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3rd Annual Creative Activities and Research Symposium

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Welcome to the 3rd Annual Creative Activities and Research Symposium

Welcome to the 3rd Annual Creative Activities and Research Symposium. The CPP Office of Undergraduate Research is proud to highlight the extracurricular projects students are engaged in. These projects deepen and broaden student knowledge and prepare them to be lifelong learners. Sharing the results of their hard work with the broader community is the culmination of their research experience.

Dr. Winny Dong Today, for your pleasure, we have included not only research that takes place on campus, but creative activities as well. While research, STEM, and the social sciences provide us with the understanding of how our world works, creative activities and the humanities provide us with the understanding of how we interpret and understand the world around us.

It is our privilege and pleasure to host and present the 3rd Annual Creative Activities and Research Symposium to the Cal Poly Pomona community, and we look forward to this and the many symposiums that are to come.

Sincerely,

Dr. Winny Dong
Director, Office of Undergraduate Research

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Keynote Address

Dr. Manuel Diaz

Dr. Manuel Diaz

Lecturer, Ethnic & Women's Studies Department Cal Poly Pomona

Dr. Diaz earned his PhD in Education from Claremont Graduate University in 2017. He is an alumnus of Cal Poly Pomona where he received his BA in Psychology and MA in Psychological Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University. He returned to Cal Poly Pomona and worked as the most recent Pride Center Coordinator and currently is a Lecturer for the Department of Ethnic and Women’s Studies where he teaches courses on women’s, gender, and sexuality studies and diverse LGBTQ+ (lesbian-gay-bisexual-transgender-queer) identities.

While at Cal Poly Pomona, he was a McNair Scholar whose research explored sexual identity and educational experiences. Diaz states, “Joining the McNair program was the turning point in my academic career. The impact of immersing myself into a research regimen really did prepare me for graduate school as a first generation college student. It is through the McNair program that I learned how to become a researcher that ignited my interest in further conducting empirical work at the graduate level. I have carried Cal Poly Pomona’s motto of “Learn by Doing” with me throughout my educational journey. Today, I strongly believe in the importance of empirically derived research as it has helped me apply theory into my everyday teaching practices.” His recent dissertation titled, Campus Voice Male: Masculinity Influences on Gay Latino College Men’s Educational Outcomes, examined the intersections of race/ethnicity, gender, and sexuality and their influences on identity development and academic success. He is passionate about research in higher education and maintains an agenda aimed at advancing the study of college men and masculinities, Latino studies, and LGBTQ+ studies.

He has years of clinical and professional work experience in the mental health and academic/college-counseling fields. He is passionate about student development and enjoys working with students through mentorship, research, and teaching to give back to students who like him, want to advance their education. His self-care regimens include crossfit, practicing yoga, and eating healthy.

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Conference Schedule

CARS Schedule

Conference Maps

CARS Maps

StraightUp

Authors: Vincent Hsiao, Rohan Vohra

Faculty Mentor(s): Olukemi Sawyerr

Session Information

Demo Day Presentation

1:30PM

University Library

Abstract

StraightUp, with this technology we are able to detect the curvature of the spine with more precision than any other technology on the market. According to customer reviews, current products in the market use gyroscopes and accelerometers. However, these do not provide accurate data tracking. Our competitive advantage is that we use fiber optic sensor technology because it is sensitive enough to provide a real-time stream of data to the user. This method allows the user to assume a healthy posture, which over time will naturally strengthen the core and back muscles that are essential for long-term health. long with a proprietary smartphone app, users will be able to see their posture in real-time and be notified if they begin to show signs of bad posture. This application will have several features such as real-time data tracking and a 2D avatar that will represent the user's current posture, and update posture settings based on what kind of activity you are doing. StraightUp collects posture data and sends it to the smartphone application through a Bluetooth Low Energy connection. The mobile application processes the data and displays a human-shaped figure, bent the same way as the user.

Solarify It

Authors: Panik Moradian, Eva Mouradian, Brian Khachatourian

Faculty Mentor(s): Olukemi Sawyerr

Session Information

Demo Day Presentation

1:50PM

University Library

Abstract

The battery technology of our modern handheld electronics has become insufficient relative to our usage of those electronics. Our startup aims to extend the battery life of our handheld electronics by harnessing and storing energy from the sun. With the popularity of solar backpacks, not everyone can spend the extra money for that convenience, or wants the bulky backpacks designed and targeted for the outdoor lifestyle. We wanted to invent a product that can upgrade any personal carrying bag. By combining solar technology, a sleek design and storage of that energy, this product upgrades your current personal carrying bags; from backpacks, to duffle bags, to beach bags, to purses. Customer validation has reaffirmed our solution that can provide this convenience that is portable, green and affordable. Our product can both generate and store energy, the external battery is detachable, and able to be charged directly by an outlet or the solar panels.

BioScope

Authors: Alec Hasegawa, Timothy DenOuden, Lauren Keyes

Faculty Mentor(s): Olukemi Sawyerr

Session Information

Demo Day Presentation

2:10PM

University Library

Abstract

BioScope is a mobile microscope costing only $40. Today, a traditional microscope costs around $400. BioScope is both hardware and a mobile app that work together using a single lens and digital zoom on the user's smartphone to achieve a magnification of 400X. At this magnification BioScope users may observe microscopic organisms, blood, and plant cells. Viewing these tissues and organisms are a fundamental part of learning and exploring in many biology classrooms; however, BioScope is not exclusively limited to the classroom. By being mobile and easy to use, BioScope encourages users to explore the world around them while capturing and sharing new discoveries with their peers. Our mobile application utilizes an online hub where users can share images of new discoveries that will promote learning and encourage users to interact with each other. This feature will encourage the development of interactive learning communities. It is also beneficial since it stimulates interest in STEM related majors. The mobile application is where we have focused our efforts and have obtained images at the cellular level. We are using an open source computer vision software, similar to what is used in self driving cars, to reduce image noise, sharpen, and colorize the images to better understand the microscopic world. Additionally, the mobile application will enable users to measure the real size of microscopic objects and track their velocity as they move. The application will also feature data storage to allow users to save captured and edited images.

Plastic with a purpose

Authors: Jesus Mancera, Nicholas DeOrian

Faculty Mentor(s): Olukemi Sawyerr

Session Information

Demo Day Presentation

2:30PM

University Library

Abstract

As college students we want to incorporates sustainability into fashion by giving ocean plastic a new purpose. Our mission is to work locally and globally to improve the environmental well being of our community. Our ultimate mission is to create dope streetwear out of sustainable materials and change the fashion industry for good

You Reap What Others Sow: Christian Patriarchal Instruction in Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice

Authors: Samantha St. Claire

Faculty Mentor(s): Marta Albala Pelegrin

Session Information

Oral Presentation

9:00AM

University Library

Abstract

Women and Jews, minority groups marginalized by a Christian patriarchy, respond to Christian rhetoric that defines them as liminal by arguing for the sameness of human bodily experience and for their position as "students" of their social and cultural oppressors. Woman and Jews are, however, ultimately helpless in the face of Christian rhetoric, hypocrisy, and New Testament scripture as fulfilled through social law.

The Tragedy of a 'Superfluous Man': A Transcultural Reading of Turgenev's Rudin

Authors: John Danho

Faculty Mentor(s): Aaron DeRosa

Session Information

Oral Presentation

9:15AM

University Library

Abstract

Ivan Turgenev's Rudin (1856) propelled its protagonist, Dmitry Nikolayevich Rudin, to the fore of Russian literature, defining the archetype of the "superfluous man." A superfluous man is one that lives both amid his time and outside of it, able to critique it from a dispassionate perch while futilely grasping at the passion to live it. Because Rudin operates between these binaries, the paradox of his position as both a seeker of truths and an ineffective actor in his own life highlights a universally applicable, existentially poignant dilemma that exists as a transcultural, literary phenomenon. Rudin is simultaneously defined and sketched by the narration and the dialogue of his peers, a constant reminder of his inability to act as an agent within his own life. These sometimes scathing, sometimes flattering depictions of Rudin throughout the novel act as truths that overshadow him, lending Rudin the tragic air that it does because he "knows enough to value authenticity and possesses no authentic self" (Schur). Rudin is the critic in each individual human, driven by passionate pursuits yet sometimes unable to act upon them, spiritually stagnant. Rudin attempts an articulation of Russia's future, and in doing so traces the contours of the human spirit as it grapples with the existential crises of change and uncertainty.Stephen Hutchings posits that his death might signal Rudin's "transcending the word/deed dichotomy through an act," but ultimately the frustration in Rudin's finale cannot escape the reductive sketches of its body, suggesting that there is no true answer to the existential drama that accompanies life - only constant questions.

The Development of the Passion for Teaching Scale

Authors: Jessica Saucedo

Faculty Mentor(s): Sara Langford

Session Information

Oral Presentation

9:30AM

University Library

Abstract

The purpose of the project is to create a scale that measures an individual's passion for the teaching professions. Current literature focuses on measuring general passion, entrepreneurial passion, and passion for work. These are general scales, which may not be most accurate when applied to work, specifically teaching. The creation of this scale will allow educational researchers to optimally understand passion in teaching. An adaptation of the general passion scale has been developed to address teaching, as well as by adapting criteria from an Excellence in Teaching Award. In addition, interviews were conducted with a sample of eight professors who received Excellence in Teaching Awards at Cal Poly Pomona. The content-analyzed interviews assisted in developing new scale items, in addition to the adapted general passion scale, the Dualistic Model of Passion. Using the adapted general passion scale and the new scale items, an updated scale was created and administered to a large group of general faculty from Cal Poly Pomona using strategic sampling. An item analysis of participants' responses will be conducted to discard or revise inadequate items. Correlations between participant responses will be examined. This scale will be beneficial for educators, employers in educational contexts, and more generally for anyone engaged in the scholarship of teaching.

