape as an act that can be designed to systematically terrorize women during wartime. Moreover, although rape is considered to be a war crime, the international community has yet to be punish rape as a crime against humanity. Many individuals believe that is because only one person is affected by the act of rape. Although that might be true in some cases, when thousands of women are raped systematically, then the notion of rape needs to be reconsidered. This research answers the question of whether rape during wartime is a crime against humanity. This paper examines case studies from different wars in which rape was used as a weapon to terrorize thousands of women. The cases that will be looked at in depth will be Sudan, Darfur, Yugoslavia in the 1990s, Boko Haram, and Rwanda. These cases provide ample evidence for the international community that rape should be considered crime against humanity.

E-STEM Laptop Liquid Cooling System

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Roberto Mendez, Bryan Lee, Zhixuan(Victor) Ding, Mostafa Vahidi, Arik Naylous, Amanali Rodriguez, Alec Valladares, Yang Lo.
Faculty Mentor: Olukemi Sawyerr.

Abstract: Our group will present a revolutionary laptop cooling pad which utilizes an all-new liquid-convection cooling technique as opposed to other similar products in the market which use inefficient fans to dispense the heat. Our product uses a conductive plate to transfer the heat from the bottom of a laptop through a plate which is exposed to channels of water on the other side. Heat is then carried from the conductive plate to the water by convection and then ultimately transferred to the fins of a radiator to be radiated into the atmosphere. The water used for cooling is circulated using a small pump which runs continuously. As a result, our new cooling technology is able to perform up to five times better than the traditional cooling pads available today.

Circadian and anticipatory feed behavior in domestic sheep (Ovis aries)

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Caitlyn Nelson, Tatiana Zhgun.
Faculty Mentor: Cord Brundage.

Abstract: Animal productivity is directly related to energy intake and expenditure. Animals that are more active will spend more energy. In normal feeding operations, the time when animals are fed is usually similar, but variations can occur. Using domesticated sheep (Ovis aries), we are investigating the timing and daily (circadian) amount of activity animals exhibited when their normal feed time (measured over three days) was shifted for five days and then is brought back to the original time (for three days). Feed anticipatory behaviors are linked to animal circadian rhythms, we hypothesized that shifts in feeding time increase the feed anticipatory activity of sheep and increase circadian activity/ energy loss. This study is conducted using a commercial accelerometer (Fitbark©) which has previously been validated as a tool to monitor sheep activity.

Purchase Intentions of Millenials in Regards to Sustainable Apparel

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Lauren Jacoby, Jessica D'ambra, Natalie Newman, Cody Beaty.
Faculty Mentor: Angella Kim.

Abstract: Fast fashion is a term coined by the global apparel industry to describe retailers with an apparel supply chain model that knocks off garments at a rapid pace and by doing so frequently update their stores with cheap products (Zamani, Sandin, & Peters, 2017). Fast fashion is unsustainable and has created irreversible damage to the environment through waste and byproducts associated with apparel products. Unfortunately, millennials; the generation born between 1982-2002, have adopted fast fashion brands as a primary source of apparel, even though researchers define millennials as a generation with "increased awareness of environmental, and social issues within society" (Hill, Lee, 2012). This is made more unpleasant by the fact that millennials make up approximately $2.45 trillion in potential spending (Mak, 2016). Millennials are a financially powerful generation and have a strong understanding of contemporary environmental issues, yet they are major supporters of the fast fashion system which is very toxic for the environment. Therefore, this paper sets out to understand millennials purchase intentions in regards to sustainable fashion. In this paper, we use quantitative data gathered from surveys completed by college age millennials to understand millennial's apparel purchase intentions and their relationship to sustainable apparel. We found that millennials accessibility to sustainable products influences purchase intentions was weak and did not support our research. We conclude that if there is concern and knowledge of sustainability and our environment, millennials will be more willing to purchase sustainable products.

Dye Sensitized Solar Cells

Oral Presentation
Time: 3:00 - 3:15
Location: 9-307

Authors: Victoria Nguyen, Mitchell Mathes, Michael Ku, Sandie To, Hang Cao, Brian Case.
Faculty Mentor: Jonathan Puthoff.

Abstract: Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) are an example of a partially organic alternative to the semiconductor-based solar cells. They employ photosensitive dye molecules associated with a conducting substrate to harvest solar photons and accumulate electrons. We fabricate DSSCs that incorporate hibiscus dye and an organic hydrocarbon gel as the electrolyte. Previous generations of DSSCs relied on liquid electrolytes to replenish electrons in the dyes. To overcome the technical challenges associated with a liquid electrolyte we investigate the performance of solid electrolytes. Lambda carrageenan, known as Irish moss, is a thickening agent, stabilizer, and gel formula when mixed with water. Because of these qualities, Irish moss can be used to create a more mechanically stable electrolyte. For example, liquid electrolytes are prone to spillage which causes inconsistent readings. We investigated strategies for making lambda carrageenan electrolytes and tested the performance of those cells. We contrast the performance of the solid electrolyte based cells with that of the liquid electrolyte based cells.

Design, and testing of a solar-driven wastewater treatment unit for off-grid applications.

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:45 - 1:00
Location: 9-325

Authors: Justine Nguyen, Daniel Andrade, Thuan Nguyen, Kyle Miller, Masoud Modabernia, John Kest, Johnny Baradii, Laura Lopez, Binh Phun, David Jacobo.
Faculty Mentor: Reza Lakeh.

Abstract: In California the drought has become an important issue due to declines in surface water sources. In order to keep up with the continuously increasing demand for water, the state is heavily relying on imported water from the Colorado River. To account for this problem, the use of recycled water became necessary. The research team at Cal Poly Pomona, with the support of Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, is developing an off-grid solar-powered greywater treatment system for non-potable use in single households. Greywater, by definition, is the drained water from bathroom sinks, showers, tubs, and washing machines; this does not include wastewater from toilets or kitchen sinks. Treating greywater on-site can provide significant water savings, and can reduce the carbon footprint of desalination using solar panels. The system is comprised of a three-stage treatment: three microfilters, three solar-driven reverse osmosis membranes, and an ultraviolet disinfection unit. The product of this project is capable of reclaiming 90 gallons of water per day while recovering approximately 60% of residential greywater. The design of the system will remove traces of organic and inorganic chemicals, and particles of dirt, food and others. The team has built and tested a preliminary design of the greywater treatment system to address the mechanical controls, and electrical aspects of the overall system for future use. Based on data collection and analysis of Version 1, an optimized and more consumer-friendly Version 2 has been built and tested.

Indoor Search and Rescue Using Unmanned Aerial Systems

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:15 - 12:30
Location: 9-325

Authors: Antonio Herrera, Thinh Nguyen.
Faculty Mentor: Subodh Bhandari.

Abstract: Unmanned Aerial Systems (UASs) can be cost effectively and efficiently used for indoor search and rescue missions. These environments pose dangerous and risky scenarios for rescue personnel. UASs can locate and assist victims that are in need during the event of natural disaster with increased safety and low response time, without posing any danger to the rescuers. However, the lack of GPS signal in the indoor environments poses many difficulties for the use and navigation of these systems. Using two small unmanned aerial systems, one for search and another for rescue, can help mitigate this problem. The search UAS, a quadcopter, uses a front-facing camera for the detection of victim, and ultrasonic sensors for collision detection. Using computer vision and machine learning, the search quadcopter navigates the indoor environments and identifies survivors of disaster, and then relays this information to the rescue UAS, also a quadcopter, via a ground control station (GCS). The rescue quadcopter then navigates to the location of the victim and releases the payload. The use of multiple vehicles allows the use of smaller and more agile vehicles. This presentation will discuss how the UASs will be able to fly autonomously within GPS-denied environments while detecting victims using artificial neural networks.

Improvement of Puffer Jacket Insulation that Retains Body Heat

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Hayli Mair, David Nguyen, Nicole Sanford, Araya Treadway.
Faculty Mentor: Jiangning Che.

Abstract: A jacket is comprised of three layers; shell, insulation, and lining. The shell is the outer layer and is the fabric the consumers see the most. While insulation is known as the fibers between the outer and inner layer that retains heat. The inner layer is the lining that conceals the insulation and provides a neat finish. Insulated jackets come in all weights, styles and are filled with different material in hopes of providing optimal warmth in cold environments. Some of the issues with thicker jackets is that it tends to have less mobility, and added bulkiness that makes it difficult to carry around or wear. There are opportunities for improvement with the ability of jackets to retain heat, comfort, weight, and mobility by changing types of insulation and design. By implementing these changes, a jacket can be thin and lightweight while still fulfilling its purpose. The purpose of this research is to improve puffer jackets by offering a thinner and lighter insulation option while still retaining thermal heat. By applying certified test methods by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), we will conduct tests on three different insulations in comparison to the insulation found in a manufactured jacket. By using The Technique for Order of Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS) and Analytic Hierarchy Process(AHP), we can make multi-criteria decisions. Our goal is to enhance thermal comfort, mobility and reduce weight with quantitative research.

Design, and testing of a solar-driven wastewater treatment unit for off-grid applications.

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:45 - 1:00
Location: 9-325

Authors: Justine Nguyen, Daniel Andrade, Thuan Nguyen, Kyle Miller, Masoud Modabernia, John Kest, Johnny Baradii, Laura Lopez, Binh Phun, David Jacobo.
Faculty Mentor: Reza Lakeh.

Abstract: In California the drought has become an important issue due to declines in surface water sources. In order to keep up with the continuously increasing demand for water, the state is heavily relying on imported water from the Colorado River. To account for this problem, the use of recycled water became necessary. The research team at Cal Poly Pomona, with the support of Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, is developing an off-grid solar-powered greywater treatment system for non-potable use in single households. Greywater, by definition, is the drained water from bathroom sinks, showers, tubs, and washing machines; this does not include wastewater from toilets or kitchen sinks. Treating greywater on-site can provide significant water savings, and can reduce the carbon footprint of desalination using solar panels. The system is comprised of a three-stage treatment: three microfilters, three solar-driven reverse osmosis membranes, and an ultraviolet disinfection unit. The product of this project is capable of reclaiming 90 gallons of water per day while recovering approximately 60% of residential greywater. The design of the system will remove traces of organic and inorganic chemicals, and particles of dirt, food and others. The team has built and tested a preliminary design of the greywater treatment system to address the mechanical controls, and electrical aspects of the overall system for future use. Based on data collection and analysis of Version 1, an optimized and more consumer-friendly Version 2 has been built and tested.

Innovative Classroom Assessment

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:30 - 12:45
Location: 15-2907

Authors: Michael Ramirez, Laura Dasilva, Nguyen Nguyen, Cheyenne Romero.
Faculty Mentor: Faye Wachs.

Abstract: Mechanical Engineering is a rigorous yet popular major chosen by over 1000 students that attend Cal Poly Pomona. Fluid Mechanics (ME 311) is a core lecture within the Mechanical curriculum and is considered to be a bottleneck course within the department due to the high failure rate that the course produces. A study conducted by Taotao Long (2016) demonstrated that students had positive attitudes towards utilizing course videos before lecture in a flipped classroom environment (Long, 2016). After several quarters of designing a course model tailored to Fluid Mechanics at Cal Poly Pomona, an ideal classroom structure was created. In the academic quarters of Winter and Spring of 2017, the flipped classroom structure was implemented ideally to produce outcomes similar to other research-backed data that proved academic success for students using a web-based learning model. Grade point averages, socio-emotional variables, and focus group data were collected at the beginning and end of each quarter to assess any development from the participants. Results from both quarters demonstrated the effectiveness of a flipped classroom structure in the ME 311 course. In the experimental group (n=63) 11.1% of students earned a failing grade while 41.3% of students received an A. In contrast, 34.3% of students in the control group (n=64) earned a failing grade, while only 14.1% earned an A. t-tests also revealed that the socio-emotional variables and cognitive belief scale data suggested that students in the experimental group perceived the classroom as significantly more stimulating when compared to the control group.

AugmentedRealms: The Next Generation of Tabletop Gaming

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Pasha Beglar, Jeffrey Schmitendorf, Flor Tonie Nguyen, Cindy Lin, Angelo Rodriguez, Jeremy Kleve, Liang Dong, Xinyuan Wang.
Faculty Mentor: Olukemi Sawyerr.

Abstract: Tabletop games such a Dungeons & Dragons allow players the ability to create a make belief world in which other players can be a part of. Tabletop games mainly depend on the players imagination, which is both its greatest feature and flaw. The frustration comes with not having shared vision for the word, so players typically buy figurines and maps. Our solution is an app that uses augmented reality to bring tabletop gaming to life. Players will be able to view the characters and maps of their story in a more interactive and immersive way. As players view the game from their phone camera, they will be able to see 3D trees, dragons, and their own personalized characters standing on the table, swaying and breathing as if they were in the room with them. Parties can be built to allow friends who are also playing the game to be able to see the same objects from their own distinct perspective. Not only do they have the option to choose through a selection of provided 3D models, but also be able to upload their own 3D models to view in the real world through their phone cameras.

3D printing Graphene-Enhanced Li-ion battery and Graphene supercapacitors

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:15 - 1:30
Location: 9-307

Authors: Matthew Tisbe, Nicholas Ferguson, Amanda Ramos, Jeffrey Lee, Calvin Nguyen, Ben Cheng, Alfredo Collazo, Alexander Lau, Jose Lopez, Alexander Botello, Albert Armienta.
Faculty Mentor: Zhen Yu.

Abstract: Batteries are power storage devices that provide their stored power to connected electronics. Li-ion batteries are a widely used battery type due to their high energy density and ability to recharge. These properties make them well suited for portable electronic devices at the expense of taking the majority weight and volume of the device. The use of a liquid electrolyte also limits the recharging speed and operating temperature. Switching to a solid electrolyte yields enhanced environmental safety and higher energy density, thus a smaller volume needed for portable applications. Our research focuses on the ease of production of such batteries through the development of a superior solid electrolyte, and the robustness of 3D printing and robotic assembly.

Fabrication of Gecko-like Adhesive

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Rohan Galotra, William Bestian, Wendy Ching, Kevin Lam, Hieu Nguyen, Muhammad Ikram.
Faculty Mentor: Jonathan Puthoff.

Abstract: Microsphere lithography is a process that involves the use of microparticles to create regular patterns with feature sizes at the microscale. This technique is applicable to the fabrication of Gecko adhesives because of the nature of the adhesive itself which operates on a microscopic scale. In order to replicate such minuscule fibers, microsphere lithography is used to create a template for the fibers that are then filled in with a liquid polymer. We developed techniques for suspending the microspheres on the surface of water and then extracting a submerged silicon wafer to produce a uniform coating of microspheres across the silicon wafer surface. The suspension of the particles was carried out using 2 methods: The first consisted of a suspension across the full area of the petri dish. This maximized the amount of usable area across which samples could be coated. The second method consisted of suspension over a limited region of the petri dish. This left space for the insertion of a syringe to extract water under the microsphere layer. The coating of the microspheres on the silicon wafer was conducted using 2 distinct methods. The float-transfer method is the more traditional technique that involves pulling silicon slides up through a layer of suspended microspheres. The second method involves withdrawing the water around the slides in order to bring the layer of microspheres to the surface of the silicon wafers. We determined that the combination of the limited-area microsphere suspension with the withdrawal method resulted in better microsphere coatings.

Body Temperature Regulation and Breathability of Synthetic Knit Structures in Sports Bras

Oral Presentation
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Ashley Garcia, Ellen Bessemans, Brandi Noble, Brianna Garrett.
Faculty Mentor: Jiangning Che.

Abstract: Sports bras were invented out of a need to remedy the physical damage and pain women felt from the excessive movement and shifting of their breasts while running or engaging in other physical activities. Desired qualities are the ability to wick moisture, breathability, fit and comfort. Issues with the current styles are discomfort from restrictive straps and lack of breathability. It is essential to identify and improve fabrications that are comfortable to wear and give breast support, while still allowing for excellent breathability. The purpose of this research is to better understand the influence knit structures and synthetic fibers in sports bras have on comfort factors of the wearer. This study's focus was on two aspects of comfort: (a) breathability, the moisture vapor permeability and transmission of a fabric's structure, and (b) thermal comfort, the insulating effect of clothing on the wearer. Our research group will perform tests comparing a sample product to four different synthetic fabrics with various knit structures to evaluate which fabric is most suitable for the desired comfort factors. To achieve this study's purpose, a multi-criteria decision-making method, TOPSIS (The Technique for Order of Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution), and AHP (Analytic Hierarchy Process) methods were utilized to select the knit structure and fiber type that performed best.

Diversity in Advertising Marketing Campaigns

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Dewen Chen, Kelsey Noriega, Denise Lopez, Shamia Hussain.
Faculty Mentor: Chitra Dabas.

Abstract: This research examined consumers attitude toward marketing campaigns that consist of diverse model ethnicity and, homogenous, white model ethnicities. Five constructs were used in this research, Self-Identification, Attitudes Toward Advertisement, Perceived Uniqueness, Word of Mouth, and Purchase Intention. We developed two stimulus that represents diversity and homogeneousness. Through convenience sampling with the use of SurveyMonkey and Social Medias, participants were asked to take a survey and to answer on a slider which stimulus they prefer given the question. The collected data are then recoded into two different scales with respect to each stimulus, diversity and homogeneousness. Then, Linear Regressions were employed to determine the significant value P, B and adjusted R square. All the hypotheses were supported. In general, consumers have a positive attitude toward diversity in marketing campaign with more engagement in word of mouth, purchase intention, and have a more positive attitude toward said advertisements. As additional analysis, we conducted t-tests to determine the frequency of participants answer on each scale. Interestingly, we found that participants are more willing to answer on the diversity spectrum instead of the homogeneous spectrum. For questions that involved the constructs of Attitude Toward Advertisement and Purchase Intentions, participants are more likely to have a strong positive impression on diversity stimulus.

The Use of Pruning, Cytokinin Application, and Fertilizer Application to Increase Flush in Murraya koenigii and Subsequent Egg Laying by ACP

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:00 - 2:15
Location: 9-251

Authors: Kathleen Nunez.
Faculty Mentor: Anna Soper.

Abstract: Tamarixia radiata (Waterson) (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) has been identified as a biological control agent of the Asian Citrus Psyllid (ACP), Diaphorina citri, Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae). This psyllid has been shown to vector Huanglongbing (HLB), a disease that has crippled the Florida citrus industry. Efforts by the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) have been made to rear and release T. radiata to manage the spread of D. citri before the psyllid reaches dangerous population levels in California. In order to adequately study the psyllid and experiment methods to manage the spread of the disease, a substantial population of ACP is essential. A host plant for the rearing of D. citri to feed reared populations of T. radiata is necessary, in which case Murraya koenigii (L.) (Rutaceae), or the Curry Leaf plant, is used. The Curry Leaf plant can support populations of ACP, but only if the plant continuously produces new, green growth which the ACP require to breed and feed. Different regiments of pruning, cytokinin application, and fertilizer application were tested to evaluate their efficacy in inducing flush in previously pruned M. koenigii plants. Thereafter, ACP were placed on the plants to observe which regiment produced the most appealing flush for production of the psyllid.

A Sensitive Method for Aging Stellar Birthplaces

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:30 - 12:45
Location: 9-333

Authors: Evan Nunez.
Faculty Mentor: Matthew Povich.

Abstract: Aging objects and regions in the universe is difficult. One of the main reasons for this lies in the timescales that occur in the universe where "short" is measured in millions of years. We present useful stars in the Great Nebula in Carina whose x-ray radiation can be used as a sensitive time clocks for young regions (astronomically speaking) of less than 5 million years. The x-ray radiation from these stars, namely, Intermediate Mass-Pre-Main Sequence Stars (IMPS) have a strong dependence on their stellar evolution. Once these stars evolve pass a certain stage, or age, they will no longer emit x-ray radiation. We find and classify stars using infrared radiation, then use follow up x-ray observations to note their quality as good IMPS candidates. One parameter that we pay close attention to is x-ray luminosity. We expect IMPS x-ray luminosities to be brighter than other sources in the same population, including their lower mass cousins known as T Tauri stars. We find that IMPS do indeed have systematically higher x-ray luminosities than the T Tauri stars in our sample. Once prime candidates are found, we will begin the science of using IMPS to constrain the ages of different regions, particularly in the Great Nebula in Carina.

Using High-Resolution Spectroscopy to Measure Exoplanetary Radial Velocity

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:45 - 1:00
Location: 9-333

Authors: Luis Ernesto Nunez.
Faculty Mentor: Matthew Povich.

Abstract: We present reduction and analysis of high-resolution, spatially separated spectroscopy of the exoplanet β Pictoris b (β Pic b). Our data was taken with NIRSPAO, a near-infrared echelle spectrograph coupled with adaptive optics (AO), on the Keck II 10-meter telescope. Astrometry was previously used to characterize the star-planet system's orbital properties, and a single radial velocity (RV) measurement via spectroscopy supplemented the astrometric measurements. However, additional and more precise RV measurements of the planet are needed to constrain the individual mass of the planet, true eccentricity, and time of periastron passage. Using cross-correlation with model spectra, our goal is to detect the planet signal in NIRSPAO data and thereby expand the number of RV measurements. With this new RV, we can constrain planetary mass and improve the precision of the planet's orbital properties. Cross-correlation results are null, but modeling of the point-spread function (PSF) on the AO imaging system could yield results in the future.

Surface Modification of Stainless Steel using Cold Plasma

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Sara Margala, Josue Monterrosa, Anthony Oceguera, Lauren Wong, Wing Jong Chan.
Faculty Mentor: Nina Abramzon.

Abstract: Surface energy of stainless steel coupons were increased through the exposure of helium and oxygen atmospheric radio-frequency generated plasma. The increase in surface energy is observed through the contact angle of a water droplet placed on the sample and quantified by Young's equation. A 5 second exposure test reveals that an oxygen flow rate of 0.20L/min results in the lowest contact angle. Our experiments on the longevity of the treatment shows that at 6 hours after a one-minute treatment, our sample still retains a 35% higher surface energy compared to the control. An analysis of the spectra of the plasma showed that more reactive species are present at lower oxygen flow rates. Additionally, to enhance precision of exposure intervals, a electromechanical rotating stage system with a microcontroller was developed.

Synthesis and Properties of Novel Polymer Matrix Composites

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:45 - 2:00
Location: 9-307

Authors: Steven Ochoa.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: Polymers today are in abundant use in many sectors like the automotive and construction industries. Unfortunately, many of these ubiquitous polymers are harmful to the environment as they degrade very slowly, often requiring thousands of years to break down. Biodegradable polymers exist but are used less as they are typically weaker than their harmful alternatives. It has been found that certain natural materials when added to a biodegradable polymer, or bio-polymer, matrix can enhance the mechanical properties of the polymer substantially. One promising natural bio-filler is prawn shells. There are approximately 6 - 8 million tons of prawn shell waste produced annually on a global scale. This is largely because prawn meat only accounts for about 40% of its body weight as compared to 75% meat content in the body of a tuna fish. Prawn shells contain the naturally occurring, non-toxic, biodegradable polymer called chitin. This compound is similar to cellulose and is currently being used in cosmetics, biomedicine, food packaging, pharmaceuticals, and textiles. In this project, the mechanical properties and biodegradability of a finely ground shrimp shell-polycaprolactone blend and a chitin-polycaprolactone blend was compared to pure polycaprolactone. Mechanical (tensile) testing data allowed for material properties like elastic modulus, yield strength and ultimate tensile strength to be determined.


Aluminization of Nickel-Base Superalloys by Slurry and Pack Cementation Processes

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:00 - 2:15
Location: 9-209

Authors: Kailey Hanan, Kenneth C. Hirscht, Keith Inouye, Steven Ochoa.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: Aluminide coatings on nickel-base superalloys are quite effective in affording protection against high temperature corrosion in gas turbine environments. The addition of small amounts (0.5 - 1 wt%) of reactive elements like yttrium has been known to improve oxide scale adhesion, thereby promoting the longevity of the material. Pack and slurry cementation are two processes for the application of aluminide coatings. Both of these are processes activated by halide salts and result in chemical reactions that produce diffusion coatings and can be utilized to deposit aluminum, silicon, or chromium on the surface of metallic alloys. Under oxidizing conditions, the coated surfaces form a passivating oxide layer to protect the base metal from high temperature corrosion. In this study, reactive elements were incorporated into aluminizing packs and slurries and used to coat Ni-base superalloys. The characteristics of coatings applied by the pack and slurry processes, e.g., thickness, microhardness, microstructure and elemental distribution, were studied using a broad range of techniques, i.e., X-ray diffraction (XRD), surface profilometry, macrophotography, optical and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS), etc.

Free Surface Electrospun Polyvinylidene Fluoride Membranes for Direct Contact Membrane Distillation

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:00 - 12:15
Location: 9-307

Authors: Carson Gattenby, Sebastian Olarte, Dajohn Murray.
Faculty Mentor: Keith Forward.

Abstract: An estimated 1.1 billion people worldwide lack access to portable water and 2.7 billion people will face water scarce for at least a month of the year. About two-thirds of the world's population are expected to experience water shortages by the year 2025. The driving forces behind water scarcity are the growing uses of fresh water and the depletion of natural freshwater sources. Addressing this problem, several methods of water purification including reverse osmosis, multistage flash distillation, and direct contact membrane distillation are being explored. Direct Contact Membrane Distillation (DCMD) may provide a solution to populations facing water scarcity which is driven by a difference temperature (or waste heat) over a small distance. This temperature gradient can be easily be achieved by renewable energy sources such as solar, geothermal, and nuclear systems. However, current DCMD membranes are expensive and inefficient due to the lack of optimization of the membrane's desirable properties. To address this limitation, the fabrication method of free surface electrospinning was used to the control of membrane properties such as fiber diameter, pore size, and membrane thickness. Membranes were electrospun from a 22 wt% polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) solution with 78 wt% dimethylacetamide (DMAC). The produced membranes were then characterized by membrane thickness and scanning electron micrographs (SEM). Finally, a DCMD apparatus evaluated the productivity of the membranes by distilling simulated seawater (3.5 wt% NaCl). These productivities were compared to a commercially produced membrane.

Monitoring for anthelmintics resistance in horses using the modified McMaster egg-count technique

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Juan Castellanos, Cristina Olvera, James Ramirez, Roberto Ramirez.
Faculty Mentor: Cord Brundage.

Abstract: The modified McMaster egg count technique is a floatation technique used as a tool to keep quantitative record of Trichostrongyles-type eggs in horses. The modified McMaster allowed us to estimate the number of eggs per gram (epg) per fecal sample, giving us an idea of the scale of internal parasites within the horse. By incorporating the fecal egg reduction test, we were able to compare the numbers before application of anthelmintics and two weeks after to determine the effectiveness of the treatment. These records also allowed us to detect if any anthelmintic-resistance has built within the populations. Although after the application of anthelmintics the epg is largely decreased, the numbers began to increase after some time. By repeating this twice over the span of two quarters, we saw a drastic decrease in epg after application, followed by a gradual increase each week since the administration of the drugs. Although we were not able to determine if resistance has been built within the populations, we determined that these populations have the potential to become fully resistant. By further using the modified McMaster egg-counting technique, we will be able to keep record of these populations, and observe if resistance has formed.

A Statistical Analysis of Los Angeles Unified School District Graduation Rates

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:30 - 2:45
Location: 9-271

Authors: Tanya Orla.
Faculty Mentor: Adam King.

Abstract: There are many factors that may play a role in determining high school graduation rates. The purpose of this study is to identify factors influencing graduation rates among the 115 non-charter Los Angeles Unified School District high schools for the 2015-2016 school year. Linear regression will be used to model the graduation rates based on demographic data and other factors relevant to each individual school. Factors that could possibly be taken into consideration would be the population size of the school, the average income of the neighboring community, and the backgrounds of the students who are enrolled in the school. Analysis of these models will allow for predictions to be made about different scenarios and their effect on graduation rates.

Design of a small-scale inflatable Martian entry vehicle for Prandtl-M

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:45 - 2:00
Location: 9-333

Authors: Nguyen Pham, Adam Charron, Jessica Ortiz, Alexander Rey, Andrew Tibbels.
Faculty Mentor: Navid Nakhjiri.

Abstract: With the prospect of a manned mission to Mars within the next decade, NASA has developed missions and projects to pave the way. The Prandtl-M, developed by NASA Armstrong, is a fully autonomous UAV that is meant to aerially survey the Martian surface. Blue Ares' mission is to safely take the Prandtl-M, packed in a 3U CubeSat, through the hypersonic atmospheric entry and deploy the aircraft at its operational altitude. Additionally, the challenge is to fit this delivery system into the confined space of a 12U CubeSat-which requires Blue Ares to be flexible and compact in addition to providing adequate thermal protection. Inspired by NASA Langley's Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) Project, Blue Ares uses an inflatable aeroshell to protect the payload through the violent conditions of atmospheric entry. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) was implemented to numerically analyze the vehicle's aerodynamic characteristics. Along with referenced data from the Phoenix Lander mission, CFD data was used in MATLAB to design a landing trajectory for the vehicle. ANSYS Workbench was used exclusively to analyze and simulate the aero-thermal behavior of the vehicle through the different stages of flight. The inflatable mechanism design, which includes material selection, folding configuration, and inflating method, was performed separately and later incorporated into the system. The outcome of this research is a vehicle that is capable of protecting the payload from atmospheric heating and aerodynamically slow down the vehicle to its desired altitude and velocity.

Solar Updraft Tower with Compost Waste Heat and Transpired Roof

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Abbygail Ang, Randy Osorio, Erik Villanueva.
Faculty Mentor: Kevin Anderson.

Abstract: This project studies the effects of incorporating compost waste heat and a transpired roof to the design of a Solar Updraft Tower (SUT). Traditional SUTs consist of a transparent collector base, which utilizes the greenhouse effect to collect heat, a cylindrical tower that creates an updraft effect, and a wind turbine on the inlet of the tower which generates power due to natural convection with hot air. By adding compost in the collector base, temperatures are allowed to increase more through the transmissive component of radiation heat transfer. Additionally, the compost waste heat can reduce landfill space in other areas while also contributing to power generation. The transpired roof "agitates" the airflow and makes it turbulent, resulting in an improved transfer of heat. A 6' x 6' prototype of the SUT was built with the transparent collector and updraft tower. Data was taken for four configurations of the SUT: (1) without compost or transpired roof, (2) with compost, (3) with transpired roof, and (4) with both compost and transpired roof. By measuring wind speeds, temperatures, and heat flux, the power generated was calculated and compared to CFD values.

Onsite Wastewater Treatment System as a Living Laboratory

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:30 - 1:45
Location: 9-325

Authors: Paola Grano, Warjay Naigan, Martin Flores, Stephanie Osorio, Renz Soriano, Angela Truong, Gustavo Perez, Christopher Thomas, Carolyn Soy, Rima Sabih, Yasmin Proa.
Faculty Mentor: Monica Palomo.

Abstract: This project proposes the establishment of a living laboratory that will provide an on campus space that can be used for learning, innovation, and leisure of the campus community. This project proposes an expansion of the current Cal Poly Pomona water and energy infrastructure with an onsite (decentralized) wastewater treatment system. The system will increase the resiliency of the existing campus infrastructure by providing the opportunity to disconnect from the central wastewater and energy networks while maintaining the connection to the centralized utilities. The proposed project provides a unique opportunity for the Cal Poly Pomona campus to become a regional and national demonstration site where students, faculty, public agencies, private companies, and community members could have the opportunity to learn and conduct research on wastewater treatment processes, water treatment, and sustainable water reclamation practices. The key treatment process centers on a membrane bioreactor (MBR), which combines microfiltration with a biologically activated sludge process. The onsite system will treat sewage to groundwater recharge standards with potential uses for flushing, irrigation, decorative fountains and other non-potable water applications. The living laboratory will be located centrally on campus for user accessibility. The criteria for site selection further included: available square footage, site geology, elevation and grading, wastewater influent, hydrologic conditions, existing developments, and potential hazards, such as seismic activity, slope stability, liquefaction, and subsurface conditions. In conclusion, the living laboratory and its location will yield a high-quality and sustainable wastewater treatment facility where Cal Poly Pomona can showcase frontline wastewater reclamation practices.

Motion of a Charged Particle Within a Rotating Black Hole

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:00 - 12:15
Location: 9-333

Authors: Davian Harry, Jennifer Oum.
Faculty Mentor: Shohreh Abdolrahimi.

Abstract: Black holes can gain a weak magnetic field from the matter accreting around it. In order to characterize the properties of a black hole with a magnetic field, we are required to study the motion of a test charged particle around a rotating black hole with a weak magnetic field. We will focus particularly on the behavior of the particle in the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) and other possible stable circular orbits (SCO) that the particle can have. For this research, we will pay attention to the spin parameters of alpha = 0.5 and B = 0.24 which denote rotation and charge respectively. Using numerical computations, we can observe the trajectory of the particle after it gets kicked out of its orbit which can be plotted using the numerical computing environment Maple. Other important plots that we generated pays attention to the radius, energy, and angular momentum of the particle. The plots that we have generated behave as we expected and we hope to use the results to compare the ISCO and SCO orbits to any unstable orbits that the particle might traverse.

Genetic and Bioinformatic Characterization of a New Sulfolobus Turreted Icosahedral Virus (STIV) Variant

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Michael Overton, Veneese Brown.
Faculty Mentor: Jamie Snyder.

Abstract: Due to their integral role in ecosystems and ideal qualities for studying evolutionary dynamics, the study of prokaryotic viruses has exploded in recent years. The archaeal virus STIV has repeatedly been confirmed to employ a lytic-only strategy in its host, Sulfolobus solfataricus (Sso), utilizing a unique lysis mechanism. Yet, several environmental strains of related S. acidocaldarius (Saci) have now been shown to contain a prophage with high sequence similarity to STIV, dubbed STIV3. This prophage was since induced and produced viable virions. The isolation of two variants of a virus with highly conserved genomes but divergent infection cycles presents an exciting system in which to study evolutionary and genetic dynamics. I have performed multiple sequence alignments for STIV, STIV3, and other archaeal viruses. Genome wide comparisons place STIV and STIV3 as sister variants, though some genomic regions also show high identity between STIV3 and a third variant, STIV2. Included in the latter is a gene, A510, which has particular similarities to known integrases. In order to deduce the actual function of A510, I am currently constructing a genetic system to generate A510 chimeras between STIV and STIV3. Sso and Saci will be infected with these chimeras, and lysogenic activity will be assessed with qPCR. As well, A510 expression will be measured with western blotting of cell lysates. My hope is to produce a genetic system for the further study of STIV3, to elucidate the role of A510 in its lysogenic cycle, and to determine potential mechanisms for STIV variant divergence.

Electrochemical Evaluation of Titanium Alloys for Biomedical Hip Implants

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:30 - 1:45
Location: 9-307

Authors: Michael Svidensky, Neelam Patel, Jaewan Bae, Carlos Pacheco, Vanessa Gomez.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: The need for longevity of hip implants is increasing as the life expectancy of the world's population increases. Titanium and titanium alloys are commonly used for biomedical implants due to their favorable strength-to-weight ratio, biocompatibility and corrosion resistance. In particular, Ti-6Al-4V (wt%) (Ti64) is widely used as a hip implant material. There are several issues with the long-term use of this alloy. One of these is the phenomenon of stress shielding in which the elastic modulus mismatch between the implant and bone leads to bone loss and subsequent loosening of the implant. Another is the release of aluminum cations into the body with potential deleterious effects, i.e., the link to Alzheimer's disease and other neurological disorders. In addition, inflammatory responses can be triggered through the phenomenon of aseptic loosening in which an imbalance between the osteoclasts (bone-eroding cells) and osteoblasts (bone-building cells) leads to bone resorption. A new class of β-phase titanium alloys (TNZ alloys), offers promising characteristics as potential candidates for orthopedic applications due to their lower elastic modulii and non-toxic characteristics. In this study, two TNZ alloys, i.e., Ti-39Nb-6Zr (wt%) and Ti-28Nb-20Zr (wt%), were cast into rods in a pure argon environment at atmospheric pressure. A witness coupon was cut from each of the as-cast rods which were then subsequently hot isostatically pressed (HIP) to remove any internal discontinuities. Witness coupons were also cut from the HIPped rods which were subsequently precision machined into a regular cylinder. The as-cast rods were subjected to non-destructive X-ray radiography pre- and post-HIPping to confirm the removal of residual porosity. The corrosion behavior of the TNZ alloys and Ti64 control coupons, was investigated through open circuit potential (OCP) tests, potentiodynamic polarization measurements (Tafel and cyclic potentiodynamic polarization), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in phosphate buffered saline solution (PBS) at normal body conditions (temperature at 37℃ +/- 1℃ and pH of 7.4 +/- 0.1). Tests were also conducted at lower pH conditions to simulate the body conditions of patients suffering from metabolic acidosis (pH of 6.9 +/- 0.1). EIS measurements were conducted before and after anodic polarization tests.

Using high resolution Lidar data from SnowEx to characterize the sensitivity of snow depth retrievals to point-cloud density and vegetation

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Victoria Patterson, Kat Bormann, Jeff Deems, Tom Painter.
Faculty Mentor: Alex Small.

Abstract: The NASA SnowEx campaign conducted in 2016 and 2017 provides a rich source of high-resolution Lidar data from JPL's Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO - http://aso.jpl.nasa.gov) combined with extensive in-situ measurements in two key areas in Colorado: Grand Mesa and Senator Beck. While the uncertainty in the 50m snow depth retrievals from NASA's ASO been estimated at 1-2cm in non-vegetated exposed areas (Painter et al., 2016), the impact of forest cover and point-cloud density on ASO snow lidar depth retrievals is relatively unknown. Dense forest canopies are known to reduce lidar penetration and ground strikes thus affecting the elevation surface retrieved from in the forest. Using high-resolution lidar point cloud data from the ASO SnowEx campaigns (26pt/m2) we applied a series of data decimations (up to 90% point reduction) to the point cloud data to quantify the relationship between vegetation, ground point density, resulting snow-off and snow-on surface elevations and finally snow depth. We observed non-linear reductions in lidar ground point density in forested areas that were strongly correlated to structural forest cover metrics. Previously, the impacts of these data decimations on a small study area in Grand Mesa showed a sharp increase in under-canopy surface elevation errors of -0.18m when ground point densities were reduced to ~1.5pt/m2. In this study, we expanded the evaluation to the more topographically challenging Senator Beck basin, have conducted analysis along a vegetation gradient and are considering snow the impacts of snow depth rather than snow-off surface elevation. Preliminary analysis suggest that snow depth retrievals inferred from airborne lidar elevation differentials may systematically underestimate snow depth in forests when canopy densities exceed 1.75 and where tree heights exceed 5m. These results provide a basis from which to identify areas that may suffer from vegetation-induced biases in surface elevation models and snow depths derived from airborne lidar data, and help quantify expected spatial distributions of errors in the snow depth that can be used to improve the accuracy of ASO basin-scale depth and water equivalent products.

Interplanetary CubeSat Solar Sail Mission

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:30 - 1:45
Location: 9-333

Authors: Holly Everson, Guadalupe Romero Bravo, Steven Jaworski, Sofiya Pascual, Riza Dayapera, Aerbwong Chitamitara, Suleman Jalal, Erica Arroyo, Justin Toney.
Faculty Mentor: Navid Nakhjiri.

Abstract: Studying CubeSats for space science missions has increased significantly in recent years. The use of a CubeSat will provide a spacecraft which is lighter, mechanically simpler, and with a fraction of the cost of a traditional space mission. Cal Poly Pomona Interplanetary CubeSat Solar Sail Mission (IPCS3M) is a multi-year research project studying the use of solar radiation pressure on a sail as an alternative method of propulsion for interplanetary CubeSat missions. With a 90 meters squared Mylar sail, the 6U CubeSat will travel to Saturn with the intended goal of dropping a 1U science payload into Saturn's northern hexagonal storm. The payload will enter the inner wall of the eye to gather data regarding storm patterns, chemical composition, and other factors. Additionally, the solar sail will provide the spacecraft with a free continuous thrust, increasing velocity throughout the mission timeline provided by the solar radiation pressure. Finite Element Analysis and Computer Aided Design (CAD) modeling were used to construct the spacecraft and allow for structural studies. In addition to computer model tests, physical tests have also been performed to research material properties, light reflectance, and boom creation. Successful solar sail implementation will give CubeSats a form of propulsion that will open up possibilities for more complex missions, most notably orbital maneuvering and interplanetary travel.

There's nothing common about Common Core

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:30 - 2:45
Location: 15-2913

Authors: Cameron Pastrano.
Faculty Mentor: Mario Guerrero.

Abstract: Common Core State Standards (CCSS) were adopted by California in 2010 and first implemented during the 2014-2015 academic year. With CCSS entering into its fourth year of practice, this thesis aims to expand readers understanding of proper professional development from the perspective of an educator. Increasingly aggressive educational benchmarks, set forth by Common Core, have created large inconsistencies from classroom to classroom across a single school district. The heightened emphasis on conceptual understanding and problem solving requires massive reform in curriculum and instruction. Specifically, this study hopes to identify ways in which educators are receiving vital training on CCSS to educate the earliest of learners (K-3rd grade). This paper anticipates to contribute to the notable scholarship of public administration by researching authentic qualitative date of CCSS implementation within East Whittier City School District Elementary Schools. Overall, providing an analysis of professional development offered by the district to familiarize educators on CCSS. As well as, equipping teachers with the training to develop new curriculum fundamental towards a successful execution of this drastically new education reform.

Electrochemical Evaluation of Titanium Alloys for Biomedical Hip Implants

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:30 - 1:45
Location: 9-307

Authors: Michael Svidensky, Neelam Patel, Jaewan Bae, Carlos Pacheco, Vanessa Gomez.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: The need for longevity of hip implants is increasing as the life expectancy of the world's population increases. Titanium and titanium alloys are commonly used for biomedical implants due to their favorable strength-to-weight ratio, biocompatibility and corrosion resistance. In particular, Ti-6Al-4V (wt%) (Ti64) is widely used as a hip implant material. There are several issues with the long-term use of this alloy. One of these is the phenomenon of stress shielding in which the elastic modulus mismatch between the implant and bone leads to bone loss and subsequent loosening of the implant. Another is the release of aluminum cations into the body with potential deleterious effects, i.e., the link to Alzheimer's disease and other neurological disorders. In addition, inflammatory responses can be triggered through the phenomenon of aseptic loosening in which an imbalance between the osteoclasts (bone-eroding cells) and osteoblasts (bone-building cells) leads to bone resorption. A new class of β-phase titanium alloys (TNZ alloys), offers promising characteristics as potential candidates for orthopedic applications due to their lower elastic modulii and non-toxic characteristics. In this study, two TNZ alloys, i.e., Ti-39Nb-6Zr (wt%) and Ti-28Nb-20Zr (wt%), were cast into rods in a pure argon environment at atmospheric pressure. A witness coupon was cut from each of the as-cast rods which were then subsequently hot isostatically pressed (HIP) to remove any internal discontinuities. Witness coupons were also cut from the HIPped rods which were subsequently precision machined into a regular cylinder. The as-cast rods were subjected to non-destructive X-ray radiography pre- and post-HIPping to confirm the removal of residual porosity. The corrosion behavior of the TNZ alloys and Ti64 control coupons, was investigated through open circuit potential (OCP) tests, potentiodynamic polarization measurements (Tafel and cyclic potentiodynamic polarization), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in phosphate buffered saline solution (PBS) at normal body conditions (temperature at 37℃ +/- 1℃ and pH of 7.4 +/- 0.1). Tests were also conducted at lower pH conditions to simulate the body conditions of patients suffering from metabolic acidosis (pH of 6.9 +/- 0.1). EIS measurements were conducted before and after anodic polarization tests.

Modeling Thermodynamics And Kinetics Of Aluminized Austenitic Stainless Steels

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:15 - 2:30
Location: 9-209

Authors: Deepali Patil, Bryce Virgin.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: The deleterious effects of corrosion at high temperatures can be mitigated by the application of coatings that can form a protective oxide layer. Halide Activated Pack Cementation (HAPC) is one such coating method in which a halide vapor is generated within a pack and undergoes reactions that ultimately result in the coating element, e.g., aluminum, being deposited and diffusing into the substrate. In this study, UNS S30400 austenitic stainless steel was aluminized for various times at 850°C. Samples were cross-sectioned for analysis by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS). The coating thickness for each layer was measured and concentration profiles were determined. The solid-state diffusion of aluminum into the stainless steel substrate was modeled using two popular computing environments, i.e., MATLAB and Thermo-Calc. For MATLAB, the diffusion coefficient of aluminum was calculated using the Forward Simulation Method (FSB) which reduces the error propagated using older methods. The use of an iterative algorithm in FSB, rather than a direct calculation, reduced the errors in calculating the concentration dependent diffusion coefficient. In turn, this was used to generate solutions to Fick's Second Law. A parallel effort utilized thermodynamic modeling of austenitic stainless steels using the graphical mode of a commercially available thermodynamic software to generate the Al-Fe-Cr ternary phase diagram. The kinetics of aluminum diffusion into the stainless steel substrate were modeled using a separate module of the software. Insights gained by comparing the two modeling approaches will be discussed.


Morphology Development of Aluminide Coatings on Mo-Si-B-Ti Alloys

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:30 - 2:45
Location: 9-209

Authors: Zachery Walsh, Shahan Kasnakjian, Logan Gallegos, Deepali Patil.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: As the need for higher efficiencies in gas turbines that are marine-based or airborne increases, alternatives to nickel-base superalloys need to be investigated. Molybdenum-silicon-boron (Mo-Si-B) alloys are refractory materials that are expected to have high temperature stabilities; however, they are denser than nickel base superalloys. More recently, the addition of titanium to Mo-Si-B to form Mo-Si-B-Ti has been considered as a possible improvement by improving the creep resistance of the base alloy while lowering the density to values lower than those of Ni-base superalloys. However, Mo-Si-B-Ti alloys are vulnerable to high temperature oxidation, and to compensate for this, a protective coating would be required. The surfaces of the Mo-12.5Si- 8.5B-27.5Ti (at.%) alloy was modified using the halide activated pack cementation (HAPC) method. This is a coating method in which a halide vapor is generated within a pack and deposits the master alloy onto the surface of the substrate. Subsequently, the coating element diffuses into the substrate. Coatings were produced at 700-750C, in times ranging from 1 to 25 hours in an inert argon environment. The aluminized specimens were characterized using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/ EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis to investigate coating thickness, structure, composition, and microhardness testing was used to obtain hardness profiles of the coatings. Coatings had similar morphologies for different coating times in the 1 - 25 h range, consisting of a single layer with multiple phases and columnar/elongated grains. Some coatings contained fine precipitates near the coating-substrate interface. The coating morphology appeared to be dependent on substrate microstructure, with regions high in Mo in the coating aligning with structures in the substrate which were also high in Mo.

Using high resolution Lidar data from SnowEx to characterize the sensitivity of snow depth retrievals to point-cloud density and vegetation

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Victoria Patterson, Kat Bormann, Jeff Deems, Tom Painter.
Faculty Mentor: Alex Small.

Abstract: The NASA SnowEx campaign conducted in 2016 and 2017 provides a rich source of high-resolution Lidar data from JPL's Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO - http://aso.jpl.nasa.gov) combined with extensive in-situ measurements in two key areas in Colorado: Grand Mesa and Senator Beck. While the uncertainty in the 50m snow depth retrievals from NASA's ASO been estimated at 1-2cm in non-vegetated exposed areas (Painter et al., 2016), the impact of forest cover and point-cloud density on ASO snow lidar depth retrievals is relatively unknown. Dense forest canopies are known to reduce lidar penetration and ground strikes thus affecting the elevation surface retrieved from in the forest. Using high-resolution lidar point cloud data from the ASO SnowEx campaigns (26pt/m2) we applied a series of data decimations (up to 90% point reduction) to the point cloud data to quantify the relationship between vegetation, ground point density, resulting snow-off and snow-on surface elevations and finally snow depth. We observed non-linear reductions in lidar ground point density in forested areas that were strongly correlated to structural forest cover metrics. Previously, the impacts of these data decimations on a small study area in Grand Mesa showed a sharp increase in under-canopy surface elevation errors of -0.18m when ground point densities were reduced to ~1.5pt/m2. In this study, we expanded the evaluation to the more topographically challenging Senator Beck basin, have conducted analysis along a vegetation gradient and are considering snow the impacts of snow depth rather than snow-off surface elevation. Preliminary analysis suggest that snow depth retrievals inferred from airborne lidar elevation differentials may systematically underestimate snow depth in forests when canopy densities exceed 1.75 and where tree heights exceed 5m. These results provide a basis from which to identify areas that may suffer from vegetation-induced biases in surface elevation models and snow depths derived from airborne lidar data, and help quantify expected spatial distributions of errors in the snow depth that can be used to improve the accuracy of ASO basin-scale depth and water equivalent products.

Determining Trends of Carrier Mobility in Potential Candidates for Organic Semiconductors

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Kylie Pearce.
Faculty Mentor: Bohdan Schatschneider.

Abstract: It has become increasingly necessary for manufacturers of modern electronics to replace costly inorganic materials with more economical organic ones. Experimental data has shown that different organic compounds exhibit promise for acting as either n-type (electron carrying) or p-type (hole carrying) semiconductors in devices such as field-effect transistors (FETs). Possible candidates for said organic semiconductors can be studied with high-throughput ab-initio calculations which can reveal relevant information about their physical properties. It is known that high band dispersion in either the valence or conduction bands contributes to a compound's ability to behavior as either an n-type or p-type semiconductor where higher conduction band dispersion correlates with behavior as an n-type semiconductor and the reverse is true for the valence band. In this study, the band structure of several compounds of interest will be analyzed in order determine the amount of dispersion present in either the valence or conduction band. These values will then be compared to a compound's experimentally determined electron or hole mobility in order to establish correlations between these values.

Trump vs the Media

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:15 - 2:30
Location: 15-1828

Authors: Edith Perez.
Faculty Mentor: Mario Guerrero.

Abstract: The media is an important part of society for the reason that it provides us with information about the actions taken by the government. From the start of his campaign Donald Trump continues to be outspoken and often says controversial statements. One of which challenges the media's credibility; the statement is that the media provides "fake news". By saying such statements Trump can have an effect on people's lives more specifically their media diet. Through the use of a quantitative research design, I conducted a survey to find out if Trump stating that the media provides "fake news" has an effect on people's media diet.

Investigating the RAW 264.7 cell density-dependent effect of Garlic (Allium sativum) on lipopolysaccharide stimulated tumor necrosis factor-α secretion

Oral Presentation
Time: 3:00 - 3:15
Location: 9-283

Authors: Angel Perez.
Faculty Mentor: Nancy Buckley.

Abstract: Garlic (Allium sativum) is used to remedy many diseases and known to modulate the immune system. Macrophages are key cells of the immune response, and are able to destroy pathogens. Macrophages not only are able to phagocytose pathogens, but are able to send a message, through cytokines, to other immune cells to aid against foreign agents. Cytokines are proteins used by immune cells to direct an immune response. We focused on tumor necrosis alpha (TNF-α) which is involved in systemic inflammation and critical for resistance against infections. Our laboratory has found that an aqueous garlic extract stimulated lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced TNF-α secretion from J774A.1 macrophages. LPS, found in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, stimulates cytokine production from macrophages. Also, our laboratory has found that, at a specific cell density, garlic stimulates LPS-induced TNF-α in J774A.1 and primary macrophages but has no effect on RAW264.7 macrophages. Thus, we set out to do a comparative study of garlic's effect on LPS-induced TNF-α secretion from RAW264.7 cells plated at different densities. RAW264.7 macrophages were plated at 5x105 cells/ml, 2.5x105 cells/ml, 1.25x105 cells/ml, 6x104 cells/ml and treated with an aqueous garlic preparation in the presence or absence of LPS (100ng/ml). After 24-hours of treatment, cell supernatants were collected and TNF-α secretion was quantified by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). Our preliminary findings show that garlic does not alter LPS-induced TNF-α, suggesting that garlic's effects are only cell-type dependent and not cell-density dependent.