Employing the Use of Hip-Hop and Rap to Bridge the Culture Gap in Curriculum and Create Accessible Pedagogy for at Risk and Learning Disabled Students

Authors: Sarah Gharibian

Faculty Mentor(s): Brian Stone

Session Information

Oral Presentation

9:45AM

University Library

Abstract

The research proposal to enact inclusive hip-hop based curriculum and pedagogy for students with dyslexia demonstrates a potential to improve the education of at-risk and learning disabled students from unique linguistic backgrounds. Students who struggle with Dyslexia, the most commonly diagnosed learning disability in the American classroom, need support in their phonological development, the development of their critical literacy skills, as well as multimodal rhetorical skills. By increasing inclusion in the classroom, validating and educating instructors on students' home dialects, and using texts within those dialect, the research also shows the capability to create social change within education. The instruction that is discussed in my research centers on the engagement of students and recognition of their home dialects. Primarily, in regard to students whose home dialects are African-American Vernacular English, there is evidence to support these students' linguistic development through the use of their home dialect in curriculum. Hip Hop features not only African-American Vernacular English, but also includes many facets of African-American culture normally unrecognized by canonical literature. By creating education that inclusive both linguistically and culturally, students can take ownership of their education and feel supported and validated. Quantitative testing in the form of word-battery tests, decoding tests, and reading comprehension could be used to determine the efficacy of the theory. This research could possibly change many people's lives, as it can allow students who would normally be disenfranchised by the educational system to learn in efficient and impactful ways.

A Rhetorical Approach to Octavia Butler's "Kindred"

Authors: Samantha Tseng

Faculty Mentor(s): Brian Stone

Session Information

Oral Presentation

10:00AM

University Library

Abstract

This paper seeks to explore the rhetorical approaches in Octavia E. Butler's 1979 novel, Kindred, and the posthumously published graphic novel version in 2017. Kindred is about a modern 1960's woman, Dana, who finds herself periodically transported to an antebellum slave plantation. Dana not only has to find her way back; she has to also survive slavery and its daily struggle, and keep the plantations owner's dangerously impulsive son alive because he begets Dana's ancestors. This paper examines how Butler rhetorically builds the slave experience through a modern character's point of view through ideology/hegemony that drove slavery by comparing slavery to Dana's contemporary social landscape and her "progressive" interracial marriage; additionally, Kindred critiques the "master narrative" that's allowed slavery to flourish with rhetorical irony. Butler challenges how Black history and, particularly, slave history, is narrated and how it adds to a repressed trauma within the Black community by using the slave narrative, Afrofuturism, and the graphic novel. The graphic novel prints the same trauma for modern readers as visual media consumers and in relation to current social and political racial turmoil. This presents a fixed interpretation leaving no space for reader's interpretation or experience taking away from slaves. The 2017 timing of the graphic novel is important too with the intersection of race and politics with rhetoric and literature intertwining as a form of protest. The trauma existed in Dana's time, in Butler's time, and still pervades our contemporary era.

Strengths Possessed by Hispanic/Latino Adults that Facilitate Gang Desistance

Authors: Sergio Maldonado

Faculty Mentor(s): Alejandro Morales

Session Information

Oral Presentation

10:15AM

University Library

Abstract

Research in gang desistance has been ignored by researchers in psychology. Although researchers have started examining the desistance process, the studies referenced present a deficiency model that ignores the character strengths that enables men to leave gangs. Gang desistance in this study is defined as the final and permanent cessation of all offenses and gang related-criminal activities. The purpose of this exploratory qualitative study is to identify the character strengths of former Hispanic/Latino male gang members that facilitated their desistance from gang membership. Three questions we will be investigating are: 1) What are the specific strengths that promote desistance; 2) How did the strengths assist in desistance; and 3) Which strengths helped participants stay desisted? The sample is compromised of seven (N=7) former gang affiliated Hispanic/Latino males between the ages of 18-60 that were in a Southern Californian gang. The study is currently being analyzed thematically using Value in Action Classification (VIA-Classification) with preliminary findings being presented. Interviewees were asked about experiences that helped them desist gangs in order to investigate ways to develop character strength-based programs, a method commonly used in Counseling Psychology, for Hispanic/Latino males.

Feminism, Women's Attitudes toward Fitness and Fitness Engagement, and Purchase Intentions of Fitness Device

Authors: Mahta Mirzaeiramin, Cailin Kuchenbecker, Ilia Eremin, Quynh Le

Faculty Mentor(s): Jae Min Jung

Session Information

Oral Presentation

10:30AM

University Library

Abstract

This research investigates how feminism influence women's decision to engage in fitness activity and purchase intentions of a fitness device. Drawing on the literature in women, sexuality, and health as well as marketing, this research proposes that feminism will positively influence women's attitudes and desires (i.e., attitude toward fitness, fitness opinion leadership, attitude toward core strength, and desire to control sex life), which in turn will positively influence women's fitness engagement. This research also hypothesizes the positive impact of attitude toward core strength and desire to control sex life, on Millennial women's awareness of Kegel exercise. Fitness engagement and awareness of Kegel exercise is further proposed to positively influence attitude toward Kegel exercise, which in turn positively influence purchase intentions. Data were collected from Millennial women from consumer panel members in 10 cities across the country. An analysis of the data shows general supports for the hypotheses. Findings of the research provide implications for theory and businesses that target at women for fitness services and products.

Autonomous 3-D Mapping and Collision Avoidance Using LIDAR and Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

Authors: Christian Carreon-Limones, Victor Ruiz, Michael Menendez, Rachel Lauf

Faculty Mentor(s): Subodh Bhandari

Session Information

Oral Presentation

9:15AM

University Library

Abstract

This presentation talks about the work being done at Cal Poly Pomona using an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) for autonomous 3-D terrain mapping. A DJI S1000 has been equipped with a Pixhawk autopilot in conjunction with Mission Planner for autonomous waypoint operation. Mission Planner, a flight management software, is programmed to autonomously fly around selected pin-points in a targeted location designed in accordance to control points placed by Civil Engineering students. The sensors used are an XSENS inertial measurement unit (IMU) for position and orientation of the vehicle, and a VLP-16 light detection and ranging (LiDAR) sensor for 3-D Mapping. An Intel NUC is utilized as an on-board flight computer. It will process and store LIDAR and IMU data and implement the collision avoidance algorithm. A point-cloud algorithm will perform geo-referencing calculations using the sensors' raw data in conjunction with the GPS data to generate a point cloud file. This file is uploaded to LAStools to generate a 3-D visualization. The data will be analyzed and compared using ArcGIS, LAStools, MATLAB, and a survey done by Civil Engineers. For collision avoidance, the LIDAR is used to detect any obstacles in the UAV's flight path. In the case of any obstacle detection, the flight computer directs the Pixhawk autopilot to re-route the flight path. The UAV then resumes the original flight path once the obstacle is avoided.

A Study of Molybdenum Complexes as Catalysts for Deoxydehydration of Diols

Authors: Nathan Wagner

Faculty Mentor(s): Alex John

Session Information

Oral Presentation

9:30AM

University Library

Abstract

Fossil resources, such as natural gas and petroleum, are finite and have adverse environmental effects. It is desirable to identify and utilize renewable and sustainable resources such as biomass to accommodate our energy and material needs. However, biomass is highly functionalized with oxygen and other heteroatoms, whereas petroleum contains only carbon and hydrogen. Therefore, being able to reducing the oxygen content of biomass is a critical step in efforts to incorporate biomass-derived feedstocks into chemical processes. A promising chemical reaction in this direction is deoxydehydration (DODH), which transforms a vicinal diol into an olefin. In the recent past, rhenium has been used to catalyze the DODH reaction. However, rhenium is not a practical catalyst due to its high cost and low abundance in the earth's crust. Our project investigates whether molybdenum can serve as an efficacious substitute for rhenium in the DODH reaction, because of molybdenum's similar chemical properties and lower cost. We therefore synthesized a series of novel molybdenum complexes using salan ligands with various electronic and steric properties. We then observed the reactivity and selectivity of these complexes as DODH catalysts under differing conditions. The synthesis of these molybdenum complexes and subsequent DODH studies using these complexes will be discussed.

Air Gap Membrane Distillation

Authors: Aaron Chan, Lucas Ardema, Benny Ly, Keaton Cornell

Faculty Mentor(s): Reza Lakeh

Session Information

Oral Presentation

9:45AM

University Library

Abstract

Air gap membrane distillation (AGMD) is a type of filtration system that can be utilized to purify saline or brackish water. The AGMD technique uses two primary mechanisms to perform filtration: pressure and heat. A membrane test cell houses the equipment to filter water which consists of four key components: a hot feed plate, membrane enclosure, condensing plate, and cold feed plate. First, hot saline water is pumped into feed channels of the test cell which is in contact with a hydrophobic membrane. A portion of liquid feed water will begin to phase change into vapor. The vapor, which is pressurized along one membrane boundary, can then pass freely through the pores of the membrane. The remaining liquid hot feed water is reprocessed, while the vapor permeates the membrane and enters an air gap. This gap is created between the backside of the membrane and the condensing plate. Clean liquid water forms on the condensing plate by removing heat from the vapor phase permeate. Lastly, the condensing plate temperature is maintained with cold feedwater flowing along the plate. Due to the numerous variable operating parameters, such as: feedwater temperatures, membrane type, gap distance, hot feed channel design, and active membrane area, extensive research is valuable in order to optimize the system. Optimization is needed to maximize the value of permeate flux (clean water collected) leaving the membrane test cell. Desire to increases flux by modifying parameters is the priority of nearly any water filtration system today.