Autonomous Collision Avoidance System for Unmanned Aerial Systems using Stereoscopic Vision

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:15 - 2:30
Location: 9-325

Authors: Erwin Perez, Alexander Winger, Alex Tran, Nick Keti, Carlos Garcia-Paredes.
Faculty Mentor: Subodh Bhandari.

Abstract: This project discusses the use of stereoscopic vision as a means of sensing and detecting obstacles and other aircraft as a collision avoidance system for small unmanned aerial systems (UASs). The importance of this research has become increasingly significant as the presence of UASs in commercial and private sectors has led to stricter FAA regulations. Implementing collision avoidance systems can help integrate UASs more seamlessly into the National Airspace System (NAS) with fewer safety concerns and fewer financial burdens. Stereoscopic vision provides a cheaper and more lightweight solution for collision detection. The project uses a Zed stereo camera that is mounted on a DJI S900 Hexacopter unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) to generate depth maps. An NVIDIA Jetson TX1 board is used for onboard processing of the depth maps and obstacle avoidance. The board communicates with the PixHawk 3DR autopilot module which transmits data to the ground control station via XBee radios. By using the Zed software development kit (SDK), it is possible to obtain depth maps directly from the camera and use them in the implementation of obstacle avoidance. The algorithm that is used will partition the depth map into multiple sections, allowing it to find the section of the image that has pixels which represent objects furthest away, hence this section should be obstacle free. From here, the UAV can maneuver in the direction of the selected section of the depth map, allowing it to avoid obstacles in its path.

Onsite Wastewater Treatment System as a Living Laboratory

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:30 - 1:45
Location: 9-325

Authors: Paola Grano, Warjay Naigan, Martin Flores, Stephanie Osorio, Renz Soriano, Angela Truong, Gustavo Perez, Christopher Thomas, Carolyn Soy, Rima Sabih, Yasmin Proa.
Faculty Mentor: Monica Palomo.

Abstract: This project proposes the establishment of a living laboratory that will provide an on campus space that can be used for learning, innovation, and leisure of the campus community. This project proposes an expansion of the current Cal Poly Pomona water and energy infrastructure with an onsite (decentralized) wastewater treatment system. The system will increase the resiliency of the existing campus infrastructure by providing the opportunity to disconnect from the central wastewater and energy networks while maintaining the connection to the centralized utilities. The proposed project provides a unique opportunity for the Cal Poly Pomona campus to become a regional and national demonstration site where students, faculty, public agencies, private companies, and community members could have the opportunity to learn and conduct research on wastewater treatment processes, water treatment, and sustainable water reclamation practices. The key treatment process centers on a membrane bioreactor (MBR), which combines microfiltration with a biologically activated sludge process. The onsite system will treat sewage to groundwater recharge standards with potential uses for flushing, irrigation, decorative fountains and other non-potable water applications. The living laboratory will be located centrally on campus for user accessibility. The criteria for site selection further included: available square footage, site geology, elevation and grading, wastewater influent, hydrologic conditions, existing developments, and potential hazards, such as seismic activity, slope stability, liquefaction, and subsurface conditions. In conclusion, the living laboratory and its location will yield a high-quality and sustainable wastewater treatment facility where Cal Poly Pomona can showcase frontline wastewater reclamation practices.

Design of a small-scale inflatable Martian entry vehicle for Prandtl-M

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:45 - 2:00
Location: 9-333

Authors: Nguyen Pham, Adam Charron, Jessica Ortiz, Alexander Rey, Andrew Tibbels.
Faculty Mentor: Navid Nakhjiri.

Abstract: With the prospect of a manned mission to Mars within the next decade, NASA has developed missions and projects to pave the way. The Prandtl-M, developed by NASA Armstrong, is a fully autonomous UAV that is meant to aerially survey the Martian surface. Blue Ares' mission is to safely take the Prandtl-M, packed in a 3U CubeSat, through the hypersonic atmospheric entry and deploy the aircraft at its operational altitude. Additionally, the challenge is to fit this delivery system into the confined space of a 12U CubeSat-which requires Blue Ares to be flexible and compact in addition to providing adequate thermal protection. Inspired by NASA Langley's Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) Project, Blue Ares uses an inflatable aeroshell to protect the payload through the violent conditions of atmospheric entry. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) was implemented to numerically analyze the vehicle's aerodynamic characteristics. Along with referenced data from the Phoenix Lander mission, CFD data was used in MATLAB to design a landing trajectory for the vehicle. ANSYS Workbench was used exclusively to analyze and simulate the aero-thermal behavior of the vehicle through the different stages of flight. The inflatable mechanism design, which includes material selection, folding configuration, and inflating method, was performed separately and later incorporated into the system. The outcome of this research is a vehicle that is capable of protecting the payload from atmospheric heating and aerodynamically slow down the vehicle to its desired altitude and velocity.

Design, and testing of a solar-driven wastewater treatment unit for off-grid applications.

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:45 - 1:00
Location: 9-325

Authors: Justine Nguyen, Daniel Andrade, Thuan Nguyen, Kyle Miller, Masoud Modabernia, John Kest, Johnny Baradii, Laura Lopez, Binh Phun, David Jacobo.
Faculty Mentor: Reza Lakeh.

Abstract: In California the drought has become an important issue due to declines in surface water sources. In order to keep up with the continuously increasing demand for water, the state is heavily relying on imported water from the Colorado River. To account for this problem, the use of recycled water became necessary. The research team at Cal Poly Pomona, with the support of Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, is developing an off-grid solar-powered greywater treatment system for non-potable use in single households. Greywater, by definition, is the drained water from bathroom sinks, showers, tubs, and washing machines; this does not include wastewater from toilets or kitchen sinks. Treating greywater on-site can provide significant water savings, and can reduce the carbon footprint of desalination using solar panels. The system is comprised of a three-stage treatment: three microfilters, three solar-driven reverse osmosis membranes, and an ultraviolet disinfection unit. The product of this project is capable of reclaiming 90 gallons of water per day while recovering approximately 60% of residential greywater. The design of the system will remove traces of organic and inorganic chemicals, and particles of dirt, food and others. The team has built and tested a preliminary design of the greywater treatment system to address the mechanical controls, and electrical aspects of the overall system for future use. Based on data collection and analysis of Version 1, an optimized and more consumer-friendly Version 2 has been built and tested.

Hot Corrosion of High Entropy Alloys in Molten Salts

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:00 - 12:15
Location: 9-209

Authors: Alexander Jalbuena, Steven Pierce, Carinne Lukiman.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: High Entropy Alloys (HEAs) are a new class of multicomponent alloys that contain five or more elements in equal or near-equal amounts in atomic percent, resulting in extraordinary mechanical properties. Turbine blades are one of many potential applications for HEAs. Gas turbine blades exposed to temperatures in the 650-900°C range in marine atmospheres, can be subject to accelerated corrosion beneath a thin molten eutectic salt film consisting of sodium chloride and sodium sulfate. This type of corrosion (Type II hot corrosion) can eventually lead to engineering failure. Understanding the corrosion behavior of HEAs in the presence of a thin fused film of these salts would therefore be relevant for this application. In this study, coupons of a multicomponent AlCoCrFeNi alloy and a selected nickel-based superalloy as a baseline were exposed to a molten NaCl-Na2SO4 eutectic salt mixture at 700, 750, and 800°C in the presence of a platinum-catalyzed SO2/air mixture. In situ electrochemical techniques were utilized to characterize the corrosion behavior of these alloys. The morphology of the attack was studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The results are discussed and comparisons between the different alloy systems are made.


Hot Corrosion Testing of Co-, Ni- and Fe-Based Alloys Using a Dean's Rig

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:15 - 12:30
Location: 9-209

Authors: Carinne Lukiman, Steven Pierce, Alexander Jalbuena.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: Hot corrosion is a form of accelerated degradation of metallic alloys underneath a thin, molten salt film in high temperature environments, such as marine and industrial gas turbines or jet engines. Sulfur impurities from the fuel react with the sodium chloride present in the marine environment, resulting in a sodium sulfate salt which subsequently forms a thin molten film on the turbine components. Simulating this phenomenon will be invaluable in materials selection for this application. The Dean's Rig has been designed to simulate this corrosive environment. It uses a two-zone furnace, with a container of salt located at the hot zone and the test coupon(s) located in the lower temperature zone. The high temperature zone (1000℃) is used to vaporize salts and introduce them into a flowing gas stream. The low temperature zone (700℃) allows for deposition of the salt vapor onto the alloy, simulating the conditions that the alloy would encounter during service. To best mimic service conditions, a O2 - 0.1% SO2 gas was used at a flow rate of 1 sccm. Coupons of cobalt, nickel and iron alloys were pre-deposited with salt prior to testing using a drip method in which a supersaturated salt solution was slowly deposited onto the surface and then heated to allow the water to completely evaporate, leaving behind a thin salt film. Corrosion rate was determined through mass loss measurements. Post test samples were analyzed using optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) as well as X-ray diffraction (XRD).

STIV Protein C92 and the Pyramidal Lysis of Sulfolobus Solfataricus

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Christian Pirijanian.
Faculty Mentor: Jamie Snyder.

Abstract: Archaeal viruses lacked a model system to study replication until Sulfolobus turreted icosahedral virus (STIV) was discovered. Both STIV and its host S. solfataricus thrive in extremely hot and acidic conditions, with native habitats such as acidic (pH2) hot (80°C ) springs within Yellowstone National Park. These conditions can be mimicked in a laboratory setting and allow for proper study of the STIV and its replication cycle in S. solfataricus. STIV expresses a lytic replication cycle that ends with the opening of unique pyramidal structures on its archaeal host. Pyramid formation is speculated to be induced either by either mechanically piercing and/or enzymatically digesting through Sulfolobus's S-layer. The viral protein responsible for this pyramid formation is called c92; a small, two domain alpha-helical rich protein with a N-terminal transmembrane domain with around 27 amino acids. Sole expression of this protein is enough to form pyramids in S. solfataricus, however, not much else is known about its catalytic sites, secretion signals, or protein motifs identifiable by inspection of its primary amino acid sequence. This project is currently aiming to test mutated c92 genes to identify essential amino acid residues. This will not only elucidate the proteins structure, but further shed light on STIV's viral replication cycle.

Inflight Power Generation and Storage in Airplanes

Oral Presentation
Time: 11:45 - 12:00
Location: 9-325

Authors: Jonathan Franco, Ian Pollard, Jake Alder, Steve Betts.
Faculty Mentor: Steven Dobbs.

Abstract: Emerging unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) and other aircraft use electrical propulsion systems. To extend battery charge and aircraft range, power can be generated from multiple sources during flight including aeroelastic vibrations from gusts and flutter, bending movements, and sunlight. These sources of "free" energy can be summed and used during flight operation. This research will employ the aeroelastic vibrations of the wing that will be captured using a created device that uses vibrations to generate electricity. Stress flexing piezoelectric devices will be attached at the root of the wing, where the most bending strain occurs. Flexible solar panels will be attached to the top of wing. These three sources will be summed together to power the propeller of an aircraft. A Maximum Power Point Tracker (MPPT) board is utilized to adjust the input voltage to harvest power from the wing vibration phenomenon and transform this power to supply the voltage requirements of the battery or graphene supercapacitors under load.

Establishment of a Candida albicans Infection Model in Caenorhabditis elegans for Study of Fungal Pathogenesis

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:45 - 1:00
Location: 9-251

Authors: Ielyzaveta Pomytkina.
Faculty Mentor: Jill Adler-Moore.

Abstract: Background: Candida albicans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that can cause life-threatening infections in immunocompromised individuals. Due to ethical and budgetary concerns associated with the use of vertebrate animals in research, interest in alternative models has increased over the past several decades. Caenorhabditis elegans, a non-parasitic nematode, has emerged as an attractive invertebrate model host due to its ease of maintenance and propagation, short life cycle, and susceptibility to a wide range of human pathogens. C. elegans relies solely on its innate immune system to mount antifungal defenses, many of which are evolutionarily conserved elements that have mammalian orthologs. The focus of our study was to design a C. elegans infection model using C. albicans yeast. Methods: Synchronized larval stage 4 worms were challenged with various doses of live C. albicans yeast cells for 4 hours at 20°C and 30°C. Survival of the worms was monitored every 24 hours for 5 days post-challenge. Some of the worms (n=416) at 24 hours post-challenge were homogenized, and homogenates plated on Sabouraud's agar for determination of fungal burden. Results: Fungal burden assessment showed an average of 380 colony forming units per worm at 24 hours post-challenge with 5x10^6 viable yeast cells/mL in PBS at 30°C. At 120 hours post-challenge, the infection resulted in 5% and 95% survival of infected and control groups, respectively. In future studies, we will use this model to investigate C. elegans innate immune responses following infection and in response to antifungal drugs and various immune adjuvants.

Use of pig-ear-notching to evaluate the wound treatment effects of Hypochlorous acid

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Hailey Pontes, Nicholas Denny.
Faculty Mentor: Cord Brundage.

Abstract: Hypochlorous acid (HA) is an electrically neutral oxidant available commercially in solutions as an antimicrobial wound treatment. We wanted to test the effects of HA on wound healing, incidence of infection and wound bacterial colonization in swine (Sus scrofa domesticus). The act of pig-ear-notching is an individual tagging system, used to distinguish animal numbers and litters. When notching, a small wedge of skin is removed at specific locations on one or both ears in piglets within 3 days of birth. These wounds usually resolve within 7-10 days. In this double-blind study, piglets receiving bilateral notching have one randomized ear treated with HA and the other treated with a control solution. Treatment commences following the notching and continues once daily for 10 days. Wound swabbing, photographs for wound scoring and inflammation grading is performed daily throughout the 10 day treatment period. Results provide evidence not only on the potency of HA as an antimicrobial, but also its activity expediting wound healing.

Identification of a Phosphatase-encoding Sperm Gene in the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:00 - 12:15
Location: 9-243

Authors: Gaurav Prajapati.
Faculty Mentor: Craig LaMunyon.

Abstract: Precise activation of sperm cells is critical for prospective fertilization for most organisms and the same is true for the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Sperm cells from C. elegans remain as inactive spherical spermatids and only activate after an external signal. Activation reorganizes the cell to produce a pseudopod and induce motility. I determined that a previously unstudied gene, F55F8.7, is involved in spermatid activation. The gene was identified from the mutation zq9 that causes premature sperm activation. The mutation was found because it restores partial fertility to worms harboring the it132 mutation in the spe-27 gene. Genome mapping and whole genome sequencing were employed to identify the mutation. The results indicated the zq9 mutation occurred in a small region on chromosome I. F55F8.7 was the only mutated sperm gene in the region. Zq9 mutants were transformed with a normal copy of the F55F8.7 gene, and normal function was restored, confirming that zq9 resides in F55F8.7. Further, RT-PCR data corroborated that the gene is expressed solely in sperm. F55F8.7 is predicted to have protein tyrosine phosphatase activity. The C. elegans genome contains 58 similar copies of this gene, many of which are sperm expressed. The substantial number of these paralogs could explain why a knockout mutation of F55F8.7 produces no phenotype. The gene is widely represented in animals with two ortholog genes in humans: PTPRG and PTPRZ1. Future work will include making a transcriptional fluorescent fusion to study expression and protein localization in spermatogenesis.

Onsite Wastewater Treatment System as a Living Laboratory

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:30 - 1:45
Location: 9-325

Authors: Paola Grano, Warjay Naigan, Martin Flores, Stephanie Osorio, Renz Soriano, Angela Truong, Gustavo Perez, Christopher Thomas, Carolyn Soy, Rima Sabih, Yasmin Proa.
Faculty Mentor: Monica Palomo.

Abstract: This project proposes the establishment of a living laboratory that will provide an on campus space that can be used for learning, innovation, and leisure of the campus community. This project proposes an expansion of the current Cal Poly Pomona water and energy infrastructure with an onsite (decentralized) wastewater treatment system. The system will increase the resiliency of the existing campus infrastructure by providing the opportunity to disconnect from the central wastewater and energy networks while maintaining the connection to the centralized utilities. The proposed project provides a unique opportunity for the Cal Poly Pomona campus to become a regional and national demonstration site where students, faculty, public agencies, private companies, and community members could have the opportunity to learn and conduct research on wastewater treatment processes, water treatment, and sustainable water reclamation practices. The key treatment process centers on a membrane bioreactor (MBR), which combines microfiltration with a biologically activated sludge process. The onsite system will treat sewage to groundwater recharge standards with potential uses for flushing, irrigation, decorative fountains and other non-potable water applications. The living laboratory will be located centrally on campus for user accessibility. The criteria for site selection further included: available square footage, site geology, elevation and grading, wastewater influent, hydrologic conditions, existing developments, and potential hazards, such as seismic activity, slope stability, liquefaction, and subsurface conditions. In conclusion, the living laboratory and its location will yield a high-quality and sustainable wastewater treatment facility where Cal Poly Pomona can showcase frontline wastewater reclamation practices.

The Reactive Element Effect on the Oxidation Behavior of Nickel Aluminide Coatings

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:00 - 1:15
Location: 9-209

Authors: Nicholas Ury, Annette Wagner, Eric Quach, Ananda Gutierrez.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: The efficiency of turbines in power generation plants can be increased by raising the operating temperatures. Currently, nickel-base alloys that form a protective layer of chromium oxide are used in the hot section components of land-based turbines. However, chromium oxide is known to volatilize at higher temperatures, a problem that is worsened in the presence of water vapor in the exhaust. One approach to resolve this issue is to apply a protective aluminide coating to the surface of the alloys. Under the oxidizing conditions in the turbine environment, the aluminide surface layers will form a protective alumina scale. The adherence of the alumina oxide scale can be improved by the presence of reactive elements, such as yttrium, in small amounts. Three different nickel-base alloys were aluminized via a slurry coating process with various reactive element additions. The coupons were then subjected to high temperature oxidation at 1000⁰C in both dry and steam-containing environments, and their short-term oxidation behavior was measured via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The coupons were analyzed post-oxidation via optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The effects of humid air on the kinetics of oxidation of the as-received and slurry aluminized alloys will be discussed.

UAS SURVEYING AND MAPPING FOR TRANSPORTATION PLANNING

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:00 - 1:15
Location: 9-269

Authors: Manuel De Leon, Gerardo Quintana.
Faculty Mentor: Omar Mora.

Abstract: Geospatial technologies and Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) have made significant strides in the past decade in terms of quality and cost efficiency. In regards to engineering practices, the combination of the two have the potential to deliver significant amounts of data in much less time and effort than traditional surveying and mapping practices. Remote Sensing technologies and their related software are usually associated with surveying and mapping, but how can transportation engineers utilize these tools in corroboration? Through the integration of photogrammetry and computer vision software such as ContextCapture, 3D surface models may be created from a collection of overlapping photos. By adding Ground Control Points (GCPs), the 3D surface model is georeferenced into any desired coordinate system. There are various amounts of information that can be obtained and analyzed for many applications, in particular, transportation planning. Geometric information, scaled distances, changes in slope and elevation, and the like, can be taken into account for projecting cost efficiency when road development plans are in consideration. With this collaboration of modern innovations, transportation engineering can have a new tool that bypasses past limitations in traditional surveying and mapping techniques.

Innovative Classroom Assessment

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:30 - 12:45
Location: 15-2907

Authors: Michael Ramirez, Laura Dasilva, Nguyen Nguyen, Cheyenne Romero.
Faculty Mentor: Faye Wachs.

Abstract: Mechanical Engineering is a rigorous yet popular major chosen by over 1000 students that attend Cal Poly Pomona. Fluid Mechanics (ME 311) is a core lecture within the Mechanical curriculum and is considered to be a bottleneck course within the department due to the high failure rate that the course produces. A study conducted by Taotao Long (2016) demonstrated that students had positive attitudes towards utilizing course videos before lecture in a flipped classroom environment (Long, 2016). After several quarters of designing a course model tailored to Fluid Mechanics at Cal Poly Pomona, an ideal classroom structure was created. In the academic quarters of Winter and Spring of 2017, the flipped classroom structure was implemented ideally to produce outcomes similar to other research-backed data that proved academic success for students using a web-based learning model. Grade point averages, socio-emotional variables, and focus group data were collected at the beginning and end of each quarter to assess any development from the participants. Results from both quarters demonstrated the effectiveness of a flipped classroom structure in the ME 311 course. In the experimental group (n=63) 11.1% of students earned a failing grade while 41.3% of students received an A. In contrast, 34.3% of students in the control group (n=64) earned a failing grade, while only 14.1% earned an A. t-tests also revealed that the socio-emotional variables and cognitive belief scale data suggested that students in the experimental group perceived the classroom as significantly more stimulating when compared to the control group.

Skeletal Anatomic Reconstructionists

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Marina Duveneck, Logan Malinchak, Roberto Ramirez, Rachel Christensen.
Faculty Mentor: Cord Brundage.

Abstract: SkAR, Skeletal Anatomic Reconstructionists, is a project that began in 2017, and has manifested into a collaborative effort of prospective veterinary students who are fascinated with anatomy and enjoy hands-on learning. The goal of SkAR was to debride animal tissue with the aid of flesh-eating beetles, in order to clean and articulate the bones back together in a physical model. The bone models are used for teaching purposes within our Animal Science department, as well as momento's for the students who built the model to keep. Highlights of SkAR so far has been tackling the challenge of debriding animal tissue in a way that is effective, sanitary, and reasonably fast. The beginning phase of the project involved the aid of a maceration tank with heated water to self decompose the tissue. These efforts were successful, but were deemed messy and time consuming. As a proposed alternative to the maceration tank, the program invested in flesh-eating beetles to feed off the tissue, which serve as a self sufficient population of decomposers. Other important highlights of this project are students conspiring as a group to articulate the bones correctly, while using appropriate support such as drills, wires, and glue. SkAR serves as a valuable opportunity for prospective veterinary students to learn animal anatomy in a way that is challenging, physical, and creative. It is anticipated that SkAR members will have a solid foundation and understanding of animal anatomy when they begin their journey as a graduate student.


Monitoring for anthelmintics resistance in horses using the modified McMaster egg-count technique

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Juan Castellanos, Cristina Olvera, James Ramirez, Roberto Ramirez.
Faculty Mentor: Cord Brundage.

Abstract: The modified McMaster egg count technique is a floatation technique used as a tool to keep quantitative record of Trichostrongyles-type eggs in horses. The modified McMaster allowed us to estimate the number of eggs per gram (epg) per fecal sample, giving us an idea of the scale of internal parasites within the horse. By incorporating the fecal egg reduction test, we were able to compare the numbers before application of anthelmintics and two weeks after to determine the effectiveness of the treatment. These records also allowed us to detect if any anthelmintic-resistance has built within the populations. Although after the application of anthelmintics the epg is largely decreased, the numbers began to increase after some time. By repeating this twice over the span of two quarters, we saw a drastic decrease in epg after application, followed by a gradual increase each week since the administration of the drugs. Although we were not able to determine if resistance has been built within the populations, we determined that these populations have the potential to become fully resistant. By further using the modified McMaster egg-counting technique, we will be able to keep record of these populations, and observe if resistance has formed.

Monitoring for anthelmintics resistance in horses using the modified McMaster egg-count technique

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Juan Castellanos, Cristina Olvera, James Ramirez, Roberto Ramirez.
Faculty Mentor: Cord Brundage.

Abstract: The modified McMaster egg count technique is a floatation technique used as a tool to keep quantitative record of Trichostrongyles-type eggs in horses. The modified McMaster allowed us to estimate the number of eggs per gram (epg) per fecal sample, giving us an idea of the scale of internal parasites within the horse. By incorporating the fecal egg reduction test, we were able to compare the numbers before application of anthelmintics and two weeks after to determine the effectiveness of the treatment. These records also allowed us to detect if any anthelmintic-resistance has built within the populations. Although after the application of anthelmintics the epg is largely decreased, the numbers began to increase after some time. By repeating this twice over the span of two quarters, we saw a drastic decrease in epg after application, followed by a gradual increase each week since the administration of the drugs. Although we were not able to determine if resistance has been built within the populations, we determined that these populations have the potential to become fully resistant. By further using the modified McMaster egg-counting technique, we will be able to keep record of these populations, and observe if resistance has formed.

3D printing Graphene-Enhanced Li-ion battery and Graphene supercapacitors

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:15 - 1:30
Location: 9-307

Authors: Matthew Tisbe, Nicholas Ferguson, Amanda Ramos, Jeffrey Lee, Calvin Nguyen, Ben Cheng, Alfredo Collazo, Alexander Lau, Jose Lopez, Alexander Botello, Albert Armienta.
Faculty Mentor: Zhen Yu.

Abstract: Batteries are power storage devices that provide their stored power to connected electronics. Li-ion batteries are a widely used battery type due to their high energy density and ability to recharge. These properties make them well suited for portable electronic devices at the expense of taking the majority weight and volume of the device. The use of a liquid electrolyte also limits the recharging speed and operating temperature. Switching to a solid electrolyte yields enhanced environmental safety and higher energy density, thus a smaller volume needed for portable applications. Our research focuses on the ease of production of such batteries through the development of a superior solid electrolyte, and the robustness of 3D printing and robotic assembly.

Design of a small-scale inflatable Martian entry vehicle for Prandtl-M

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:45 - 2:00
Location: 9-333

Authors: Nguyen Pham, Adam Charron, Jessica Ortiz, Alexander Rey, Andrew Tibbels.
Faculty Mentor: Navid Nakhjiri.

Abstract: With the prospect of a manned mission to Mars within the next decade, NASA has developed missions and projects to pave the way. The Prandtl-M, developed by NASA Armstrong, is a fully autonomous UAV that is meant to aerially survey the Martian surface. Blue Ares' mission is to safely take the Prandtl-M, packed in a 3U CubeSat, through the hypersonic atmospheric entry and deploy the aircraft at its operational altitude. Additionally, the challenge is to fit this delivery system into the confined space of a 12U CubeSat-which requires Blue Ares to be flexible and compact in addition to providing adequate thermal protection. Inspired by NASA Langley's Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) Project, Blue Ares uses an inflatable aeroshell to protect the payload through the violent conditions of atmospheric entry. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) was implemented to numerically analyze the vehicle's aerodynamic characteristics. Along with referenced data from the Phoenix Lander mission, CFD data was used in MATLAB to design a landing trajectory for the vehicle. ANSYS Workbench was used exclusively to analyze and simulate the aero-thermal behavior of the vehicle through the different stages of flight. The inflatable mechanism design, which includes material selection, folding configuration, and inflating method, was performed separately and later incorporated into the system. The outcome of this research is a vehicle that is capable of protecting the payload from atmospheric heating and aerodynamically slow down the vehicle to its desired altitude and velocity.

Las dos caras de la moneda (The two sides of the coin)

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:30 - 1:45
Location: 15-1802

Authors: Erica Reyes.
Faculty Mentor: Kent Dixon and Dr. Stella Manley.

Abstract: Las dos caras de la moneda (The two sides of the coin) In 1982 Rigoberta Menchú narrated her testimonial biography, "Me llamo Rigoberta Menchú y así me nació la conciencia" (My Name is Rigoberta Menchú and This is How my Conscience was Born) to Elizabeth Burgos. There, Menchú revealed the injustices and hardships that indigenous people had endured vis a vis gubernamental racial and class oppression. Menchú's was raised in Quiche, Guatemala, as a peasant woman Mayan descent. The publication raised international awareness and in 1992 Menchú was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. This essay analyzes Menchú's childhood, her adolescent years and the social repression by the "Ladinos" (men spoke Spanish but do not live in the community anymore) taking place in her community. Critics such as David Stoll and Kay Warren, have questioned the intensive participation of Vicente Menchú (Rigoberta's father) in the Committee for Peasant Unity (CUC), and most precisely how Rigoberta survived the massive "ethnic cleansing." An ethnic cleansing refers to a government's campaign against Mayas, radicalized Catholics or antidictatorial democrats. My paper would, therefore, focus on issues concerning the mediation of Rigoberta's voice through editorial, and copy-editing processes that ultimately open a question about the very notion of authorship.

Crossdressing and Classdressing in As You Like It

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:00 - 12:15
Location: 15-2913

Authors: Amanda Riggle.
Faculty Mentor: Brian Stone.

Abstract: As You Like It, on the surface, is a play about love bonds: from familial bonds between brothers or cousins, to the bonds of parent to child, to the bonds of marriage. The bond between the female characters Rosalind and Celia drives the plot in As You Like It. These two royal women also experience a drop in social and perceived economic status when Rosalind, accompanied by her cousin Celia, dresses as commoners to flee her uncle's court. In addition to this shift in position, Rosalind also shifts genders and presents herself as male while in hiding. As You Like It jumps from court to forest, from noblemen to commoners, and from conflict to resolution dependent upon the location which also adds to the potential for a Jamesonian analysis.

Apparatus for the Characterizing of Gecko-Like Adhesive Specimens

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Arden Le, Natasha Beltran, Casandra Rivera-Fernandez, Nathan Doi, Jonathan Carranza.
Faculty Mentor: Jonathan Puthoff.

Abstract: Geckos adhere to surfaces across an array of microscopic hairs on their toes, and the adhesion forces between those hairs and the surface are based on Van der Waals' interactions. Scientists and engineers wish to produce materials that have gecko-like fibers that mimic the adhesive and non-contaminating properties of the natural material. In order to qualify how well these gecko-like adhesives perform, we need ways of measuring the tribological forces, such as adhesion and friction force. Measuring these forces will assist in identifying the relevant structural and materials variables that influence their performance. We developed a custom-built test platform that allows us to measure frictional forces produced by gecko-like materials. Our experimental setup includes a linear actuator, a force sensor, and is instrumented using LabView software. The sliding motion of an adhesive specimen against a glass substrate is initiated by the actuator to produce a frictional force. During an experiment, we can vary the sliding speed and normal forces applied to the specimen to influence the amount of adhesion generated by the specimen. We characterized the performance of the instrument using materials with known frictional properties; these results provide a baseline for the analysis of future experiments.

Reading with Therapy Dogs

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:30 - 1:45
Location: 15-1808

Authors: Tania Roa.
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Aubrey Fine.

Abstract: Animal-assisted interventions have recently been studied in an educational setting. They have recently shown to be beneficial to children- specifically children learning how to read. There are many reading dog programs that are created in order to provide children comfort during a difficult task which in this case is reading. The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether a reading dog program can help improve a child's reading speed, accuracy, and prosody. By observing a child read to a dog puppet, then to an actual dog, the difference in their reading level can be determined. This is determined by DIBELS- a measurement utilized by elementary school teachers in order to infer a child's reading level. It counts the amount of errors, and types of errors, a child makes during a reading session. This data will later be analyzed in order to compare how the child does when he/she is reading to a puppet versus when he/she is reading to a therapy dog. Our hypothesis is that the child will have fewer errors in reading when the live dog is present. The main factor that has led us to this prediction is the calming effect animals have on children. When the child feels less stress, it is assumed that they will be more able to focus on the task at hand.

Localized Corrosion Behavior of Titanium Alloys

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:45 - 2:00
Location: 9-209

Authors: Kevin Robles , Jacob Benoun.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: Titanium and its alloys have been used in numerous applications, ranging from aerospace to biomedical. The mechanical properties as well as excellent corrosion behavior of these alloys have made it an ideal choice for a broad range of applications including aerospace, naval, sports and implants. Previous research conducted by this group has indicated that the addition of small amounts of boron may have helped improve corrosion behavior and biocompatibility of different titanium alloys using bulk dc and ac methods. To further elucidate the effect of boron on the corrosion behavior of titanium systems, this study is focused on the deployment of localized techniques, e.g., using a scanning droplet cell, to analysis corrosion behavior in small areas across different regions of a corrosion test coupon. The materials to be studied in this manner would include boron-containing alloys of Ti-6Al-4V (Ti64; UNS R56400) and commercial purity titanium (CP Ti; UNS R50400). The test solutions will include simulated seawater, saline, etc. Localized open circuit, linear polarization and cyclic potentiodynamic polarization measurements will be used to determine the local corrosion potential, resistance to polarization and the onset of pitting corrosion. This will allow for the analysis of the formation of the passive film in these unique alloys. Surface profiling will be conducted using both contact and non-contact techniques to provide further insights into the material behavior in these solutions


Biofilm Formation on Novel Human Prosthetics Metal Alloys

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Jeyashree Alagarsamy, Cindy Toscano, Kevin Robles.
Faculty Mentor: Steve Alas.

Abstract: Solid biomaterials with characteristics, such as high biocompatibility or corrosion resistance, are now being implanted in the human body more frequently for a wide range of purposes. However, implant-related infection is generally the most common serious complication. When bacteria adhere to and proliferate on the biomaterial surface, the bacteria produce extracellular polymeric substances, primarily polysaccharides, which mediate cell-to-cell adhesion and form a biofilm. In our lab, the long-term goal is to extend the life of a prosthetic implant by identifying new metal alloys that are less susceptible to bacterial colonization. Using two major biofilm producing bacteria commonly found to colonize implants after surgery, Staphylococcus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we investigated the biocompatibility of novel metal alloys with regard to their susceptibility to biofilm propagation. The Experimental biometal alloys examined were stainless steel (SS), commercially pure titanium (CPTi), titanium alloy (Ti64) and dental grade titanium (Ty). Biofilm formation was analyzed using crystal violet staining and fluorescent microscopy. Ideal experimental conditions were obtained using flasks with 50mL TSB media for 48 hours at 37oC or using a biofilm reactor with 350mL TSB media, and allowing incubation for 72 hours at 37oC. Biofilm reactor experiments were performed with or without a constant infusion of growth media during biofilm formation. Results indicate that the Ty alloy permits less biofilm formation than SS, CPTi and the Ti64, by Staphylococcus epidermidis. Thus, the Ty alloy may be a better alternative to traditional metals, stainless steel and pure titanium, as a modern prosthetic biometal.

Corrosion Behavior of Metallic Alloys in a Molten Chloride Eutectic Salt for Nuclear Reactor Coolant

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:30 - 12:45
Location: 9-209

Authors: Dominic Dinh, Touba Shah, Peter Kang, Savannah Rodriguez.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: The rising demand for energy is creating an urgent need to develop an alternative method of energy production that is sustainable, cost-efficient and a clean alternative to traditional fossil fuel processes. Nuclear power is one option that has the potential to resolve these issues. Other alternative energy concepts such as solar energy and wind energy may seem promising, but the costs of operation and maintenance can cause these processes to be more expensive than nuclear in the long term. The coolant fluid in a nuclear reactor must possess certain qualities such as high volumetric heat capacity, high boiling point, low vapor pressure, resistance to radiation and thermodynamic stability. In recent years, there has been an increased shift from water to molten salts as the coolant for nuclear reactors. Despite the potential for increased corrosion rates in the containment vessel, molten salts minimize the risk of explosions because they do not to be pressurized. Fluoride salts are the preferred candidates for a coolant material but the associated expenses and safety hazards make them unattractive for prolonged utilization. A safer and more cost-effective alternative must be considered. Chloride salts fit this criteria but can be highly corrosive Therefore, careful consideration is required in the material selection process of the containment vessel. In this project, two stainless steels and one nickel-base alloy were tested at 700℃ using a DC electrochemical setup in a ternary molten salt eutectic salt. Linear polarization resistance and cyclic potentiodynamic polarization tests were performed to measure the corrosion behavior of the alloys. The post-test coupons were categorized with optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The viability of the chloride salt as a replacement for the coolant material will be discussed.

AugmentedRealms: The Next Generation of Tabletop Gaming

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Pasha Beglar, Jeffrey Schmitendorf, Flor Tonie Nguyen, Cindy Lin, Angelo Rodriguez, Jeremy Kleve, Liang Dong, Xinyuan Wang.
Faculty Mentor: Olukemi Sawyerr.

Abstract: Tabletop games such a Dungeons & Dragons allow players the ability to create a make belief world in which other players can be a part of. Tabletop games mainly depend on the players imagination, which is both its greatest feature and flaw. The frustration comes with not having shared vision for the word, so players typically buy figurines and maps. Our solution is an app that uses augmented reality to bring tabletop gaming to life. Players will be able to view the characters and maps of their story in a more interactive and immersive way. As players view the game from their phone camera, they will be able to see 3D trees, dragons, and their own personalized characters standing on the table, swaying and breathing as if they were in the room with them. Parties can be built to allow friends who are also playing the game to be able to see the same objects from their own distinct perspective. Not only do they have the option to choose through a selection of provided 3D models, but also be able to upload their own 3D models to view in the real world through their phone cameras.

E-STEM Laptop Liquid Cooling System

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Roberto Mendez, Bryan Lee, Zhixuan(Victor) Ding, Mostafa Vahidi, Arik Naylous, Amanali Rodriguez, Alec Valladares, Yang Lo.
Faculty Mentor: Olukemi Sawyerr.

Abstract: Our group will present a revolutionary laptop cooling pad which utilizes an all-new liquid-convection cooling technique as opposed to other similar products in the market which use inefficient fans to dispense the heat. Our product uses a conductive plate to transfer the heat from the bottom of a laptop through a plate which is exposed to channels of water on the other side. Heat is then carried from the conductive plate to the water by convection and then ultimately transferred to the fins of a radiator to be radiated into the atmosphere. The water used for cooling is circulated using a small pump which runs continuously. As a result, our new cooling technology is able to perform up to five times better than the traditional cooling pads available today.

Innovative Classroom Assessment

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:30 - 12:45
Location: 15-2907

Authors: Michael Ramirez, Laura Dasilva, Nguyen Nguyen, Cheyenne Romero.
Faculty Mentor: Faye Wachs.

Abstract: Mechanical Engineering is a rigorous yet popular major chosen by over 1000 students that attend Cal Poly Pomona. Fluid Mechanics (ME 311) is a core lecture within the Mechanical curriculum and is considered to be a bottleneck course within the department due to the high failure rate that the course produces. A study conducted by Taotao Long (2016) demonstrated that students had positive attitudes towards utilizing course videos before lecture in a flipped classroom environment (Long, 2016). After several quarters of designing a course model tailored to Fluid Mechanics at Cal Poly Pomona, an ideal classroom structure was created. In the academic quarters of Winter and Spring of 2017, the flipped classroom structure was implemented ideally to produce outcomes similar to other research-backed data that proved academic success for students using a web-based learning model. Grade point averages, socio-emotional variables, and focus group data were collected at the beginning and end of each quarter to assess any development from the participants. Results from both quarters demonstrated the effectiveness of a flipped classroom structure in the ME 311 course. In the experimental group (n=63) 11.1% of students earned a failing grade while 41.3% of students received an A. In contrast, 34.3% of students in the control group (n=64) earned a failing grade, while only 14.1% earned an A. t-tests also revealed that the socio-emotional variables and cognitive belief scale data suggested that students in the experimental group perceived the classroom as significantly more stimulating when compared to the control group.

Interplanetary CubeSat Solar Sail Mission

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:30 - 1:45
Location: 9-333

Authors: Holly Everson, Guadalupe Romero Bravo, Steven Jaworski, Sofiya Pascual, Riza Dayapera, Aerbwong Chitamitara, Suleman Jalal, Erica Arroyo, Justin Toney.
Faculty Mentor: Navid Nakhjiri.

Abstract: Studying CubeSats for space science missions has increased significantly in recent years. The use of a CubeSat will provide a spacecraft which is lighter, mechanically simpler, and with a fraction of the cost of a traditional space mission. Cal Poly Pomona Interplanetary CubeSat Solar Sail Mission (IPCS3M) is a multi-year research project studying the use of solar radiation pressure on a sail as an alternative method of propulsion for interplanetary CubeSat missions. With a 90 meters squared Mylar sail, the 6U CubeSat will travel to Saturn with the intended goal of dropping a 1U science payload into Saturn's northern hexagonal storm. The payload will enter the inner wall of the eye to gather data regarding storm patterns, chemical composition, and other factors. Additionally, the solar sail will provide the spacecraft with a free continuous thrust, increasing velocity throughout the mission timeline provided by the solar radiation pressure. Finite Element Analysis and Computer Aided Design (CAD) modeling were used to construct the spacecraft and allow for structural studies. In addition to computer model tests, physical tests have also been performed to research material properties, light reflectance, and boom creation. Successful solar sail implementation will give CubeSats a form of propulsion that will open up possibilities for more complex missions, most notably orbital maneuvering and interplanetary travel.

Apparatus for Measuring Efficiency of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Timothy Butch, Bassim Fakhro, Hannah Le, Kevin Sin, Carlos Rosete, Austin Hudson.
Faculty Mentor: Jonathan Puthoff.

Abstract: With the move toward renewable energy sources comes the necessity to validate the performance of next generation devices such as dye-sensitized solar cells. The issue with existing dye-sensitized solar cells is that it is difficult to measure their efficiency because of the relatively complicated nature of the devices. These complications include the presence of an electrolyte and dye based photoelectron generation. To address this problem we created an instrumented test platform for characterizing dye-sensitized solar cells in a simple circuit. Our platform includes a power supply/data acquisition module that can be controlled using custom software written in Laboratory Virtual Instrument Engineering Workbench (LabVIEW). With this instrumentation, numerous test variables can be controlled such as voltage step size and dwell time during a voltage sweep. The current versus voltage curves produced during an experiment can be analyzed to calculate cell efficiency. This efficiency data can be used to guide efforts to improve the manufacturing of dye-sensitized solar cells. This configuration will serve as a stepping stone for making solar power a more reliable energy resource by making its research more so uninhibited.

Design and Testing of an Iso-element Thermal Energy Storage System using Wastewater

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:15 - 2:30
Location: 9-269

Authors: Jessica Rule, James Zimmerman, Matthew Wong.
Faculty Mentor: Reza Lakeh.

Abstract: The United States Department of Energy launched the Sunshot Initiative with a goal of reducing the cost of solar energy by 75% to make it more competitive with other forms of energy. One of the ways to achieve this goal is to increase the efficiency of Concentrated Solar Power Plants (CSP's). Thermal Energy Storage can also play a key role in resolving the mismatch between power generation and consumption. Current CSP plants employ molten salts, mainly sodium nitrate, for thermal storage; however, molten salt plants have temperature limits of about 600 °C. Chloride salts are an attractive alternative for the state-of-the-art due to their low cost and thermal stability. Additionally, chloride salts promise to be substantially more economical if the source of the salt is wastewater. This presentation examines the results from testing the thermal stability of salt extracted from wastewater brine. In this study, thermal characteristics of an iso-element brine-based thermal energy storage system is explored at various high temperatures. Repurposing salt from brine, to store thermal energy, can potentially create a more economical and efficient thermal energy storage medium.

Triboelectrification

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:15 - 12:30
Location: 9-307

Authors: Erik Jensen, Maria Rullan.
Faculty Mentor: Keith Forward.

Abstract: Triboelectrification is the natural phenomena of the transfer of an electrostatic charge between two materials upon contact. This concept is seemingly simple, yet has left many debating over the factors affecting it, and how this charge is transferred. The goal of this experiment was to determine how environmental factors, such as humidity affect different materials and their triboelectric charge. The experimental system is a sealed incubator chamber to control for humidity, and air pressure. Inside the incubator is a downward coiled copper tube (1.5 mm in-diameter), that either contains nylon or teflon tubing, and is connected to a tin-metal Faraday cup. A single 500-800 micron sized particle of soda-lime glass or polystyrene is dropped into the top end of the coiled tube and the particle is allowed to rolls downward through the tubing accumulating charge before being deposited into the tin metal Faraday cup. The charge was measured and recorded within a period of time as the particle discharges. Measurements taken at a constant low relative humidity are compared to those of higher humidity. This was done by soaking the particles in water and evaporating until a desired relative humidity was reached. It is necessary to determine the humidity affect triboelectrification in insulated materials to better understand the possible benefit and hazards of this process.

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Onsite Wastewater Treatment System as a Living Laboratory

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:30 - 1:45
Location: 9-325

Authors: Paola Grano, Warjay Naigan, Martin Flores, Stephanie Osorio, Renz Soriano, Angela Truong, Gustavo Perez, Christopher Thomas, Carolyn Soy, Rima Sabih, Yasmin Proa.
Faculty Mentor: Monica Palomo.

Abstract: This project proposes the establishment of a living laboratory that will provide an on campus space that can be used for learning, innovation, and leisure of the campus community. This project proposes an expansion of the current Cal Poly Pomona water and energy infrastructure with an onsite (decentralized) wastewater treatment system. The system will increase the resiliency of the existing campus infrastructure by providing the opportunity to disconnect from the central wastewater and energy networks while maintaining the connection to the centralized utilities. The proposed project provides a unique opportunity for the Cal Poly Pomona campus to become a regional and national demonstration site where students, faculty, public agencies, private companies, and community members could have the opportunity to learn and conduct research on wastewater treatment processes, water treatment, and sustainable water reclamation practices. The key treatment process centers on a membrane bioreactor (MBR), which combines microfiltration with a biologically activated sludge process. The onsite system will treat sewage to groundwater recharge standards with potential uses for flushing, irrigation, decorative fountains and other non-potable water applications. The living laboratory will be located centrally on campus for user accessibility. The criteria for site selection further included: available square footage, site geology, elevation and grading, wastewater influent, hydrologic conditions, existing developments, and potential hazards, such as seismic activity, slope stability, liquefaction, and subsurface conditions. In conclusion, the living laboratory and its location will yield a high-quality and sustainable wastewater treatment facility where Cal Poly Pomona can showcase frontline wastewater reclamation practices.

Multilayer Plasmonic Structures in Terahertz Frequencies

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Bo Shrewsbury, Nolan Johnston, Ildar Salakhutdinov.
Faculty Mentor: Ertan Salik.

Abstract: Layered structures of alternating conducting materials and dielectric materials are creating plasmonic strcutures. These multilayer plasmonic structures have plasmonic modes with high effective refractive index. A material or structure with a high effective refractive index has great use in sensing because any change in the effective refractive index is easily detectable. This phenomenon can have many applications in a variety of fields, but is specifically important for biomedical sensing applications. However, the optimal frequency range for some biomedical sensing applications would be in the terahertz range due to the human body's natural emissions and reflections in other ranges. Gold would typically be used as the conducting material for many other frequency ranges like visible light or IR, but gold will not function optimally in Thz range. Therefore, we had to find materials that could operate as a conducting material in the terahertz range. Indium antimonide (InSb) and Lead telluride (PbTe) are promising materials in for THz plasmonic applications but they properties are not studued properly yet. We chose to work with InSb since it has satisfactory values for its complex permittivity in the terahertz range. With a working material, the multilayer plasmonic waveguide was tested using FEM simulations. We analyzed the mode(s) found in these plasmonic structures and the effective refractive index of the mode(s) for use in biomedical sensing applications.

An Exploration of Marketing Strategies for University Conference Centers: A Delphi Approach

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Madeline Samuel.
Faculty Mentor: Wan Yang.

Abstract: The meeting and events industry is becoming an increasingly competitive and significant market in hospitality today. More specifically, the use of conference services on university campuses has seen a growth in recent years. By focusing on three universities located in Southern California, the objective of this study is to explore the innovative practices, tools, and strategies that sales and marketing teams must utilize in order to attract potential clients. The tools and strategies used by professionals working in university conference services will be examined through the use of the Delphi Method.

How do primary systems affect electoral outcomes?

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:15 - 12:30
Location: 15-1828

Authors: Esteven Sanchez.
Faculty Mentor: Mario Guerrero.

Abstract: The primary system in the United States plays a significant role on the types of candidates elected in a non-presidential election. This thesis argues that primary systems promote political change that results in the change of how voters behave. This paper will examine the open, closed, and top-two primary systems. Scholars have examined these three primary systems; arguing that the closed primary system leads to more partisanship between candidates; polarization in certain areas; and the promotion of political elites from both parties. Scholars argue that the open primary system promotes better representation and limits partisanship and polarization, while the top-two system promotes more moderates into office and greater competition. This paper identifies the real impact that primary systems have on electoral outcomes from different states; each with their own significant primary system.

Changing Participation: A closer look at DACA students and their peers on college campuses

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:30 - 2:45
Location: 15-2907

Authors: Ivan Sanchez.
Faculty Mentor: Mario Guerrero.

Abstract: DACA is a nationwide program aimed at creating protections for children of immigrants who themselves were brought to the United States at a young age. DACA is under intense public scrutiny after Congress looks to protect "Dreamers" as the program is set to expire in March 2018. DACA and Hispanic college students will be severely impacted by changing the way they participate in politics, by not engaging and participating in local, state, and national politics and elections. Due to the uncertainty of many programs which allow these students to continue studying or their families to be in the United States, political participation is essential for their voices to be heard and for changes to occur. This project uses surveys of Cal Poly Pomona and nearby college campuses to assess age and levels of participation of current college students amid conversations about the DACA program. The results ultimately show that younger students participate less than their older classmates.

Development and Execution of a Veterinary Medical Massage Training Workshop

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Susanna Glore, Brianna Kelley, Emily Sanchez.
Faculty Mentor: Cord Brundage.

Abstract: Medical massage, therapeutic touch and acupressure are techniques used to help relieve tension, support circulation and treat soreness. These use can be as beneficial in veterinary medicine as they are in human medicine. There is however, less awareness of medical massage applications and techniques in veterinary medicine. Our goal was to develop a workshop where we could introduce people to medical massage and instruct them on the proper methods that can be used in pets. We reviewed literature and created an instruction guide and presentation. We piloted the workshop with a group of Cal Poly Pomona students and conducted surveys to help us refine the demonstrations/presentations. This information was used to create a program for us to outreach to community members and teach them how to strengthen the human-animal bond and support their own pet's wellness through medical massage.

La monja alférez: El travestismo en el Siglo de Oro (The Lieutenant Nun-Transvestism in the Early Modern World)

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:45 - 2:00
Location: 15-1802

Authors: Lizeth Sandoval.
Faculty Mentor: Marta Albalá Pelegrín.

Abstract: Transvestism has long been a topic of controversy and disagreement. During the 17th century, cross-dressing for women was one of the few options to escape from the patriarchal system. In this essay, I will analyze the live of one of the most famous transvestites in the Early Modern Transatlantic World, Catalina de Erauso (1592-1650), commonly known as ¨the Lieutenant Nun.¨ In her autobiography, she recalls how at the age of fifteen, she escaped from a convent leaving behind her social status. Her only option to not getting married was to dress as a man and to continuously change her male identity. Living as Francisco de Loyola, Alonso Díaz Ramírez de Guzmán or Antonio de Erauso he worked as a court servant, a sailor, a merchant and a soldier. Towards the end of her life, she confessed to the pope her real sexual identity. He allowed her to continue dressing as a man. Catalina also received a military pension for her military service. However, there were other women that dressed as men during the Spanish Golden Age whose experience were different to that of Catalina´s. They were discriminated, endured lashes and/or locked in a hospital were it was mandatory to dress as women. My paper compares and analyzes the performance of transvestism in the live of Catalina de Erauso, the Queen of Sweden(Cristina), and Elena de Céspedes who was a hermaphrodite, taking in consideration the critical works of Sherry Velasco, Veronica Buckley, Raúl Carrillo Esper and Vern L. Bullough.

Improvement of Puffer Jacket Insulation that Retains Body Heat

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Hayli Mair, David Nguyen, Nicole Sanford, Araya Treadway.
Faculty Mentor: Jiangning Che.