Quantifying NO Activation and Coordination Modes by X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

Authors: Phan Phu

Faculty Mentor(s): Chantal Stieber

Session Information

Oral Presentation

10:00AM

University Library

Abstract

Nitrous oxide (N2O) is the third most potent greenhouse gas with a global warming potential 310 times higher than carbon dioxide. Reducing the concentration of N2O is chemically challenging, however biological systems can reduce N2O through chemical reactions at copper centers within enzymes. Understanding the mechanism of N2O reduction would benefit pollutant control and have possible environmental significance. This project aims to explore activation modes relevant to the conversion of N2O to NO by studying the electronic and geometric structures of metal nitrosyl complexes. We investigated how metal compounds interact with NO species through synthesis, X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and calculations. XES probes transitions from filled valence orbitals and can be used to inform ligand identity, metal ligand bonding, and metal spin state. While XES is a sensitive probe for the identification of metal-bound ligands and the quantification of small-molecule bond activation, the method is still being developed. We have used XES in combination with computational chemistry to understand chemical interactions between NO and nickel, and to quantify NO activation and coordination modes. Currently, synthesis of Co-N2 and Co-NO complexes is underway for future XES studies. The XES development in this work offers new techniques for characterizing complex systems, understanding mechanisms of N2O reduction, and detecting NO in biological settings.

Rollocopter: Preliminary Design of Autonomous Rolling Quadrotor, Application to Titan Exploration

Authors: Roberto Mendez

Faculty Mentor(s): Reza Lakeh

Session Information

Oral Presentation

10:15AM

University Library

Abstract

Through this research, a novel mobility device is presented for efficient and safe solar system body surface exploration. In particular, application to exploration of Saturn's moon, Titan, is discussed. The conceptual device features architecture similar to that of a quadrotor, but also features an external cylindrical cage attached by a rod enabling the quadrotor to roll terrestrially. In addition, the external cage would feature mechanical spring bumpers that allow collision resilience while maintaining a rigid sub-frame. This quadrotor with an external cage configuration would attempt to lower the mission risk factor associated with autonomous exploration of a planetary/moon surface using aerial devices, while also allowing for significant power savings with the capability of terrestrial movement. This research focuses primarily on the mechanical design aspect of the concept, studying the dynamics and taking significant consideration into propeller design as well as cage structure to provide a realistic perspective for possible implementation to a mission to Titan.

Developing Novel Bio-Fuels using Computer Aided Molecular Design (CAMD).

Authors: Jeffrey Hymas

Faculty Mentor(s): Farhana Abedin

Session Information

Poster and Creative Works Showcase

10:00AM

University Library

Abstract

With the world's supply of fossil fuels decreasing by the day, and the environmental impact of extracting such fuels from the earth taking a toll on the planet, the demand for an alternative is increasing. In the long term renewable energies will provide a viable replacement, but those changes will take decades to implement. In the interim a replacement for fossil fuels is needed. To that end this project utilizes computer aided molecular design (CAMD) to design candidate novel bio-based fuels that can be used to replace existing fossil fuels, specifically gasoline for internal combustion engines. From the literature, 15 current biofuels and their property values were identified. Of specific interest was the heat of combustion, the heat of vaporization, and the auto-ignition temperature. Molecular descriptors were then used to quantitatively link the structure of the fuels with their property values by linear regression. These correlations allowed for the prediction of chemical properties based on the structure of the molecule. The final step was to actually design the new molecules. This was accomplished by developing a set of 42 molecular groups, based on the 15 existing fuels, and using a stochastic search algorithm to combine the groups in such a way as to limit the difference between the predicted property of the novel fuel and the target values.

Development Of Novel Bio Diesel Using Computer Aided Molecular Design

Authors: Cesar Cortes

Faculty Mentor(s): farhana abedin

Session Information

Poster and Creative Works Showcase

10:00AM

University Library

Abstract

The goal of this research work is to design candidate alcohols with optimal properties for biodiesel production by transesterification. The global storage of fossil fuel is dwindling and its price is increasing, triggering an interest in biodiesel as an alternative fuel. The transesterification process involves reaction between an alcohol and plant/animal oil in the presence of a catalyst/enzyme to produce an ester. Here, the candidate alcohols were designed via computer-aided molecular design (CAMD). Eleven alcohols were used to form the model building set which were utilized to derive quantitative correlations between the properties of interest and molecular descriptors. The two properties interest were percent conversion and their log P. The correlations along with molecular constraints were formulated into an optimization problem to search for candidate alcohols which will have high yield of biodiesel and desirable log P. The optimization problem was solved via stochastic algorithm.

Using Machine Learning for Facial Recognition

Authors: Samantha Montoya

Faculty Mentor(s): Zekeriya Aliyaziciaglu

Session Information

Poster and Creative Works Showcase

10:00AM

University Library

Abstract

Humans can efficiently recognize one person from the next utilizing many senses and previous knowledge of the person. Utilizing just sight, consider what information is needed for a computer to recognize someone. The algorithms would need to account for changes in lighting, color, and movement among other things. To manually create an algorithm for a computer to accurately recognize someone in a video feed would be very complex. Machine learning can be used to bypass the complexity of manual algorithm design, because the computer teaches itself to perform the specific task at hand. For this project we are not only looking into using machine learning for facial recognition, but also using this as a means for security. The process for completing this project involved researching different libraries, methods, and understanding some of the background processes that these libraries are using. TensorFlow and OpenCV were considered for use, they are both open source libraries specializing in numerical computation. Gathering information about each library as well as using it in application, shows some of it's weaknesses and strengths. If we assume the security system to be used by a part of the population that does not want a long set up time, it was found that OpenCV was the best stand alone option. It can gather data and recognize in real-time, and the time for training is really fast.

Drone Collision Avoidance

Authors: Philippe Schicker, Basel Chahla, Brian Rodriguez, Ulises Vega

Faculty Mentor(s): Zekeriya Aliyazicioglu

Session Information

Poster and Creative Works Showcase

10:00AM

University Library

Abstract

Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are aircrafts that are either controlled remotely by a human from a ground station or by an onboard computer. There are various types of UAVs such as fixed wing drones as well as quadcopters and hexacopters, all of which use rotating blades. Originally, drones were used in areas deemed too dangerous for humans with exclusive applications in the military sector, but recent enthusiasm has led to an expansion into commercial, scientific and recreational areas. The goal is to embellish a drone with a Collision Avoidance System (CAS). Such a system uses ultrasonic sensors to detect potential objects that are in the flight path of the aircraft. It then measures and displays the distance between hazards and the UAV. The drone also records live video footage, with its camera, which is sent to goggles or a display. The skills applied to the project include learning how to solder, wire, read blueprints, use mechanical tools as well as the methodology of assembling, building, and programming drones. To accomplish this, three sensors are placed strategically on the front, rear and bottom of the UAV. These sensors are connected to an Arduino (a single-board microcomputer) that is coded to send the data to the ground station. At the station, another microcomputer is connected to a radio receiver. This receiver collects specific information and displays them on an LCD screen.

Smart Home Automation

Authors: Kyle Gerfen, Tuan Nguyen

Faculty Mentor(s): Zekeriya Aliyazicioglu

Session Information

Poster and Creative Works Showcase

10:00AM

University Library

Abstract

Automating home appliances is a process of making mundane, dull tasks, such as turning on and off light bulbs, or opening and closing blinds more interesting and interactive, as well as convenient. In doing this project, the purpose is to grow as engineers and programmers specifically in the field of home automation. But ultimately, the goal is to make the technology more affordable and available to every household. In order to automate a home, there must be a way for all of the devices in a household to communicate. This is accomplished through wireless signals such as WiFi or Bluetooth. A simple home router was used to create a network connecting devices through WiFi. A microcontroller was used to control lights, fans, and alarms, and was coded to leverage the Amazon cloud based voice service that is used by the Echo Dot. The Echo Dot introduced a way to easily communicate with multiple devices through voice recognition. With these items the team was able to create a simple automated system that realistically cuts costs in home automation and can be controlled by a user's voice commands. In essence, the purpose of the project is to cultivate our growth and understanding in our respective fields specifically in regard to smart home automation. The project makes it so that voice-controlled smart home appliances are more affordable and accessible. Therefore, through this project, smart home automation is made accessible to families and can potentially become a revolutionary force in the community.

Decentralized Renewable Off-Grid Water Treatment (DROWT)

Authors: Justine Nguyen, Laura Lopez, Santiago Mateus, Daniel Andrade, Thuan Nguyen, Masoud Modabernia, Kylie Ng

Faculty Mentor(s): Reza Lakeh

Session Information

Poster and Creative Works Showcase

10:15AM

University Library

Abstract

In California, the drought has become an important issue due to declines in surface water sources. Dependence on groundwater and importing water from the Colorado River continues to increase in order to keep up with high water demands. Therefore, use of recycled water is necessary and the implementation of water reuse is becoming more widely accepted in the community. Greywater is used water from bathroom sinks, showers, tubs, and washing machines, not including wastewater from toilets or kitchen sinks. The research team at Cal Poly Pomona, with the support of Metropolitan Water District of Southern California and Citrus College, are developing an off-grid solar-powered greywater treatment system for non-potable use in single households. Treating greywater on-site can provide huge water savings and reduce people's carbon footprint. The system is comprised of a three-stage treatment which includes a microfiltration, solar-driven reverse osmosis, and a UV disinfection unit. The product of this project is capable of reclaiming 90 gallons of water per day while recovering 63% of residential greywater. The design of the system will remove traces of organic chemicals, inorganic chemicals, and particulates of dirt, food, etc. In addition, the team has completed and built a preliminary design of the greywater treatment system to address the mechanical, controls, and electrical aspects of the overall system for future use. Data is being collected and analyzed to assist in the design process of Version 2 of the system.