Abstract: A jacket is comprised of three layers; shell, insulation, and lining. The shell is the outer layer and is the fabric the consumers see the most. While insulation is known as the fibers between the outer and inner layer that retains heat. The inner layer is the lining that conceals the insulation and provides a neat finish. Insulated jackets come in all weights, styles and are filled with different material in hopes of providing optimal warmth in cold environments. Some of the issues with thicker jackets is that it tends to have less mobility, and added bulkiness that makes it difficult to carry around or wear. There are opportunities for improvement with the ability of jackets to retain heat, comfort, weight, and mobility by changing types of insulation and design. By implementing these changes, a jacket can be thin and lightweight while still fulfilling its purpose. The purpose of this research is to improve puffer jackets by offering a thinner and lighter insulation option while still retaining thermal heat. By applying certified test methods by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), we will conduct tests on three different insulations in comparison to the insulation found in a manufactured jacket. By using The Technique for Order of Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS) and Analytic Hierarchy Process(AHP), we can make multi-criteria decisions. Our goal is to enhance thermal comfort, mobility and reduce weight with quantitative research.

Effect of Inclination Angle on the Performance of an Isochoric and Elemental Thermal Energy Storage Tube

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:30 - 2:45
Location: 9-269

Authors: Kevin Liu, Jego Santos.
Faculty Mentor: Reza Lakeh.

Abstract: Most renewable energy sources, e.g., Concentrated Solar Power (CSP), are intermittent in power generation, having supply periods that are not synchronous with power demand. Thermal energy storage (TES) can be integrated with CSP plants to improve system response and availability. This paper investigates the charging behavior of sulfur when used as a TES medium in various containment orientations. Sulfur was incorporated as the TES medium due to its stability, low cost, and high energy density. A commercially available computational fluid analysis (CFD) package (ANSYS/FLUENT) was used to analyze a three-dimensional tubular containment model in different orientations. The model was configured as a transient, sensible TES system operating from 200 to 400°C, corresponding to the initial sulfur temperature and to the heated storage wall temperature. The properties of sulfur were incorporated into the CFD software to simulate buoyancy-driven convective flow inside the storage tube under different inclinations. Analysis of the CFD results determined that sulfur is a valid TES candidate with good thermal performance.

HORIZONTAL DIRECTIONAL DRILLING: A PARAMETRIC STUDY OF STRESS CHANGES IN SOIL AND A FOOTING USING FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS SOFTWAR

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:30 - 1:45
Location: 9-269

Authors: Jose Zuniga, Charles Sargent.
Faculty Mentor: Jinsung Cho.

Abstract: Horizontal directional drilling (HDD) is a trenchless tunneling technology that is becoming increasingly popular especially for installing utility. However, this technology was developed somewhat recently in the 1970s, and it still makes up a relatively small percentage of pipe installations. Because of this, we may still be able to make significant improvements on the various standards and guidelines associated with HDD. This research examines the change in stress in the soil and a footing above an HDD installation depending on the the clearance, diameter, and if the pipe material is PVC, HDPE, steel, or DIP. The goal of this research is to better understand these stress patterns, allowing for more precise codes andguidelines,andthus more efficient and competitive designs and bids.

Improving Plant Resistant to Powdery Mildew Disease

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:00 - 12:15
Location: 9-335

Authors: Stephanie Mora Garcia, Ryan Schiefelbein, Paul Larsen.
Faculty Mentor: Gregory Barding.

Abstract: Powdery mildew disease is a fungal infection which can have negative effects on crop growth. There is evidence that a bio-signaling molecule is present in our model plant, A. thaliana, that results in an increase of powdery mildew disease. By utilizing various separation techniques, a method for isolation and identification of the molecule is underway. Plant extracts containing the metabolite are prepared using C18 solid phase extraction (SPE) followed by weak anion exchange (WAX) SPE and tested with a bioassay. The initial results suggest that the molecule in question is highly polar and anionic. To further isolate the molecule, a high performance liquid chromatograph is being utilized for fractionation. Due to the nature of the metabolite, the method being used on the liquid chromatograph is hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC). The buffer system that elutes the metabolite from the column has been identified along with the parameters in which the separation of the metabolite from other constituents is successful. The effectiveness of our fractionation is determined by the same bioassay. As our method for isolation improves, high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is used to assist in the identification of the molecule. Isolating and identifying the metabolite will provide valuable information regarding the biological mechanism of the resistance to the fungal disease and possible applications to the broader agricultural community.

AugmentedRealms: The Next Generation of Tabletop Gaming

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Pasha Beglar, Jeffrey Schmitendorf, Flor Tonie Nguyen, Cindy Lin, Angelo Rodriguez, Jeremy Kleve, Liang Dong, Xinyuan Wang.
Faculty Mentor: Olukemi Sawyerr.

Abstract: Tabletop games such a Dungeons & Dragons allow players the ability to create a make belief world in which other players can be a part of. Tabletop games mainly depend on the players imagination, which is both its greatest feature and flaw. The frustration comes with not having shared vision for the word, so players typically buy figurines and maps. Our solution is an app that uses augmented reality to bring tabletop gaming to life. Players will be able to view the characters and maps of their story in a more interactive and immersive way. As players view the game from their phone camera, they will be able to see 3D trees, dragons, and their own personalized characters standing on the table, swaying and breathing as if they were in the room with them. Parties can be built to allow friends who are also playing the game to be able to see the same objects from their own distinct perspective. Not only do they have the option to choose through a selection of provided 3D models, but also be able to upload their own 3D models to view in the real world through their phone cameras.

Quantification of trace fermentation products by 2D NMR

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:15 - 2:30
Location: 9-333

Authors: Liliana Cahuas, Michael Tran, Erica Hummel, Ana Cortes, Jacqueline Scott.
Faculty Mentor: Gregory Barding and Dr. Wei-Jen Lin.

Abstract: Biofuel development is a topic of high interest. Butanol, a promising alternative and direct substitute for gasoline powered engines, is naturally produced in relatively large quantities by bacteria that undergo ABE fermentation. To maximize butanol production, understanding the basic biochemistry of the underlying pathways is important and quantifying the biochemically related products can lead to the development of alternative biofuel sources. Quantification is complicated by the similarities of the targeted compounds, with several resonances overlapping. Using 2D NMR, which decreases convolution by spreading chemical information out in two dimensions, we can overcome the signal overlap. While 2D NMR is commonly used qualitatively for spectral assignments, our goal is to develop a 2D NMR method for the trace detection of butanol and related metabolites. To explore the quantitative nature of 2D NMR and quantify butanol and butyric acid, 1H-NMR and 2D TOCSY NMR methods were carried out on a buffered standard solution with three different pH values; 4.75, 7.00, and 8.5. As expected, the 1D analysis found the actual and expected concentrations to be similar. However, the results from the 2D experiments were not consistent with the actual concentrations. The analytes were also measured using an external calibration curve, with concentrations of 1, 4, 8, and 10 mM. The results indicate that while the 2D methods are not amenable to the traditional quantitation approaches by NMR, quantitation can be carried out if a calibration curve is applied.

Corrosion Behavior of Metallic Alloys in a Molten Chloride Eutectic Salt for Nuclear Reactor Coolant

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:30 - 12:45
Location: 9-209

Authors: Dominic Dinh, Touba Shah, Peter Kang, Savannah Rodriguez.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: The rising demand for energy is creating an urgent need to develop an alternative method of energy production that is sustainable, cost-efficient and a clean alternative to traditional fossil fuel processes. Nuclear power is one option that has the potential to resolve these issues. Other alternative energy concepts such as solar energy and wind energy may seem promising, but the costs of operation and maintenance can cause these processes to be more expensive than nuclear in the long term. The coolant fluid in a nuclear reactor must possess certain qualities such as high volumetric heat capacity, high boiling point, low vapor pressure, resistance to radiation and thermodynamic stability. In recent years, there has been an increased shift from water to molten salts as the coolant for nuclear reactors. Despite the potential for increased corrosion rates in the containment vessel, molten salts minimize the risk of explosions because they do not to be pressurized. Fluoride salts are the preferred candidates for a coolant material but the associated expenses and safety hazards make them unattractive for prolonged utilization. A safer and more cost-effective alternative must be considered. Chloride salts fit this criteria but can be highly corrosive Therefore, careful consideration is required in the material selection process of the containment vessel. In this project, two stainless steels and one nickel-base alloy were tested at 700℃ using a DC electrochemical setup in a ternary molten salt eutectic salt. Linear polarization resistance and cyclic potentiodynamic polarization tests were performed to measure the corrosion behavior of the alloys. The post-test coupons were categorized with optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The viability of the chloride salt as a replacement for the coolant material will be discussed.

Autonomous Collision Avoidance of UAVs With ADS-B Transponders

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:45 - 3:00
Location: 9-325

Authors: Tristan Sherman, Mitchell Caudle, Hana Haideri, Jimmy Lopez.
Faculty Mentor: Subodh Bhandari.

Abstract: If UAVs are to be successfully integrated into U.S. national airspace, the ability to perform autonomous collision avoidance between both manned and unmanned aircraft is a necessity. This poster presents a method for collision avoidance utilizing Automatic Dependent Surveillance - Broadcast (ADS-B) transponders which will be required in all manned aircraft by 2020. These devices broadcast and receive global position of all similarly equipped aircraft in a 100-nautical mile vicinity. A Sig Kadet Senior and a Hangar 9 Valiant fixed wing aircraft are used as flight platforms to test autonomous collision avoidance. These aircraft will include ADS-B transponders, a Pixhawk autopilot and an Intel NUC as the primary components of the avionics system. The uniquely developed algorithm is compiled in a Linux environment and uses MAVLink protocols to send off-board commands to the autopilot. The collision avoidance algorithm uses kinematic and circular motion equations to predict the future positions of both aircraft and employ an avoidance maneuver at a constant altitude. This system is demonstrated through simple ground tests, and subsequently moving on to full-system flight tests.

Multilayer Plasmonic Structures in Terahertz Frequencies

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Bo Shrewsbury, Nolan Johnston, Ildar Salakhutdinov.
Faculty Mentor: Ertan Salik.

Abstract: Layered structures of alternating conducting materials and dielectric materials are creating plasmonic strcutures. These multilayer plasmonic structures have plasmonic modes with high effective refractive index. A material or structure with a high effective refractive index has great use in sensing because any change in the effective refractive index is easily detectable. This phenomenon can have many applications in a variety of fields, but is specifically important for biomedical sensing applications. However, the optimal frequency range for some biomedical sensing applications would be in the terahertz range due to the human body's natural emissions and reflections in other ranges. Gold would typically be used as the conducting material for many other frequency ranges like visible light or IR, but gold will not function optimally in Thz range. Therefore, we had to find materials that could operate as a conducting material in the terahertz range. Indium antimonide (InSb) and Lead telluride (PbTe) are promising materials in for THz plasmonic applications but they properties are not studued properly yet. We chose to work with InSb since it has satisfactory values for its complex permittivity in the terahertz range. With a working material, the multilayer plasmonic waveguide was tested using FEM simulations. We analyzed the mode(s) found in these plasmonic structures and the effective refractive index of the mode(s) for use in biomedical sensing applications.

Incorporating Sustainable Tourism for the Olympic Games

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Monica Louise Siasoco.
Faculty Mentor: Wan Yang.

Abstract: Mega events are known to waste a large amount of natural resources and negatively impact their natural and socio-cultural environment after the event (Dolles & Söderman, 2010). Host cities of upcoming Olympic Games create large sport stadiums and lodging accommodations for their mega event within seven years of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) approving their bid. Host cities consider sustainability as an afterthought compared to cost and time needed to build the structure (Steinbrink, 2013). When the Games are over, these stadiums and hotels are abandoned because the host communities have no use for them. In order to mitigate this problem, the IOC has released sustainable initiatives that host cities can apply into the construction of their Games ("Factsheet: The Environment and Sustainable Development", 2014). How can host cities incorporate sustainable tourism into the planning of the Olympic Games so that their communities can benefit after the Games? What are strategies that host cities can use to build environmentally friendly structures that will reduce waste and ultimately benefit the host community after the Games? This conceptual paper will review the sustainable strategies that the host cities from the past ten years have utilized to create their Olympic communities.This project aims to create a model of the major sustainable tourism strategies that can be implemented into future Olympic Games. This plan can help developing countries that hope to organize a mega event and transform their community into a sustainable tourism destination.

Differences in efficacy of fluconazole and liposomal amphotericin B in diabetic and non-diabetic mice infected with an azole resistant or sensitive Candida albicans strain

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:45 - 2:00
Location: 9-283

Authors: Shirleen Simargi.
Faculty Mentor: Jill Adler-Moore.

Abstract: Background: Diabetes compromises immune and metabolic pathways, which can lead to increased susceptibility to infection. To examine this, we tested diabetic versus non-diabetic mice infected with a Candida albicans azole sensitive(C.alb-S) or azole resistant(C.alb-R) strain. Methods: Mice (3-4wks old) were fed a high (60%) fat diet for 4 wks. Diabetes was then induced by intraperitoneal nicotinamide (60 mg/kg) and streptozotocin (100 mg/kg); by d7-14 blood glucose levels were ≥200mg/dl. All mice were challenged intravenously with C.alb-R or C.alb-S and 24h later, given 5 mg/kg AmBi or 5% dextrose (D5W) intravenously, or Fluconazole (Flu) 40 mg/kg PO 2X/day for 6 days. Tissues were collected d4-7 post-challenge, and cultured for fungal burden while other mice were monitored for morbidity to d28. Results: In C.alb-R infection, AmBi, non-diabetic and diabetic mice, had significantly better survival and decreased kidney fungal burden than Flu or D5W (p≤0.01); no fungi were recovered in livers or spleens with AmBi. With C.alb-S infection, AmBi or Flu, non-diabetic mice had 80-100% survival while in diabetic mice, survival was 100% for AmBi and only 16% for Flu (p≤ 0.002). Fungal burden was significantly lower with AmBi versus Flu or D5W (p≤ 0.008). Conclusions: AmBi and Flu were effective in treating non-diabetic, C. alb-S infected mice; AmBi was effective in treating non-diabetic and diabetic mice infected with C. alb-S or C. alb-R. In diabetic mice with C. alb-S, Flu produced poor survival and elevated fungal burden, indicating that diabetes enhanced susceptibility to candidiasis caused by C. alb-S or C. alb-R strain.

Fabrication of Gecko-like Adhesive

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Rohan Galotra, William Bestian, Wendy Ching, Kevin Lam, Hieu Nguyen, Muhammad Ikram.
Faculty Mentor: Jonathan Puthoff.

Abstract: Microsphere lithography is a process that involves the use of microparticles to create regular patterns with feature sizes at the microscale. This technique is applicable to the fabrication of Gecko adhesives because of the nature of the adhesive itself which operates on a microscopic scale. In order to replicate such minuscule fibers, microsphere lithography is used to create a template for the fibers that are then filled in with a liquid polymer. We developed techniques for suspending the microspheres on the surface of water and then extracting a submerged silicon wafer to produce a uniform coating of microspheres across the silicon wafer surface. The suspension of the particles was carried out using 2 methods: The first consisted of a suspension across the full area of the petri dish. This maximized the amount of usable area across which samples could be coated. The second method consisted of suspension over a limited region of the petri dish. This left space for the insertion of a syringe to extract water under the microsphere layer. The coating of the microspheres on the silicon wafer was conducted using 2 distinct methods. The float-transfer method is the more traditional technique that involves pulling silicon slides up through a layer of suspended microspheres. The second method involves withdrawing the water around the slides in order to bring the layer of microspheres to the surface of the silicon wafers. We determined that the combination of the limited-area microsphere suspension with the withdrawal method resulted in better microsphere coatings.

"Where Do I Belong, Here or Where You Are?": A Postcolonial Feminist Reading of "Wide Sargasso Sea" and "Corpse Song"

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:30 - 1:45
Location: 15-2913

Authors: Parveena Singh, Devon Mier.
Faculty Mentor: Alison Baker.

Abstract: This paper discusses how opposing forces in power, race, and social status can displace the identity of an ethnic woman which is present in Jeans Rhys' Wide Sargasso Sea and Margaret Atwood's "Corpse Song." Through the application of a Postcolonial Feminist lens, the paper explores how both texts incorporate concepts multiple such as "double colonization" and "othering" in order to reinforce the economic, social, and psychological oppression of the two female protagonists. The paper also discusses the presence of multiple identities and how they can lead to either the displacement of a woman's identity or the reclaiming of it. The presence of identities is further explored through the negative effects of postcolonialism and the patriarchy. The two texts utilize a disruptive narrative style in order to represent the resistance against the Eurocentric and phallocentric ideas that traditional literature is usually defined by.

Evaluation of Surface Modified Stainless Steels and Titanium for Fuel Cells

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:45 - 1:00
Location: 9-307

Authors: Shehab Bassiouni, Sean Vinik, Fiona Follett, Brooke Singleton.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: The concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has steadily increased since the industrial revolution. The past few years have seen an alarming rise in the rate of carbon dioxide emissions with deleterious consequences on a global scale. Efforts to achieve a cleaner, more sustainable environment need to be accelerated. Replacing fossil-fuel burning vehicles with electrochemically powered vehicles can greatly mitigate the emissions of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. The proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell is an excellent solution due to its low operating temperatures and high efficiency. Despite technological improvements, proton exchange membrane fuel cell-powered vehicles are not commercially competitive with internal combustion engine vehicles. In this study, we aim to reduce fuel cell costs and improve their durability by substrate selection and surface modification of a crucial component - separator plates. Currently, graphite is used as the endplates of the fuel cell stack. Graphite offers excellent corrosion resistance; however, its porous nature makes it difficult to shape into thin sheets and its brittleness makes it unsuitable for transportation applications. In addition, the cost in manufacturing graphite causes the separator plates to account for 60% of the fuel cell cost. In order to allow PEM fuel cells to be more commercially available, a cost effective material should be selected to use as a bipolar plate. Current targets goals for a bipolar plate require materials to have desirable mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, high electrical conductivity, and low density. In this study, UNS S41000 stainless steels and UNS R50400 titanium were selected as possible candidate materials due to their high electrical conductivity, ductility and low cost. The surfaces of the selected materials were surface modified using two approaches: (a) coating with graphene and (b) gas phase nitridation. As-received and surface modified test coupons were subjected to electrochemical tests that were conducted under simulated PEMFC environments, i.e., 70℃ in 0.01 M sulfuric acid solution in a three-electrode flat cell. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and optical microscopy were used to characterize the test coupons. The effectiveness of the surface modification will be discussed and an optimal path forward will be outlined.

Vaccination with a Liposomal Vaccine Containing Aspergillus Proteins Protects Mice Against Pulmonary Aspergillosis Caused By Azole Resistant Strains of Aspergillus fumigatus'

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:45 - 2:00
Location: 9-243

Authors: Matthew Slarve.
Faculty Mentor: Jill Adler-Moore.

Abstract: Background: Pulmonary aspergillosis is a life-threatening infection of immunocompromised individuals, frequently caused by strains of Aspergillus fumigatus. Antifungal drug treatment with liposomal amphotericin B (AmBisome) or azoles, such as Voriconazole, is helpful but survival is still only 50% even with antifungal drug treatment. To add to the problem, there are increasing reports of strains of A. fumigatus being resistant to azoles. We have been developing a prophylactic liposomal Aspergillus vaccine (VesiVax, Molecular Express Inc.) to address this problem, testing it against azole resistant A . fumigatus strains, with or without subsequent AmBisome treatment. Methods: Mice were vaccinated d0 (subcutaneously) and d21 and d42 (intranasally), immunosuppressed with triamcinolone, and d56 challenged intranassaly with one of three A. fumigatus strains (V29, V45, V80), with or without additional 7.5mg/kg AmBisome IV treatment at 12h, 24h, 36h post-challenge. Controls were AmBisome alone or buffer. Mice were evaluated for morbidity to d80. Results: Unlike AmBisome alone, the vaccine alone was protective against V29 and V45 infections, and the vaccine plus AmBisome was protective against V29 and V80 infections, based on disease signs, weight loss and survival. Conclusion: Liposomal Aspergillus vaccination can be used alone or with AmBisome to further improve treatment outcome for pulmonary aspergillosis.

Onsite Wastewater Treatment System as a Living Laboratory

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:30 - 1:45
Location: 9-325

Authors: Paola Grano, Warjay Naigan, Martin Flores, Stephanie Osorio, Renz Soriano, Angela Truong, Gustavo Perez, Christopher Thomas, Carolyn Soy, Rima Sabih, Yasmin Proa.
Faculty Mentor: Monica Palomo.

Abstract: This project proposes the establishment of a living laboratory that will provide an on campus space that can be used for learning, innovation, and leisure of the campus community. This project proposes an expansion of the current Cal Poly Pomona water and energy infrastructure with an onsite (decentralized) wastewater treatment system. The system will increase the resiliency of the existing campus infrastructure by providing the opportunity to disconnect from the central wastewater and energy networks while maintaining the connection to the centralized utilities. The proposed project provides a unique opportunity for the Cal Poly Pomona campus to become a regional and national demonstration site where students, faculty, public agencies, private companies, and community members could have the opportunity to learn and conduct research on wastewater treatment processes, water treatment, and sustainable water reclamation practices. The key treatment process centers on a membrane bioreactor (MBR), which combines microfiltration with a biologically activated sludge process. The onsite system will treat sewage to groundwater recharge standards with potential uses for flushing, irrigation, decorative fountains and other non-potable water applications. The living laboratory will be located centrally on campus for user accessibility. The criteria for site selection further included: available square footage, site geology, elevation and grading, wastewater influent, hydrologic conditions, existing developments, and potential hazards, such as seismic activity, slope stability, liquefaction, and subsurface conditions. In conclusion, the living laboratory and its location will yield a high-quality and sustainable wastewater treatment facility where Cal Poly Pomona can showcase frontline wastewater reclamation practices.

Firearm Regulation & Violence Prevention in America

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:30 - 1:45
Location: 15-2907

Authors: Adrian Sosa.
Faculty Mentor: Mario Guerrero.

Abstract: Legislation that deals with issues of the firearm regulation, more commonly referred to as "gun control," is a heavily-debated topic throughout American societies and in American politics, with large support on both sides of the debate. Dispute over issues of firearm regulation are ongoing, however it is only in the wake of occurrences of large scale public violence, such as a mass shooting, that these issues are brought to the spotlight, only as long as the news media decides it is a relevant or interesting topic. When large scale incidents of gun violence occur such as the massacre at the Pulse nightclub in Orlando in June 2016 which resulted in the death of 49 people,(primarily homosexual men) a question that often comes up as part of the discussion of future deterrence of such tragedies is what our policy makers in local and state governments can do to prevent future tragedies. The physical safety of civilians should unquestionably be an important if not the primary concern of any established government. Aside from the factor of law enforcement which more often acts as a means of stopping violence that has already started rather than as a preventative force to preemptively reduce violence so it does not occur, the government provides protection for its citizens most effectively through laws passed that can carry undesirable punishments such as fines or jail time. Using this logic of how legislators can be most effective it makes sense that the literature analyzed revealed that the states with very loose regulations on firearms were among states with the highest rates of gun violence including homicide and suicide.

Onsite Wastewater Treatment System as a Living Laboratory

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:30 - 1:45
Location: 9-325

Authors: Paola Grano, Warjay Naigan, Martin Flores, Stephanie Osorio, Renz Soriano, Angela Truong, Gustavo Perez, Christopher Thomas, Carolyn Soy, Rima Sabih, Yasmin Proa.
Faculty Mentor: Monica Palomo.

Abstract: This project proposes the establishment of a living laboratory that will provide an on campus space that can be used for learning, innovation, and leisure of the campus community. This project proposes an expansion of the current Cal Poly Pomona water and energy infrastructure with an onsite (decentralized) wastewater treatment system. The system will increase the resiliency of the existing campus infrastructure by providing the opportunity to disconnect from the central wastewater and energy networks while maintaining the connection to the centralized utilities. The proposed project provides a unique opportunity for the Cal Poly Pomona campus to become a regional and national demonstration site where students, faculty, public agencies, private companies, and community members could have the opportunity to learn and conduct research on wastewater treatment processes, water treatment, and sustainable water reclamation practices. The key treatment process centers on a membrane bioreactor (MBR), which combines microfiltration with a biologically activated sludge process. The onsite system will treat sewage to groundwater recharge standards with potential uses for flushing, irrigation, decorative fountains and other non-potable water applications. The living laboratory will be located centrally on campus for user accessibility. The criteria for site selection further included: available square footage, site geology, elevation and grading, wastewater influent, hydrologic conditions, existing developments, and potential hazards, such as seismic activity, slope stability, liquefaction, and subsurface conditions. In conclusion, the living laboratory and its location will yield a high-quality and sustainable wastewater treatment facility where Cal Poly Pomona can showcase frontline wastewater reclamation practices.

Perpetuation of Belief Systems and Obedience through Imitation: Rhetorical Storytelling in the Book of Job

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:15 - 12:30
Location: 15-2913

Authors: Samantha St. Claire.
Faculty Mentor: Brian Stone.

Abstract: Christianity is the largest of the world religions, claiming about 2.2 billion followers, roughly 31% of the world's population. Believers argue that the worldwide success of this religion is due to the fact that it is the one true religion and has been helped on its way by the Holy Spirit's quickening power within unbelievers' hearts, especially since it somehow dominated the western world through word of mouth and letters which traveled as fast as the pre-Industrial age post could carry them. Others, including philosophers like Frederick Nietzsche, argue that such wide-spread persuasion stems from strong and effective rhetoric that creates a nation of servants. Many writings have been devoted to the rhetoric of the New Testament, especially since the apostle Paul himself was classically trained in the rhetoric of Plato and Aristotle, whose footprints he leaves in his letters to the church. However, not as much research has focused on the Jewish rhetoric of the Old Testament and, seeing as how the first Christians were Jewish, I want to explore the difference between the rhetoric used in the Old Testament and the New Testament. I will be analyzing the two major differences between these two Testaments - imitation and purpose - by focusing on the narrative structure of the Book of Job while applying various rhetorical theories of Plato, Aristotle, and Augustine.

Two Stage Wave Disk Engine

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Christopher Tait, Colby Stark, Bradley Thomas.
Faculty Mentor: Pejman Akbari.

Abstract: The Two-Stage Wave Disk Engine (TWDE) is a novel engine that has the potential for higher efficiency and power density of power-generation systems. The TWDE combines benefits of pressure-gain combustion of piston engines and full gas expansion of gas turbine engines. There are only two moving parts in the TWDE: the rotating disk functioning as a pressure-gain combustor and the turbine that produces torque which is converted into electricity or mechanical work.