Autonomous Collision Avoidance System for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles using Stereoscopic Vision

Authors: Erwin Perez , Alexander Winger

Faculty Mentor(s): Subodh Bhandari

Session Information

Poster and Creative Works Showcase

10:00AM

University Library

Abstract

This presentation discusses the use of stereoscopic vision as a means of sensing and detecting obstacles and other aircraft for collision avoidance systems for small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). The importance of this research has become increasingly significant as the presence of UAVs in commercial and private sectors has led to stricter FAA regulations. Implementing collision avoidance systems can help integrate UAVs more seamlessly into the National Airspace System with fewer safety concerns and fewer financial burdens. Stereoscopic vision provides a cheaper and more lightweight solution for collision detection. The project uses a Zed stereo camera that is mounted on a DJI S900 Hexacopter UAV to generate depth maps. A NVIDIA Jetson TX1 board is used for onboard processing of the depth maps and obstacle avoidance. The board communicates with the PixHawk 3DR autopilot module, which transmits data to the ground control station via XBee radios. By using the Zed SDK, it is possible to obtain depth maps directly from the camera and use them in the implementation of obstacle avoidance. The algorithm that is used will partition the depth map into multiple sections, allowing it to find the section of the image that has pixels which represent objects furthest away. In other words this section should be obstacle free. From here, the UAV can maneuver in the direction of the selected section of the depth map, allowing it to avoid any obstacles in its path.

Autonomous Collision Avoidance of UAVs Utilizing ADS-B Transponders

Authors: Tristan Sherman, Hana Haideri, Jimmy Lopez, Mitchell Caudle

Faculty Mentor(s): Subodh Bhandari

Session Information

Poster and Creative Works Showcase

10:00AM

University Library

Abstract

If UAVs are to be successfully integrated into U.S. national airspace, the ability to perform autonomous collision avoidance between both manned and unmanned aircraft is a necessity. This poster presents a method for collision avoidance utilizing Automatic Dependent Surveillance - Broadcast (ADS-B) transponders which will be required in all manned aircraft by 2020. These devices broadcast and receive global position of all similarly equipped aircraft in a 100-nautical mile vicinity. A Sig Kadet Senior and a Hangar 9 Valiant fixed wing aircraft are used as flight platforms to test autonomous collision avoidance. These aircraft will include ADS-B transponders, a Pixhawk autopilot and an Intel NUC as the primary components of the avionics system. The uniquely developed algorithm is compiled in a Linux environment and uses MAVLink protocols to send off-board commands to the autopilot. The collision avoidance algorithm uses kinematic and circular motion equations to predict the future positions of both aircraft and employ an avoidance maneuver at a constant altitude. This system is demonstrated through simple ground tests, and subsequently moving on to full-system flight tests.

Indoor Search and Rescue using Unmanned Aerial Systems

Authors: Antonio Herrera, Emre Ozen, Ernie Rivera, Karen Llacsa

Faculty Mentor(s): Subodh Bhandari

Session Information

Poster and Creative Works Showcase

10:00AM

University Library

Abstract

Indoor Search and Rescue using Unmanned Aerial Systems Unmanned Aerial Systems (UASs) can be cost effective and efficiently used for indoor search and rescue missions. These environments pose dangerous and risky scenarios for rescue personnel. UASs can locate and assist victims that are in need during the event of natural disaster with increased safety and low response time, without posing any danger to the rescuers. However, the lack of GPS signal in the indoor environments poses many difficulties for the use and navigation of these systems. A team from Cal Poly Pomona is using two small unmanned aerial systems, one for search and another for rescue, that can help mitigate this problem. The search UAS, a quadcopter, uses a front-facing camera for the detection of victims, a Pixhawk flight controller, and ultrasonic sensors for collision detection. Using computer vision and machine learning, the search quadcopter navigates through the indoor environments and identifies survivors of disaster, and then relays this information to the rescue UAS, also a quadcopter, via a ground control station (GCS). The rescue quadcopter then navigates to the location of the victim and releases the payload. The use of multiple unmanned aerial systems, allow for smaller, lighter, and more agile vehicles to perform better distribution of tasks. This presentation will discuss how the UASs will be able to fly autonomously within GPS-denied environments while detecting victims using artificial neural networks.

Analyzing and Predicting Highway-Railroad Crashes through Driver Behavior Data

Authors: Jamie Hatfield , Ruben Molina

Faculty Mentor(s): Wen Cheng

Session Information

Poster and Creative Works Showcase

10:00AM

University Library

Abstract

Traffic around the worlds keeps getting worse as people drives more due to economic development and population increase. Consequently, accidents and the number of people that die or are injured increase every year. This research consist of analyzing the behaviors of vehicle drivers at and or around intersections or roadway segments to prevent or find solutions that will decrease the number of crashes, injured, or dead by predicting the driver behaviors. In order to analyze all the data that has been collected, a program called R is used. This software is a high level computer programing designed to facilitate the implementation of statistical method. It is embedded in a programing environment. By programing data into this software, a table of coefficients is given. This will provide a list that will determine if the data affects the traffic safety or not. Furthermore, a Generalized Linear Model is created. There are three different types of GLM; Binary Response, Multinomial Response and Crash Count response. Binary Response would only tell if that mode is going to be safe or not. . A Multinomial Reponses would give different types of solution for example if the accident would be fatal, or if there would be injures, or types of accidents. A Crash count response is a repeat of binary or multinomial responses. In conclusion, three types of popular crash models are used to investigate on the influential factors of crash severities and number thereof.

Assessing the Accuracy of UAV Surveying at Varying Altitudes

Authors: Jose Velasco, David Sanjenis, Mark Anthony Lao

Faculty Mentor(s): Ahmed Elaksher

Session Information

Poster and Creative Works Showcase

10:00AM

University Library

Abstract

Civil engineering projects require collecting precise measurements using geospatial technologies through topographic and photographic mapping. Photographic mapping focuses on collecting, processing, and analyzing optical and ranging images of the mapped area. Recently, developments in airborne sensors and easy to fly, reliable, low-cost commercial UAVs have opened a new era for high quality and reliable mapping from UAVs using remote sensing techniques. Two types of sensors are utilized to extract accurate geospatial information: active and passive. UAV mapping systems have been employed in numerous surveying assignments and have established a low-cost and time efficient alternative to classical manned aerial surveys. Data from photogrammetry are collected from different elevations to see which elevation produces the most accurate results to produce high quality Digital Elevation Models (DEMs). Drones equipped with a Canon PowerShot S100 camera were flown at 30 meters and 127 meters of elevations, the measurement error changed from 1.5 meters to 2.5 meters. We used the Agisoft Photoscan commercial software to check the errors of both datasets. Based on the one-meter increase in error, we concluded that when altitude increases the accuracy decreases.

Nanofiber Processing by Electrohydrodynamical Casting

Authors: Niousha Panahi, Christina Yu

Faculty Mentor(s): Yong Gan

Session Information

Poster and Creative Works Showcase

10:00AM

University Library

Abstract

This poster presentation focuses on electrohydrodynamic casting nanofiber composite materials. Single jet and coaxial jet was used to fabricate polymer and carbonized composite nanofibers with various structures. In the process of the electrohydrodynamic casting, polyacrylonitril (PAN) was used as the polymer, and dimethylforamide (DMF) was employed as the solvent.Various metallic compounds including nickel acetate, iron chloride, europium (III) acetate, titanium (IV) butoxide, and iron oxide nanoparticles were added into the polymer solution and co-cast onto tissue paper substrate. Upon completion of the electrohydrodynamic casting, the products were heat treated at high temperature in an inert gas chamber to form polymeric carbon based composite materials. Following the collection of carbon based materials, The Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) analysis revealed the composite structure of the nanofibers. Further tests including Hyperthermia test and photosensitive test were also carried out to demonstrate the potential applications of the nanofiber composites for biomedical treatments and photosensing.

Facial privacy

Authors: Waleed Karim, Ricky Kim

Faculty Mentor(s): Sampath Jayarathna

Session Information

Poster and Creative Works Showcase

10:00AM

University Library

Abstract

Technology is evolving and especially in cameras, with how connected everything is the line in a person's privacy is running thin. This problem is significant affects celebrities with paparazzi but for the general population, there have been instances where our picture was taken without our consent. So we know the problem, what can we do about it? Fight fire with fire or in this instance technology with technology. Our project is a camera app using facial recognition to find the desired user and if desired so, can blur their face. The process of blurring the face will happen in a nanosecond when the phone processes the picture right before it saves the photo in the image gallery. The methodology of the program is to use a person's face as a variable, meaning the user's face will be stored in the app as a database for the program to recognize before displaying the message to the wearable device whether to blur the individual's face. We are still working on what method is faster by having the image of the user saved in a database or only relying on the wearable device. To achieve this, we need a smartwatch, the one we used is called Hexaware, and a smartphone, we were provided a Samsung S5. On the side, we also designed and modeled the user interface of the app for both the Samsung S5 and the smartwatch.The user interface so far is pretty simple. The setup process takes about 3 steps.