Ternary complexes Through Maillard Conjugation of Sodium Caseinate, Dextran and Resveratrol to be used as emulsifiers

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:45 - 1:00
Location: 9-335

Authors: Benjamin Steiner.
Faculty Mentor: Gabriel Davidov Pardo.

Abstract: Ternary complexes of Maillard Conjugates (MC) comprised of proteins, polysaccharides and polyphenols can be used as emulsifiers to stabilize emulsions and prevent their oxidation. The objective was to investigate the effect of the molecular weight (MW) of dextran (polysaccharide) on the formation of MC with sodium caseinate (NaC) and the capacity of the MC to bind resveratrol and stabilize nanoemulsions. To form the MC, samples containing NaC and dextran 12, 40, and 250 kDa were submitted to dry heat. Conjugation efficiency (CE) and conjugation yield (CY) were measured to determine the optimal dextran molecular weight as well as conjugation time. Polyphenol-binding capacity and antioxidant activity were also measured to determine the impact of adding resveratrol (polyphenol) to the MC. NaC with dextran 12 and 40 kDa yielded the greatest CE. CY after 24 h was 100% for both 12 and 40 kDa dextrans. Dextran 40 kDa was selected to test the stabilization of nanoemulsions and the polyphenol-binding capacity. The diameter of the nanoemulsions formed with the MC at the Isoelectric point remained monomodal at 134±0.015 nm, while the diameter of the nanoemulsion made with the non-conjugated protein completely destabilized. The addition of up to 500 µm/mL of resveratrol showed a polyphenol-binding capacity of 100%, which showed greater antioxidant activity than the MC alone. MC and resveratrol form stable complexes that can be used to physically stabilized nanoemulsions to deliver hydrophobic compounds sensitive to oxidation.

Cobalt Nitrosyl complexes with Bidentate N-heterocyclic Carbene Ligands

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:15 - 1:30
Location: 9-335

Authors: Jonathan Stoffel.
Faculty Mentor: Chantal Stieber.

Abstract: With the increase in greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide (CO2) remediation is oftentimes the focus, however, lesser known pollutants such as nitrogen oxides (NOx) pose a similar threat. While biological cycles convert NOx into less harmful inert gases, the conversion is not carried out at a high enough rate to diminish atmospheric levels to a favorable level and the mechanism is unknown. This project aims to synthesize cobalt metal complexes that have the capability to react with NOx species as alternatives to biological NOx reduction with nitrous oxide reductase. Synthesized cobalt species with NHC ligands for stability were reacted with NO+ and characterized with IR, Raman, UV-vis, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy to determine if and how NO was bonded to the cobalt center. Preliminary results from the IR and X-ray absorption data show strong agreement with other NO complexes, but further characterization must be done to conclude these results. Synthesizing and characterizing these transition metal complexes may be able to provide insights towards intermediates and how these biological cycles convert NOx. The long-term goal of this project is to utilize the new cobalt complexes to incorporate NOx species into new chemical products.

UAS Based Mapping for Earthwork Quantity Estimation

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:00 - 1:15
Location: 9-271

Authors: Paul Stoiber, Brandon Arden.
Faculty Mentor: Omar Mora.

Abstract: Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) are emerging as an alternative tool for mapping and computing earthwork quantities in small to medium projects. The dense point clouds and surface models created from imagery acquired by these systems have not been extensively tested in terms of accuracy performance. For this reason, an evaluation was performed to test and evaluate the capabilities of UAS based mapping for earthwork quantity estimation. The UAS image based results were compared to a high-resolution surface model that was acquired by Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS). Aerial Targets (ATs) were distributed throughout the test area, and were subsequently surveyed using Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Real-Time Kinematic (RTK) surveying practices to achieve high-accuracy positioning. The laser scan point cloud was co-registered and the scanning stations were geo-referenced through a GNSS RTK survey. Initial results indicate that UAS based volumetric computations for earthwork quantity estimation can compete with scanning techniques, where the TLS volume were computed to be 564 yd3 and the UAS based results were 566 yd3, resulting in a percent error of 0.4%. These outcomes demonstrate that in some cases, the UAS based mapping may be a more cost effective alternative for surveying earthwork projects. A stockpile was surveyed and mapped by a UAS to generate a high-resolution surface model. The surface model were generated through three programs which were then used to determine volumes. The three programs used were Context Capture, AgiSoft Photoscan and PixElement. The dense point clouds were then brought into AUTOCAD Civil 3D where volumes were calculated by the difference between two surfaces method. The first surface for the volume calculation was a surface to represent the flat ground below the stockpile. The limits of the stockpile were established from data gathered in a general survey. The second surface was created to represent the outline of the stockpile created from the dense point cloud. The volumes from the dense point clouds that were created using the aerial imagery were then compared to volumes created through Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS).

Electrochemical Evaluation of Titanium Alloys for Biomedical Hip Implants

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:30 - 1:45
Location: 9-307

Authors: Michael Svidensky, Neelam Patel, Jaewan Bae, Carlos Pacheco, Vanessa Gomez.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: The need for longevity of hip implants is increasing as the life expectancy of the world's population increases. Titanium and titanium alloys are commonly used for biomedical implants due to their favorable strength-to-weight ratio, biocompatibility and corrosion resistance. In particular, Ti-6Al-4V (wt%) (Ti64) is widely used as a hip implant material. There are several issues with the long-term use of this alloy. One of these is the phenomenon of stress shielding in which the elastic modulus mismatch between the implant and bone leads to bone loss and subsequent loosening of the implant. Another is the release of aluminum cations into the body with potential deleterious effects, i.e., the link to Alzheimer's disease and other neurological disorders. In addition, inflammatory responses can be triggered through the phenomenon of aseptic loosening in which an imbalance between the osteoclasts (bone-eroding cells) and osteoblasts (bone-building cells) leads to bone resorption. A new class of β-phase titanium alloys (TNZ alloys), offers promising characteristics as potential candidates for orthopedic applications due to their lower elastic modulii and non-toxic characteristics. In this study, two TNZ alloys, i.e., Ti-39Nb-6Zr (wt%) and Ti-28Nb-20Zr (wt%), were cast into rods in a pure argon environment at atmospheric pressure. A witness coupon was cut from each of the as-cast rods which were then subsequently hot isostatically pressed (HIP) to remove any internal discontinuities. Witness coupons were also cut from the HIPped rods which were subsequently precision machined into a regular cylinder. The as-cast rods were subjected to non-destructive X-ray radiography pre- and post-HIPping to confirm the removal of residual porosity. The corrosion behavior of the TNZ alloys and Ti64 control coupons, was investigated through open circuit potential (OCP) tests, potentiodynamic polarization measurements (Tafel and cyclic potentiodynamic polarization), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in phosphate buffered saline solution (PBS) at normal body conditions (temperature at 37℃ +/- 1℃ and pH of 7.4 +/- 0.1). Tests were also conducted at lower pH conditions to simulate the body conditions of patients suffering from metabolic acidosis (pH of 6.9 +/- 0.1). EIS measurements were conducted before and after anodic polarization tests.

Corrosion Resistance of Metal-Ceramic Composites Produced by Directed Metal Oxidation

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:30 - 1:45
Location: 9-209

Authors: Salar Tabesh, Christopher Kha, Joshua Diaz, Ian Limon, Jason Brayshaw, Kentaro Fujimoto Lunn.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) couple the wear resistance of ceramics and the ductility of metals. They also can provide an alternative to the difficult issue of shape formation confronting all-ceramic components if they can be formed to near net shape. Directed Metal Oxidation is a method of fabricating CMCs to near net shape. The process can be engineered to produce a wide range of geometries of alumina matrix/aluminum composites with minimum machining and also allows for further reinforcement of the composite through the addition of constituents such as silicon carbide. In applications, e.g., pump impellers and housing, where a combination of erosion, wear and corrosion resistance are required, the CMCs could be an ideal choice. Plates of ceramic-metal composites were fabricated from an aluminum-silicon-magnesium alloy using the Directed Metal Oxidation process. Coupons were prepared for a series of tests to characterize the corrosion behavior, hardness and erosion/wear resistance of this ceramic matrix composite material. Microstructural characterization of the composite was accomplished through scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) and optical microscopy. Hardness tests - both macro and micro - were conducted in different regions of the composites. The erosion resistance of these composites were determined using slurry abrasion and rotating pin tests.

Two Stage Wave Disk Engine

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Christopher Tait, Colby Stark, Bradley Thomas.
Faculty Mentor: Pejman Akbari.

Abstract: The Two-Stage Wave Disk Engine (TWDE) is a novel engine that has the potential for higher efficiency and power density of power-generation systems. The TWDE combines benefits of pressure-gain combustion of piston engines and full gas expansion of gas turbine engines. There are only two moving parts in the TWDE: the rotating disk functioning as a pressure-gain combustor and the turbine that produces torque which is converted into electricity or mechanical work.

CITED2 Is a Negative Regulator of Human Adipogenesis

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Esra Ibili, Lun Tan.
Faculty Mentor: Yuanxiang Zhao.

Abstract: Human adipogenesis is the process through which uncommitted human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) differentiate into adipocytes (fat cells). HMSCs normally reside in the bone marrow and adipose tissue. They can be easily isolated, expanded in vitro and upon exposure to a cocktail (AIM) of isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX), Dexamethasone (DEX) and Insulin, can differentiate into mature adipocytes (fat cells), making it an excellent in vitro cellular model for studying human adipogenesis. Based on a high throughput screen using siRNAs targeting 5000 genes in the human genome, a list of genes whose expression knock-down by its siRNAs led to enhanced adipogenic differentiation of hMSCs were uncovered. This study has focused on one of the uncovered genes, CITED2, whose role in human adipogenesis has never been studied. Here we report that expression of CITED2 is upregulated by about 2-4 fold during normal adipogenic commitment stage, between day 3 to day 6 post adipogenic induction by AIM. Expression knockdown by siCITED2 led to about 80% reduction of its normal expression level, but resulted in near 2-fold increase in total fat accumulation based on OilRedO staining and extraction. To find out whether the increased fat accumulation was due to increased total fat cell numbers or increased fat accumulation in individual fat cells, total cell numbers and mature fat cells were counted, and the resulting percentage of fat cells was found to be significantly higher in siCITED2 treated group (25%) vs. siCONTROL treated group (7%). In addition, the total number of cells in both treatment groups were insignificantly different, indicating that expression knockdown of CITED2 during adipogenesis significantly promoted adipogenic differentiation efficiency of hMSCs, hence increasing the total number of mature fat cells. Furthermore, real time RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that the expression of CEBPα and PPARγ, two master regulators of adipogensis, were both dramatically increased in siCITED2 cells compare to siControl cells, suggesting that CITED2 normally acts as negative regulator of human adipogenesis by suppressing the expression of CEBPα and PPARγ.


Upregulation of Adipogenesis by SUV39H1 and CITED2 siRNA Double Knock-down

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Shayne Fabian, Julian Aragon, Lun Tan.
Faculty Mentor: Yuanxiang Zhao.

Abstract: Obesity is a modern epidemic in the United States and other developed countries across the world. It is characterized by excessive body fat accumulation due to increased number of adipocytes (fat cells) through adipogenesis and/or enlarged adipocytes through lipogenesis. Human adipogenesis is the process through which uncommitted human mesenchymal stem cells differentiate into adipocytes. Understanding the molecular and cellular regulation of adipogenesis may provide a way to mitigate obesity and obesity related diseases. Based on a high throughput screen using siRNAs targeting 5000 genes in the human genome, a list of genes, whose expression knock-down by their corresponding siRNAs led to enhanced adipogenic differentiation of hMSCs, were identified. Two of the uncovered genes, SUV39H1, a histone lysine methyltransferase and CITED2, a transcriptional co-regulator, have been confirmed to significantly promote adipogenesis when individually knocked down by their siRNAs, siSUV39H1 and siCITED2, respectively, indicating that both SUV39H1 and CITED2 normally act as adipogenic suppressors. Here we focus on examining the combinatorial effect of siSUV39H1 and siCITED2 on adipogenesis by comparing the effect of double knock-down of these two genes (siSUV39H1 + siCITED2) to each single knock-down (siSUV39H1 + siControl; siCITED2 + siControl). Our preliminary data demonstrated that double knock-down treatment significantly increased total adipocyte count (by 4.5 folds) and adipocyte percentage (by 6.5 folds) in comparison to each single knock-down treatment, both of which increased by 3 folds for adipocyte counts and by 3.5 - 4 folds for adipocyte percentage, suggesting that knock-down of these two genes exert accumulative effect on suppressing adipogenesis.

How Queer Hip Hop Artists Cultivate a Space on the Internet

Oral Presentation
Time: 3:00 - 3:15
Location: 15-1808

Authors: Carissa Tang.
Faculty Mentor: Kai Smith.

Abstract: By creating a space on the internet, Queer Hip Hop artists can expand their audience and create their own agency in controlling their respective social media. This is highlighted especially in the political climate of the United States today, where mainstream media shows members of the Queer community as well as the Hip Hop community in an increasingly positive, yet still negative light. Alternative media that have traditionally been a haven for LGBT+ creators are increasingly filtering or even censoring LGBT+ creators, especially artists relying on social media to promote their work. In this paper, I will attempt to analyze the internet spaces of ten Queer Hip Hop artists by collecting top comments and other auxiliary data from five of their top individual songs (songs that are not collaborations) published online post-2000. Additionally, I will analyze the lyrical content as well as the visual content of the music videos. By doing so, I will compile primary sources to support my hypothesis that these individual artists are cultivating a political space of their own.

Is there a connection between food prices and revolutions?

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:45 - 3:00
Location: 15-1828

Authors: Barrett Tate.
Faculty Mentor: Mario Guerrero.

Abstract: The political chaos caused by the Arab Spring raises several key questions regarding the cause or causes of the revolutions. One key question to ask is: if the dictators and despots have been in power for decades, and they've been abusing their power for almost the entirety of that time, why would these revolutions happen now? While there are a multitude of reasons for revolution, each reason more complex than the last, they all tended to have one notable catalyst - a sudden inability to afford the basic food groups. This research asks whether or not the inability to afford food is the final straw that ignites a revolution. Using the price of food in several key Arab countries, this paper argues that food stability is only a contributing factor, not the sole factor bringing about revolution in the Arab Spring.

CASE STUDY OF IVANPAH SOLAR PLANT USING NREAL-SAM

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Jacob Tharp.
Faculty Mentor: Kevin Anderson.

Abstract: The Ivanpah solar plant located in Southern Nevada was simulated using National Renewable Energy Laboratory System Advisor Model (NREL SAM) software with the power tower concentrating solar power utilizing direct steam option. This case study provides insight into how the theory, modeling and actual performance data of a large scale concentrated solar energy project such as Ivanpah can be used to examine the overall efficiency and benefits of renewable energy technologies. The NREL SAM data includes information on performance of the system and data on the cost for the lifetime of the system including Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE) and Internal Rate of Return (IRR). The outputs from NREL SAM are then verified using real measured data collected from the Ivanpah power-plant.

Two Stage Wave Disk Engine

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Christopher Tait, Colby Stark, Bradley Thomas.
Faculty Mentor: Pejman Akbari.

Abstract: The Two-Stage Wave Disk Engine (TWDE) is a novel engine that has the potential for higher efficiency and power density of power-generation systems. The TWDE combines benefits of pressure-gain combustion of piston engines and full gas expansion of gas turbine engines. There are only two moving parts in the TWDE: the rotating disk functioning as a pressure-gain combustor and the turbine that produces torque which is converted into electricity or mechanical work.

Onsite Wastewater Treatment System as a Living Laboratory

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:30 - 1:45
Location: 9-325

Authors: Paola Grano, Warjay Naigan, Martin Flores, Stephanie Osorio, Renz Soriano, Angela Truong, Gustavo Perez, Christopher Thomas, Carolyn Soy, Rima Sabih, Yasmin Proa.
Faculty Mentor: Monica Palomo.

Abstract: This project proposes the establishment of a living laboratory that will provide an on campus space that can be used for learning, innovation, and leisure of the campus community. This project proposes an expansion of the current Cal Poly Pomona water and energy infrastructure with an onsite (decentralized) wastewater treatment system. The system will increase the resiliency of the existing campus infrastructure by providing the opportunity to disconnect from the central wastewater and energy networks while maintaining the connection to the centralized utilities. The proposed project provides a unique opportunity for the Cal Poly Pomona campus to become a regional and national demonstration site where students, faculty, public agencies, private companies, and community members could have the opportunity to learn and conduct research on wastewater treatment processes, water treatment, and sustainable water reclamation practices. The key treatment process centers on a membrane bioreactor (MBR), which combines microfiltration with a biologically activated sludge process. The onsite system will treat sewage to groundwater recharge standards with potential uses for flushing, irrigation, decorative fountains and other non-potable water applications. The living laboratory will be located centrally on campus for user accessibility. The criteria for site selection further included: available square footage, site geology, elevation and grading, wastewater influent, hydrologic conditions, existing developments, and potential hazards, such as seismic activity, slope stability, liquefaction, and subsurface conditions. In conclusion, the living laboratory and its location will yield a high-quality and sustainable wastewater treatment facility where Cal Poly Pomona can showcase frontline wastewater reclamation practices.

Design of a small-scale inflatable Martian entry vehicle for Prandtl-M

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:45 - 2:00
Location: 9-333

Authors: Nguyen Pham, Adam Charron, Jessica Ortiz, Alexander Rey, Andrew Tibbels.
Faculty Mentor: Navid Nakhjiri.

Abstract: With the prospect of a manned mission to Mars within the next decade, NASA has developed missions and projects to pave the way. The Prandtl-M, developed by NASA Armstrong, is a fully autonomous UAV that is meant to aerially survey the Martian surface. Blue Ares' mission is to safely take the Prandtl-M, packed in a 3U CubeSat, through the hypersonic atmospheric entry and deploy the aircraft at its operational altitude. Additionally, the challenge is to fit this delivery system into the confined space of a 12U CubeSat-which requires Blue Ares to be flexible and compact in addition to providing adequate thermal protection. Inspired by NASA Langley's Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) Project, Blue Ares uses an inflatable aeroshell to protect the payload through the violent conditions of atmospheric entry. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) was implemented to numerically analyze the vehicle's aerodynamic characteristics. Along with referenced data from the Phoenix Lander mission, CFD data was used in MATLAB to design a landing trajectory for the vehicle. ANSYS Workbench was used exclusively to analyze and simulate the aero-thermal behavior of the vehicle through the different stages of flight. The inflatable mechanism design, which includes material selection, folding configuration, and inflating method, was performed separately and later incorporated into the system. The outcome of this research is a vehicle that is capable of protecting the payload from atmospheric heating and aerodynamically slow down the vehicle to its desired altitude and velocity.

3D printing Graphene-Enhanced Li-ion battery and Graphene supercapacitors

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:15 - 1:30
Location: 9-307

Authors: Matthew Tisbe, Nicholas Ferguson, Amanda Ramos, Jeffrey Lee, Calvin Nguyen, Ben Cheng, Alfredo Collazo, Alexander Lau, Jose Lopez, Alexander Botello, Albert Armienta.
Faculty Mentor: Zhen Yu.

Abstract: Batteries are power storage devices that provide their stored power to connected electronics. Li-ion batteries are a widely used battery type due to their high energy density and ability to recharge. These properties make them well suited for portable electronic devices at the expense of taking the majority weight and volume of the device. The use of a liquid electrolyte also limits the recharging speed and operating temperature. Switching to a solid electrolyte yields enhanced environmental safety and higher energy density, thus a smaller volume needed for portable applications. Our research focuses on the ease of production of such batteries through the development of a superior solid electrolyte, and the robustness of 3D printing and robotic assembly.

Dye Sensitized Solar Cells

Oral Presentation
Time: 3:00 - 3:15
Location: 9-307

Authors: Victoria Nguyen, Mitchell Mathes, Michael Ku, Sandie To, Hang Cao, Brian Case.
Faculty Mentor: Jonathan Puthoff.

Abstract: Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) are an example of a partially organic alternative to the semiconductor-based solar cells. They employ photosensitive dye molecules associated with a conducting substrate to harvest solar photons and accumulate electrons. We fabricate DSSCs that incorporate hibiscus dye and an organic hydrocarbon gel as the electrolyte. Previous generations of DSSCs relied on liquid electrolytes to replenish electrons in the dyes. To overcome the technical challenges associated with a liquid electrolyte we investigate the performance of solid electrolytes. Lambda carrageenan, known as Irish moss, is a thickening agent, stabilizer, and gel formula when mixed with water. Because of these qualities, Irish moss can be used to create a more mechanically stable electrolyte. For example, liquid electrolytes are prone to spillage which causes inconsistent readings. We investigated strategies for making lambda carrageenan electrolytes and tested the performance of those cells. We contrast the performance of the solid electrolyte based cells with that of the liquid electrolyte based cells.

Co-Ni-Ga: Shape Memory Alloys

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:30 - 2:45
Location: 9-307

Authors: Matthew Tom, Joliette Li, Christopher Bautista.
Faculty Mentor: Jonathan Puthoff.

Abstract: Shape-memory alloys (SMAs) are metal alloys that can return to their original shape upon the addition of heat. Magnetic SMAs are alloys that possess magnetic properties in addition and can therefore be reconfigured through the application of external magnetic fields and heat. These materials have application in motors, actuators, implants, and prosthetics, providing a consolidated mechanical system that lacks separate components. Despite these advantageous properties, magnetic SMAs' low efficiency and high production costs prevent them from being used in many applications. In order to identify the optimal alloy structure and composition, and thereby improve the performance of the SMAs, we created phase diagrams for the Co-Ni-Ga SMA system. We employed published Gibbs energy functions to construct a database of the properties of phases found in this system and constructed the diagrams using the ThermoCalc software package. These diagrams are useful for calculating the relative amounts of magnetic and shape-memory phases in alloys with given Co, Ni, and Ga compositions. Optimizing this phase mixture can lead to potentially more effective magnetic SMAs.

Interplanetary CubeSat Solar Sail Mission

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:30 - 1:45
Location: 9-333

Authors: Holly Everson, Guadalupe Romero Bravo, Steven Jaworski, Sofiya Pascual, Riza Dayapera, Aerbwong Chitamitara, Suleman Jalal, Erica Arroyo, Justin Toney.
Faculty Mentor: Navid Nakhjiri.

Abstract: Studying CubeSats for space science missions has increased significantly in recent years. The use of a CubeSat will provide a spacecraft which is lighter, mechanically simpler, and with a fraction of the cost of a traditional space mission. Cal Poly Pomona Interplanetary CubeSat Solar Sail Mission (IPCS3M) is a multi-year research project studying the use of solar radiation pressure on a sail as an alternative method of propulsion for interplanetary CubeSat missions. With a 90 meters squared Mylar sail, the 6U CubeSat will travel to Saturn with the intended goal of dropping a 1U science payload into Saturn's northern hexagonal storm. The payload will enter the inner wall of the eye to gather data regarding storm patterns, chemical composition, and other factors. Additionally, the solar sail will provide the spacecraft with a free continuous thrust, increasing velocity throughout the mission timeline provided by the solar radiation pressure. Finite Element Analysis and Computer Aided Design (CAD) modeling were used to construct the spacecraft and allow for structural studies. In addition to computer model tests, physical tests have also been performed to research material properties, light reflectance, and boom creation. Successful solar sail implementation will give CubeSats a form of propulsion that will open up possibilities for more complex missions, most notably orbital maneuvering and interplanetary travel.

Analyzing morphological variation among honey bee (Apis mellifera) individuals with different foraging behaviors on watermelon flowers (Citrullus lanatus)

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:45 - 2:00
Location: 9-251

Authors: Marisol Torres.
Faculty Mentor: Joan Leong.

Abstract: Adult honey bees spend the last few weeks of their life span foraging on flowers for pollen and/or nectar. A typical bee's foraging behavior at a flower is usually a single visit per individual flower, during a brief period of time (< 60 s). However, there have been field observations of honey bees visiting an individual flower repeatedly during a brief period of time (revisitation). My study asks if there are morphological differences between individuals that exhibit these two different behavioral patterns on watermelon flowers. This research focuses on gathering qualitative and quantitative data from both single visiting and revisiting honeybees from two different sites to compare their wing wear. Wings are part of an insect that do not regenerate so as insects age, they accumulate wing wear. The scoring method is scoring how much wing wear a wing using an index from 0-6, six being the most wear and tear. The other measurement is a quantitative distance of a line that starts at the angle that bisects right below the marginal cell and ends at the wing margin. For Prime Time Ranch, the results showed revisiting honeybees had more wing wear damage then single visiting honeybees. For Spadra Ranch, some preliminary results showed that there was no difference between the revisiting and single visiting honeybees.

Biofilm Formation on Novel Human Prosthetics Metal Alloys

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Jeyashree Alagarsamy, Cindy Toscano, Kevin Robles.
Faculty Mentor: Steve Alas.

Abstract: Solid biomaterials with characteristics, such as high biocompatibility or corrosion resistance, are now being implanted in the human body more frequently for a wide range of purposes. However, implant-related infection is generally the most common serious complication. When bacteria adhere to and proliferate on the biomaterial surface, the bacteria produce extracellular polymeric substances, primarily polysaccharides, which mediate cell-to-cell adhesion and form a biofilm. In our lab, the long-term goal is to extend the life of a prosthetic implant by identifying new metal alloys that are less susceptible to bacterial colonization. Using two major biofilm producing bacteria commonly found to colonize implants after surgery, Staphylococcus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we investigated the biocompatibility of novel metal alloys with regard to their susceptibility to biofilm propagation. The Experimental biometal alloys examined were stainless steel (SS), commercially pure titanium (CPTi), titanium alloy (Ti64) and dental grade titanium (Ty). Biofilm formation was analyzed using crystal violet staining and fluorescent microscopy. Ideal experimental conditions were obtained using flasks with 50mL TSB media for 48 hours at 37oC or using a biofilm reactor with 350mL TSB media, and allowing incubation for 72 hours at 37oC. Biofilm reactor experiments were performed with or without a constant infusion of growth media during biofilm formation. Results indicate that the Ty alloy permits less biofilm formation than SS, CPTi and the Ti64, by Staphylococcus epidermidis. Thus, the Ty alloy may be a better alternative to traditional metals, stainless steel and pure titanium, as a modern prosthetic biometal.