Self-Assembled Microsphere Based Lithography of Template to Fabricate Gecko-Like Synthetic Adhesive

Authors: Jan Emil Collado, Jade Lim, Rohan Galotra, Natanael Ariawan, Frank Wills, Brent Hirokawa

Faculty Mentor(s): Jonathan Puthoff

Session Information

Poster and Creative Works Showcase

10:00AM

University Library

Abstract

Gecko-like synthetic adhesives (GSAs) are dry adhesives that replicate the function of gecko toepads through their microscopic fibrillar structure. To produce GSA molds, we fabricated Si templates using microsphere lithography. We formed a monolayer of polystyrene microspheres using colloidal self-assembly, then transferred this mask to a Si wafer. Next, we sputtered Au onto the mask and substrate and removed the microspheres using ultrasonication. The resulting Au-patterned Si wafer was exposed to a chemical etch to remove the uncoated material, forming deep pits in the Si surface. This surface structure forms a template for the fabrication of soft polymer molds that can be used to fabricate GSAs.

Microstructural Analysis of Oxidized Metals

Authors: Brandon Sanabria

Faculty Mentor(s): Vilupanur Ravi

Session Information

Poster and Creative Works Showcase

10:00AM

University Library

Abstract

Oxidation is a corrosion phenomenon where metals degrade by reacting with their surrounding environment. There is always a need for better and more durable metals that can be used to create load-bearing structures. The objective of this project was to expose steels with different carbon contents to air at various temperatures and to analyze the microstructures of the oxidized materials. This analysis is expected to yield insights into the oxidation behavior. This presentation will report on the results of oxidation experiments on different carbon steels and microstructures obtained using optical and scanning electron microscopy will be presented. The effect of carbon content on the oxidation resistance of carbon steels will be reported. Learning outcomes and skills obtained as a result of this summer research experience will also be mentioned.

Microstructural Analysis of a Chromized Stainless Steel for Fuel Cell Applications

Authors: Ana Sitan

Faculty Mentor(s): Vilupanur Ravi

Session Information

Poster and Creative Works Showcase

10:00AM

University Library

Abstract

A fuel cell is a system that produces electricity from chemical reactions, between a hydrogen/hydrogen-containing fuel and oxygen (typically from air). One type of fuel cell is the Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC). The main advantage of using a PEMFC is the effectiveness of energy conversion compared to fossil fuels. Using PEMFCs will help in lowering poisonous emissions into the air and reduce our dependence on fossil fuels. For a PEMFC to work to its full capacity the system must meet several criteria, e.g., high corrosion resistance, high mechanical strength and low manufacturing cost. In this experiment, stainless steel was chromized by a halide activated pack cementation process. Chromizing stainless steel is one way to enhance the steel’s hardness and corrosion resistance. The focus of my project was to analyze the microstructure of the chromized stainless steel. The results will establish how the chromized coating benefited the stainless steel by looking at the microstructure of the steel and chromized coating layer. Analyzing the microstructure will help determine how the coating will help the stainless steel in a cell fuel environment.

An Empirical Study of Accessibility Practices on Google Play's Top Free Android Applications

Authors: Paul Chiou

Faculty Mentor(s): Yu Sun

Session Information

Poster and Creative Works Showcase

10:00AM

University Library

Abstract

Google Play, the largest mobile app market with over 82 billion downloads across its 2.7 million published apps has transformed the modern mobile experience. Most apps are designed to solve real-world problems, providing convenience to better our lives. Unfortunately, most mobile app developers lack the awareness to integrate accessibility features to accommodate users with disabilities. Per World Bank, 15% of the world's population has some type of disability. Common disabilities that affect a person's use of an Android device include blindness or low vision, color blindness, deafness or impaired hearing, and restricted motor skills. In our research, we test Google Play's most popular Top Free apps following key accessibility principles provided by Google. These guidelines include content labeling, touch target size, color contrast, and view attributes, etc. All these measures define the app's ability to work in conjunction with adaptive technologies such as switch control, on-screen reader, etc. We will evaluate each app's score in terms of usability in each of these areas. Lastly, we propose suggestions on improving the app's design with best practices to allow users with disabilities to navigate and interact with ease.

Mathematical Model for HIV Dynamics

Authors: Briana Canzano, Celine Spathias

Faculty Mentor(s): An Do

Session Information

Poster and Creative Works Showcase

10:00AM

University Library

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to produce a simulation for the dynamics of the HIV virus once introduced into the human body. HIV is a virus that weakens the immune system by targeting healthy T cells and duplicating its DNA into the host cell. New virion will then slowly bud from the surface of the host cell either slowly, sparing the host cell, or rapidly causing the host cell to burst. The body's natural immune defense system will try to combat the virus, but over the course of a decade this process will become overwhelming for the body eventually allowing for the number of T cells to drop significantly and for the virus to grow without bound. By using a system of ordinary differential equations to model the dynamics of the HIV virus, and a computer software (Matlab) that can simulate the numerical solution to the model, we successfully produced results that show the general course of the virus over time. Three separate graphs are created which illustrate the behavior of healthy T cells, the virus, and infected T cells, respectively, when there is no treatment being applied. Stability analysis is also performed to verify the optimal range of the parameter. HIV is a complex virus to understand and model, thus the ordinary differential equations do not account for the delay between the initial infection and the release of virion. In future work, we would like to incorporate this aspect into the model and compare its accuracy with biological data.

Molybdenum-Catalyzed Deoxydehydration of Diols to Olefins

Authors: Christine Navarro

Faculty Mentor(s): Alex John

Session Information

Poster and Creative Works Showcase

10:00AM

University Library

Abstract

Processes capable of transforming biomass into renewable substitutes for petrochemicals are in high demand. Such a process must be cost efficient, eco-friendly, and use an abundant resource. The deoxydehydration (DODH) reaction was chosen because it is a single step reaction that transforms a vicinal diol like cellulose into an alkene, which can be used to make petroleum-based materials. This reaction requires a catalyst, reductant and a solvent. The chemicals commonly used in this process are either not abundant, expensive or unsustainable. Commonly used catalysts in a deoxydehydration reaction are based on rhenium (Re); which is a rare and expensive metal and makes it an undesirable catalyst for large-scale processes. We have explored the use of a molybdenum (Mo) based catalyst, ammonium heptamolybdate (AHM), (as Mo is relatively abundant and cheap) in toluene as the solvent and using sodium sulfite (Na2SO3) as the reductant. This reaction was performed at 170 οC for 24 h, yielding the alkene in 8-32 %. Other molybdenum based heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysts were evaluated for their effectiveness.

Molybdenum-Catalyzed Oxidative Cleavage of Lignin

Authors: Paula Marie Magat

Faculty Mentor(s): Alex John

Session Information

Poster and Creative Works Showcase

10:00AM

University Library

Abstract

Depleting fossil fuels has been an undergoing issue that calls for the attention of many scientists around the world, as the demand for it increases with the increasing population. Thus, various types of renewable energy sources are being studied and evaluated to determine which can accommodate the world's growing demand. For this particular study, biomass-derived substitute for aromatic compounds is being investigated, particularly biomass derived from lignin. Lignin, a complex organic polymer is one of the major components that makes up the structure of plants and wood. If broken down into simpler molecules, lignin could potentially provide a substitute for aromatic compounds, a major constituent of petroleum, which are used in variety of materials. In order to break down lignin into simpler compounds, a catalyst is essential. However, different catalysts break down lignin into different compounds, and another issue associated with biomass-derived materials is the presence of oxygen in the biomass-derived compounds. Whereas, fossil-derived compounds are mainly composed of hydrocarbons. Hence, the goal of the study is to determine whether a molybdenum catalyst can break down lignin into useful aromatics. Our findings along these lines will be discussed.

Measuring Deformation Due to the San Jose Fault Using GPS Monuments Near Cal Poly Pomona Campus

Authors: Vanessa Moran, Brenton Hirao

Faculty Mentor(s): Jascha Polet

Session Information

Poster and Creative Works Showcase

10:00AM

University Library

Abstract

The San Jose fault is a relatively little-known fault that runs from the eastern San Gabriel Valley towards the Chino Basin and through the Cal Poly Pomona campus, with a total length of 18 km. The fault is considered a significant hazard due to its potential to generate an earthquake of magnitude 6.0-6.5, as well as its location in a densely populated area. Although the 1990 Upland earthquakes are thought to have occurred on this fault, it has been the topic of little investigation. However, its destructive potential provides an important incentive to monitor the fault and learn more about its geometry and slip rate, which is the purpose of this study. In order to do this we had to find areas with exposed bedrock and good visibility of the sky, on and near Cal Poly Pomona campus where 10 distributed monuments could be installed for use in geodetic studies. In these studies precise measurements are made of Earth's surface deformation. The monument locations will be well documented for future reference and a first set of measurements will be made of their detailed absolute and relative locations. We will use total stations to determine the distance between the monuments, as well as Global Positioning System units to obtain accurate absolute locations of the monuments. Additional measurements will be conducted yearly to produce estimates of slip rate and direction of motion of the San Jose fault on CPP campus.

Alumina-Supported Vanadium Catalysts for Deoxydehydration of Vicinal Diols

Authors: Amanda Nguyen, Karlos Manzanarez

Faculty Mentor(s): Chantal Stieber

Session Information

Poster and Creative Works Showcase

10:00AM

University Library

Abstract

The consumption of fossil fuels has rapidly increased worldwide, which is a concern because they are a finite energy resource. Ideally, a renewable energy source, such as biomass, could offer a viable, domestic, and cost-efficient alternative. A challenge in using biomass for fuels is the high percentage of oxygen content. The removal of oxygen functional groups through deoxygenation is necessary to increase the energy density of biomass. More specifically, deoxydehydration (DODH) reactions convert vicinal diols to olefins by removing two hydroxide functional groups and forming an unsaturated carbon double bond. This work examined new catalysts for DODH reactions. Alumina (neutral/basic/acidic)-supported vanadyl acetylacetonate (VO(acac)2) catalysts were developed and tested for DODH chemistry with a PPh3 reductant. The reaction was studied under a range of concentration and temperature conditions in order to determine the catalytic efficiency. By using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, successful conversion of vicinal diols to olefins was demonstrated. These results demonstrate the feasibility for using supported vanadium catalysts for deoxygenation reactions relevant to biomass conversion.