Microemulsion Based Hydrogel to deliver ibuprofen

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Tai Tran.
Faculty Mentor: Laila Jallo.

Abstract: This study focuses on deliver ibuprofen in form of microemulsion -based hydrogel formation. Sodium alginate serves as hydrogel matrix, Tween 80 acts as cosurfactant, and various oils serve as the drug loaded phase. Solability of iburprofen is tested with many oils and oil mixtures. Ibuprofen-loaded microemulsion is prepared in ratios of surfactant, acivel, oil and water prior to add alginate-the gel matrix. Viscosity of hydrogel mixtures are determined by DV3T Viscometer. Electron scanning microscopic (ESM) images are considerred for each sample to detemine cohesive force between the crystals. Physical stability of the drug-carring hydrogel is the final target of this study which promises a better delivery method of ibuprofen.

The Impact of Spatial Resolution on the Accuracy of Landslide Detection: A Case Study in the Carlyon Beach Peninsula, Washington

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:30 - 1:45
Location: 9-271

Authors: Caitlin Tran.
Faculty Mentor: Omar Mora.

Abstract: Landslides are events in which masses of rock and soil slide down the slope of a mountain or hillside. The scale of landslide activity varies and is dependent on factors such as, topography, geology, weather and human activity, and can cause extensive damage to the environment and infrastructure. Modern landslide mapping uses Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) derived Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) and sophisticated algorithms to analyze surface roughness and extract spatial features and patterns of landslide and landslide-prone areas. Spatial resolution plays an important role in remote sensing technology as it defines the smallest scale at which surface features may be extracted, identified, and mapped. Remote sensing technology has become a vital component in recent developments for landslide detection. The spatial resolution is essential, especially when landslide dimensions vary. Few studies have demonstrated the potential impact that spatial resolution may have on landslide detection. For these reasons, an evaluation to assess the impact of spatial resolution was performed using data acquired along the Carlyon Beach Peninsula, Washington. Using a methodology based on several feature extractors that employ unsupervised classifiers; k-means clustering and Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM), landslide surface features were extracted and identified on a cell-by-cell basis from DEMs generated at 6, 12, 24, 48, and 96 ft spatial resolution. The performance of the landslide surface feature extraction algorithm was then evaluated using an inventory map and a confusion matrix to assess the effects of spatial resolution. From this study we can conclude that when compared with the detailed, independently compiled landslide inventory map, our results from this evaluation reveal patterns caused by the varying spatial resolution of the terrain in our study area. These results suggest that the spatial resolution has an effect on the accuracy and surface features extracted for landslide detection, as the performance is dependent on the scale of the landslide morphology and DEM to provide important surface information and be used as efficient tools for digital terrain analysis to create accurate landslide maps.

Quantification of trace fermentation products by 2D NMR

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:15 - 2:30
Location: 9-333

Authors: Liliana Cahuas, Michael Tran, Erica Hummel, Ana Cortes, Jacqueline Scott.
Faculty Mentor: Gregory Barding and Dr. Wei-Jen Lin.

Abstract: Biofuel development is a topic of high interest. Butanol, a promising alternative and direct substitute for gasoline powered engines, is naturally produced in relatively large quantities by bacteria that undergo ABE fermentation. To maximize butanol production, understanding the basic biochemistry of the underlying pathways is important and quantifying the biochemically related products can lead to the development of alternative biofuel sources. Quantification is complicated by the similarities of the targeted compounds, with several resonances overlapping. Using 2D NMR, which decreases convolution by spreading chemical information out in two dimensions, we can overcome the signal overlap. While 2D NMR is commonly used qualitatively for spectral assignments, our goal is to develop a 2D NMR method for the trace detection of butanol and related metabolites. To explore the quantitative nature of 2D NMR and quantify butanol and butyric acid, 1H-NMR and 2D TOCSY NMR methods were carried out on a buffered standard solution with three different pH values; 4.75, 7.00, and 8.5. As expected, the 1D analysis found the actual and expected concentrations to be similar. However, the results from the 2D experiments were not consistent with the actual concentrations. The analytes were also measured using an external calibration curve, with concentrations of 1, 4, 8, and 10 mM. The results indicate that while the 2D methods are not amenable to the traditional quantitation approaches by NMR, quantitation can be carried out if a calibration curve is applied.

Autonomous Collision Avoidance System for Unmanned Aerial Systems using Stereoscopic Vision

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:15 - 2:30
Location: 9-325

Authors: Erwin Perez, Alexander Winger, Alex Tran, Nick Keti, Carlos Garcia-Paredes.
Faculty Mentor: Subodh Bhandari.

Abstract: This project discusses the use of stereoscopic vision as a means of sensing and detecting obstacles and other aircraft as a collision avoidance system for small unmanned aerial systems (UASs). The importance of this research has become increasingly significant as the presence of UASs in commercial and private sectors has led to stricter FAA regulations. Implementing collision avoidance systems can help integrate UASs more seamlessly into the National Airspace System (NAS) with fewer safety concerns and fewer financial burdens. Stereoscopic vision provides a cheaper and more lightweight solution for collision detection. The project uses a Zed stereo camera that is mounted on a DJI S900 Hexacopter unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) to generate depth maps. An NVIDIA Jetson TX1 board is used for onboard processing of the depth maps and obstacle avoidance. The board communicates with the PixHawk 3DR autopilot module which transmits data to the ground control station via XBee radios. By using the Zed software development kit (SDK), it is possible to obtain depth maps directly from the camera and use them in the implementation of obstacle avoidance. The algorithm that is used will partition the depth map into multiple sections, allowing it to find the section of the image that has pixels which represent objects furthest away, hence this section should be obstacle free. From here, the UAV can maneuver in the direction of the selected section of the depth map, allowing it to avoid obstacles in its path.

Improvement of Puffer Jacket Insulation that Retains Body Heat

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Hayli Mair, David Nguyen, Nicole Sanford, Araya Treadway.
Faculty Mentor: Jiangning Che.

Abstract: A jacket is comprised of three layers; shell, insulation, and lining. The shell is the outer layer and is the fabric the consumers see the most. While insulation is known as the fibers between the outer and inner layer that retains heat. The inner layer is the lining that conceals the insulation and provides a neat finish. Insulated jackets come in all weights, styles and are filled with different material in hopes of providing optimal warmth in cold environments. Some of the issues with thicker jackets is that it tends to have less mobility, and added bulkiness that makes it difficult to carry around or wear. There are opportunities for improvement with the ability of jackets to retain heat, comfort, weight, and mobility by changing types of insulation and design. By implementing these changes, a jacket can be thin and lightweight while still fulfilling its purpose. The purpose of this research is to improve puffer jackets by offering a thinner and lighter insulation option while still retaining thermal heat. By applying certified test methods by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), we will conduct tests on three different insulations in comparison to the insulation found in a manufactured jacket. By using The Technique for Order of Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS) and Analytic Hierarchy Process(AHP), we can make multi-criteria decisions. Our goal is to enhance thermal comfort, mobility and reduce weight with quantitative research.

Onsite Wastewater Treatment System as a Living Laboratory

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:30 - 1:45
Location: 9-325

Authors: Paola Grano, Warjay Naigan, Martin Flores, Stephanie Osorio, Renz Soriano, Angela Truong, Gustavo Perez, Christopher Thomas, Carolyn Soy, Rima Sabih, Yasmin Proa.
Faculty Mentor: Monica Palomo.

Abstract: This project proposes the establishment of a living laboratory that will provide an on campus space that can be used for learning, innovation, and leisure of the campus community. This project proposes an expansion of the current Cal Poly Pomona water and energy infrastructure with an onsite (decentralized) wastewater treatment system. The system will increase the resiliency of the existing campus infrastructure by providing the opportunity to disconnect from the central wastewater and energy networks while maintaining the connection to the centralized utilities. The proposed project provides a unique opportunity for the Cal Poly Pomona campus to become a regional and national demonstration site where students, faculty, public agencies, private companies, and community members could have the opportunity to learn and conduct research on wastewater treatment processes, water treatment, and sustainable water reclamation practices. The key treatment process centers on a membrane bioreactor (MBR), which combines microfiltration with a biologically activated sludge process. The onsite system will treat sewage to groundwater recharge standards with potential uses for flushing, irrigation, decorative fountains and other non-potable water applications. The living laboratory will be located centrally on campus for user accessibility. The criteria for site selection further included: available square footage, site geology, elevation and grading, wastewater influent, hydrologic conditions, existing developments, and potential hazards, such as seismic activity, slope stability, liquefaction, and subsurface conditions. In conclusion, the living laboratory and its location will yield a high-quality and sustainable wastewater treatment facility where Cal Poly Pomona can showcase frontline wastewater reclamation practices.

Sustainability of Materials and Processes of Medical Implants

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Amanda Tylosky.
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Winny Dong.

Abstract: Over 165,000 revision surgeries are done every year in the United States and the United Kingdom to replace medical implants due to loosening from the bone. The cost of making these replacement implants is immense and the amount of energy and CO 2 emissions produced is harmful to the environment. Titanium dioxide nanotubes are a suggested alternative to pure titanium implants due to their success in adhering as dental implants. The titanium dioxide nanotubes are manufacture through electrochemistry and tested for mechanical properties comparable to that needed of a medical implant. The mechanical testing was deemed inconclusive due to the sample size of the titanium dioxide nanotube not being capable of staying stationary in the machine's grips. Further testing is still needed with thicker samples size.

The Reactive Element Effect on the Oxidation Behavior of Nickel Aluminide Coatings

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:00 - 1:15
Location: 9-209

Authors: Nicholas Ury, Annette Wagner, Eric Quach, Ananda Gutierrez.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: The efficiency of turbines in power generation plants can be increased by raising the operating temperatures. Currently, nickel-base alloys that form a protective layer of chromium oxide are used in the hot section components of land-based turbines. However, chromium oxide is known to volatilize at higher temperatures, a problem that is worsened in the presence of water vapor in the exhaust. One approach to resolve this issue is to apply a protective aluminide coating to the surface of the alloys. Under the oxidizing conditions in the turbine environment, the aluminide surface layers will form a protective alumina scale. The adherence of the alumina oxide scale can be improved by the presence of reactive elements, such as yttrium, in small amounts. Three different nickel-base alloys were aluminized via a slurry coating process with various reactive element additions. The coupons were then subjected to high temperature oxidation at 1000⁰C in both dry and steam-containing environments, and their short-term oxidation behavior was measured via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The coupons were analyzed post-oxidation via optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The effects of humid air on the kinetics of oxidation of the as-received and slurry aluminized alloys will be discussed.

E-STEM Laptop Liquid Cooling System

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Roberto Mendez, Bryan Lee, Zhixuan(Victor) Ding, Mostafa Vahidi, Arik Naylous, Amanali Rodriguez, Alec Valladares, Yang Lo.
Faculty Mentor: Olukemi Sawyerr.

Abstract: Our group will present a revolutionary laptop cooling pad which utilizes an all-new liquid-convection cooling technique as opposed to other similar products in the market which use inefficient fans to dispense the heat. Our product uses a conductive plate to transfer the heat from the bottom of a laptop through a plate which is exposed to channels of water on the other side. Heat is then carried from the conductive plate to the water by convection and then ultimately transferred to the fins of a radiator to be radiated into the atmosphere. The water used for cooling is circulated using a small pump which runs continuously. As a result, our new cooling technology is able to perform up to five times better than the traditional cooling pads available today.

E-STEM Laptop Liquid Cooling System

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Roberto Mendez, Bryan Lee, Zhixuan(Victor) Ding, Mostafa Vahidi, Arik Naylous, Amanali Rodriguez, Alec Valladares, Yang Lo.
Faculty Mentor: Olukemi Sawyerr.

Abstract: Our group will present a revolutionary laptop cooling pad which utilizes an all-new liquid-convection cooling technique as opposed to other similar products in the market which use inefficient fans to dispense the heat. Our product uses a conductive plate to transfer the heat from the bottom of a laptop through a plate which is exposed to channels of water on the other side. Heat is then carried from the conductive plate to the water by convection and then ultimately transferred to the fins of a radiator to be radiated into the atmosphere. The water used for cooling is circulated using a small pump which runs continuously. As a result, our new cooling technology is able to perform up to five times better than the traditional cooling pads available today.

Design and Control of a High Precision Laser Cutting Machine

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Mason Van Bibber.
Faculty Mentor: Behnam Bahr.

Abstract: Education in mechanical design and control theory is paramount to anyone interested in engineering and the "Maker" culture. The goal of this project is to educate individuals while equipping them with the necessary tools and information to recreate a high-precision mechanical device at a minimal cost while introducing them to concepts normally not addressed in classroom settings. These ideas include open loop control, basic G-code machining language, electrical designs, mechanical assemblies, machine calibration, and basic laser concepts and safety. Available on the market today are a wide range of laser cutting and engraving machines that offer an array of design options. Most of these machines available for $1000 and under, however, are suitable only for inaccurate engraving. In addition, most of these systems come preassembled and, thus, offer no hands-on learning potential. This project was developed to educate individuals in the topics aforementioned through giving them access to a low-cost and reproducible laser cutting machine that integrates those qualities normally found in their more expensive counterparts. These include exceptionally high precision movements and high power laser modules strong enough for precision cutting rather than simple engraving.

Tecno Showroom and Workplace Interior Design (Studio 4 Class Project)

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Edward Varias.
Faculty Mentor: Apurva Pande.

Abstract: Tecno is an industrial company which includes the support of an international network of branch offices and retailers. Tecno's newest showroom is located on the 6th floor of the Collection building in the heart of downtown Los Angeles. The square footage of the space is approximately 3300 sq. ft. with key zones to create a workplace and showroom gallery combined. Tecno's workplace can serve as a meeting space suitable for furniture related events. Taking the inspiration from a suitcase, the space is organized into compartmental key zones that separates the program framework for the studio showroom. Gridded glazing and a Mondrian inspired color scheme transformed the workplace. The meeting commons, work hub and resource center were strategically placed so that it took advantage of the downtown Los Angeles views.

EXAFS and μXRF analysis of arsenic speciation and spatial distribution in mine tailings: Implications for physical weathering, bioaccessibility, and remediation

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:45 - 3:00
Location: 9-333

Authors: Manuel Vejar.
Faculty Mentor: Christopher Kim.

Abstract: In California, the mining and processing of mineral resources such as gold and silver ore deposits has resulted in large volumes of metal(loid)-bearing mine wastes, including arsenic, which remain largely untreated and exposed, threatening the health of humans and the environment. Determining the chemical speciation and bioaccessibility of arsenic in mine wastes is critical to assessing the potential toxicity. Bioaccessibility is dependent on physical and chemical properties of the waste materials, such as particle size, surface area, initial arsenic concentration, arsenic speciation, and arsenic spatial distribution; however, the relative contribution of each of these factors is insufficiently understood. X-Ray absorption spectroscopy and X-Ray fluorescence techniques that target arsenic species were applied to analyze size-sorted mine-tailing samples collected from several sites of the Empire Gold Mine, Grass Valley, CA, USA. XRF maps of 30 μm thin sections of selected size-sorted samples, contrasting As and Fe, were produced to study the relationships between arsenic's spatial distribution and its chemical speciation. EXAFS analysis was also conducted on bulk ground and unground tailing samples before and after leach extraction tests with simulated gastric fluid. Linear combination fitting of EXAFS data was employed to characterize the arsenic species existing in these mine tailings. Analysis of μXANES data visualized in XRF maps reveals the arsenic species present as encapsulated, homogenous, or surface bound with respect to particle distribution. Insights in these relationships should enable us to produce more comprehensive assessments of short- and long-term potential health hazards and help inform the remediation of arsenic-contaminated environments.

The Geochemical Evolution of the Central Mojave Batholith

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:45 - 2:00
Location: 9-335

Authors: Karissa Vermillion.
Faculty Mentor: Nicholas Van Buer.

Abstract: Here we present reconnaissance U-Pb geochronology and whole rock geochemistry on the Central Mojave Batholith, geographically defined by the Newberry, Ord, and Granite Mountains adjacent to Victorville and Barstow, CA, and the Cady, Marble, and Bristol Mountains adjacent to Ludlow, CA. In contrast to other relatively well studied large intrusive suites in the Mojave Desert generated by Mesozoic subduction (e.g. Western Mojave and Cadiz Valley Batholith), little work has been done on the Central Mojave Batholith. U-Pb ages, done at CSU-Northridge's Laser-Ablation Inductively-Coupled-Plasma Mass Spectrometer confirm that the Central Mojave Batholith records magmatism from the Proterozoic until magmatic cessation of the Mesozoic magmatic arc at ~73 Ma in the Mojave Desert. Cretaceous plutons can be divided into two groups based on geochemical correlations: (1) 91 -81 Ma granitoids with about 61 - 73% SiO2 and (2) 80 - 73 Ma granites about 5% richer in SiO2 for a given Fe-Index than group 1. Cretaceous magmatism in the Central Mojave Batholith is hypothesized to have undergone three stages (1) 91 - 84 Ma, (2) 84 - 77 Ma, and (3) 77 - 73 Ma. Stage 1 was emplaced into little or no basement based on low lead isotope values, and consequent stages were emplaced into thicker basement to the southeast as the arc migrated in the same direction. As seen in stage 3, Ludlow and Cadiz Valley Batholith which have similar ages, whole rock geochemistry, and petrographic descriptions and lie along the same axis, suggesting that Mojave magmatism ended in similar affinity to Sierra Nevada magmatism.

EDUCATION FOR EVERY ONE? THE GAP BETWEEN LOW INCOME AND WEALTHY PEOPLE IN THE UNITED STATES

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:45 - 3:00
Location: 15-2907

Authors: Sarita Vidal.
Faculty Mentor: Mario Guerrero.

Abstract: This paper talks about the gap that exist among students who come from a low income families versus those coming from wealthier families. The information for this thesis is collected from the America National Election study 2016 survey with 1200 respondents. The question in relation to this were in regards to income, education and other demographic variables. Through a data analysis and the use of the system SPSS we will see the influence on the gap between the rich and the poor and their relation to education. The result from this study show that income as a variable in many instance had a very high relationship with education. Low income people, student with this background will also be affected in their economic ladder on a future, for their standard of living and security may be affected due to their education. We can safely assume that there is an uneven existence on the upward mobility that in many ways diminish some and favors others. A better support and policymaking in relation to education would give better rewards to the student, and people in general helping to a better evolution and help close the gap that now exists among the low income people and the wealthier people. All this with time and the support to education to all could help improve the human capital and potential that could be produced by giving a little bit more support instead of fix walls and diminishing some and favoring others.

Modeling the Detectability of Extraterrestrial Intelligence with Gemini Planet Imager

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:15 - 1:30
Location: 9-333

Authors: Christina Vides.
Faculty Mentor: Matthew Povich.

Abstract: Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) is a direct high contrast imaging instrument coupled to the Gemini South Telescope. Its purpose is to image extrasolar planets around young (~<100Myr) and relatively close (=< 100 pc) stars in the near infrared. Using a combination of adaptive optics (AO) and image processing techniques, the signal of a planet can be differentiated from diffraction in the images. 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made="" rapidly="" and="" efficiently="" compared="" to="" the="" manual="" process="" i="" was="" able="" to="" make="" final="" decisions="" quickly="" and="" see="" significant="" improvement="" in="" fit="" and="" construction="" in="" the="" final="" garments="" thus="" helping="" me="" enhance="" both="" my="" patternmaking="" and="" problem="" solving="" skills="" with="" such="" benefits="" customization="" to="" specific="" sizes="" using="" cad="" technology="" is="" highly="" advantageous="" through="" the="" visualization="" of="" the="" 2d="" to="" 3d="" garment="" design="" process="" implications="" of="" this="" project="" are="" valuable="" and="" informative="" for="" small="" to="" large="" apparel="" companies="" to="" provide="" a="" highly="" efficient="" and="" rapid="" patternmaking="" and="" product="" development="" process="" with="" the="" short="" lead-time="" p="" div="" div="" div="" div="" div="" div="" class="card" div="" class="card-header" id="headingVillanuevaErik" h5="" button="" aria-controls="collapseVillanuevaErik" aria-expanded="true" class="btn btn-link btn-block" data-target="#collapseVillanuevaErik" data-toggle="collapse" villanueva="" erik="" button="" h5="" div="" div="" aria-labelledby="headingVillanuevaErik" class="collapse show" data-parent="#accordion" id="collapseVillanuevaErik" div="" class="card-body" div="" class="row-fluid" div="" class="span12" p="" span="" class="abstractTitle" solar="" updraft="" tower="" with="" compost="" waste="" heat="" and="" transpired="" roof="" span="" p="" p="" strong="" poster="" and="" creative="" works="" showcase="" strong="" strong="" time:="" 3:15="" -="" 4:15="" strong="" br="" strong="" location:="" university="" library="" -="" 3rd="" floor="" grand="" reading="" room="" strong="" p="" p="" strong="" authors:="" strong="" abbygail="" ang="" randy="" osorio="" erik="" villanueva="" br="" strong="" faculty="" mentor:="" strong="" kevin="" anderson="" p="" p="" strong="" abstract:="" strong="" this="" project="" studies="" the="" effects="" of="" incorporating="" compost="" waste="" heat="" and="" a="" transpired="" roof="" to="" the="" design="" of="" a="" solar="" updraft="" tower="" sut="" traditional="" suts="" consist="" of="" a="" transparent="" collector="" base="" which="" utilizes="" the="" greenhouse="" effect="" to="" collect="" heat="" a="" cylindrical="" tower="" that="" creates="" an="" updraft="" effect="" and="" a="" wind="" turbine="" on="" the="" inlet="" of="" the="" tower="" which="" generates="" power="" due="" to="" natural="" convection="" with="" hot="" air="" by="" adding="" compost="" in="" the="" collector="" base="" temperatures="" are="" allowed="" to="" increase="" more="" through="" the="" transmissive="" component="" of="" radiation="" heat="" transfer="" additionally="" the="" compost="" waste="" heat="" can="" reduce="" landfill="" space="" in="" other="" areas="" while="" also="" contributing="" to="" power="" generation="" the="" transpired="" roof="" agitates="" the="" airflow="" and="" makes="" it="" turbulent="" resulting="" in="" an="" improved="" transfer="" of="" heat="" a="" 6="" x="" 6="" prototype="" of="" the="" sut="" was="" built="" with="" the="" transparent="" collector="" and="" updraft="" tower="" data="" was="" taken="" for="" four="" configurations="" of="" the="" sut:="" 1="" without="" compost="" or="" transpired="" roof="" 2="" with="" compost="" 3="" with="" transpired="" roof="" and="" 4="" with="" both="" compost="" and="" transpired="" roof="" by="" measuring="" wind="" speeds="" temperatures="" and="" heat="" flux="" the="" power="" generated="" was="" calculated="" and="" compared="" to="" cfd="" values="" p="">

Evaluation of Surface Modified Stainless Steels and Titanium for Fuel Cells

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:45 - 1:00
Location: 9-307

Authors: Shehab Bassiouni, Sean Vinik, Fiona Follett, Brooke Singleton.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: The concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has steadily increased since the industrial revolution. The past few years have seen an alarming rise in the rate of carbon dioxide emissions with deleterious consequences on a global scale. Efforts to achieve a cleaner, more sustainable environment need to be accelerated. Replacing fossil-fuel burning vehicles with electrochemically powered vehicles can greatly mitigate the emissions of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. The proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell is an excellent solution due to its low operating temperatures and high efficiency. Despite technological improvements, proton exchange membrane fuel cell-powered vehicles are not commercially competitive with internal combustion engine vehicles. In this study, we aim to reduce fuel cell costs and improve their durability by substrate selection and surface modification of a crucial component - separator plates. Currently, graphite is used as the endplates of the fuel cell stack. Graphite offers excellent corrosion resistance; however, its porous nature makes it difficult to shape into thin sheets and its brittleness makes it unsuitable for transportation applications. In addition, the cost in manufacturing graphite causes the separator plates to account for 60% of the fuel cell cost. In order to allow PEM fuel cells to be more commercially available, a cost effective material should be selected to use as a bipolar plate. Current targets goals for a bipolar plate require materials to have desirable mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, high electrical conductivity, and low density. In this study, UNS S41000 stainless steels and UNS R50400 titanium were selected as possible candidate materials due to their high electrical conductivity, ductility and low cost. The surfaces of the selected materials were surface modified using two approaches: (a) coating with graphene and (b) gas phase nitridation. As-received and surface modified test coupons were subjected to electrochemical tests that were conducted under simulated PEMFC environments, i.e., 70℃ in 0.01 M sulfuric acid solution in a three-electrode flat cell. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and optical microscopy were used to characterize the test coupons. The effectiveness of the surface modification will be discussed and an optimal path forward will be outlined.

Modeling Thermodynamics And Kinetics Of Aluminized Austenitic Stainless Steels

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:15 - 2:30
Location: 9-209

Authors: Deepali Patil, Bryce Virgin.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: The deleterious effects of corrosion at high temperatures can be mitigated by the application of coatings that can form a protective oxide layer. Halide Activated Pack Cementation (HAPC) is one such coating method in which a halide vapor is generated within a pack and undergoes reactions that ultimately result in the coating element, e.g., aluminum, being deposited and diffusing into the substrate. In this study, UNS S30400 austenitic stainless steel was aluminized for various times at 850°C. Samples were cross-sectioned for analysis by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS). The coating thickness for each layer was measured and concentration profiles were determined. The solid-state diffusion of aluminum into the stainless steel substrate was modeled using two popular computing environments, i.e., MATLAB and Thermo-Calc. For MATLAB, the diffusion coefficient of aluminum was calculated using the Forward Simulation Method (FSB) which reduces the error propagated using older methods. The use of an iterative algorithm in FSB, rather than a direct calculation, reduced the errors in calculating the concentration dependent diffusion coefficient. In turn, this was used to generate solutions to Fick's Second Law. A parallel effort utilized thermodynamic modeling of austenitic stainless steels using the graphical mode of a commercially available thermodynamic software to generate the Al-Fe-Cr ternary phase diagram. The kinetics of aluminum diffusion into the stainless steel substrate were modeled using a separate module of the software. Insights gained by comparing the two modeling approaches will be discussed.