Synthesis of Reduced Vanadium Complexes and Applications for Catalysis

Authors: Beverly Stretch

Faculty Mentor(s): Chantal Stieber

Session Information

Poster and Creative Works Showcase

10:00AM

University Library

Abstract

Vanadium complexes are of interest as catalysts for the coupling of aldehydes, for understanding enzyme reactivity, and one-electron reductions. In particular vanadium complexes with low oxidation states (low valent) are relatively rare and could be used as catalysts for various chemical reactions. The current work aims to synthesize new low valent vanadium complexes stabilized by bidentate carbene ligands. There has only been one reported crystal structure of a vanadium carbene complex, so results of this work will be significant for catalyst development. Ligands for the new vanadium complexes were synthesized by preparing bisimidazolium salts from each di(isopropyl)phenyl imidazole and mesityl imidazole. Two ligand types were synthesized to determine the effect of ligand sterics on the resulting vanadium complexes and reactivity. The ligand precursors were transferred into an air and moisture free nitrogen environment inside a glovebox to activate and complex with vanadium. Vanadium pre-catalysts were synthesized by reducing vanadium(III) precursors using sodium in order to reduce vanadium to the III, II, and I oxidation states. Future research will include testing reduced vanadium complexes for catalysis.

Decarbonylative coupling reactions using carboxylic acids

Authors: Andres Lopez

Faculty Mentor(s): Alex John

Session Information

Poster and Creative Works Showcase

10:00AM

University Library

Abstract

Linear alkylbenzene (LAB) is an important industrial intermediate for the product linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LABS), a chemical commonly used for detergents. The process used to form LABS has raised concerns over the use of hydrofluoric acid a source of environmental pollution and industrial hazard, the use of solid catalysts has recently been proposed as a safer alternative. The reaction of carboxylic acids to LAB can serve an alternative to the petroleum oil based demands, this reaction could allow the use of biomass-derived carboxylic acids from organic materials such as plant oils and animal fats as an alternative source of energy. The carboxylic acid, hydrocinnamic acid, with a palladium catalyst, triphenylphosphine (PPh3), and pivalic anhydride additive react and go through a decarbonylation and -hydride elimination reaction to form the terminal olefin styrene. Activators such as an pivalic anhydride is used to allow the dehydrative decarbonylation reactions to proceed further and have a higher selectivity for terminal olefin.The intermediate terminal olefin would then couple with phenylpyridine to form a LAB.

Deoxydehydration of Phenylethane-1,2-diol by Silica-Supported VO(acac)

Authors: Karlos Manzanarez, Amanda Nguyen

Faculty Mentor(s): Chantal Stieber

Session Information

Poster and Creative Works Showcase

10:00AM

University Library

Abstract

Biomass is currently being researched as an alternative to fossil fuels because it does not have a finite supply. Biomass refers to organic matter such as wood, agricultural products, solid waste and natural gas that all contain precursors to high energy molecules. A challenge in using biomass as a fuel is that large numbers of oxygen atoms must be removed to increase the overall energy density. Deoxydehydration (DODH) is the name of the process that converts vicinal diols into alkenes. When DODH reactions are catalyzed, the reactions may be carried out in the presence of a metal oxide catalyst and reductant. In the current work, a vanadium complex was synthesized and adsorbed onto a silica support in order to form a heterogeneous catalyst. Several vanadium to silica ratios were synthesized and tested for DODH catalysis. Initial studies investigated conversion of styrene glycol into styrene. Catalysts synthesized at higher temperatures with higher vanadium:silica ratios were more effective for converting styrene glycol into styrene. Properties of supported catalysts are not fully understood and supported catalysts have not been widely studied for DODH reactions. This experiment demonstrates that supported catalysts are effective catalysts for DODH reactions. Extensions of the work will tailor catalysts for higher product yields and direct biomass conversion.

Bidentate N-Heterocyclic Carbene Nickel Complexes for Decarbonylation of Ketones

Authors: Justin Lanz Cortez, Zijie Zhang

Faculty Mentor(s): Chantal Stieber

Session Information

Poster and Creative Works Showcase

10:00AM

University Library

Abstract

Bidentate N-Heterocyclic Carbene Nickel Complexes for Decarbonylation of Ketones Student author: Justin Tabay Cortez and Zijie Zhang, Chemistry & Biochemistry, Cal Poly Pomona Mentor: Dr. S. Chantal E. Stieber, Chemistry & Biochemistry, Cal Poly Pomona Achieving decarbonylation of ketones is of interest as a route towards synthesizing carbon-carbon bonds. However, decarbonylation requires the cleavage of two carbon-carbon bonds which are kinetically and thermodynamically more stable than the carbon-hydrogen bond of an aldehyde. A recent study first reported decarbonylation of ketones by nickel bound to phosphine or carbene ligands. This project aims to establish feasibility of using bidentate N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) nickel complexes as catalysts for decarbonylation reactions. Three nickel complexes with varying ligand sterics were tested as catalysts in an initial reaction with benzophenone to establish feasibility. Following the reaction, the observation of biphenyl by GC-MS indicated that a decarbonylation had occurred. Future goals include tailoring the catalyst and reaction conditions to improve yields and expanding the scope to substituted ketones. Improving nickel mediated decarbonylation of ketones will be significant in the development of new reactions for synthesis of pharmaceuticals and fine chemicals.

Classifying Ovis aries behavior with a tri-axial accelerometer

Authors: Hailey Pontes

Faculty Mentor(s): Cord Brundage

Session Information

Poster and Creative Works Showcase

10:00AM

University Library

Abstract

Accelerometers are widely used commercially in devices to quantify human and pet activity. We sought to validate the application of a tri-axial accelerometer sold for canine applications (FitBark) as a potential monitor of sheep activity. Animal activity was classified using an observer ethogram every 15 sec for 30 min intervals. The observer classified activity into categories, 1-4 (resting to highly active). This data was compared with FitBark raw minute activity data (Points) from animals with collars fitted with 1-2 FitBark devices. FitBark data correlated well with periods of rest and sustained activity. There was minimal inter device variability, and the specificity and sensitivity of the FitBark device ranged from 0.53 to 0.75 in sensitivity, and 0.54 to 0.98 in specificity. The precision ranged from 0.167 to 0.937. Animals monitored for 24 hours (n = 5) demonstrated periods of activity and inactivity consistent with periods for rest and feeding (p < 0.05) . The 24 hours displaced higher activity (FitBark data higher than 18.54) revolving around feeding times, between 05:30-07:30 and 16:30-17:30, which aligned with observations. Despite some limitations, tri-axial accelerometer can be used to quantify and predictable monitor sheep daily activity level.

Comparing the Gestation Length and Birth Size of Cal Poly Pomona Arabian Foals (2012 vs. 2017)

Authors: Irene Ngo

Faculty Mentor(s): Cord Brundage

Session Information

Poster and Creative Works Showcase

10:00AM

University Library

Abstract

Environmental and husbandry changes can create stress in horses, these can manifest themselves in illness, poor development and altered gestation. The Cal Poly Pomona campus has undergone a period of change over the past 5 years and 2016-2017 has had an increased amount of precipitation relative to the recent past. The Arabian horse herd and breeding program at Cal Poly Pomona has been maintained since 1925 in agreement with the stipulations of W.K. Kellogg. This study compared the birth size and gestation (length of time between actual and expected birth date) of Cal Poly Arabian foals born in 2012 (n = 9) to those in 2017 (n =14). Actual birth dates were within the same range as those expected in both the 2012 and 2017 foal groups (5.44 days +/- 12.78 days and 5.86 days +/- 10.48 days respectively). Foals born in 2012 were on average 99.48 cm +/- 5.61 cm tall and weighed 57.95 kg +/- 16.00 kg. Foals in 2017 were not significantly different, with an average height of 108.58 cm +/- 8.49 cm and weight of 49.51 kg +/- 16.18 kg. This data suggests that although the Cal Poly Pomona Arabian horses may have experienced some significant changes over the past 5 years, their pregnancy and birth size was not significantly affected.

Type VI Secretion System-Mediated Interbacterial Competition Between the Cystic Fibrosis Pathogens Burkholderia cenocepacia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

Authors: Patricia Galvan

Faculty Mentor(s): Peggy Cotter

Session Information

Poster and Creative Works Showcase

10:00AM

University Library

Abstract

The type VI secretion system (T6SS) in Gram-negative bacteria mediates contact-dependent antagonism within bacteria. In patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), chronic pulmonary infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cenocepacia are common. Our lab previously performed T6SS-mediated interbacterial competitions between B. cenocepacia strain AU1054 and the P. aeruginosa reference strain PAO1, both of which produce functional T6SSs. Results revealed there is a strong competitive interaction in favor of PAO1 when it is exposed to T6SS attack from AU1054. This is indicative of the proposed "tit-for-tat" mechanism of T6SS activity in P. aeruginosa strain PAO1. However, B. cenocepacia can be the dominant organism in the lungs of CF patients during polymicrobial infections, even outnumbering P. aeruginosa. Our hypothesis is that B. cenocepacia can outcompete P. aeruginosa reference strains other than PAO1 and recently collected P. aeruginosa clinical isolates, possibly in a T6SS- dependent manner. We evaluated T6SS microbial competitions between both wild-type AU1054 and a T6SS-null AU1054 mutant against the P. aeruginosa reference strains PA14 and PAK, as well as a collection of recent P. aeruginosa clinical isolates. Competition results demonstrated that reference strains PAK and PA14 responded to and outcompeted an AU1054 T6SS attack in a similar manner as PAO1. However, AU1054 strongly outcompeted the P. aeruginosa clinical strains BC236 and BC238 in a T6SS-dependent manner. Our findings indicate that the interactions between B. cenocepacia and laboratory-adapted P. aeruginosa strains are not indicative of the true interactions between B. cenocepacia and P. aeruginosa during coinfection of the CF lung.