The Reactive Element Effect on the Oxidation Behavior of Nickel Aluminide Coatings

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:00 - 1:15
Location: 9-209

Authors: Nicholas Ury, Annette Wagner, Eric Quach, Ananda Gutierrez.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: The efficiency of turbines in power generation plants can be increased by raising the operating temperatures. Currently, nickel-base alloys that form a protective layer of chromium oxide are used in the hot section components of land-based turbines. However, chromium oxide is known to volatilize at higher temperatures, a problem that is worsened in the presence of water vapor in the exhaust. One approach to resolve this issue is to apply a protective aluminide coating to the surface of the alloys. Under the oxidizing conditions in the turbine environment, the aluminide surface layers will form a protective alumina scale. The adherence of the alumina oxide scale can be improved by the presence of reactive elements, such as yttrium, in small amounts. Three different nickel-base alloys were aluminized via a slurry coating process with various reactive element additions. The coupons were then subjected to high temperature oxidation at 1000⁰C in both dry and steam-containing environments, and their short-term oxidation behavior was measured via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The coupons were analyzed post-oxidation via optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The effects of humid air on the kinetics of oxidation of the as-received and slurry aluminized alloys will be discussed.

Death and Taxa: How Megathrust Earthquakes on Costa Rica's Nicoya Peninsula Affect Fishing Livelihoods and the Role of Social Capital in Mitigating Natural Hazards

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: John Walls.
Faculty Mentor: Kristen Conway-Gomez.

Abstract: This story map was created using preliminary data collected from 12 interviews of fishermen and residents about the impacts of the 2012 7.6 magnitude earthquake on Costa Rica's Nicoya Peninsula. Specifically, we asked fishermen and residents in communities on the Nicoya Peninsula how coastal uplift affected their fishing livelihoods and marine food resource use since the 2012 earthquake. Seismic hazards of convergent plate margins are substantial, Costa Rica's Nicoya Peninsula produces Mw≥7.5 megathrust earthquakes once every ~50 years. With a short earthquake repeat time and high sensitivity to vertical deformation, the Nicoya Peninsula is a natural laboratory for studying megathrust earthquake hazards, specifically as they impact peoples' livelihoods in coastal areas. As a next step, we consider the role of social capital in mitigating natural hazards in a variety of contexts.

Morphology Development of Aluminide Coatings on Mo-Si-B-Ti Alloys

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:30 - 2:45
Location: 9-209

Authors: Zachery Walsh, Shahan Kasnakjian, Logan Gallegos, Deepali Patil.
Faculty Mentor: Vilupanur Ravi.

Abstract: As the need for higher efficiencies in gas turbines that are marine-based or airborne increases, alternatives to nickel-base superalloys need to be investigated. Molybdenum-silicon-boron (Mo-Si-B) alloys are refractory materials that are expected to have high temperature stabilities; however, they are denser than nickel base superalloys. More recently, the addition of titanium to Mo-Si-B to form Mo-Si-B-Ti has been considered as a possible improvement by improving the creep resistance of the base alloy while lowering the density to values lower than those of Ni-base superalloys. However, Mo-Si-B-Ti alloys are vulnerable to high temperature oxidation, and to compensate for this, a protective coating would be required. The surfaces of the Mo-12.5Si- 8.5B-27.5Ti (at.%) alloy was modified using the halide activated pack cementation (HAPC) method. This is a coating method in which a halide vapor is generated within a pack and deposits the master alloy onto the surface of the substrate. Subsequently, the coating element diffuses into the substrate. Coatings were produced at 700-750C, in times ranging from 1 to 25 hours in an inert argon environment. The aluminized specimens were characterized using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/ EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis to investigate coating thickness, structure, composition, and microhardness testing was used to obtain hardness profiles of the coatings. Coatings had similar morphologies for different coating times in the 1 - 25 h range, consisting of a single layer with multiple phases and columnar/elongated grains. Some coatings contained fine precipitates near the coating-substrate interface. The coating morphology appeared to be dependent on substrate microstructure, with regions high in Mo in the coating aligning with structures in the substrate which were also high in Mo.

AugmentedRealms: The Next Generation of Tabletop Gaming

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Pasha Beglar, Jeffrey Schmitendorf, Flor Tonie Nguyen, Cindy Lin, Angelo Rodriguez, Jeremy Kleve, Liang Dong, Xinyuan Wang.
Faculty Mentor: Olukemi Sawyerr.

Abstract: Tabletop games such a Dungeons & Dragons allow players the ability to create a make belief world in which other players can be a part of. Tabletop games mainly depend on the players imagination, which is both its greatest feature and flaw. The frustration comes with not having shared vision for the word, so players typically buy figurines and maps. Our solution is an app that uses augmented reality to bring tabletop gaming to life. Players will be able to view the characters and maps of their story in a more interactive and immersive way. As players view the game from their phone camera, they will be able to see 3D trees, dragons, and their own personalized characters standing on the table, swaying and breathing as if they were in the room with them. Parties can be built to allow friends who are also playing the game to be able to see the same objects from their own distinct perspective. Not only do they have the option to choose through a selection of provided 3D models, but also be able to upload their own 3D models to view in the real world through their phone cameras.

Effect of Photobiomodulation on Post-Operative Dental Healing in Canines

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Andrea Watson.
Faculty Mentor: Cord Brundage.

Abstract: Photobiomodulation, using low-level-lasers, has been shown to reduce inflammation and expedite wound healing in animals and humans. To determine the therapeutic effect of photobiomodulation on dental inflammation and erythema in canines a low energy GaAlInP laser with a continuous 650 nm wavelength and 100 mW power output is used. Owners have the option to enroll their canine (n = est. 40) in the study if they are receiving an anesthetized dental treatment. During the post-operative recovery, each patient receives irradiation (10 J/cm2) as a member of one of three randomly assigned treatment groups. One group receives four treatment points of irradiation on the gingiva of the right upper and lower dental arcade, one group receives four treatment points of irradiation on the gingiva of the left upper and lower dental arcade, and one group receives a mock gingiva treatment without irradiation. Inflammation along the gingival treatment area of each canine is scored 24 hours after treatment by a blinded veterinary evaluator in person or via photograph. The owner is asked to guess which group they believe their canine is in as well as give a pain score for the canine during the follow up evaluation. Data from this study provides insight into the efficacy of photobiomodulation and its utility following canine dental procedures.


Is your best friend too old for laser treatment?

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Divya Biligiri, Andrea Watson.
Faculty Mentor: Cord Brundage.

Abstract: Cold Laser therapy is a treatment used for a large variety of physical ailments in many species. In this study I will be looking at canines and the influence of age and breed dependent maturation on the efficacy of the treatment after dental prophylaxis. Age and breed dependent maturation can greatly affect the animal's immune system and tissue healing rate, which are both factors that are influence by cold laser therapy. The canines will be between the ages of four months and eight years of varying breed and size (none larger than 60 pounds). Each patient will be placed in one of three groups: one treatment group where patients receive treatment on the gums of the upper and lower left side, a second treatment group for the upper and lower right side, and a control group where patients receive no treatment (treatment is 650nm wavelength, 10J/cm2). Photographs will be taken of the patient's gums one day after treatment and will be rated on a scale of one to seven by a blind evaluator. Once the data has been collected I will be analyzing it for the impact of age and breed, as two separate factors and with both combined, on the efficacy of the treatment on the patients. The data for this study is currently being collected, current results will be presented.


Laser Photomodulation Decreases the Likelihood of Wound Dehiscence in Laboratory Mice

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Benjamin Clock, Andrea Watson.
Faculty Mentor: Cord Brundage.

Abstract: Photomodulation (PM) using low-level-lasers is used therapeutically in human and veterinary medicine to minimize inflammation and expedite wound healing. To test the efficacy of this therapy we preformed PM on the surgical wound healing of live adult mice (Mus musculus) in a controlled laboratory environment. A class II, maximum 100 megaWatt, 650 nanometer wavelength type BF laser was used. Age controlled female mice (n = 12) were anesthetized and receive an initial surgical wound of approximately 2 centimeters located on their lower abdomen, mimicking a spay/neuter wound. After this surgery, all mice had their wounds surgically closed (3-stitches) and received a single dose of analgesic. The treatment group (n = 8) received an initial laser treatment 10 J/cm2 at the incision site after the surgical closure; A control group (n = 4) did not receive any laser treatment. The following morning each animal was evaluated and their incision site was photographed for scoring. PM decreases the likelihood of wound dehiscence (opening) in mice, as the mice that did not receive treatment displayed more wound dehiscence than the mice that that did receive PM. Additional experimentation is needed to further evaluate the effects of PM on wound healing in mice.

The Effectiveness of Chryseobacterium Indologenes on Batrachochytrium Dendrobatidis in Vitro

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:15 - 2:30
Location: 9-283

Authors: Deborah Wheeler.
Faculty Mentor: Wendy Dixon.

Abstract: Approximately thirty percent of amphibians are affected by chytridiomycosis (chytrid). Chytrid is an infectious disease, caused by the parasitic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). Bd is a serious risk to amphibians globally, as over a hundred amphibian species are extinct due to Bd. One of the most successful lab treatments for Bd was a solution of the bacteria Janthinobacterium lividum. However, J. lividum does not thrive in certain habitats. An alternative treatment is needed. The bacteria Chryseobacterium indologenes shares many characteristics with J. lividum. It is also known to survive in a wider variety of habitats relative to J. lividum. The validation of C. indologenes as a prospective treatment option for Bd could lead to the bacteria being used to save amphibians in natural habitats. The goal of the pilot study is to evaluate the relative effectiveness of C. indologenes and J. lividum in the treatment of Bd. The experimental plan is to grow Bd on several culture plates and test the inhibition capabilities of the following treatment groups: C. indologenes, J. lividum and E. coli (control). Areas where the growth of Bd is inhibited will be established and defined as "zones of inhibition." The inhibition rate will be used to determine the effectiveness of each treatment. Currently, the focus is on establishing the growth of Bd for use in the later phases of the study.

Sesimic Energy and Friction Dampers

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:00 - 12:15
Location: 9-325

Authors: Brent Wilder.
Faculty Mentor: Giuseppe Lomiento and Felipe Perez.

Abstract: This study focuses on mitigation of earthquake induced pounding effects between adjacent buildings. Pounding is the event of two structures colliding with each other due to excessive horizontal sway. It can occur between adjacent buildings with significantly different dynamic characteristics, and when the distance between the two structures is less than the seismic separation set by design specifications. This is a concern as pounding can cause serious damage to the building, or even bring about complete failure and collapse. For example, in the Mexico earthquake of 1985 pounding was found in 40% of the 330 buildings that experienced structural failure [1]. In our experiment we investigate the ability of friction dampers to mitigate pounding effects between two model frames while being tested on a shake table to simulate earthquakes. Friction dampers utilize the Law of Conservation of Energy by translating the kinetic energy of the earthquake, into heat energy via friction in the damper. We use the device to compare and contrast changes in energy dissipation throughout the structure. Numerical analysis is performed to extend experimental results to a wider range of excitation levels. Also, our test shows the ability of friction dampers to decrease the likelihood of pounding. This research is still on-going and further conclusions and applications of friction dampers in multi-degree of freedom systems will be presented in the Spring of 2018. [1] Jeng, V., K. Kasai, and A. Jagiasi. "The separation to avoid seismic pounding." Proceedings, 10th World Conference on Earthquake Engineering, Madrid (Spain). 1992.

Autonomous Collision Avoidance System for Unmanned Aerial Systems using Stereoscopic Vision

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:15 - 2:30
Location: 9-325

Authors: Erwin Perez, Alexander Winger, Alex Tran, Nick Keti, Carlos Garcia-Paredes.
Faculty Mentor: Subodh Bhandari.

Abstract: This project discusses the use of stereoscopic vision as a means of sensing and detecting obstacles and other aircraft as a collision avoidance system for small unmanned aerial systems (UASs). The importance of this research has become increasingly significant as the presence of UASs in commercial and private sectors has led to stricter FAA regulations. Implementing collision avoidance systems can help integrate UASs more seamlessly into the National Airspace System (NAS) with fewer safety concerns and fewer financial burdens. Stereoscopic vision provides a cheaper and more lightweight solution for collision detection. The project uses a Zed stereo camera that is mounted on a DJI S900 Hexacopter unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) to generate depth maps. An NVIDIA Jetson TX1 board is used for onboard processing of the depth maps and obstacle avoidance. The board communicates with the PixHawk 3DR autopilot module which transmits data to the ground control station via XBee radios. By using the Zed software development kit (SDK), it is possible to obtain depth maps directly from the camera and use them in the implementation of obstacle avoidance. The algorithm that is used will partition the depth map into multiple sections, allowing it to find the section of the image that has pixels which represent objects furthest away, hence this section should be obstacle free. From here, the UAV can maneuver in the direction of the selected section of the depth map, allowing it to avoid obstacles in its path.

Vacuuming as an alternative control method for the invasive pest, Bagrada hilaris

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:30 - 1:45
Location: 9-251

Authors: Joseph Wolf.
Faculty Mentor: Aaron Fox.

Abstract: Bagrada bug, Bagrada hilaris, is an invasive insect pest originally from Africa that is now found throughout Southern California, the Southwest U.S., and as far north as Yolo County. Bagrada bug causes significant damage to Cole crops (e.g. broccoli, cabbage, kale) and has been seen feeding on a host of other crop families, from papaya to potatoes. They have caused 10% crop loss in broccoli, 20% crop loss in cauliflower, and 35% yield loss in cabbage. Yearly production of broccoli, cauliflower and cabbage in California are worth $806.6 million, $309 million, and $177.7 million, respectively. Despite Bagrada bug's significant impact on California agriculture, only preliminary research on the insect's biology has been conducted and very few effective control measures have been developed. Due to a lack of alternative control methods, organic growers and urban farmers have been especially impacted by the Bagrada bug. Vacuuming is one pest management method that has proven successful in other crops, and may be an option for organic Bagrada bug control. A vacuuming experiment was conducted in October 2017 in turnips, Brassica rapa var. rapa, at Cal Poly Pomona's campus farm. Bagrada bugs were collected via vacuum sampling from Treatment and Control plots for five days. All treatment plots were vacuumed with a modified leaf blower on the first day of the experiment. On the subsequent four days, three Treatment plots were randomly selected and insects were collected with a vacuum. Each day, three Control plots that had never been previously vacuumed were sampled with the vacuum. All insect samples were brought back to the lab and kept in the laboratory freezer until they were inspected for Bagrada bug and other key insect groups.

Cloud Plush

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Bryan Arciniega, Yuna Jung, Kathleen Wong, Joshua Montanez, Jakub Kupsik.
Faculty Mentor: Yu Sun.

Abstract: Our product will allow people to connect through a pair of stuffed toys. The stuffed toys will allow the users to send each other hugs through our stuffed toy. When hugging the stuffed animal, they will feel a heartbeat and warmth (by seeing a visible glowing heart). The heartbeat and warmth would essentially recreate the feeling of hugging their partner, which would bring the two physically together. All of this is done in real time. It is just as fast as sending and receiving a text message. When brought together again, the stuffed animals would "celebrate." Our product is a stuffed toy that incorporates technology with intimacy. It creates a second pathway for relationships to connect in a way that is physical and healthier than through digital communication. The technology we are building into our toy will improve the experience of having a stuffed toy. We want to utilize Raspberry Pi, WLAN, bluetooth, sensor, motor and LEDs in each product. This will allow the stuffed toy to communicate via wifi and vibrate. We also want to incorporate an ergonomic design so that our stuffed toy can be comfortable. Bluetooth will be incorporated into the main circuit board so that it can connect to your phone. The connection to your phone will allow for you to send and receive hugs when there is no wifi network present. All of this technology will allow users to hug their loved one whether they are in the same room or halfway across the globe.

Design and Testing of an Iso-element Thermal Energy Storage System using Wastewater

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:15 - 2:30
Location: 9-269

Authors: Jessica Rule, James Zimmerman, Matthew Wong.
Faculty Mentor: Reza Lakeh.

Abstract: The United States Department of Energy launched the Sunshot Initiative with a goal of reducing the cost of solar energy by 75% to make it more competitive with other forms of energy. One of the ways to achieve this goal is to increase the efficiency of Concentrated Solar Power Plants (CSP's). Thermal Energy Storage can also play a key role in resolving the mismatch between power generation and consumption. Current CSP plants employ molten salts, mainly sodium nitrate, for thermal storage; however, molten salt plants have temperature limits of about 600 °C. Chloride salts are an attractive alternative for the state-of-the-art due to their low cost and thermal stability. Additionally, chloride salts promise to be substantially more economical if the source of the salt is wastewater. This presentation examines the results from testing the thermal stability of salt extracted from wastewater brine. In this study, thermal characteristics of an iso-element brine-based thermal energy storage system is explored at various high temperatures. Repurposing salt from brine, to store thermal energy, can potentially create a more economical and efficient thermal energy storage medium.

Surface Modification of Stainless Steel using Cold Plasma

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Sara Margala, Josue Monterrosa, Anthony Oceguera, Lauren Wong, Wing Jong Chan.
Faculty Mentor: Nina Abramzon.

Abstract: Surface energy of stainless steel coupons were increased through the exposure of helium and oxygen atmospheric radio-frequency generated plasma. The increase in surface energy is observed through the contact angle of a water droplet placed on the sample and quantified by Young's equation. A 5 second exposure test reveals that an oxygen flow rate of 0.20L/min results in the lowest contact angle. Our experiments on the longevity of the treatment shows that at 6 hours after a one-minute treatment, our sample still retains a 35% higher surface energy compared to the control. An analysis of the spectra of the plasma showed that more reactive species are present at lower oxygen flow rates. Additionally, to enhance precision of exposure intervals, a electromechanical rotating stage system with a microcontroller was developed.

Evaluation of the Stoichiometry Between [Pt(Cl)_6]^2-and TOA^+ Ions During the Liquid/liquid Extraction

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Kevin Liang, Shu Wu.
Faculty Mentor: Peng Sun.

Abstract: The monolayer protected Pt nanoparticles have been widely used in catalyst, energy conversion, chemical sensing etc. The Brust-Schiffrin (BS) is a two-phase synthesis method that is mostly used to synthesize the monolayer protected Pt nanoparticles. In the BS method, [Pt(Cl)_6]^2- ions in the aqueous phase needs to be transferred into an organic phase with the assistance of TOA^+. However, a problem quickly arises because the stoichiometry between TOA^+ and [Pt(Cl)_6]^2- during the facilitated transfer process is still unknown. In this project, a hemispherical micro-liquid/liquid interface formed between a layer of [Pt(Cl)_6]^2- aqueous filled micropipette and an organic phase has been employed to study the stoichiometry of TOA^+ facilitated transfer of [Pt(Cl)_6]^2-. Since at the hemispherical micro-liquid/liquid interface there is even diffusion field, the theoretical i-V curve for TOA^+ facilitated transfer of [Pt(Cl)_6]^2- can be derived much more easily. By simulating the theoretical i-V curve to the experimental voltammogram, the stoichiometry of TOA^+ facilitated transfer of [Pt(Cl)_6]^2- can be precisely obtained by fitting the experimental curve with the theoretical curve.

How Individual Difference Measures Inform Event Processing in Monolingual and Early and Late Bilingual Spanish Speakers

Oral Presentation
Time: 12:30 - 12:45
Location: 15-1828

Authors: Cloe Zeidan.
Faculty Mentor: Eleonora Rossi.

Abstract: Bilingual speakers' two languages are highly coactivated and compete for selection even when speaking one language alone (Kroll et al., 2006; Blumenfeld & Marian, 2007; Marian & Spivey, 2003). The constant state of language coactivation and competition for selection has supported the hypothesis that bilingual speakers are highly skilled at managing competition and at resolving conflict in the linguistic domain (Blumenfeld & Marian, 2011) and when processing language-independent information (Bialystok et al, 2009). Previous work in lexical prediction has suggested that both monolinguals and bilinguals recruit inhibitory control in order to manage conflict when prediction errors arise (Zirnstein, Van Hell, & Kroll, 2017). What is less understood is how cognitive control ability affects the earlier anticipation of upcoming words or events, and how this might be impacted by bilingual experience. We assessed how individual differences in executive functioning predicted performance in event comprehension, in both monolinguals and in bilingual speakers who are processing the information in their dominant language (L1) or their second language (L2). Individuals anticipate the end state of an action when hearing change of state verbs also need to maintain multiple object state representations when processing an event (Hindy, Altmann, Kalenik, & Thompson-Schill, 2012). In our study, participants completed a visual world paradigm task containing a change of state verb and no change of state verb, the AX-Continuous Performance Task (AX-CPT); an index of goal maintenance and inhibitory control, e.g., Braver et al., 2001), and a pro- and anti-saccade task to measure attention and inhibition. The preliminary results of this study show that visual cueing and cognitive control abilities modulate real-time event processing in language comprehension.

Synthesis of Nickel Nitrosyl Complexes with Bidentate N-heterocyclic Carbene Ligands

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Zijie Zhang.
Faculty Mentor: Chantal Stieber.

Abstract: Nitrous oxide (N2O), a greenhouse gas that mainly produced from fossil fuel combustion and human activities, has a warming potential up to 310 times that of carbon dioxide. It has a significant impact because it can damage the ozone layer, reducing protection from the sun and UV radiation. While soil micro-organisms such as Geobacillus stearothermophilus, can reduce N2O and transform it into N2, the rate is not high enough to counteract N2O generation. With the aim to develop methods to mitigate N2O, possible oxidation and reduction mechanisms were studied in nickel nitrosyl complexes. Nickel(0) complexes with bidentate N-heterocyclic carbene ligands were synthesized and oxidized to nickel(I) nitrosyl cations with the addition of NOBF4 and NO2BF4. The presence of a new Ni-NO bond and a BF41- counterion was confirmed by infrared spectroscopy. Future directions will include oxidation, reduction and synthesis of N2O and N2 complexes to understand how N2O can be converted to N2.

Circadian and anticipatory feed behavior in domestic sheep (Ovis aries)

Poster and Creative Works Showcase
Time: 3:15 - 4:15
Location: University Library - 3rd Floor Grand Reading Room

Authors: Caitlyn Nelson, Tatiana Zhgun.
Faculty Mentor: Cord Brundage.

Abstract: Animal productivity is directly related to energy intake and expenditure. Animals that are more active will spend more energy. In normal feeding operations, the time when animals are fed is usually similar, but variations can occur. Using domesticated sheep (Ovis aries), we are investigating the timing and daily (circadian) amount of activity animals exhibited when their normal feed time (measured over three days) was shifted for five days and then is brought back to the original time (for three days). Feed anticipatory behaviors are linked to animal circadian rhythms, we hypothesized that shifts in feeding time increase the feed anticipatory activity of sheep and increase circadian activity/ energy loss. This study is conducted using a commercial accelerometer (Fitbark©) which has previously been validated as a tool to monitor sheep activity.

Design and Testing of an Iso-element Thermal Energy Storage System using Wastewater

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:15 - 2:30
Location: 9-269

Authors: Jessica Rule, James Zimmerman, Matthew Wong.
Faculty Mentor: Reza Lakeh.

Abstract: The United States Department of Energy launched the Sunshot Initiative with a goal of reducing the cost of solar energy by 75% to make it more competitive with other forms of energy. One of the ways to achieve this goal is to increase the efficiency of Concentrated Solar Power Plants (CSP's). Thermal Energy Storage can also play a key role in resolving the mismatch between power generation and consumption. Current CSP plants employ molten salts, mainly sodium nitrate, for thermal storage; however, molten salt plants have temperature limits of about 600 °C. Chloride salts are an attractive alternative for the state-of-the-art due to their low cost and thermal stability. Additionally, chloride salts promise to be substantially more economical if the source of the salt is wastewater. This presentation examines the results from testing the thermal stability of salt extracted from wastewater brine. In this study, thermal characteristics of an iso-element brine-based thermal energy storage system is explored at various high temperatures. Repurposing salt from brine, to store thermal energy, can potentially create a more economical and efficient thermal energy storage medium.

HORIZONTAL DIRECTIONAL DRILLING: A PARAMETRIC STUDY OF STRESS CHANGES IN SOIL AND A FOOTING USING FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS SOFTWAR

Oral Presentation
Time: 1:30 - 1:45
Location: 9-269

Authors: Jose Zuniga, Charles Sargent.
Faculty Mentor: Jinsung Cho.

Abstract: Horizontal directional drilling (HDD) is a trenchless tunneling technology that is becoming increasingly popular especially for installing utility. However, this technology was developed somewhat recently in the 1970s, and it still makes up a relatively small percentage of pipe installations. Because of this, we may still be able to make significant improvements on the various standards and guidelines associated with HDD. This research examines the change in stress in the soil and a footing above an HDD installation depending on the the clearance, diameter, and if the pipe material is PVC, HDPE, steel, or DIP. The goal of this research is to better understand these stress patterns, allowing for more precise codes andguidelines,andthus more efficient and competitive designs and bids.

XRF Mineral Identification

Oral Presentation
Time: 2:15 - 2:30
Location: 9-271

Authors: Jaqueline Zuniga.
Faculty Mentor: Nicholas J Van Buer.

Abstract: My project includes obtaining unknown specimens, whether they be mineral or rock samples, and crushing them into smaller fragments. Consequently, the crushed specimens are compressed into pellet form using a pressure gauge, followed by inserted them into the X-ray fluorescence machine for chemical analysis. The objective of this project is to be able to identify what each specimen is based on the chemical analysis results that are obtained by the xrf machine.