Individual-level variation in honey bee (Apis mellifera) revisitation behavior on watermelon flowers

Authors: Jon Sacro

Faculty Mentor(s): Joan Leong

Session Information

Poster and Creative Works Showcase

10:00AM

University Library

Abstract

The study seeks to examine pollinator visitation behavior with relationship to resource availability. A particular behavior in honey bees called revisitation occurs when subsequent visits are made by a bee on the same flower which may be related to nectar volume level in flowers. The information collected included each individual bee visit was recorded along with the corresponding type of flowers it had visited in its time inside the array and number of single visits and subsequent visits to each presented flower. By looking at the number of bees that perform single visit and revisitation behavior, the study aims to confirm the whether there is an existence of a subgroup of bees that perform revisitation behavior or whether this type of behavior is a result of nectar level or farm location. From the floral perspective, this study also seeks to know whether certain flowers get a higher total number of visits from all the bees compared to other presented flowers. Flowers may develop certain characteristics in order to attract more pollinators as well as increase their chances of successful reproduction. I predict that nectar manipulated flowers will have less revisitations from bees compared to nectar unmanipulated flowers. I also predict that flowers with unmanipulated nectar levels would be more attractive to single visit and revisitation to bees because of higher levels of nectar present compared to the nectar manipulated flowers. The potential significance of this study can determine whether flower nectar levels and farm location influence bee revisitation behavior.

A comparative analysis of branching pattern of Aquilegia species.

Authors: Karapet Mkrtchyan, Jesus Preciado, Michael Speck

Faculty Mentor(s): Bharti Sharma

Session Information

Poster and Creative Works Showcase

10:00AM

University Library

Abstract

Aquilegia is a good model system for genetic and evolutionary studies. Its phylogenetic position is between grasses and core eudicots. Aquilegia is a genus consisting of 60-70 species. Aquilegia has a cymose inflorescence pattern. The branching pattern within the genus slightly differs, this may be because of the different climate adaptations of the species and differences in pollination syndromes. In this study, branching patterns are compared between A.coerulea and A. formosa. We have observed that inflorescence in A. formosa is more bramched and bears more flowers.

Fecundity Rates of Tamarixia radiata under various conditions after emergence

Authors: Brooke Blandino

Faculty Mentor(s): Benjamin Lehan

Session Information

Poster and Creative Works Showcase

10:00AM

University Library

Abstract

Huanglongbing (HLB) is a detrimental disease destroying the citrus industry worldwide and is vectored by the invasive species, Asian Citrus Psyllid (ACP), Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae). Tamarixia radiata Waterson (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) is currently mass reared as a biological control agent for the Asian citrus psyllid. Fecundity rates of T. radiata were examined over a period of seven days to determine fertility levels over time. T. radiata were starved to discover natural mortality rates. Different diets were tested on starved T. radiata to determine fecundity recovery after starvation. The starved T. radiata were separated into two groups and fed honey or a protein mixture of crushed ACP. The natural mortality rate of T. radiata indicated that the fertility rate peaked on the first day after emergence. The starved T. radiata recovered more efficiently with the sugar diet opposed to the ACP diet.

Initial Structural and biochemical characterization of BaiCD, an enzyme involved in bile acid metabolism in Clostridium scindens.

Authors: Siyoung Lee

Faculty Mentor(s): Kathryn McCulloch

Session Information

Poster and Creative Works Showcase

10:00AM

University Library

Abstract

Primary bile acids are converted to secondary bile acids by gut bacteria, and secondary bile acids are known to be related to GI tract cancers. This research focuses on Clostridium scindens, a bacterial strain that harbors a multi-gene bile acid inducible operon. The BaiCD gene product is one target of this research due to this enzyme's stereospecificity for its substrate. There will be two approaches for this research, biochemical and structural. Starting with biochemical approach, enzymes that have similar redox catalysis that also have high similarity on the sequence identity were found by conducting multiple sequence alignments. Next, site directed mutagenesis will be used to mutate likely key amino acids of BaiCD. Primers that have the desired mutation in them will be designed and prepared prior to PCR and purification. The DNA products after site-directed mutagenesis will be confirmed by sequencing. Redox experiments and enzymatic assays will be conducted on wild type and mutant BaiCD gene products to characterize the impact of each mutated residue on the function of BaiCD enzyme. In parallel, the structural approach will use X-ray crystallography to determine a high resolution structure of BaiCD, and later the structure of the BaiCD enzyme will be compared to other known crystal structures of enzymes that have high similarity on their sequence identity. Together, the biochemical and structural studies will provide information about the mechanism and action of BaiCD.

Writing Outside the Margins: Racebending in Fanfiction

Authors: Parveena Singh

Faculty Mentor(s): Alison Baker

Session Information

Poster and Creative Works Showcase

10:00AM

University Library

Abstract

Fanfiction allows people from various communities to celebrate their favorite fandoms, characters, and relationships together. Over the past decade, fanfiction has developed into a center for activism through the racebending movement in online communities like Tumblr. The following research focuses on how racebending in fanfiction provides women of color with a space where they can have creative power and a voice for their unique narratives by recasting white female characters with women of color instead. There is primarily a focus on women of color due to how studies show women having lower self-esteem with increased media exposure as opposed to men, and how stereotyped representations of female minorities on screen have a profound effect on girls of color. The research shows why racebending is of importance for women of color by highlighting the lack of central characters played by them in movies and television, as well as the lack of these women in creatives roles such as writers and directors. The deficiency of women of color both onscreen and off screen directly leads to the homogenous nature of mainstream media and the occurrence of whitewashing, which is detrimental because as Dr. Lori Kido Lopez presents in "Fan-Activists and the Politics of Race in The Last Airbender" it supports the idea that whiteness can stand in for all racial difference. Fanfiction counters this idea through racebending, where women of color can see positive representations of themselves by being producers of their own media instead of simply consumers of it.

Femicide in Mexico

Authors: John Miranda

Faculty Mentor(s): Alyssa Lang

Session Information

Poster and Creative Works Showcase

10:00AM

University Library

Abstract

This project is a designed campaign for femicide in Mexico using all forms of mediums such as print, video, craft, and literature. The campaign is to educate a massive public on the epidemic of femicide in Mexico and how individuals can help make change by learning the current social backlash and conditions in Mexico. What is Femicide? How does it relate to the U.S.? These are the two bases the campaign tackles for a U.S audience. Femicide is the mass killing of women based on gender. It's become an epidemic in Mexico for the past three decades. However, for the past three decade there have been very little media coverage on the mass murders that have occurred across the border. How can we change that?

Bring Your Own Cup

Authors: Judy Leon

Faculty Mentor(s): Alyssa Lang

Session Information

Poster and Creative Works Showcase

10:00AM

University Library

Abstract

It is estimated that about 54% of Americans in the U.S. drink coffee on a daily basis. Equaling to 3 cups of coffee a day per person. The end result to all of the coffee drinking is a total waste of 60 billion paper coffee cups of waste that end up in our landfills every year. Very little people know that paper coffee cups are non recyclable because they are lined with a layer of plastic known as Polyethylene also known as grade 4 plastic. Because the recycling process is too expensive and difficult, most recycling centers reject these paper coffee cups. Although the coffee industry is one of the main consumers of paper cups, sadly it isn't the only industry using paper cups. these cups are also used for other food related purposes. This creative research project is based off of research and the combination of design. It is a 3 piece project that explains the reason why coffee cups are non recyclable. Starting with an infographic, followed by a series of posters that encourage people to bring there own cups to coffee shops, and ending with a completed board game that has setbacks throughout the game to represent how harmful and how much of our earths resources it takes to make and decompose paper coffee cups.

Overfishing

Authors: Maria De Lourdes Muñoz

Faculty Mentor(s): Alyssa Lang

Session Information

Poster and Creative Works Showcase

10:00AM

University Library

Abstract

When thinking about extinction, rarely do fish come to mind. Marine life has become a popular topic over the years, but people rarely consider fishing as one of the main causes of endangerment of many of the ocean's inhabitants. Overfishing is the act of collecting more fish than is sustainable. This not only affects the fish that are being targeted, but their ecosystem as a whole. The Overfishing advertising series was made to bring awareness to the damages that commercial fishing brings and the lack of legislation to protect marine life from them. My infographic, poster series, and postcard deliverables all work together to showcase different parts of marine life effected by commercial fishing. The work as a whole was designed to draw people in, using appealing and vibrant colors, urging the viewer to inform themselves in a society where people are constantly berated with gruesome images in an attempt to guilt them into caring. I focused on educating the viewer and providing solutions to the problem, thus making them empathetic towards the cause without evoking fear.

One Digit Makes a Difference

Authors: Brooke Emmett

Faculty Mentor(s): Alyssa Lang

Session Information

Poster and Creative Works Showcase

10:00AM

University Library

Abstract

A large majority of people do not know there is even a difference between Type One Diabetes and Type Two, let alone what that difference is. This project aims to help people understand, through humor, that even though the two share a similar name only differentiated by one digit or letter, they are different diseases entirely and mean different things. People also tend to tune out when it comes to discussing medical illnesses they cannot relate to. Using adobe softwares to digitally illustrate the "scenes" of each poster, I strived not only to catch the audience's attention and instill the fact that the two are different diseases, but also to inspire them to research them on their own and share the information by word of mouth.

English, Social Sciences, and Business

University Library - 1808

9:00AM

You Reap What Others Sow: Christian Patriarchal Instruction in Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice

Authors: Samantha St. Claire Faculty Mentor: Dr. Marta Albala Pelegrin
9:15AM

The Tragedy of a 'Superfluous Man': A Transcultural Reading of Turgenev's Rudin

Authors: John Danho Faculty Mentor: Dr. Aaron DeRosa
9:30AM

The Development of the Passion for Teaching Scale

Authors: Jessica Saucedo Faculty Mentor: Dr. Sara Langford
9:45AM

Employing the Use of Hip-Hop and Rap to Bridge the Culture Gap in Curriculum and Create Accessible Pedagogy for at Risk and Learning Disabled Students

Authors: Sarah Gharibian Faculty Mentor: Dr. Brian Stone
10:00AM

A Rhetorical Approach to Octavia Butler's "Kindred"

Authors: Samantha Tseng Faculty Mentor: Dr. Brian Stone
10:15AM

Strengths Possessed by Hispanic/Latino Adults that Facilitate Gang Desistance

Authors: Sergio Maldonado Faculty Mentor: Dr. Alejandro Morales
10:30AM

Feminism, Women's Attitudes toward Fitness and Fitness Engagement, and Purchase Intentions of Fitness Device

Authors: Mahta Mirzaeiramin, Cailin Kuchenbecker, Ilia Eremin, Quynh Le Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jae Min Jung

Science, Technology, Engineering and Math

University Library - 1814

9:15AM

Autonomous 3-D Mapping and Collision Avoidance Using LIDAR and Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

Authors: Victor Ruiz, Michael Menendez, Rachel Lauf, Christian Carreon-Limones Faculty Mentor: Dr. Subodh Bhandari
9:30AM

A Study of Molybdenum Complexes as Catalysts for Deoxydehydration of Diols

Authors: Nathan Wagner Faculty Mentor: Dr. Alex John
9:45AM

Air Gap Membrane Distillation

Authors: Aaron Chan, Lucas Ardema, Benny Ly, Keaton Cornell Faculty Mentor: Dr. Reza Lakeh
10:00AM

Quantifying NO Activation and Coordination Modes by X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

Authors: Phan Phu Faculty Mentor: Dr. Chantal Stieber
10:15AM

Rollocopter: Preliminary Design of Autonomous Rolling Quadrotor, Application to Titan Exploration

Authors: Roberto Mendez Faculty Mentor: Dr. Reza Lakeh

Engineering and Computer Sciences

University Library - Grand Reading Room 4th Floor

10AM - 11:15 AM

Developing Novel Bio-Fuels using Computer Aided Molecular Design (CAMD).
Jeffrey Hymas Faculty Mentor: Dr. Farhana Abedin
Development Of Novel Bio Diesel Using Computer Aided Molecular Design
Cesar Cortes Faculty Mentor: Dr. farhana abedin
Using Machine Learning for Facial Recognition
Samantha Montoya Faculty Mentor: Dr. Zekeriya Aliyaziciaglu
Drone Collision Avoidance
Philippe Schicker, Basel Chahla, Brian Rodriguez, Ulises Vega Faculty Mentor: Dr. Zekeriya Aliyazicioglu
Smart Home Automation
Kyle Gerfen, Tuan Nguyen Faculty Mentor: Dr. Zekeriya Aliyazicioglu
Decentralized Renewable Off-Grid Water Treatment (DROWT)
Justine Nguyen, Laura Lopez, Santiago Mateus, Daniel Andrade, Thuan Nguyen, Masoud Modabernia, Kylie Ng Faculty Mentor: Dr. Reza Lakeh
Autonomous Collision Avoidance System for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles using Stereoscopic Vision
Erwin Perez , Alexander Winger Faculty Mentor: Dr. Subodh Bhandari
Autonomous Collision Avoidance of UAVs Utilizing ADS-B Transponders
Tristan Sherman, Hana Haideri, Jimmy Lopez, Mitchell Caudle Faculty Mentor: Dr. Subodh Bhandari
Indoor Search and Rescue using Unmanned Aerial Systems
Antonio Herrera, Emre Ozen, Ernie Rivera, Karen Llacsa Faculty Mentor: Dr. Subodh Bhandari
Analyzing and Predicting Highway-Railroad Crashes through Driver Behavior Data
Jamie Hatfield , Ruben Molina Faculty Mentor: Dr. Wen Cheng
Assessing the Accuracy of UAV Surveying at Varying Altitudes
Jose Velasco, David Sanjenis, Mark Anthony Lao Faculty Mentor: Dr. Ahmed Elaksher
Nanofiber Processing by Electrohydrodynamical Casting
Niousha Panahi, Christina Yu Faculty Mentor: Dr. Yong Gan
Facial privacy
Waleed Karim, Ricky Kim Faculty Mentor: Dr. Sampath Jayarathna
Self-Assembled Microsphere Based Lithography of Template to Fabricate Gecko-Like Synthetic Adhesive
Frank Wills, Brent Hirokawa Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jonathan Puthoff
Microstructural Analysis of Oxidized Metals
Brandon Sanabria Faculty Mentor: Dr. Vilupanur Ravi
Microstructural Analysis of a Chromized Stainless Steel for Fuel Cell Applications
Ana Sitan Faculty Mentor: Dr. Vilupanur Ravi
An Empirical Study of Accessibility Practices on Google Play's Top Free Android Applications
Paul Chiou Faculty Mentor: Dr. Yu Sun

Health, Nutrition, and Clinical Science

University Library - Grand Reading Room 4th Floor

10AM - 11:15 AM

Initial Structural and biochemical characterization of BaiCD, an enzyme involved in bile acid metabolism in Clostridium scindens.
Siyoung Lee Faculty Mentor: Dr. Kathryn McCulloch

Humanities and Languages

University Library - Grand Reading Room 4th Floor

10AM - 11:15 AM

Writing Outside the Margins: Racebending in Fanfiction
Parveena Singh Faculty Mentor: Dr. Alison Baker

Physical and Mathematical Sciences

University Library - Grand Reading Room 4th Floor

10AM - 11:15 AM

Mathematical Model for HIV Dynamics
Briana Canzano, Celine Spathias Faculty Mentor: Dr. An Do
Molybdenum-Catalyzed Deoxydehydration of Diols to Olefins
Christine Navarro Faculty Mentor: Dr. Alex John
Molybdenum-Catalyzed Oxidative Cleavage of Lignin
Paula Marie Magat Faculty Mentor: Dr. Alex John
Measuring Deformation Due to the San Jose Fault Using GPS Monuments Near Cal Poly Pomona Campus
Vanessa Moran, Brenton Hirao Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jascha Polet
Alumina-Supported Vanadium Catalysts for Deoxydehydration of Vicinal Diols
Amanda Nguyen, Karlos Manzanarez Faculty Mentor: Dr. Chantal Stieber
Synthesis of Reduced Vanadium Complexes and Applications for Catalysis
Beverly Stretch Faculty Mentor: Dr. Chantal Stieber
Decarbonylative coupling reactions using carboxylic acids
Andres Lopez Faculty Mentor: Dr. Alex John
Deoxydehydration of Phenylethane-1,2-diol by Silica-Supported VO(acac)
Karlos Manzanarez, Amanda Nguyen Faculty Mentor: Dr. Chantal Stieber
Bidentate N-Heterocyclic Carbene Nickel Complexes for Decarbonylation of Ketones
Justin Lanz Cortez, Zijie Zhang Faculty Mentor: Dr. Chantal Stieber

Biological and Agricultural Sciences

University Library - Grand Reading Room 4th Floor

10AM - 11:15 AM

Classifying Ovis aries behavior with a tri-axial accelerometer
Hailey Pontes Faculty Mentor: Dr. Cord Brundage
Comparing the Gestation Length and Birth Size of Cal Poly Pomona Arabian Foals (2012 vs. 2017)
Irene Ngo Faculty Mentor: Dr. Cord Brundage
Type VI Secretion System-Mediated Interbacterial Competition Between the Cystic Fibrosis Pathogens Burkholderia cenocepacia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Patricia Galvan Faculty Mentor: Dr. Peggy Cotter
Individual-level variation in honey bee (Apis mellifera) revisitation behavior on watermelon flowers
Jon Sacro Faculty Mentor: Dr. Joan Leong
A comparative analysis of branching pattern of Aquilegia species.
Karapet Mkrtchyan, Jesus Preciado, Michael Speck Faculty Mentor: Dr. Bharti Sharma
Fecundity Rates of Tamarixia radiata under various conditions after emergence
Brooke Blandino Faculty Mentor: Dr. Benjamin Lehan

Creative Works and Design

University Library - Grand Reading Room 4th Floor

10AM - 11:15 AM

Femicide in Mexico
John Miranda Faculty Mentor: Dr. Alyssa Lang
Bring Your Own Cup
Judy Leon Faculty Mentor: Dr. Alyssa Lang
Overfishing
Maria De Lourdes Muñoz Faculty Mentor: Dr. Alyssa Lang
One Digit Makes a Difference
Brooke Emmett Faculty Mentor: Dr. Alyssa Lang

Poetry Session

University Library - 1808

1:15 PM
Zane Landin

CPP Undergraduate Student, Poetry Circle Member

1:30 PM
John Danho

CPP Graduate Student

1:45 PM
Alex Lennert

CPP Graduate Student

2:00 PM
Michelle Mermilliod

CPP Alumni

2:15 PM
Grant Palmer

PhD Candidate at UCR and CPP Alumni

2:30 PM
Ryan Leack

Pomona Valley Review Editor, PhD Candidate at UCR and CPP Alumni